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Descendents of John Barker, Sr. and Martha Snead


      141. Mitchell5 Barker (Charles Chiles4, Charles3, John2, Edward1) (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.) was born August 25, 1831 in Jonesville, Lee County, VA (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.), and died August 1907 in Llano, TX (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.). He married (1) Nancy Blankenship (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.). He married (2) Nancy Levinia Higginbotham (Source: E-mail from Mick.) December 22, 1852 in Lee County, VA (Source: E-mail from Mick.).

Notes for Mitchell Barker:
Mitchell Barker migrated to Texas with Squire Leander Barker in 1871. PSBF p. 3.

More About Mitchell Barker and Nancy Higginbotham:
Marriage: December 22, 1852, Lee County, VA (Source: E-mail from Mick.)
     
Child of Mitchell Barker and Nancy Blankenship is:
  617 i.   unknown son6 Barker (Source: Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM), p. 8, Mitchell, who later came to Texas with his brother Squire, had a son who married my mother's sister. Laura.). He married Annie Laura McQuire (Source: Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM), p. 8.).
     
Child of Mitchell Barker and Nancy Higginbotham is:
  618 i.   Charles6 Barker (Source: E-mail from Mick.), born April 29, 1857 in Lee County, VA (Source: E-mail from Mick.).


      146. Joel5 Barker (Charles Chiles4, Charles3, John2, Edward1) (Source: (1) Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles., (2) E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley, Nores from Cheryl Jean Ousley: Joel served in the same company (Civil War) as (his brother) William and settled in Hastings, CO after first living in TN.) was born July 1842 in Jonesville, Lee County, VA (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.), and died July 08, 1894 in Jarosa, Costillo County, CO (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.). He married (1) Elizabeth Johnston (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.) April 12, 1860 in Campbell County, TN (Source: (1) Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles., (2) E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley, Joel and Elizabeth were married on the 12th of April, 1860 in Campbell Co., Tenn. by Alexander Heatherly, a justice of the peace.), daughter of David Johnson. She was born August 12, 1836 in Knoxville, Knox County, TN (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.), and died March 14, 1897 in Douglas County, MO. He married (2) Misha Palmer (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.) Aft. 1869 in Kansas City, MO (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.). She died April 10, 1891 (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.). He married (3) Nancy Ann Caldwell (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.) December 13, 1893 in Hastings, CO (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.).

Notes for Joel Barker:
Notes from Cheryl Jean Ousley: Joel Barker (1842-1894) was born in the last half of June, 1842 at his parents' farm in Lee County on Powell River near Jonesville, Virginia. Joel left home at the age of 16 or 17 and obtained at least enough education to be literate, however, his knowledge of the woods and wildlife was extensive. He loved to roam the out-doors, hunt and was an expert rifle shot.

As a grown man, he was approximately 5'11" tall, large framed, fair complected with light hair and blue eyes. It was said of him that he was a "daredevil" sort of person as a young man. About 1858-59, he moved to Campbell Co., Tennessee where he lived with his brother Mitchell and worked as a farm hand. While there he met and courted Elizabeth Johnston, the daughter of David Johnston, who operated a water powered grist mill in the Powell River Valley in Campbell County. Joel and Elizabeth were married on the 12th of April, 1860 in Campbell Co., Tenn. by Alexander Heatherly, a justice of the peace. He continued to live with his brother, Mitchell, at Fincastle, Campbell Co., Tenn., for awhile. At the time of his marriage he was still employed as a farm hand and had personal property of $30., as listed in the 1860 census. Around July 1, 1863, Joel decided to enlist in the Union Army. It was said that his decision to join the Union Army rather than the Confederate was based more on the nearness of a recruiting station than on any compulsion to fight for a cause. He just wanted to fight and the Union Army was nearer at the time. It was also said that he didn't like the first outfit he joined, so he quit, went over the hill - almost literally and joined another. At any rate, he was a member, along with his brother, William, of Company E of the Second Regiment of the Tennessee Infantry under the command of Captain Branson. At the end of the Civil War, he was honorably discharged on the 9th of August, 1865 in Nashville, Tenn. He was a private and served part of the time as a guide. When he was discharged, he was due $27.04 back pay and $100. bounty. These sums were never collected.

Joel and Elizabeth had the following children: John Henry (1861-1925), Charles David (1863-1928), William Russell (1866-1943), and Isaac Burney (1869-1948). Around the time that Burney was born, Joel borrowed a horse from their neighbor, James Ousley, and went to Nashville to see about collecting his back pay and bounty from the army. When he didn't return, they went to look for him. They found the horse in a pasture just outside of Nashville, but they never found Joel. His family never heard from him again. This was in the fall of 1869.

Joel had been wanting to travel west, but his wife, Elizabeth, didn't want to go. He claimed that too many in-laws visiting had something to do with his leaving. Joel actually traveled to Kansas City and lived there awhile. Elizabeth, not hearing any more of Joel, had him declared dead. Elizabeth later remarried and so did Joel. In Kansas City, Joel met and married his second wife Mishia Palmer. They moved to Colorado and settled near Trinidad in Los Animos County. Their home was at the foot of the Spanish Peaks on a stream called the Apishipa. They had the following children: Frank Barker (b.1879), Pearl Barker (b. 1882), May Barker (b.1884), Alva Barker (b.1886), Thomas Barker (b.1888) and Jewel (a boy - b.1890). Mishia died around 1891. The two sets of children did not know about each other.

Joel married a third time in Hastings, Colorado on Dec. 13, 1893 to Nancy Ann Caldwell, the family's former housekeeper. They had no children.

In 1890, Joel applied for a pension under the Act of June 27, 1890, granting pensions to disabled soldiers and sailors. He also made two other applications, the last one in 1893. On the application it was stated that he had no means of support and that he had been unable to do a full day's work since he was 46 because of heart trouble, rheumatism and injuries. In the 1890s he lived near Jaroso, Colorado, where he died on July 8, 1894.

Notes for Elizabeth Johnston:
Notes from Cheryl Jean Ousley: After Joel left, Elizabeth and her children lived near her family. Her father, David Johnston, operated a grist mill on Cedar Creek in Powell Valley in Campbell Co., Tenn. In 1871, David Johnston and his family, including Elizabeth and her four sons, moved to Augusta, Pike Co., Indiana. Around 1872, while in Indiana, Elizabeth married again to Andrew Jackson Estes. Charley's father also remarried and settled in Colorado, although Charley and his brothers never knew about it. In 1878, the Johnston, Estes and Barker families, along with the James Ousley family, moved to Missouri.
They traveled by Ox-drawn wagons and crossed the Mississippi River into Missouri at Cape Girardeau. They brought along one milk cow. The Johnston, Estes and Barker families first settled in Dent Co., Missouri, but after a year or so later moved on to Douglas Co., Missouri to a farm located below where Hwy. HH crosses the Norfolk River. Andrew Estes died in the winter of 1881-82 and was buried in the Bittick Cemetery. Elizabeth and her sons, who were nearly grown, moved to Clinton Township near Vanzant, Mo. and she filed claim to a homestead, the SW 1 of 31-27-12 on March 31, 1882.

More About Joel Barker and Elizabeth Johnston:
Marriage: April 12, 1860, Campbell County, TN (Source: (1) Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles., (2) E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley, Joel and Elizabeth were married on the 12th of April, 1860 in Campbell Co., Tenn. by Alexander Heatherly, a justice of the peace.)

More About Joel Barker and Misha Palmer:
Marriage: Aft. 1869, Kansas City, MO (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.)

More About Joel Barker and Nancy Caldwell:
Marriage: December 13, 1893, Hastings, CO (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.)
     
Children of Joel Barker and Elizabeth Johnston are:
  619 i.   John Henry6 Barker (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.), born April 10, 1861 in Campbell County, TN (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.); died April 25, 1925 in Mountain Grove, Wright County, MO (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.). He married Sarah M. Smith (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.) November 30, 1882 in Denlow, Douglas County, MO (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.); born February 10, 1866 in Monroe County, TN (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.); died May 18, 1904 in Vanzant, Douglas County, MO (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.).
  More About John Barker and Sarah Smith:
Marriage: November 30, 1882, Denlow, Douglas County, MO (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.)

  620 ii.   Charles David Barker (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.), born January 16, 1863 in Jacksboro, Campbell County, TN (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.); died October 31, 1928 in Mountain Grove, Wright County, MO (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.). He married (1) Ella Minerva Bell (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.) December 17, 1882 in Clinton Township, MO (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley, On the 17th of December, 1882, Charley married Ella Minerva Bell whose family also lived in Clinton Township. The wedding was performed by Rev. R.F. Beesley in the home of Alexander and Anne Bell, parents of the bride.); born July 09, 1858 in Maryland (Source: J. C. Snodgrass, Clan Snodgrass, (Roootsweb World Connect).); died April 19, 1927 in Mountain Grove, Wright County, MO (Source: J. C. Snodgrass, Clan Snodgrass, (Roootsweb World Connect).). He married (2) Netta Pierce (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.) Aft. 1912.
  Notes for Charles David Barker:
Notes from Cheryl Jean Ousley: Charley was able to obtain about a third grade education, which was good for that time. He liked to fish, hunt and sing; was stubborn at times, but fair, honest and willing to take the blame when he made a mistake. As a man, Charley was heavy set with dark hair and blue eyes.

On the 17th of December, 1882, Charley married Ella Minerva Bell whose family also lived in Clinton Township. The wedding was performed by Rev. R.F. Beesley in the home of Alexander and Anne Bell, parents of the bride. Charley and Ella had the following children: Myrtle Mae (b.1884), Lola Minday (b.1885), Cora Elizabeth (b.1887), Otis Harvey (1888-1966), Hester Nina (1890-1959), Effie Viola (b.1892), Amos Vergil (b.1894), Noble Alexander (1896-1967), Jesse Loine (b.1900) and Delbert McKinley (b.1902).

Charley was a lumberman and a farmer. There home was at Vanzant, Douglas Co., Mo., There first house, where most of their children were born, was about 200 yards southwest of the Vanzant school and cemetery. In 1904, Charley and his family moved a little further down the road into a new house, which they built themselves. This house was one of the finest two-story houses in the east end of Douglas Co. and still stands today, now the home of the Vanzant Post Office. The family also lived part of the time at or near sawmills which Charley and his brothers owned and operated in the east end of Douglas County. Charley had a house at the mill in the Watered Hollow on Clifty Creek and also on the hill above the mill. Living at the mill, however, made it inconvenient for the children to attend school, so after their new house was built, Ella and the younger children stayed at Vanzant.

In 1912, Charley and Ella divorced. Charley then married Netta Pierce. They had the following children: Bertha, Darkus, Hargel, Hazel, Mildred, Vera Irene, Virginia, Joel, Charles David, Jr., and Bonnie. Around 1915, Charley and his second family moved to Burnam where the Barker Brothers Lumber Co. was located. The Lumber Co. was owned by Charley, Russell, and Burney. Charley moved to Mtn. Grove, Mo around 1918 and built another new house. The reason the Johnston, Barker and Estes families came to the east end of Douglas Co. was because of the pine timber and the demand for railroad ties by the Frisco Railroad, which was putting the line from Springfield, Mo. to Memphis, Tenn. Charley's first job was at a sawmill where HH Hwy. crosses the Norfolk River. He also worked on the new railroad for awhile, using a team and scraper. After the railroad was complete, Charley and his brothers continued to saw lumber and ties. Their first mills were on Clifty and North Fork creeks. As time went along, they added planers and dry kilns, eventually establishing a wholesale and retail lumber yard, Landers and Barker Lumber Co., in partnership with their financier, Landers from Springfield, Mo. Their lumber yard was at Mtn. Grove next to the Frisco Railroad. They shipped many car loads of top grade, kiln dried, dressed lumber prior to the 1930s. Charley and his brothers operated sawmills on North Fork: the Masterson Set from about 1908-1910; Wolf Den Hollow Set from about 1910-1912; Biggs set from about 1911-1915; Brush Creek - the Cleveland Set from about 1920-1922; in Ozark County on they Bryant River: the Lowgap Set from about 1916 to 1920, and the Cane Bottom or Big Mill Set from about 1923 to 1929. Most of these mills included planers and kilns as well as sawmills. The mills were powered by steam engines and the logging was done with mules and wagons. Some hauling of logs required the use of steam traction engines. The lumber was hauled by teams and wagons until 1917 when their first fleet of trucks, Fords and Federals, were bought. These trucks had solid tires, were slow and subject to frequent breakdowns. It was several years before they completely replaced wagons for hauling lumber and did not replace the wagon for hauling logs during Charley's lifetime; although they used log trucks on longer hauls. Pneumatic tires gradually took over during the 1920s. The timber they cut was almost all Southern Short leaf Yellow Pine. There was much fine white oak and other trees but very little demand for it except for flooring. It may be hard to believe that much of South Central Missouri was once covered with tall pines where there is so much hardwood, brush and bare rocks today. After the timber was cut over, the mills moved on but people stayed with the land to farm or graze livestock on. Charley sold his interest in Landers and Barker Lumber Co. in 1923 but bought back in a short time later and continued to manage the company until 1928. In 1928 he became ill and was admitted to the hospital in Springfield, Mo. where an operation revealed he had stomach cancer. He died in Mtn. Grove a few days later on October 31 and was buried in Vanzant Cemetery. *Notes and data of Noble G. Barker **Submitters comments: The Barker sons continued on investing in the lumber business and were also later responsible for the manufacturing of the Barker Chain saw. Charley's first wife, Ella, is also buried at Vanzant Cemetery, but they are not "side by side." My grandmother, Hester (Barker) Ousley, is buried between them. It doesn't seem that even after death they could get along.

  More About Charles Barker and Ella Bell:
Divorce: 1912
Marriage: December 17, 1882, Clinton Township, MO (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley, On the 17th of December, 1882, Charley married Ella Minerva Bell whose family also lived in Clinton Township. The wedding was performed by Rev. R.F. Beesley in the home of Alexander and Anne Bell, parents of the bride.)

  More About Charles Barker and Netta Pierce:
Marriage: Aft. 1912

  621 iii.   William Russell Barker (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.), born 1866 (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.); died 1943 (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.). He married Octavia unknown (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.).
  622 iv.   Isaac Burney Barker (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.), born 1869 in Tennessee (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.); died 1948 in Douglas County, MO (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.). He married Lucinda Cooper (Source: J. C. Snodgrass, Clan Snodgrass, (Roootsweb World Connect).) April 07, 1894 in Douglas County, MO (Source: Jeannie Stafford Dobbs, Stafford, Swearengin, ..., (WorldConnect Project).); born 1870 in Indiana (Source: Jeannie Stafford Dobbs, Stafford, Swearengin, ..., (WorldConnect Project).).
  More About Isaac Burney Barker:
Burial: Vanzant Cemetery, Bryan Township, Douglas Co., Missouri (Source: Jeannie Stafford Dobbs, Stafford, Swearengin, ..., (WorldConnect Project).)

  More About Isaac Barker and Lucinda Cooper:
Marriage: April 07, 1894, Douglas County, MO (Source: Jeannie Stafford Dobbs, Stafford, Swearengin, ..., (WorldConnect Project).)

     
Children of Joel Barker and Misha Palmer are:
  623 i.   Frank6 Barker (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.), born August 06, 1879 in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, KS (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.); died April 21, 1950 (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.).
  624 ii.   Pearl B. Barker (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.), born August 02, 1882 (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.); died 1943 (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.).
  625 iii.   Stella Mae Barker (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.), born November 24, 1884 in Jarosa, Las Animas County, CO (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.); died June 10, 1958 (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.).
  626 iv.   Elva Barker (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.), born October 07, 1886 (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.).
  627 v.   Thomas Barker (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.), born April 05, 1888 (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.).
  628 vi.   Jewell "Julie" Barker (Source: E-mail from Cheryl Jean Ousley.), born January 15, 1890 (Source: Delta Joy Barker Bement.).


      148. Rev. Squire Leander5 Barker (Charles Chiles4, Charles3, John2, Edward1) (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.) was born July 04, 1847 in Jonesville, Lee County, VA (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.), and died July 15, 1930 in Sapello Valley, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Letter from Marinella Garrett Charles.). He married (1) Pricilla Jane McQuire (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) July 16, 1868 in Jonesville, Lee County, VA (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 2, Married in the McGuire home.), daughter of Robert McGuire and Evaline Speer. She was born 1848 in Surry County, NC (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), and died July 06, 1907 in Las Vegas, San Miguel County, NM. He married (2) Amanda Thompson (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) Abt. 1908 in MS (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 30.). She died Bef. 1921 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 36.).

Notes for Rev. Squire Leander Barker:
For more details about Squire Leander Barker and his family, read "The Pioneer Squire Barker Family" by Marjorie and Robert Phillips. Harp Enterprises, Arlington, VA, 1996. Library of Congress Card Catalog Number 96-78966, ISBN 0-9655473-0-2. This book still available from Borders (borders.com as of 02/10/1999. Telephone 800-770-7811). This book is not very expensive ($8.76 plus shipping= $12.71) and has been described as "wonderfully written". It contains some of the poetry of Squire Omar Barker (I thought many poems were very good) and lists many very interesting accomplishments of the other children of this family. For example, it describes how we Barkers are "related to Smokey Bear". Also contains many amazing family photographs.

Also, if you can find a copy, Mattie Barker Phillips Crews and Rodney Vernon Phillips wrote "Back To My Mountains." ISBN 1-880047-71-3. The copy I obtained took 3 years to find on E-Bay.

These Barkers, the children of Squire Leaner Barker and descendants, have written so much that I can only provide samples and clues for further reading.
*
http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~mcmillan/Restlit/Biogs/barkersl.htm. Biographical Sketch of Squire L. Barker. Text from Scott, Laurence W. (editor), Texas Pulpit by Christian Preachers. St. Louis: Christian Publishing Company, 1888. Pages 389-391. This online edition © 1996, James L. McMillan.

Born: Lee County, Virginia, July 4, 1847. Died:

SQUIRE L. BARKER was born July 4th, 1847, in Lee county, Virginia. To be born in the Old Dominion on the Fourth of July was certainly a patriotic start in the world. And his biography, if written in full, would be somewhat eventful for one of his age.

During the civil war he lived in a section of country that was alternately overrun and pillaged by the contending armies, and sometimes he could hear the roar of cannon and the clash of resounding arms, reverberating over the hills and through the valleys of his beloved State. His young heart was fired, and his sentiments he could but freely speak. And, though but a boy, he was silenced by being sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he was incarcerated in December, 1864. He was not liberated till the 8th of May, 1865. During his confinement he was sick a great deal, and meditated on things divine. When released, pale and emaciated, he had no thought of enlisting in any earthly army to fight with carnal weapons. He wanted to become a soldier of the cross; but how? was the question that confronted him.

On his return home, light broke in on his mind by hearing the gospel preached by Eld. Samuel Shelburn. He saw his duty clear, and resolved to obey forthwith. He was accordingly baptized, in 1865, in a beautiful running stream near a church called Mount Olivet. Three years later he took another wise step--he was married to a Miss McGuire, July 16th, 1868, which, he says, was the very making of him. In 1871 he moved to Burnett county, Texas, where he made himself useful as a Sunday-school worker. In 1882 he removed to Hulltown, Shackleford county, where he now resides, and was soon set apart as an elder in the church.

A minister of one of the denominations announced that he would read from his creed, to let the people now its teachings, which he did. Bro. Barker then announced that he would read from his creed, to let the people know what it taught. He read from the New Testament. From that time he was a preacher. The brethren recognized the fact, and called in Bro. Silas Scarborough and formally set him apart. During the recent protracted drought that prevailed in Western Texas, Brother Barker became extensively known by his efforts in behalf of the sufferers.

Notes for Pricilla Jane McQuire:
PSBF p. 14: Priscilla named the home in Sapello Valley, NM "Buelah" - the promised land.
PSBF p. 16: Priscilla decided she must go and see Allie (Alice) and her two granddaughters. She took Mattie and Grace with her for their first train ride... While in Colorado they also visited one of Squire's brothers, Joel Barker and his family.
*
BEULAH San Miguel County Post Office History http://www.newmexicogenealogy.org/smarragon.htm

Beulah was located about nineteen miles northwest of Las Vegas in Sapello Canyon. The name was taken from the hymn Beulah Land. Another Beulah Post Office (in Rio Arriba County) had just been discontinued in 1895 which allowed the name to be used. The first postmaster Priscilla Barker opened the office on March 26, 1896. The post office was located in the Barker family home and the mail was delivered twice a week by a Star Route out of Sapello.

Squire L. Barker was selected to be the second postmaster and was scheduled to assume the duties on October 5, 1907. Squire decided to decline the position and Priscilla remained in office until Charles Barker became postmaster on December 24, 1907. Squire Barker again tried for the postmaster position and actually held the office for a short time after Charles resigned. Squire was not commissioned, however, and had to give the job up. Amanda Barker became postmaster on June 15, 1910. Charles had to wait a long time for his third opportunity because Amanda held the postmaster position for over thirteen years.

Squire Barker did get his chance and was appointed postmaster on September 7, 1923. He must have enjoyed the job once he got it because he held the position for over seven years. The Beulah Post Office was discontinued on March 15, 1932. After the Beulah Post Office closed, the mail was delivered to rural type mail boxes by the route.

Postmaster:

Priscilla J. Barker March 26, 1896
Charles B. Barker December 24, 1907
Squire L. Barker February 18, 1910 Amanda T. Barker June 15, 1910
Squire L. Barker September 7, 1923
Mattie Phillips June 16, 1930


More About Pricilla Jane McQuire:
Burial: July 12, 1907, Sapello Canyon, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)

More About Squire Barker and Pricilla McQuire:
Marriage: July 16, 1868, Jonesville, Lee County, VA (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 2, Married in the McGuire home.)

More About Squire Barker and Amanda Thompson:
Marriage: Abt. 1908, MS (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 30.)
     
Children of Squire Barker and Pricilla McQuire are:
  629 i.   Alice6 Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born May 01, 1869 in Jonesville, Lee County, VA (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died August 19, 1893 in Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 17, Died of tuberculosis.). She married Thaddeus Troupe Turner (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) December 24, 1888 in Albany, Shackleford County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); born May 01, 1865 in San Saba County, TX (Source: Marilyn K. Moore, Family Information for Marilyn K. Moore, (RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project).); died May 03, 1917 in Near El Porvenir, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marilyn K. Moore, Family Information for Marilyn K. Moore, (RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project).).
  Notes for Alice Barker:
Moved to Colorado before the Winter 1889.
*
BTMM p. 46: Late in 1892, just before Ben's death, Alli's health failed, so they decided to to move to New Mexico where they could be near us.

p. 47: Allie's family lived with us until her death, August 19, 1893. Her's was the first grave in the little graveyard on the hill. She chose the spot herself, foe she knew she could not live long. Just before she died, she called us in from play and told us she was going to die. She asked me to take care of Roy (Alice's youngest child), and when he died only a month later, I think no one grieved as much as I. I felt like I hadn't taken good care of him or he wouldn't have died. Three deaths in the family within a year. It was almost too much!

  More About Thaddeus Turner and Alice Barker:
Marriage: December 24, 1888, Albany, Shackleford County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)

  630 ii.   Benjamin Franklin Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born March 31, 1871 in Jonesville, Lee County, VA (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died December 03, 1892 in Moran, Shackleford County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 17, Died of typhoid fever.).
  Notes for Benjamin Franklin Barker:
PSBF p.15. In the Fall of 1890, Ben decided to return to Texas and the girl he still loved. Died of typhoid fever in Texas during visit.
*
BTMM p. 45. As Benjamin's sister Mattie remembered him: Benny, tall, quiet and competent cowboy of trip (from TX to NM) , who didn't like New Mexico and returned to Texas a year later.

  631 iii.   Ida Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born August 15, 1874 in Dobyville, Bumet County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died January 25, 1966 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.). She married Henry Elwyn Blake (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) March 18, 1896 in Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 64.); born 1869 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died 1940 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.).
  More About Henry Blake and Ida Barker:
Marriage: March 18, 1896, Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 64.)

  632 iv.   Minerva Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born April 16, 1876 in Burnet County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died February 25, 1955 in Medford, Jackson County, OR (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.). She married Fred W. Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p, 25, No known relation to other Barkers mentioned here.) October 03, 1903 in Sapello Ranch, San Miguel County, NM (Source: (1) Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 25, Married by Squire Leander Barker., (2) Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM), p. 203..); born 1873 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died 1957 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.).
  More About Fred Barker and Minerva Barker:
Marriage: October 03, 1903, Sapello Ranch, San Miguel County, NM (Source: (1) Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 25, Married by Squire Leander Barker., (2) Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM), p. 203..)

  633 v.   Charles Burton Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born October 12, 1878 in Burnet County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died November 09, 1969 in Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.). He married (1) Bertha Myrl Steed (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 25.) August 1904 in Taos, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 26., ...were married in a civil ceremony in Taos in August 1904 and Squire performed a religious ceremony at the ranch in November.); born 1894 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died 1940 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.). He married (2) Helen Wiley (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) June 14, 1941 (Source: Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM), p. 204..). He married (3) Dorothy Sudler Chavez (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) 1956 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.).
  Notes for Charles Burton Barker:
PSBF p. 39: Attorney for the New Mexico State Land Office.

  More About Charles Burton Barker:
Mayor Santa Fe, NM: 1934 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 46.)

  More About Charles Barker and Bertha Steed:
Marriage: August 1904, Taos, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 26., ...were married in a civil ceremony in Taos in August 1904 and Squire performed a religious ceremony at the ranch in November.)

  More About Charles Barker and Helen Wiley:
Marriage: June 14, 1941 (Source: Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM), p. 204..)

  More About Charles Barker and Dorothy Chavez:
Marriage: 1956 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)

  634 vi.   Pearl B. Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born November 12, 1881 in Burnet County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died August 05, 1973 in Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.). She married William Lee Hart (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) June 04, 1908 in Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); born 1867 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died 1948 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.).
  More About Pearl B. Barker:
Burial: Rifle, Garfield County, CO

  More About William Hart and Pearl Barker:
Marriage: June 04, 1908, Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)

  635 vii.   Matilda Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born January 10, 1884 in Hulltown (Moran), Shackleford County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died February 28, 1974 in Big Springs, Howard County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.). She married (1) John Isaac Phillips (Source: Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM).) October 22, 1905 in Sapello Ranch, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); born September 16, 1864 in Lebanon, KY (Source: Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM), p. 207.); died August 13, 1926 in Winnfield, LA (Source: Mattie Barker Phillips Crews, Back To My Mountains, (1997. Creative Designs, Inc. Albuquerque, NM).). She married (2) John Crews (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) 1939 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died 1943 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.).
  Notes for Matilda Barker:
From Paul Neil Fradenburgh: Mattie Barker Phillips and her son Rodney V. Phillips published Mattie's memoirs entitled "Back to My Mountains". (BTMM) It was published in 1997 by Creative Designs, Inc. 11024 Montgomery NE, Suite 311, Albuquerque, NM, 87111. 505-856-2600.
*
BTMM p.7. It seems that the Barkers, who were from England, were printers. One, Robert Barker, who was the queen's printer, published the first King James version of the Bible. I do not know if he was related to our family, as I have never tried to trace our family tree.

The Barkers were the early settlers and planters in the area of the Cumberland mountains of southwestern Virginia. I think that my father's great-grandparents were John Barker and Martha Snead Barker. One of their sons, Charles, born in 1793, married Katherine Chiles. Charles had eleven children, on of whom was Charles Chiles Barker, born in 1797.



  More About John Phillips and Matilda Barker:
Marriage: October 22, 1905, Sapello Ranch, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)

  More About John Crews and Matilda Barker:
Marriage: 1939 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)

  636 viii.   Elliott Speer Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born December 25, 1886 in Moran, Shackleford County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died April 03, 1988 in Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.). He married Ethel Margaret Arnold (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) May 11, 1911 in Las Vegas, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); born 1893 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died 1996 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.).
  Notes for Elliott Speer Barker:
PSBF p. 32: During the summer of 1912 Elliot and crew constructed a new cabin where the original Beatty's cabin had been in the upper Pecos. It served many years as a base for the Forest Service men.
*
Author "Beatty's Cabin; Adventures in the Pecos High Country", Albuquerque, University of New Mexico Press, 1953.
*
Author " "Western Life and Adventures 1890-1970", Calvin Horn Publisher, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
p. 48: After accidentally wrecking a heavy wagon on a steep hill. "I finally got the horses untangled and loose from the wagon, with no harm done except that one of the horses and I had lost some skin off our legs. That wreck put a kink in my teamster ego, but I said, 'Everbody turns his wagon over sometime.' Figuratively how true that is."
*
P. 49, " Pioneer Squire Barker Family": In 1950 one of Elliot's District Wardens, while fighting a devastating forest fire, found a whimpering five-pound bear cub. The half-starved cub was clinging to a scorched pine tree, his fur singed and his footpads badly blistered. The cub was given first aid, bedded in a shoe box, then flown to Santa Fe by Ray L. Bell, the game department pilot, where his family nursed it back to health. They dubbed the cub "Smokey". When the cubs's sores had healed and he had gained some weight, Elliot worked out an agreement with the U. S. Forest Service to turn Smokey over to them with the provision that, "his life be dedicated to forest fire prevention and wildlife conservation." Smokey later became the greatest single attraction in the National Zoo in Washington, D.C.".
*
http://www.aracnet.com/~histgaz/hgv3n2.htm
Historical Gazette, Volume Three Number Two

Smokey Bear Celebrates 50 Years 1944-1994

Bear cub burned by wildfire lives to bring Smokey to life "Smokey" soon becomes darling of our National Zoo

In 1950, a careless act turned into tragedy when a fire burned wild and swept away over 17,000 acres of forest and watershed land in Capitan Mountains, Lincoln National Forest, N. M. Hundreds of firefighters battled the blaze.

A strong wind trapped 24 firefighters and only by laying face down with their faces covered with wet kerchiefs were they able to escape with their lives. The flames Flared-up-up all around them and the smoke near choked them to death. When the fire died down the 24 firefighters spotted a badly burned little cub clinging to a charred tree.

They rescued the bear and did a quick look for mother bear, but the fire must have claimed her life because all around the firefighters, as far as they could see, the forest was blackened and bare.

Smokey's name was given to the small cub who escaped death by wildfire. With the love and care shown to the cub by Ray Bell*, his wife and daughter, Judy he soon recovered. A home at the National Zoo would be his ticket to living to a ripe old age.

In 1961, an orphaned bear found in the Magdelena Mountains of New Mexico became Smokey's lifetime companion. They named her "Goldie." They became the most visited attraction at the Zoo. Smokey lived until 1976 and is buried at the Smokey Bear Historical Park, Capitan, N.M. --Bridget Smith, Historical Gazette

*Editor's Note: My sincere apologies to Ray Bell (who is still alive and well) for having credited Harold Bell for the rescue of the cub, Smokey. We were contacted by his son, Donald Ray Bell, by email who corrected the mistake. My delight was in getting the chance to talk with Ray Bell from his home in North Dakota. Thank you both for helping me to get the story straightened out! And, thank you, Ray, for directly contributing to our nation's history.

The story above is from the front page of this edition. Our newspaper carries five illustrations by Rudy Wendelin, Smokey's official artist.

© 1997 Market Your Place in History Bridget E. Smith editor & publisher 1-503-289-2720/FAX 1-503-285-8016 email: histgaz@aracnet.com Historical Gazette 7342 N. Alma Avenue Portland, OR 97203
*
http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/ffp/history.htm Forestry Smokey History

Smokey Bear, the guardian of our forests, has been a part of the American scene for so many years it is hard for us to remember when he first appeared. Dressed in a ranger's hat, belted blue jeans, and carrying a shovel, he has been the recognized forest fire prevention symbol for over 50 years. Today, Smokey Bear is one of the most famous advertising symbols in the world and is protected by Federal Law. He has his own private zip code, his own legal council, and his own private committee to insure that his name is used properly. Smokey Bear is much more than a make-believe paper image; he exists as an actual symbol of forest fire prevention.

To understand how Smokey Bear became associated with forest fire prevention, we must go back to World War II. On December 7, 1941, Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor. The following spring in 1942, a Japanese submarine surfaced near the coast of Southern California and fired a salvo of shells that exploded on an oil field near Santa Barbara, very close to the Los Padres National Forest. Americans throughout the country were shocked by the news that the war had now been brought directly to the American mainland. There was concern that further attacks could bring a disastrous loss of life and destruction of property. There was also a fear that enemy incendiary shells exploding in the timber stands of the Pacific Coast could easily set off numerous raging forest fires.

With experienced firefighters and other able-bodied men engaged in the armed forces, the home communities had to deal with the forest fires as best they could. Protection of these forests became a matter of national importance, and a new idea was born. If people could be urged to be more careful, perhaps some of the fires could be prevented.

With this is mind, the Forest Service organized the Cooperative Forest Fire Prevention Campaign with the help of the Wartime Advertising Council. Posters and slogans were created by the Advertising Council, including "Forest Fires Aid the Enemy," and "Our Carelessness, Their Secret Weapon." By using catchy phrases, colorful posters and other fire prevention messages, the Advertising Council suggested that people could prevent accidental fires and help win the war.

Walt Disney's motion picture, "Bambi" was produced in 1944 and Disney let the forest fire prevention campaign use his creation on a poster. The "Bambi" poster was a success and proved that using an animal as a fire prevention symbol would work. A fawn could not be used in subsequent campaigns because "Bambi" was on loan from Walt Disney studios for only one year; the Forest Service would need to find an animal that would belong to the Cooperative Forest Fire Prevention Campaign. It was finally decided that the Nation's number one firefighter should be a bear.

On August 9, 1944, the first poster of Smokey Bear was prepared. The poster depicted a bear pouring a bucket of water on a campfire. Smokey Bear soon became popular, and his image began appearing on other posters and cards. In 1952, Smokey Bear had enough public recognition to attract commercial interest. An Act of Congress passed to take Smokey out of the public domain and place him under the control of the Secretary of Agriculture. The Act provided for the use of collected fees and royalties for forest fire prevention. One of the first licensed items was a Smokey Bear stuffed toy. Hundreds of items have been licensed over the years.

We still have a lot of work to do. There are children and adults who need to hear and learn about Smokey Bear and his forest fire prevention message and there are still people who need to be continually reminded of the need to prevent forest fires.

Remember, Only YOU Can Prevent Forest Fires!
*
Los Angeles Times. Sunday, September 3, 2000. Rudolph Wendelin; Smokey the Bear's 'Caretaker'
Rudolph A. Wendelin, 90, an artist who became best known as the "caretaker" of firefighting icon Smokey the Bear. Wendelin joined the U.S. Forest Service in Milwaukee in 1933 and transferred to Washington, D.C., four years later. After World War II service as a Navy artist, he resumed his Forest Service career as the man in charge of Smokey the Bear, whom the agency had contrived in 1945 as its "spokesman" in the fight against forest fires. The bear's slogan, "Remember, only you can prevent forest fires," became one of the most familiar and imitated instructions of all time.

Under Wendelin's guidance, the bear changed from what originally was a bear cub and later a full-grown animal with fangs and fearsome claws to a more human character. By the 1950s, the bear (by then using a middle name of "the") sported a ranger's hat and belted bluejeans. His paws had become hands, in which he always carried a shovel, to better protect America's forests. Smokey appeared on government posters, postage stamps and television, in magazines, on radio and in various teaching materials. The government licensed Smokey's likeness for use on such commercial products as school lunch boxes. Wendelin, a native of Kansas who had studied at the University of Kansas, oversaw Smokey's activities until he retired in 1973. During his long career as a government artist, Wendelin also designed government awards and five commemorative U.S. postage stamps. On Aug. 31 in Falls Church, Va., of injuries sustained in an automobile accident.

*
See also:
http://www.emnrd.state.nm.us/forestry/smokey.htm
*
PSBF p. 56: In December 1986 there was a big celebration for Elliott's one hundredth birthday which was covered by the "Sante Fe New Mexican." His oft-quoted remark at the time was, "I don't have an enemy in the world- I've outlived all the bastards!"
*
The Handbook of Texas Online is a joint project of The General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin and the Texas State Historical Association. © The Texas State Historical Association, 1997, 1998, 1999.

BARKER, ELLIOTT SPEER (1886-1988). Elliott Speer Barker, conservationist, author, and the "father" of Smokey Bear, was born in Moran, Texas, on December 25, 1886, the son of Squire L. and Priscilla (McGuire) Barker. When he was three years old the family moved to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in New Mexico for his asthmatic mother's health. When he was thirteen his mother moved to Las Vegas, New Mexico, from the family ranch near Sapello so that he and those of his ten siblings who were of school age could attend school there. He finished high school in three years and graduated in 1905, then took a six-month course at a college of photography in Effingham, Illinois. He worked briefly with his brother-in-law, a photographer, in Texico, New Mexico.

Barker worked as a professional guide and hunter near Las Vegas for two years before passing the United States Forest Service ranger examination in April 1908. He worked as an assistant forest ranger in the Jemez National Forest in Cuba, New Mexico, in 1909. In November of that year he was transferred to the Pecos National Forest in Pecos, New Mexico, and promoted to ranger. In November 1912 he was transferred to the Carson National Forest near Tres Piedras, New Mexico, where he worked under the famous American conservationist Aldo Leopold. In the fall of 1914 Barker was promoted to deputy forest supervisor and moved to Taos, New Mexico. He spent a year as acting supervisor, then transferred to the Coconino National Forest in Arizona as forest supervisor.

During World War I he was a first lieutenant in the National Guard, a deputy United States marshal, and the chairman of the Taos County Red Cross. He almost died during the flu epidemic in 1917. He resigned in April 1919 and acquired 640 acres, including the old family homestead, near Las Vegas. He ranched from 1919 to 1930 and worked as a guide for deer and cougar hunts. Barker went broke at the onset of the Great Depression qv and sold out. In April 1930 he went to work for Harry Chandler, the publisher of the Los Angeles Times-Mirror, as wildlife and predator-control manager at Chandler's Vermejo Park Ranch. A year later, however, Barker was appointed state game warden and director of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. He held that position until 1953, when he retired to devote himself full-time to writing.

His first book, When the Dogs Bark "Treed": A Year on the Trail of the Longtails, was published in 1946. His other books included Beatty's Cabin: Adventures in the Pecos High Country (1953), Ramblings in the Field of Conservation and Eighty Years with Rod and Rifle (both 1976), and Smokey Bear and the Great Wilderness (1982). Barker also published two books of poetry, A Medley of Wilderness and Other Poems (1962) and Outdoors, Faith, Fun and Other Poems (1968). His best-known book was Western Life and Adventures, 1889-1970, originally published in 1970 and reprinted in 1974 as Western Life and Adventures in the Great Southwest. It won the Golden Spur Award from the Western Writers of America for the best nonfiction book of the year.

The best-remembered monument to Barker's memory, however, had nothing to do with his literary accomplishments. In May 1950 a huge fire broke out on Capitan Mountain, New Mexico. A fireman rescued a small bear cub, badly burned, clinging to a charred tree, and the cub was flown to Santa Fe and nursed back to health. On behalf of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, Barker donated Smokey to the Forest Service in Washington, D.C., specifying that the cub should become a symbol of forest-fire prevention and wildlife conservation. Smokey lived for more than twenty-six years at the National Zoo and became the most recognized animal in the world.

Barker married Ethel M. Arnold on May 17, 1911, and they had one son and two daughters. Barker was a member of the International Association of Game, Fish, and Conservation Commissioners, the Western Writers of America, the National Wildlife Federation, and the Western Association of Game and Fish Commissioners. He received a meritorious-service citation from the New Mexico Wildlife Conservation Association in 1953, and the National Wildlife Federation named him conservationist of the year in 1965. In 1966 the United States Game Commission dedicated a 5,000-acre wildlife area to Barker in recognition of the assistance he had given to the regional Girl Scout council. In 1976 he received an honorary doctorate from New Mexico State University. Barker died at the age of 101 on April 3, 1988, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

bibliography: Contemporary Authors, Vol 89.

Martin Donell Kohout
*
From "Smokey Bear And the Great Wilderness" by Eliott S. Barker. P. 39: One day Ray and I talked o Forest Supervios K. D. Flock about having our cub made into a SMOKEY BEAR, a symbol of fire prevention and wildlife conservation. Flock was enthusiastic and wrote to the Regional Forrester in Albuquerque about it. Amazingly, Flock got a negative reply. Since he wouln't go over the Regional Forester's head, we took the liberty and did so ourselves.

As soon as Chief Forester Lyle Watts and his public relations officer, Clint Davis, learned of Smokey's story, they called me and begged us to donate him to the Forest Service and have him domiciled at the National Zoo where he would be made the living symbol of forest fire revention. I agreed to this plan but insisted that wildlife conservation be included in the long-range goal.




  More About Elliott Speer Barker:
Social Security Number: 585-10-8496 (Source: Social Security Death Index, Last residence: Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501.)

  Notes for Ethel Margaret Arnold:
PSBF p. 31, 32: ... Elliott saw the prettiest 16-year old girl he had ever laid eyes on. She was fishing out of season, without a license, through a hole in the ice, all of which were against the law. He fell in love with Ethel Arnold on the spot and immediately faced a dilemma because he had taken a oath to enforce the game laws without fear or favor. Her dad contended she was too young to put in jail and he was too poor to pay the fine. To solve the problem Elliott had her remanded to his custody. After he was promoted to Forest Ranger at $100 per month and quarters furnished, he persuaded Ethel to become his fishing partner for life... Ethel later remarked, "I never violated the law again. Just see what happened to me the first time."

  More About Elliott Barker and Ethel Arnold:
Marriage: May 11, 1911, Las Vegas, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)

  637 ix.   Grace Gertrude Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born June 29, 1889 in Moran, Shackleford County, TX (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died February 04, 1989 in Aztec, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 56.). She married James R. Wilson (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) 1923 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died Bef. 1924 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 38.).
  Notes for Grace Gertrude Barker:
Biographical Sketch. http://elibrary.unm.edu/oanm/NmLcU/nmlcu1%23ms16/nmlcu1%23ms16_m5.html

Grace Barker Wilson was born June 29, 1889 in Moran, Texas. She was one of the eleven children of Squire Leander Barker and Priscilla Jane McGuire. Her brothers include Southwestern writers S. Omar Barker and Elliott S. Barker. At the age of six weeks, she came to New Mexico in a covered wagon driven by her mother. The family settled near Las Vegas, New Mexico. Wilson attended Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, Northern Arizona University and eventually earned an M.A. from the University of New Mexico

She began teaching school at age 19 and served as superintendent of the Central Consolidated School at Kirtland, New Mexico for 24 years (1925-1949). Following her retirement in 1949, the first newly constructed school building in the district was named in Wilson's honor. Wilson was again honored for her educational work in 1956, when she became the first woman and first living educator inducted to the New Mexico Education Hall of Fame.

After her retirement in 1949, Wilson began writing poetry. She authored over 1500 verses and published five volumes of poetry. Winds Blow West, her first book appeared in 1954. Miles to Go was published in 1960 and Stuff of Dreams in 1964. In 1968, Wise Horizons was published and Scarlet Memories in 1976. Besides writing poetry, Wilson taught a monthly poetry workshop and lectured on topics including history, literature, religion, and education.

Among Wilson's social and civic activities was a fourteen year tenure on the library board of the Farmington Public Library. She was a member of Phi Kappi Phi honorary scholastic society and was active in the San Juan Delphion Society. She was also a member of the Farmington Study Club, Delta Kappa Gamma, American Association of University Women, the Bethany Christian Church, and was vice president of the Farmington Writers Association.

Wilson died in February 1989. She had one daughter, Elizabeth Wilson Baumann.



  More About Grace Gertrude Barker:
Burial: February 07, 1889, Aztec, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 64.)

  More About James Wilson and Grace Barker:
Marriage: 1923 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)

  638 x.   David Marion Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born March 08, 1892 in Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died August 31, 1928 in Farmington, San Juan County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p.40, ... suffered from a ruptured appendix,...). He married Rose Alpha Arnold (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) November 21, 1921 in Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 36.); born 1899 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died 1975 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.).
  Notes for David Marion Barker:
From "Smokey Bear And The Great Wilderness" by Elliot Speer Barker p. 102: This chapter is dedicated to the memory of my brother, David Marion Barker. A veteran of World War I, he passed away at age 26 ... as an indirect result of being gassed twice during the war.

  More About David Marion Barker:
Burial: September 03, 1928, National Cemetery, Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 64.)

  More About David Barker and Rose Arnold:
Marriage: November 21, 1921, Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 36.)

  639 xi.   Squire Omar Barker (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.), born June 16, 1894 in Beulah, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died April 02, 1985 in Las Vegas, San Miguel County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.). He married Elsa McCormick (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.) July 01, 1927 in Hagerman, Chavez County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); born 1906 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.); died 1996 (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.).
  Notes for Squire Omar Barker:
http://www.abqtrib.com/here/urh122498_cowboy.html. The Albuquerque Tribune, December 24, 1998: N E W M E X I C O, U. S. A. Church on the range By Ollie Reed Jr. TRIBUNE REPORTER

New Mexico author S. Omar Barker and his palomino horse, Nick, pose for a photograph during a 1950 hunting trip. Barker, who grew up hunting and working cattle in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, wrote thousands of articles, poems and stories and won two prized Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America. He is best remembered for "A Cowboy's Christmas Prayer," verse about a cowhand's talk with God.

A simple, soulful prayer from the heart of a cowboy becomes part of Christmas tradition

In November 1962, New Mexico author S. Omar Barker received a telegram asking permission for his poem "A Cowboy's Christmas Prayer" to be read on the Lawrence Welk TV show. Barker, a sunup-to- sundown, every-day-of-the-week professional writer for much of his more than 90 years, telegraphed back that for $100 they had a deal. Back again comes a telegraph from the TV show's agent asking if Barker would settle for $50. "Fifty bucks no steak. Beans," Barker wired in response on Nov. 26, 1962. "But will accept anyway to help TV poor folks."

Jodie Phillips, wife of Barker's nephew Bob Phillips, smiled as she pointed out copies of the telegrams pasted in a thick scrapbook put together by Barker himself and kept by the Phillipses in their Santa Fe apartment. "If he didn't sell a poem, he didn't eat," Jodie Phillips said of Barker, who died in Las Vegas, N.M., in April 1985, just a couple of months shy of his 91st birthday. Apparently the Welk show decided not to use the poem. That was a rarity. Tennessee Ernie Ford and sausage king-country singer Jimmy Dean read it on national television, and it has been reprinted much more than 100 times in collections of Barker's works, anthologies, magazines and Christmas cards.

Leanin' Tree cards of Boulder, Colo., has used the Barker verse -- about a humble cowboy's chat with God at Chrimastime -- more years than not for more than two decades. You wouldn't want to bet the ranch on it, but there's a chance that outside of Holy Scripture, Clement Moore's "Night Before Christmas" and maybe the words of two or three popular carols, Barker's cowboy prayer has appeared on more American Christmas cards than anything else ever written.

"Omar said he made more money from that poem than from any other one thing he did," Jodie Phillips said. That's because the poem, which appeared in Barker's 1954 book "Songs of the Saddleman," strikes a chord with people -- ranchers, farmers, outdoorsmen -- who find God in the beauty and harshness of nature rather than in the pews and pulpits of a church. "It's a classic," said Gordon Snidow, a New Mexico artist who has made a living out of painting pictures of working cowboys and working ranchers. In the early 1970s, Snidow's painting of a cowboy standing in front of his horse, hat in hands and boots ankle deep in snow, was used to illustrate a Leanin' Tree Christmas card containing Barker's cowboy prayer.

In a phone interview from his Ruidoso home, Snidow said Barker's prayer does in words what he tries to do in paint -- capture the essence of men who work cattle for a living. "I think it's marvelous," he said. " I'm proud to be associated with that."

Barker did not have to do any research to come up with the feelings expressed in the prayer by his "sinful cowpoke." He was too self-effacing to claim the gloried title of cowboy, but he had lived the life. Squire Omar Barker (He got a kick out of his S.O.B. initials and once raised cattle under the Lazy SOB brand) was born June 16, 1894, in a log cabin in Sapello Canyon near New Mexico's Sangre de Cristo Mountains. He was the youngest of 11 children born to Squire Leander Barker and his wife, Priscilla Jane. "They say he was born in Beulah," Jodie Phillips said, "but Beulah wasn't a town. It was what grandma Barker called her house. She named it for the promised land in the Bible, and she had a post office there -- in a desk in the living room."

Omar Barker was college-educated. He got his bachelor's degree from New Mexico Normal University (now New Mexico Highlands) in Las Vegas in 1924 and taught English there. He was a World War I veteran and served one term in the New Mexico Legislature. He became a full-time writer in 1925, and he was, according to Jodie Phillips, a quiet but witty person. He also was tall -- more than 6 feet --and a vigorous man of the wide-open spaces from the inside out and back again to his gizzard. Omar Barker grew up riding horses, working cattle on his father's homestead, and hunting deer and mountain lion in the rugged New Mexico mountains.

For a year before entering military service, he was a U.S. forest ranger in the Carson National Forest. Jodie Phillips said that Omar and his brother Elliott, a noted New Mexico conservationist and an author in his own right, were excellent riders who loved their horses and knew the high country of the Sangre de Cristo range better than many men know their own back yards. "Those men used to talk about trees up there," she said. "They'd say, 'You know that tree that is fire scarred and has a branch on only one side.' Those men were just amazing."

Barker's only novel, a 1966 work aimed at young people and titled "Little World Apart," was about growing up on a mountain ranch. It has chapter titles such as "Gathering the Cattle," "Branding Day" and "Snorts in the Dark," and it was more than a tad autobiographical."

Barker didn't call himself a cowboy, but he had a lot more right to do so than many who do. He did admit to being a writer, but he could hardly get away with claiming otherwise. During his lengthy career, Barker, known as the Sage of Sapello and the Poet Lariat of New Mexico, churned out 1,200 articles, 2,500 poems and 1,500 stories and novelettes, including nine pieces of fiction for the Saturday Evening Post. The Post paid Barker about $2,500 for stories such as "My Gun Talks for Me," "The Girl Who Busted Broncos" and "Don't Pull That Knife!" That was a princely sum in the 1940s and 1950s. "Whenever he would sell something to the Saturday Evening Post, he would buy another car," Jodie Phillips said. "He always bought Chevys."

Another major market for Barker and his wife, Elsa, also a writer, was "Ranch Romances," a popular pulp magazine a few decades back. Everything Barker wrote, he methodically cut out and pasted in books that he had bound and stamped with titles such "Pulp Yarns," "Pot Boilers" and "Big Windies." The total output comes to 17 large volumes. Barker's widow died in Albuquerque several years ago, so Bob and Jodie Phillips ride herd on Barker's written legacy. The Phillips are responsible for getting two collections of Omar Barker's works published this year: "Ol S.O.B. Sez: Cowboy Limericks," TwoDot/Falcon Publishing, P.O. Box 1718, Helena, Mont. 59624; paperback; $9.95. Foreword by cowboy poet Waddie Mitchell. And "Cowboy Poetry Classic Rhymes by S. Omar Barker," Cowboy Miner Productions, P.O. Box 9674, Phoenix, Ariz. 85068; hardback; limited edition of 2,000; $19.95 each. Foreword by western novelist Elmer Kelton.

Jodie Phillips is happy about those books but she'd like to see more of Omar Barker's work back in print, "Little World Apart," for example. "It's not a sexy, grownup novel, but how many stories do you have about boys growing up in the New Mexico mountains 100 years ago?" she said. "It should be republished. So should 'Born to Battle.' It's such a good collection of animal stories." But, if S. Omar Barker had written nothing other than "A Cowboy's Christmas Prayer," his place in cowboy literature would be safe. Of the neatly collected 17 volumes he left behind, the heftiest, most densely packed is the one containing materials relating to the poem -- cards and magazine pages on which it is printed, deposit slips recording payments for its use, letters about it from school children, other writers and former President Dwight Eisenhower.

"A Cowboy's Christmas Prayer" will last because the man who wrote it honored God, respected cowboys and had faith in both. Jodie Phillips said she never heard Barker talk about what inspired him to write the Christmas prayer, but she thinks it's based on his own brand of theology." "There were no churches where Omar grew up," she said. "He believed in God, and I think he had a very strong religious conviction. But he belonged to no sect. He never went to church services." "A Cowboy's Christmas Prayer" will last because even though he never claimed to be a cowboy, S. Omar Barker had a cowboy's heart and a cowboy's soul.

Ollie Reed Jr.'s Trail Tales, stories rooted in the rich history and legend of New Mexico and the Southwest, runs monthly in the You Are Here section of The Tribune's print edition..

"A COWBOY'S CHRISTMAS PRAYER"

I ain't much good at prayin', and You may not know me, Lord -
I ain't much seen in churches where they preach Thy Holy Word,
But You may have observed me out here on the lonely plains,
A-lookin' after cattle, feelin' thankful when it rains,
Admirin' Thy great handiwork, the miracle of grass,
Aware of Thy kind spirit in the way it comes to pass
That hired men on horseback and the livestock that we tend
Can look up at the stars at night and know we've got a Friend.

So here's ol' Christmas comin' on, remindin' us again
Of Him whose coming brought good will into the hearts of men.
A cowboy ain't no preacher, Lord, but if You'll hear my prayer,
I'll ask as good as we have got for all men everywhere.
Don't let no hearts be bitter, Lord. Don't let no child be cold.
Make easy beds for them that's sick and them that's weak and old.
Let kindness bless the trail we ride, no matter what we're after,
And sorter keep us on Your side, in tears as well as laughter.

I've seen ol' cows a-starvin', and it ain't no happy sight:
Please don't leave no one hungry, Lord, on Thy good Christmas night -
No man, no child, no woman, and no critter on four feet.
I'll aim to do my best to help You find 'em chuck to eat.

I'm just a sinful cowpoke, Lord - ain't got no business prayin' -
But still I hope you'll ketch a word or two of what I'm sayin':
We speak of Merry Christmas, Lord - I reckon You'll agree
There ain't no Merry Christmas for nobody that ain't free.
So one thing more I'll ask you Lord: just help us what You can
To save some seeds of freedom for the future sons of man!

- S. Omar Barker, 1894-1985

*
From Rawhide Rhymes by Squire Omar Barker

Jack Potter’s Courtin’

Now young Jack Potter was a man who knowed the ways of steers,
From bur-nest in their hairy tails to ticks that clawed their ears.
A Texican and cowhand, to the saddle bred and born,
He could count the trail herd on the move and never miss a horn.
But one day on a tally, back in eighteen-eighty-four,
He got to actin’ dreamy, and he sure did miss the score.
The Trail Boss knowed the symptoms. Jack, you ain’t no good like this.
I’ll give you just ten days to go and find just what’s amiss!
A "miss" was just what ailed him, for he’d fell in love for sure
With a gal named Cordie Eddy, mighty pretty, sweet and pure.
So now Jack rode a hundred miles, a-sweating with the thought
Of sweetsome words to ask her with, the way a fellow ought.
I’m just a humble cowhand, Miss Cordie, if you please,
That hereby asks your heart and hand, upon by bended knees!
It sounded mighty simple thus rehearsed upon the trail,
But when he came to Cordie’s house, his words all seemed to fail.
‘Twas Howdy, ma’am, and how’s the crops? And how’s your pa and ma?
For when it came to askin’ her, he couldn’t come to taw.

He took her to a dance one night. The hoss she rode was his.
He’s a dandy little horse, she says. Well, yep, says Jack, He is.
They rode home late together and the moon was ridin’ high,
And Jack, he got to talkin’ ‘bout the stars up in the sky,
And how they’d guide a trail herd like they do see-goin’ ships,
But the words of love and marriage - they just wouldn’t pass his lips!
So he spoke about the pony she was ridin’, and he said:
You’ll note he’s fancy-gaited and don’t never fight his head.
He’s sure a little dandy! she agrees, and heaves a sigh.
Jack says: Why, you can have him - that is - maybe - when I die.
He figured she might savvy what he meant or maybe guess,
And gave him that sweet answer which he longed for, namely yes.
But when they reached the ranch house, he was still a - wonderin’ how
He could pop the question, and he had to do it now
Or wait and sweat and suffer till the drive was done that fall,
When maybe she’d be married, and he’d lose her after all.
He put away her saddle, led the pony to the gate:
I recon I’ll be driftin’, ma’am. It’s gittin’ kinder late.
Her eyes was bright as starlight, and her lips looked sweet as flow’rs.
Says Jack: Now this here pony - is he mine, or is he ours?
Our pony, Jack! she answered, and her voice was soft as moss.
Then Jack, he claims he kissed her - but she claims he kissed the hoss!
*
S. OMAR BARKER
Big Windies

They asked me: 'What's a windy?'... Well, us cowpokes love to spin
Our yarns around the campfire. Listen how them tales begin:

“Well, boys, I'm goin' to tell you 'bout the time I hunted b’ar.
The fall work all was finished, so I took a pasear
A way up in the timber where the hoot owls have their fun,
To see if I could find some bear and maybe shoot me one.

The day was kinder warmish so I laid down for a nap.
I woke up late that evenin' when I heard a great big snap,
And there beside me stood a bear - I tell you, boys, it's true -
This bear had took my rifle and he'd snapped it right it two!

He throwed the pieces at me as I shinnied up a tree,
Then gave a grunt, spit on his hands and clumb right after me.
By that time it was gittin' dark. I reached the topmost limb.
That bear kept right on comin', so I knowed 'was me or him.

Well, boys, that tree was mighty tall - a lucky thing, no doubt -
For by the time he got it clumb, ol bruin's tongue was out
A lollin' through his slobbers, such a tongue you never see,
As purty, pink and limber as a rubber singletree.

That's what I grabbed aholt of, and I swang him round and round
Until I yanked him inside out, then flang him to the ground.
But here' the part that's funny: I had started down when, wup !
Here come that doggone bear again, a-climbin' right back up !

Looked like he'd somehow turned hisself all right side out once more.
All I could do was grab his tongue the way I had before,
And yank him inside out again. I heard him hit the earth,
Then started squirlin' down that tree for all that I was worth.

But I'd no sooner started down than by the gobs I'll swear,
Tongue out and climbin' fast again, here come that doggone bear !
Well, boys, we kept right on that way until the break of day:
Ten times I yanked him wrong side out, but still he wouldn't stay.

At least that's what I figgered, but as soon as it was light
I saw what I'd been doin', boys, throughout the dark of night.
There lay upon the ground below - my word please do not doubt -
Not one but ten dead grizzly bears, all turned plumb wrong side out.

Big windies, ” if you'd like to know, are tales us cowboys spin
To kinder kill the lonesomes when night comes closin' in:
About the mighty Pecos Bill, with cyclones in his loop;
About the wring-tailed wowser and the barbwire-tailed kadoop.

In fact the so-called windy of the well known cow range stamp,
Ain't nothin' but us cowpokes huntin' grizzly bears - in camp!

*
Notes from Dorothy from New Mexico.

Hello again,

Thanks for the information! I am a writer and my mother was a writer--not famous like Omar Barker--but my mother was fairly prolific and was also a newspaper reporter for the Las Vegas Daily Optic. I grew up in Las Vegas. I know who Marjorie Phillips is. I have been here all my life, so I know most of the people who are the "old timers." I just retired as a professor from New Mexico Highlands University. I wrote a book (biography) on Dr. Carl Gellenthien, the director of Valmora Tuberculosis Sanatorium which is near Las Vegas. (HOVELS, HACIENDAS, AND HOUSE CALLS.) In it I quoted his poem "Mountain Cemetery," one of many I like. When the book was being written, Omar was elderly and somewhat ill. I wrote to him to ask him permission to quote his poem. He wrote back a very nice letter giving me permission to quote any of his work I wanted!! I was thrilled!

Elsa was a member of PEO. If you ask around, you will probably find some women who belong to it. Most towns have a chapter. It is a women's club which sponsors Cotty College and is a kind of service organization. I used to see Elsa at meetings quite often.

I first heard Omar Barker speak when I was in high school and he was asked to come to my English class at Las Vegas Robertson High School to give a lecture. He talked about poetry. What is poetry? He spent much of his time giving definitions of poetry and verse. He also read a few of his short poems. He had a great sense of humor. I heard him speak a time or two after that, once in an English class when I was in college at New Mexico Highlands University, I think.

He used to tell a funny story about his name, which I'm sure you've probably heard, but I will relate it to you here anyway. He said he went to the livestock office to register a brand. He wanted to use his initials, S.O. B. with the S lying sideways, which is read or said as a LAZY S. So his brand would have been Lazy S - 0 - B. But he said he couldn't get that brand because it was already taken. "Some other Lazy S O B beat me to it!" he said. Everyone laughed at that! He also signed some of his books with the Lazy S - 0 - B "brand" after his name, just to be funny. I think those books are worth a lot. Around here nothing by S. Omar Barker sells for less than $100, but a signed edition goes for more.



  More About Squire Omar Barker:
Burial: April 05, 1985, National Cemetery, Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family, p. 64.)

  Notes for Elsa McCormick:
Directory of Western Entertainers: Page B - 4 Stan Paregien, Editor

Elsa McCormick Barker was born in Illinois in 1906. She married S. Omar Barker, now deceased, in 1927. She graduated from New Mexico Highlands University, and she taught English in high school in Las Vegas, NM from 1930 to 1971. She and Omar joined WWA in 1954, and they each served as president of the organization. Elsa Barker was president of the WWA from 1972-73, and her husband was president in 1958-59.

Elsa M. Barker was a cover-featured author for Ranch Romance Magazine throughout the heyday of Western fiction pulp magazines, and she was a contributor to many other magazines as well. Several of her serials and novelettes were distributed world-wide by King Features Syndicate. She wrote some 200 short stories.

Elsa Barker also wrote such fiction books as Riders of the Ramhorn (1956), Clouds Over the Chupaderos (1957), Cowboys Can't Quit (1957), Showdown at Penasco Pass (1958), War on the Big Hat (1959), and Secret of the Badlands (1960). All were published under the name "E.M. Barker," since editors at that time did not believe fans of Westerns would read books written by women.

Six of Elsa Barker's novels were published in England and in Holland. Her novels War on the Big Hat and Clouds Over the Chupaderos were published in translated and published in the French language by the 30,000 member Club de Lecture des Jeunes in Paris under the titles Le Ranch du Grand Chapeau and Cowboy au Nouveau Mexique.

Her husband, the late S. Omar Barker, wrote a touching tribute to her in the May, 1954 issue of The Roundup. In part he said, "Elsa shares with me a great love of the outdoor West, as well as a fondness for and tenderheartedness toward dumb animals--maybe especially housecats and horses. Essentially a quiet person, maybe a little reserved, she is completely friendly, not uncomfortably shy nor without independent opinions. If she has any vice, it is reading books when she ought to be asleep.

"Frankly, I'm right proud of what she has accomplished as a writer, not only because she has sold several hundred shorts, plus novelettes, and serials, but because in her western romances she writes what is primarily a vigorous plotted, action western with love interest, rather than merely a love story set in the West. She has not sacrificed home making to her writing, but when she digs in her heels on a serial, she can pile up wordage like any other professional."

The Barker family--Elsa, Omar and his brother, Elliott-- certainly made significant contributions to the literature of the West.



  More About Squire Barker and Elsa McCormick:
Marriage: July 01, 1927, Hagerman, Chavez County, NM (Source: Marjorie and Robert Phillips, The Pioneer Squire Barker Family.)



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