Family Tree Maker Online
Navigation Bar

[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]

Descendants of William I, The Conqueror, King of England and The Sanford Family




Generation No. 1


1. WILLIAM1I, THE CONQUEROR, KING OF ENGLAND (ROBERTAI, THE DEVIL, 6TH DUKE OF NORMANDY, RICHARDBII, THE GOOD, 4TH DUKE OF NORMANDY, RICHARDCI, THE FEARLESS, 3RD DUKE OF NORMANDY, WILLIAMDI, LONGSWORD, 2ND DUKE OF NORMANDY, ROLLO THE DANEE ROBERT, 1ST DUKE OF NORMANDY, RAGNVALDFI, THE WISE, EYSTEINSSON, EARL OF MORE, GLUMRAG EYSTEIN, THE NOISY, JARL OF THE UPLANDS, IVARH OPLAENDINGE, JARL OF THE UPLANDS OF NORWAY, THE STINGYI HALFDAN, EYSTEINNJI, FRETR HALFDANSSON, HALFDANK HUITBEIN/OLASSON, OLAF INGJALDSSON/ULAFL TVETELIA, INGIALDM YNGLING, BRAUT-ONUNDN INGVARSSON, INGVARO EYSTEINSSON, EYSTEINP ADILSSON, ADILSQ OTTARSSON, OTTARR EGILSSON, EGILS AUNSSON, AUNT JORUNDSSON, THE AGED, JORUNDU YNGVASSON, YNGVIV ALREKSSON, ALREKW AGNASSON, AGNIX DAGSSON, DAGY DYGGVASSON, DYGGVIZ DOMARSSON, DOMARAA DOMALDASSON, DOMALDIAB VISBURSSON, VISBURAC VANLANDASSON, VANLANTIAD SVEGDASSON, SVEGDIAE FJOLNARSSON, FJOINIRAF YNGVI-FREYSSON, KING OF SWEDESAG YNGVI-FREY, KING OF SWEDESAH NJORD)1 was born 14 Oct 1027 in Falaise, Calvados, France1, and died 4 Sep 1087 in Hermenbrayville, Roune, France1. He married MATILDA OF FLANDERS1 1050 in Cathedral of Notre Dame d'Eu, Normandy, France1, daughter of BAUDOUIN and PRINCESS ADELA. She was born 1032 in Flanders, France1, and died 2 Nov 1083 in Caen, Calvados, France1.

Notes for W
ILLIAMI, THE CONQUEROR, KING OF ENGLAND:
WILLIAM I, called The Conqueror (1027-87), first Norman king of England (1066-87), who has been called one of the first modern kings and is generally regarded as one of the outstanding figures in western European history. Born in Falaise, France, William was the illegitimate son of Robert I, Duke of Normandy (1010?-35), and Arletta (fl. 1025-40), a tanner's daughter, and he is therefore sometimes called William the Bastard.

Upon the death of his father, the Norman nobles, honoring their promise to Robert, accepted William as his successor. Rebellion against the young duke broke out almost immediately, however, and his position did not become secure until 1047 when, with the aid of Henry I, King of France, he won a decisive victory over a rebel force near Caen. During a visit in 1051 to his childless cousin, Edward the Confessor, King of England, William is said to have obtained Edward's agreement that he should succeed to the English throne. In 1053, defying a papal ban, William married Matilda of Flanders (1031?-83), daughter of Baldwin V (1012-66), Count of Flanders and a descendant of King Alfred the Great, thereby strengthening his claim to the crown of England. Henry I, fearing the strong bond between Normandy and Flanders resulting from the marriage, attempted in 1054 and again in 1058 to crush the powerful duke, but on both occasions William defeated the French king's forces.

Conquest of England. About 1064, the powerful English noble, Harold, Earl of Wessex, was shipwrecked on the Norman coast and taken prisoner by William. He secured his release by swearing to support William's claim to the English throne. When King Edward died, however, the witenagemot (royal council) elected Harold king. Determined to make good his claim, William secured the sanction of Pope Alexander II (r. 1061-73) for a Norman invasion of England. The duke and his army landed at Pevensey on Sept. 28, 1066. On October 14, the Normans defeated the English forces at the celebrated Battle of Hastings, in which Harold was slain. William then proceeded to London, crushing the resistance he encountered on the way. On Christmas Day he was crowned king of England in Westminster Abbey. The English did not accept foreign rule without a struggle. William met the opposition, which was particularly violent in the north and west, with strong measures; he was responsible for the devastation of great areas of the country, particularly in Yorkshire, where Danish forces had arrived to aid the Saxon rebels. By 1070 the Norman conquest of England was complete. William invaded Scotland in 1072 and forced the Scottish king Malcolm III MacDuncan (1031?-93) to pay him homage. During the succeeding years the Conqueror crushed insurrections among his Norman followers, including that incited in 1075 by Ralph de Guader (fl. 1066-98), 1st Earl of Norfolk, and Roger Fitzwilliam (fl. 1071-75), Earl of Hereford, and a series of uprisings in Normandy led by his eldest son, Robert (c. 1054-1134), who later became Robert II, Duke of Normandy.

His Achievements. One feature of William's reign as king was his reorganization of the English feudal and administrative systems. He dissolved the great earldoms, which had enjoyed virtual independence under his Anglo-Saxon predecessors, and distributed the lands confiscated from the English to his trusted Norman followers. He introduced the Continental system of feudalism; by the Oath of Salisbury of 1086 all landlords swore allegiance to William, thus establishing the precedent that a vassal's loyalty to the king overrode his fealty to his immediate lord. The feudal lords were compelled to acknowledge the jurisdiction of the local courts, which William retained along with many other Anglo-Saxon institutions. The ecclesiastical and secular courts were separated, and the power of the papacy in English affairs was curtailed. Another accomplishment was the economic survey undertaken and incorporated in the Domesday Book in 1086. In 1087, during a campaign against King Philip I of France, William burned the town of Mantes (now Mantes-la-Jolie). William's horse fell in the vicinity of Mantes, fatally injuring him. He died in Rouen on September 7 and was buried at Caen in Saint Stephen's, one of the abbeys he and Matilda had founded at the time of their marriage as penance for their defiance of the pope. William was succeeded by his third-born son, William II.
                 
                        Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia

Notes for M
ATILDA OF FLANDERS:
MATILDA, Queen of England, from 1066-1083, wife of William I, King of England, (aka, William The Conqueror) was the daughter of Baudouin V, Count of Flanders (France), and the sixth in descent from Elfrida, daughter of Alfred the Great.

ALFRED, called The Great (849-99), king of the West Saxons (871-99), and one of the outstanding figures of English history. Born in Wantage in southern England, Alfred was the youngest of five sons of King Ethelwulf (790?-858). On the death of his brother Ethelred (r. 866-71) Alfred became king, coming to the throne during a Danish invasion. Although he succeeded in making peace with the Danes, they resumed their marauding expeditions five years later, and by early 878 they were successful almost everywhere. About Easter of 878, however, Alfred established himself at Athelney and began assembling an army. In the middle of that year he defeated the Danes and captured their stronghold, probably at present-day Edington. During the following 14 years Alfred was able to devote himself to the internal affairs of his kingdom. By 886 he had captured the city of London, and soon afterward he was recognized as the king of all England.

In 893 the Danes invaded England again, and the following four years were marked by warfare; eventually, the Danes were forced to withdraw from Alfred's domain. The only ruler to resist Danish invasions successfully, Alfred made his kingdom the rallying point for all Saxons, thus laying the foundation for the unification of England.

Alfred was a patron of learning and did much for the education of his people. He began a court school and invited British and foreign scholars, notably the Welsh monk Asser (fl. 885-909?) and the Irish-born philosopher and theologian John Scotus Erigena, to come there. Alfred translated such works as The Consolation of Philosophy by the Roman statesman and philosopher Boethius, The History of the World by the Spanish priest Paulus Orosius (c. 385-420), and Pastoral Care by Pope Gregory I. Alfred's laws, the first promulgated in more than a century, were the first that made no distinction between the English and the Welsh peoples.

                        Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia
     
Children of W
ILLIAM and MATILDA FLANDERS are:
2. i.   ROBERT2 COURTHOSE, DUKE OF NORMANDY, b. 1052, Normandy, France; d. 10 Feb 1133/34, Cardiff, Glamorganshire, Wales.
  ii.   ABBESS OF CAEN CECILIA, b. 1056, Normandy, France; d. 30 Jul 1126, Caen, Calvados, France.
  iii.   PRINCE OF ENGLAND RICHARD, b. 1057, Normandy, France; d. 1081, New Forest, Hampshire, England.
  iv.   WILLIAMII, RUFUS, KING OF ENGLAND, b. 1060, Normandy, France; d. 2 Aug 1100, New Forest, Hampshire, England.
  Notes for WILLIAMII, RUFUS, KING OF ENGLAND:
WILLIAM II, called Rufus (1060?-1100), King of England (1087-1100), who extended his power into Normandy and Scotland. He was the third son of William the Conqueror, King of England, who on his deathbed named him as his successor in England, leaving the duchy of Normandy to his eldest son, Robert (1054?-1134). William Rufus, as he was known because of his ruddy complexion, was crowned in Westminster Abbey in 1087. The following year William's uncle Odo, bishop of Bayeux (1036?-97), led a rebellion of Norman barons who sought to unseat him in favor of Robert. William's English subjects, believing his promises of less oppressive taxation and more liberal laws, helped him quell the revolt. The king, despite his promises, continued to pursue a domestic policy that was harsh and venal.

William invaded Normandy in 1089, 1091, and 1094, winning some concessions from his brother Robert II, duke of Normandy, each time. He forced the Scottish king Malcolm III MacDuncan (1031?-93) to pay him homage and in 1092 seized the city of Carlisle and other areas claimed by Malcolm in Cumberland and Westmorland. In 1096 Robert mortgaged Normandy to William for funds to finance a Crusade. William then fought to recapture lands his brother had lost as duke of Normandy and returned the county of Maine to the rule of the duchy.

After the death in 1089 of Lanfranc, the archbishop of Canterbury, William delayed naming a successor. He held open vacant bishoprics and enriched himself with church monies, incurring the displeasure of many ecclesiastics. In 1093 he selected Anselm, Abbot of Bec (see Anselm, Saint), as the new archbishop, but they quarreled over William's authority to control church appointments. William was killed on Aug. 2, 1100, while on a hunting trip in the New Forest in Hampshire. It is not known whether the slaying, which is traditionally ascribed to a Norman named Walter Tirel (d. after 1100), was accidental or intentional. William was buried at Winchester; he never married and had no children. His younger brother succeeded to the throne as King Henry I.

                        Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia

  v.   PRINCESS OF ENGLAND CONSTANCE, b. 1061, Normandy, France; d. 13 Aug 1090, England; m. ALAN FERGANT, DUKE OF BRITTANY, 1086; b. Bef. 1062; d. Unknown.
3. vi.   PRINCESS OF ENGLAND ADELA, b. 1062, Normandy, France; d. 8 Mar 1134/35, Marsilly, France.
  vii.   AGATHA MATILDA, PRINCESS OF ENGLAND, b. ABT 1064, Normandy, France; d. Bef. 1080, Calvados, France; m. EARL OF WESSEX HAROLD; b. Bef. 1064; d. Unknown.
4. viii.   HENRYI, BEAUCLERC, KING OF ENGLAND, b. Sep 1068, Selby, Yorkshire, England; d. 1 Dec 1135, Rouen, Normandy, France.
  ix.   PRINCESS OF ENGLAND ADELIZA, b. ABT 1074; d. Unknown.


[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]
Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com