Family Tree Maker Online
Navigation Bar
Prev Page Prev Item Contents Index Go to Page Home Page Next Item Next Page

Page 48 of 387


Descendants of Thomas Clarkston


      104. Richard Pearl 'Old Pearl'4 Morris (Ellender 'Nellie'3 Clarkston, John2, Thomas1) (Source: Pierson, Dana, 2001, "Electronic.") was born 27 Apr 1859 in Pigeon Creek, Wise co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.", (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Births - Richard Pearl Morris - 27 Apr 1862.), and died 22 Dec 1940 in Big Stone Gap, Wise Co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.", (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Deaths - Richard Pearl Morris - 22 Dec 1940.). He married (1) Emma L. 'Emily' Stamper 13 Nov 1877 in Lee Co, VA (Source: Marriage record, Lee Co, VA marriage register; 1853-1884;, 13 nov 1877; name; Emily Stamper, age 24, single, b. NC, parents George & Naomie Stamper, groom; R. P. Morris.), daughter of George Stamper and Naomi Stamper. She was born 1853 in Ashe Co, NC (Source: (1) Marriage record, Lee Co, VA, Marriage reg; 1853-1884;, 13 nov 1877; name Emily Stamper, age 24 single b . NC; parents George && Naomie Stamper. Groom; R. P. Morris., (2) Hall, Carol; <lola@setel.com>, "Electronic."), and died Aft. 1880 in VA. He married (2) Margaret 'Peggy' Galloway 17 Dec 1881 in Lee Co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," Lee Co., Virginia Marriage Register 2, 1853-1916 (LDS microfilm), pg. 55: December 17, 1881 MORRIS, R. P., 22, widowed, b. Lee Co. parents: R. & Ellen MORRIS - Margaret GALAWAY, 18, single, b. Lee Co., parents: David & K. GALAWAY., (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Richard Pearl Morris married Margarette Galloway 18 Dec 1882 at Lee VAby J. N. Redwine, witnessed by Jasper Witt & David Reynolds.), daughter of David Galloway and Kizziah Dykes. She was born 25 Nov 1864 in Lee Co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," gives birth and death locations and parents for Peggy., (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Births - Margarette Morris - 26 Nov 1864.), and died 05 Feb 1949 in Big Stone Gap, Wise Co, VA (Source: (1) Lila Reach., (2) Lila Reach., (3) Lila Reach., (4) Lila Reach., (5) Lila Reach., (6) Lila Reach.).

Notes for Richard Pearl 'Old Pearl' Morris:
Beverly Reach Perry; Mar 2002; Wise Co., Virginia Birth Register, 1856-1871; Morris, Richard P: Male-Alive, April 27, 1859; Parents: Richard and Ellender (Clark/ston) Morris.
When his father was murdered and his homestead burned, "Uncle Pearl" remembered his little red cap being thrown into the fire by the marauders.
From "The Heritage of Wise Co., Virginia," by Charles Garrison: "Pearl enjoyed hunting and riding in the mountains, and was an expert marksman. Apparently his knowledge of the mountains made him a valuable coal prospector, and the Stonega Coke and Coal Company hired him to work with the company's engineers and geologists. He lived for many years in Appalachia, near the present Appalachia High School, and later moved to Big Stone Gap, where he purchased several acres east of the L&N depot, near the point where the north and south forks of the Powell River converge. About 1927, Pearl suffered a stroke while he was in the mountains. He was paralyzed and placed in the company hospital at Stonega. He recovered almost fully, walking with crutches for a time and later with a cane.
Another possible birth date is April 27, 1862
Family lore has "Uncle Pearl" b. in Wise Co., but it's more likely he was b. in Lee Co., as the marriage record states.
From The Big Stone Gap Post ; Morris learned his craft in laboratory of nature by Howard E. Cummins, special writer; E. (sic) Pearl Morris was a mountain man who worked out his talents within the great circle of his God-given natural talents. The story of ``Uncle Pearl'' Morris is representative of a time when men and women fully understood that there are things knowable things unknowable. The knowable things were worthy of spending a person's time and strength on. The unknowable was a waste of time and energy. When a brief sketch of the life of E. (sic) Pearl Morris was presented by the Appalachia Cultural Arts Council of Appalachia, several members of the audience who are descendants of the famous ``prospector extraordinary'' were in attendance. After the show, they offered a more detailed version of their famous ancestor's intelligence and wisdom. The highest peak of the mountains where E. (sic) Pearl Morris walked during his life served to enhance the highest peaks of his knowledge of coal. Wherever he walked, he understood what was hidden there, out of sight and beneath his feet. The unschooled geologist and surveyor did not attend the big universities as did some of his contemporaries who came to this area to develop the coal industry, such as John K. Taggert, John C. Oliphant, J. P. Wolfe (see reminiscences of a Surveyor and Civil Engineer, 1931, by J. P. Wolfe) and David M. Lipps.
Morris was employed by some of the intellectual giants of his time -- men with many degrees, schooled in university laboratories. Yet many of the puzzling problems and solutions were unraveled by a man who never wore a university cap and gown, but learned his craft in the universal laboratory of nature. Mildred Carroll of Big Stone Gap has written (in a local historical publication) that Morris bought a piece of land in the western end of town. When the highway was built between Big Stone Gap and Pennington Gap, it ran directly through the middle of his property. Carroll writes: ``Oh, they paid him what they considered a fair price for the half they took. But he kept the land in the bend of the river because he had built his house on the slight knoll that sloped gently down to the river.''
One of the interesting stories told by Mildred Carroll (and often re-told by local historians) is the ``airport story.'' Carroll writes: ``There was a stretch of flat land just across the river, and to quote (local writer and newspaper editor) Bill Hendricks, `after trains and cars came plans,' and that was the best spot for a runway. But when the planes took off they barely cleared Pearl's chimney.''
The vibrations from the low-flying planes shook the windows and dislodged mud from the chimney. The story gets better. ``Uncle Pearl'' would rush outside his house, ``cussing a blue streak,'' and the pilot just smiled and waved. One day, one crashed on take-off and landed in Pearl's cornfield, and the pilot walked away, barely injured, with only a few bruises and cuts, and made his way across the river. Later, some men returned to collect the remains of the plane. They were surprised to see Morris sitting near the plane. Morris was holding his rifle. ``You will not touch your plane till you pay for my corn,'' E. (sic) Pearl Morris warned the interlopers. They did not question a man who made his own rifle, and a man who had the ability to ``surely hit what he aimed at.'' Morris is remembered for declaring that, at least, there was one of his cornfields which paid off substantially more than the others, and with far less work. Morris was born during the Civil War and grew up in the mountains of Southwest Virginia. Some accounts claim that he was born on Powell Mountain, near Big Stone Gap, the son of Richard D. Morris, who was killed during the civil war in Scott County.
Exeter, once known as Pigeon Creek, however, is given credit for the birthplace of the great prospector. Morris died on December 22, 1940, wearing his trusted hat and his well-traveled mountain boots. Morris is not only remembered for his uncanny scientific knowledge of where coal could be found without digging for it, but for his life in its relation to himself. Here was a man who truly realized that in everything which had life -- or had once been a part of life -- there was a kinship to himself. He knew that the coal resting beneath the soil, on the mountains he knew so well, had obtained a loftier form of life in the beginning.... [Last 12 paragraphs omitted]

Part 2; Morris' powers extended beyond the known senses by Howard E. Cummins, special writer;
By most accounts of local storytellers, historians and ``fellow geologists,'' R. Pearl Morris was not an ordinary man. The more-than-six-foot mountain man was born with a strong back, a good constitution and a miraculous mute sense of smell -- a gift which did not require a great deal of words. This was only one of his extra-sensory powers -- the power extending beyond the known senses. ``Uncle Pearl,'' as he was known, was able to smell, hear and see where coal could be found. From early boyhood, Morris started studying the lay of the land, the rises and the dips, the crevices, the very character and condition of the earth's makeup. He was able to describe the conformation of the ground, the very nature and close connections existing between the influences of the climate, the natural resources and topography of the land.
More importantly, he carried a living map within his head as to the location of where coal lay hidden. Up until the year 1910, Morris was a practicing farmer. He was a quiet, resourceful man, not given to small talk, but his neighbors and friends spread the word that if anyone wanted to know where coal was, ``Uncle Pearl'' could find it. When he went to work for the Stonega Coke and Coal Company, the experts soon discovered that no other person in their employment could match the natural instincts of R. Pearl Morris. The late Brownie Polly, Sr., who was production manager with the Stonega Coke and Coal Company, used to tell the story of how he and Morris walked across the mountains from Stonega to Dunbar, looking for coal. It was in the time of Morris's life when his itching feet and his wanderlust, combined with his keen extra-sensory powers, were at their peak.
It was at a time when he obeyed the whispering beyond the mountains, and when he obeyed them, coal could be detected. The man, who spoke only when there was something important to say, stopped in his tracks on a remote spot and stood there in silence. When we hear this story, again and again, we imagine seeing the two men, standing there on a bright, early, summer morning, surrounded by purple and white rhododendron, trillium, May apple, hepatica and the pink-whitish blossoms of mountain laurel. (This imagined scene is based upon an actual photograph with R. Pearl Morris standing on a low hill with what appears to be a large growth of rhododendron towering over his tall frame.) Morris's long, white beard is highlighted by the dark suit covering his broad frame. He holds a cane in his left hand, but stands tall and erect, peering directly into the camera. In the distance, far beyond a cluster of bushes and a scattering of unidentified ground coverings, is a towering mountain in full vegetation. It is a rambunctious picture of a man almost dominating the beautiful and expressive landscape in the background. This is the image of Morris which most of us have today: a man in full intercommunication with his surroundings.
As the story goes, and as the tale is told, after being passed down from Brownie Polly over the many years, the two men stood there in complete silence. Then the great geologist spoke: ``Here it is.'' In the tradition of the self-reliant, self-taught, self-instructed mountain men of Morris's era, the object of all missions, speculations and expeditions -- whether they be far or near -- was formed to establish and broaden the way of life during the time in which they lived. The mountain man's world had more than ample room for change. During ``Uncle Pearl's'' career as ``prospector extraordinary,'' he worked closely with James M. Hodge, a well-known geologist from the East.
Working with Hodge, Morris soon learned to use the technical names of the strata he found by seeing, smelling and hearing. To his credit, he never acquiesced and placed his instinctive knowledge of geology below that which was found in books and taught in universities. As the story is told, Morris stormed into the office of John K. Taggart in a rage, ``spitting fire'' and protesting that an engineer had questioned his ability to find coal without digging for it. ``I resign, sir,'' he shouted at Taggart.
(In June of 1890, Taggart came to the Virginia Coal and Iron Company from Connellsville, Pa., as general superintendent to take charge of the property, succeeding General Ayers.) Taggart tried to pacify the angry mountain man and begged him to reconsider. ``Uncle Pearl'' held his ground and did not give in. He had resigned and that was that. There was no giving in for this proud man on whom Taggart depended for his uncanny expertise. After Morris had taken a seat and calmed down, Taggart said, ``All right, but make sure you're at work on Monday morning.'' On the following Monday morning, E. (sic) Pearl Morris arrived on time for work and all was forgiven. The upstart, university-trained engineer kept out of ``Uncle Pearl's'' sight for the remainder of the day.
The Appalachia Cultural Arts Council will present a program on R. Pearl Morris for the second time during Railroad and Coal Days/Appalachia Reunion 2000 in August.

From the Big Stone Gap Post; The Appalachia Cultural Arts Council will present a variety of short plays dealing with the lives of famous and interesting former and present members of the Appalachia area. Among them are ... E. (sic) Pearl Morris (legendary local geologist).... To get to the cemetery where Pearl MORRIS is buried, nearly as soon as you get to Exeter (coming from Appalachia) turn left at a white house that sits a little way off the road (this might have been a mine superintendent's house because it is a little larger and sits farther off the road than most houses in Exeter). There is a path next to driveway of this house that leads up on top of the mountain. It's a fair piece to walk; a four-wheel drive vehicle might make it up there. The cemetery is right on top of the mountain. Pearl and Peggy are on the knoll on one end. -bp-3-01.

1920 Wise Co. Census, Big Stone Gap, Supervisor's District 9, Enumeration District 177, Sheet 9B, Jan. 20, 1920:
HH 10 MORRIS, R. P. Head M W 58 married b. VA mother/father b. VA Coal Prospector
Margaret Wife F W 55 married b. VA mother/father b. VA
Clyde son M W 6 b. VA mother/father b. VA
CLARK, Thomas grandson M W 16 single b. VA mother/father b. VA student
MOORE, Edith granddau. F W 15 single b. VA mother/father b. VA student
McCONNELL, Grace boarder F W 16 single student
McCONNELL, Nellie boarder F W 14 single student
MOORE, Edith

From The Big Stone Gap Post:
R. PEARL MORRIS DIES SUDDENLY ; Aged Big Stone Gap Citizen Suffers Attack While Walking About Home Sunday. Richard Pearl Morris, 78, widely known throughout this section where he was employed 35 years as coal prospector for the Stonega Coke and Coal Company, died very suddenly at his home in Big Stone Gap Sunday afternoon. His body was found a few yards from the house by members of the family after he had been missing a few minutes. It is presumed he suffered a heart attack. Mr. Morris was born on Powell Mountain near Big Stone Gap, being a son of Richard D. Morris, who was killed during the Civil War in Scott County. About 10 years ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis while at work near Dunbar from which he never fully recovered. However, Mr. Morris was able at times to visit town [sic] and chat with his many friends. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Margaret Morris, a son, J. W. Morris of Exeter, and two daughters, Mrs. C. T. Moore of Big Stone Gap and Mrs. Florence McConnell of Pennington Gap. Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock in charge of the Rev. Dan Robinette. Interment was made to the Exeter cemetery.

From "The Heritage of Wise County and the City of Norton 1856-1993": Richard Pearl MORRIS II, by Mildred Carroll, Big Stone Gap, VA 24219: "Born during the Civil War, growing up in the untamed mountains of S.W. Virginia, Pearl MORRIS was a rugged individual. I've heard him tell of turning over a rock when he heard a buzz and killing 18 to 20 rattlesnakes. Year after year his beard grew longer and whiter because he never actually shaved. He never had a mind to buy a rifle, said he could make a better gun than they sold, and make them he did. The S. W. Virginia Museum has a ball and cap muzzle loader, about 50 caliber, he made. There's always been some question as to what Uncle Pearl did best, shoot a gun or find coal. When he went to work for the coal company, they soon learned no one could face up coal through the mountain and find outcroppings like Uncle Pearl. He would find the coal and they would follow with the technical knowledge of surveying and mapping. Uncle Pearl did a lot of prospecting with James HODGE, a well known geologist from the East. It was not long until he could point out strata and give the technical name for it. But he never did place his instinctive knowledge below that of book and instrument. Not long after he went to work for what later became Stonega Coke and Coal Co., he bought land in the western end of Big Stone Gap. When they built the road from Big Stone Gap toward Pennington Gap, it ran through the middle of Pearl MORRIS' land. Oh, they paid him what they considered a fair price for the half they took. (Later, the town honored him by naming a short street after him). But he kept the land in the bend of the river because he had built the house on a slight knoll that sloped gently down to the river. It was a large house for that time with five rooms and a root cellar (basement today), with a wrap-around porch. On the widest corner of the porch was a water pump. Now that was a luxury, a covered water pump on your porch.
There was a stretch of flat land just across the river and to quote Bill Hendricks "after tra ins and cars came planes", and that was the best spot for a runway. But when the planes too k off they barely cleared Pearl's chimney. The vibrations shook the windows and even dislodg ed dabs of mud from the chimney. I've seen him run outside shaking his fist and cussing a blu e streak, and the pilot just smiled and waved. One day one crashed on take off and landed i n Pearl's cornfield. The pilot walked away with just cuts and bruises and made his way bac k across the river. But when they returned to collect their plane, there sat Pearl with hi s rifle. He told them "You will not touch your plane till you pay for my corn". I guess the y figured if he could make his own rifle he could surely hit what he aimed at. At least, h e said, that cornfield paid off with less work than the others. December 22, 1940, the prosp ector extraordinary fell dead. He had his hat and boots on, and he probably would have wanted it that way." \\\\\

More About Richard Pearl 'Old Pearl' Morris:
Burial: 27 Dec 1940, Morris Cem., Exeter, Wise Co, VA (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.")
Census 1: 1860, Wise Co, VA, Richard P., age 1 mo, b. KY
Census 2: 1870, Harlan CO KY, Mt. Pleasant, Pearl, age 11, b. VA, name is PEARL Clark, living w/stepfather, Benj F. Clark
Census 3: 1880, Lee Co, VA Yokum Sta d-48; hh 299-305; Richard P. Morris, age 21, b. VA, both parents b. NC
Census 4: 1900, Lee Co, VA; Sulphur Springs; pg 184; hh 128-130; R. P. Morris, head, age 39, b. apr 1861 VA, md 17 yrs
Census 5: 1910, Wise Co, VA; dist 136, hh 639-652; Richard P. Morris, age 48, m1, 25 yrs, b. VA
Census 6: 1920, also in this hh are Edith Moore granddau, age 15, and Thomas E. Clark, grandson, age 17, both b. VA
Census 7: 1920, Wise Co, VA; also in this hh are; McConnell, Grace age 16 and Nellie, age 14, both b. VA, listed as boarders (must be some relation to dau=in-law, Florence McConnell
Census 8: 1920, Wise Co, VA; Richmond, dist 177; hh 10-10; R. P. Morris, head, age 58, b. VA
Census 9: 1930, Wise Co, VA; Big Stone Gap; dist 19; hh 432-435; Richard P. Morris, head, age 67, b. VA, md@21

More About Emma L. 'Emily' Stamper:
Date born 2: Abt. 1844, Ashe Co, NC (Source: otisone@charter.net, Light, Paula., <otisone@charter.net>, "Electronic.")
Burial: Aft. 1880, Morris Cem., Exeter, Wise Co, VA
Census 1: 1860, Lee co, VA; Emily, age 11, b. Grayson Co, VA
Census 2: 1870, Lee Co, VA; Rocky Sta; hh 337-332; Emma Stamper, age 18, b. Ashe Co, NC, in hh of Robert and Mary Mery
Census 3: 1880, Lee Co, VA; Emma L. age 27 b. NC, both parents b. NC

More About Richard Morris and Emma Stamper:
Marriage: 13 Nov 1877, Lee Co, VA (Source: Marriage record, Lee Co, VA marriage register; 1853-1884;, 13 nov 1877; name; Emily Stamper, age 24, single, b. NC, parents George & Naomie Stamper, groom; R. P. Morris.)

Notes for Margaret 'Peggy' Galloway:
Beverly Reach Pearl; March 2002; not sure which newspaper this is from; MRS. MARGARET MORRIS; Special To The Herald Courier ; Big Stone Gap, Oct. 4. -- Mrs. Margaret G. MORRIS, 86, widow of the late R. Pearl MORRIS, died at 8:30 p.m. today at the home here of a daughter, Mrs. Charlie MOORE, after an illness of about two weeks. Besides Mrs. MOORE, she is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Florence McCONNELL, Big Stone Gap; one son, J. W. MORRIS, Imboden; 22 grandchildren, 44 great-grandchildren and 11 great-great grandchildren. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the home of Mrs. MOORE with Revs. R. L. BLEDSOE and Billy GALLOWAY officiating. Burial will be in Exeter Cemetery, Exeter, Va. The body was removed today from Holding Funeral Home to the residence of Mrs. MOORE.
To get to the cemetery where Peggy Galloway MORRIS is buried, nearly as soon as you get to Exeter (coming from Appalachia) turn left at a white house that sits a little way off the road (this might have been a mine superintendent's house because it is a little larger and sits farther off the road than most houses in Exeter). There is a path next to driveway of this house that leads up on top of the mountain. It's a fair piece to walk; a four-wheel drive vehicle might make it up there. The cemetery is right on top of the mountain. Pearl and Peggy are on the knoll on one end. -bp-3-01. \\\\\

More About Margaret 'Peggy' Galloway:
Died 2: 03 Oct 1949, Keokee, Lee Co, VA (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.")
Burial 1: 05 Oct 1949, Morris Cem., Exeter, Wise Co, VA
Burial 2: 05 Oct 1949, Exeter Cem., Wise Co, VA (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," cites both burial sites.)
Census 1: 1900, Lee Co, VA; Margaret, wife, age 34?, b. nov 1865 VA, md 17 yrs, 4 ch/3 living
Census 2: 1920, Wise Co, VA; Margaret, wife, age 55, b.va
Census 3: 1930, Wise Co, VA; Margaret, wife, age 66, b. VA, md@19

More About Richard Morris and Margaret Galloway:
Marriage: 17 Dec 1881, Lee Co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," Lee Co., Virginia Marriage Register 2, 1853-1916 (LDS microfilm), pg. 55: December 17, 1881 MORRIS, R. P., 22, widowed, b. Lee Co. parents: R. & Ellen MORRIS - Margaret GALAWAY, 18, single, b. Lee Co., parents: David & K. GALAWAY., (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Richard Pearl Morris married Margarette Galloway 18 Dec 1882 at Lee VAby J. N. Redwine, witnessed by Jasper Witt & David Reynolds.)
     
Child of Richard Morris and Emma Stamper is:
  726 i.   Mary Elizabeth 'Ella'5 Morris (Source: Pierson, Dana, 2001, "Electronic."), born Mar 1878 in Seminary, Lee Co, VA; died 21 Jul 1903 in Exeter, Lee Co, VA (Source: Hall, Carol; <lola@setel.com>, "Electronic."). She married David Calloway Clarkston 17 Sep 1896 in Clover Fork, Harlan Co, KY (Source: Elton C. Bingham. et a;, Harlan Co, KY Marriage Book A, http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyharlan/Harlan_Ky_Marriage_Book_A.html, bk 1, pg 164?, Harlan Co, KY marriage index; bk 1-142; groom, D. C. Clark, bride, Mary E. Morris.); born 22 Dec 1861 in Seminary, Lee Co, VA (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic."); died 04 Nov 1923 in Chewalah, WA (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.").
  More About Mary Elizabeth 'Ella' Morris:
Died 2: Nov 1903, Exeter, Lee Co, VA
Burial 1: 1903, Clarkston Cem., Exeter, Wise Co, VA (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.")
Burial 2: 1903, Slemp Mem Cem., Dryden, Lee Co, VA (Source: Hall, Carol; <lola@setel.com>, "Electronic.")
Census 1: 1880, Lee Co, VA, Crab Orchard, p. 318D; Mary E., age 2, b. VA
Census 2: 1900, Wise Co, VA; Mary E., wife, b. mar 1878 VA, age 22, md 3 yrs, 3 ch, 3 living

  More About David Calloway Clarkston:
Died 2: 1923, Got sick on the train, taken off in Chewalah, WA, where he died, carried back to Wise Co, VA to be buried (Source: Schumacher, Sarah Eva Clarkston.)
Burial 1: 1923, Clarkston Cem., Exeter, Wise Co, VA (Source: Cemetery Records, Lee Co, VA cemetery records by A G Catron.)
Burial 2: 1923, Slemp/Marion Cem., Seminary, Lee Co, VA (Source: Ancestry.com, "Electronic," Burley Ray Johnson <BRJohnson@verizon.net>.)
Census 1: 1870, Wise Co, VA; David C., age 9, b. va
Census 2: 1880, Wise Co, VA; david C., son, age 18, b. va
Census 3: 1900, Wise Co, VA; hh 422-600; Clark, David C., b. dec 1861 VA, age 38, md 3 yrs

  More About David Clarkston and Mary Morris:
Marriage: 17 Sep 1896, Clover Fork, Harlan Co, KY (Source: Elton C. Bingham. et a;, Harlan Co, KY Marriage Book A, http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyharlan/Harlan_Ky_Marriage_Book_A.html, bk 1, pg 164?, Harlan Co, KY marriage index; bk 1-142; groom, D. C. Clark, bride, Mary E. Morris.)

     
Children of Richard Morris and Margaret Galloway are:
  727 i.   John Wesley5 Morris, born 14 Feb 1883 in Pigeon Creek, Wise Co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," gives both birth and death data., (2) SSDI (Soc Sec Death Index), SSDI, Name John Morris, birth 14 Feb 1883., (3) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Births - John Wesley Morris - 14 Feb 1884.); died 14 Mar 1966 in Big Stone Gap, Wise, VA (Source: SSDI (Soc Sec Death Index), SSDI, SS# 227-09-0556. Name John Morris, death date Mar 1966, death residence - Big Stone Gap, Wise, VA.). He married (1) Una 'Unice' Moore 12 Jan 1901 in Harlan Co, KY (Source: (1) Marriage record, lists her name as Una MORRIS., (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Marriages - John Wesley Morris to Una Moore - Jan 1902.); born Dec 1878 in Exeter, Wise Co, VA; died 03 Jan 1917 in Richmond, Wise Co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," gives her name as Euna Moore., (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Deaths - Una Moore Morris - 15 Jan 1917.). He married (2) Flora Edna Adams (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.") 06 Jan 1920 (Source: Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Marriages - John Wesley Morris to Flora Edna Adams 6 Jan 1920.); born 1900 in TN; died 15 Jul 1940 (Source: Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Deaths - Flora Edna Morris - 15 Jul 1940.). He married (3) Polly Ann Holbrook (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.") 24 Oct 1942 (Source: Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Marriages - John Wesley Morris to Polly Ann Adams 24 Oct 1942.); born Abt. 1890.
  Notes for John Wesley Morris:
Beverly Reach Perry; Mar 2002; Lived for much of his life in Exeter, where he worked as an employee of the Stonega Coke & Coal Co. He spent most of his working years as a coal inspector. In this capacity, he was responsible for analyzing coal samples. [Charles Garrison writing in "The Heritage of Wise Co., Virginia."] \\\\

  More About John Wesley Morris:
Burial: Powell Valley Memorial Gardens, East Stone Gap, Wise, VA (Source: <lilagr@earthlink.net>, Reach, Lila Garrison .)
Census 1: 1900, Lee Co, VA; John W., son, age 17, b. feb 1883 VA
Census 2: 1910, Wise Co, VA; dist 136; hh 634-647; John W. Morris, head, age 27, m1, 11 yrs, b. va
Census 3: 1920, Wise Co, VA; Richmond, dist 199; hh 314-315; John Morris, head, age ??, b. VA
Census 4: 1930, Wise Co, VA; Richmond, dist 22; hh 497-500' John Morris, head, age 45, b. VA
WWI Draft Registration: 12 Sep 1918, of Exeter, Wise Co, VA; John Wesley Morris, age 35, dob 14 feb 1883, night watchman for Stonega Coke & Coal; nearest rel; Ethel Morris of Exeter; height m ed, build med, eyes lt blue, hair blond
WWII Enlists & Registr: 1942, Imboden, Wise, VA; Name John Wesley Morris, Birth 14 Feb 1883, contact - A. N. Phillips.

  More About Una 'Unice' Moore:
Name 2: Euna Moore
Died 2: 17 Jan 1917, Of Tuberculosis
Census 1: 1910, Wise Co, VA; Unie, wife, age 30, m1, 11 yrs, 5 ch/5 living, b. VA
Census 2: 1880, Wise Co, VA; Enid? M., dau, age 1, b. VA
Census 3: 1900, Lee Co, VA; Una M., dau, age 21, b. dec 1878 VA, single, 1 ch/1 living

  More About John Morris and Una Moore:
Marriage: 12 Jan 1901, Harlan Co, KY (Source: (1) Marriage record, lists her name as Una MORRIS., (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Marriages - John Wesley Morris to Una Moore - Jan 1902.)

  More About Flora Edna Adams:
Census 1: 1920, Wise Co, VA; Flora, wife, age 19, b. VA
Census 2: 1920, Wise Co, VA; Flora, wife, age 19, b. VA
Census 3: 1930, Wise Co, VA; Flora, wife, age 38, b. TN

  More About John Morris and Flora Adams:
Marriage: 06 Jan 1920 (Source: Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Marriages - John Wesley Morris to Flora Edna Adams 6 Jan 1920.)

  More About John Morris and Polly Holbrook:
Marriage: 24 Oct 1942 (Source: Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Marriages - John Wesley Morris to Polly Ann Adams 24 Oct 1942.)

  728 ii.   Alice Arminda Morris, born 01 Jun 1885 (Source: Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Births - Alice Arminda Morris - 1 Jun 1885.); died Dec 1886 in Lee Co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," Lee Co., Virginia Death Records, vol. 1, compiled by A. G. Catron, 1968, LDS Film 975.5735, pg. 126: A. A. MORRIS, female, 16 mos., d. December 16, 1885; parents: R. P. and Margaret MORRIS., (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Alice Arminda Morris - death Dec 1886.).
  Notes for Alice Arminda Morris:
In an email from Lila Reach Garrison, dated 15 Sep 2007, Lila wrote:

This Bible has just been found in my Aunt Edith Moore Smith's possessions. The owner of the Bible is
Herbert Smith. (great grandson of Richard Pearl Morris, Jr.) Herbert's wife called me today to tell me about the find.

I cannot tell you the number of times I have wondered about the name of Great Grandma and Grandpa's baby who died. We only had A. A. Mother only remembered that the baby was about 18 months old when it died. Well the information is recorded in the Bible.
Name: Alice Arminda born June 1, 1885
died Dec. (no day listed) 1886

When I see the Bible, I will look closely at the dates.

Notice the death date is different from the record compiled by A. G. Catron.


  729 iii.   Eliza Jane Morris, born 11 Aug 1886 in Pigeon Creek, Wise Co, VA (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic.", (2) Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Births - Eliza Jane Morris - 11 Aug 1887.); died 13 Mar 1974 in Big Stone Gap, Wise Co, VA. She married Charles Thomas Moore 02 Apr 1903 in Harlan Co, KY (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," Beverly added birth and death dates and location for all previously existing children, and added Mary Catherine Moore, who was not on our prior list. Also added middle names.;Marriage index of Harlan Co, KY; bk A-160? Groom is Charley Moore; Bride is Eliza J. Morris., (2) Elton C. Bingham. et a;, Harlan Co, KY Marriage Book A, http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyharlan/Harlan_Ky_Marriage_Book_A.html, P. 160/161.); born 28 Dec 1884 in near Keokee, Lee Co, VA (Source: Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," also gives death information.); died 10 Mar 1962 in Big Stone Gap, Wise Co, VA.
  Notes for Eliza Jane Morris:
Beverly Reach Perry; Mar 2002; Pigeon Creek is near Exeter and Keokee, according to Vergie MOORE GARRISON. From "The Heritage of Wise Co., Virginia," by Charles Garrison: "Pearl's children spent their early years in a sparsely settled and isolated mountain setting. The children helped with the farm chores and attended school in the winter months."

From "The Post," Big Stone Gap, Virginia, unk. date: OBSERVE FIFTIETH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY; Mr. and Mrs. C. T. MOORE of Penville, Ind., came to Big Stone Gap last week to visit among their children and observe their fiftieth wedding anniversary. The occasion was marked by the gathering of every member of the family at the home of their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Bascomb [sic] GARRISON last Sunday. The was the first time in twenty-five years all members of the family had been together. All brought in a liberal supply of food and a big table was piled high with many good things to eat. An outdoor outing had been planned but rain prevented it. Fourteen grandchildren and three great grandchildren were also present.
Mr. and Mrs. MOORE said it was the happiest occasion of their life time to get back among their children and meet again with their friends in Big Stone where they resided for many years. Mr. MOORE is a retired employee of the Stonega Coke and Coal Company after an active career of twenty-seven years. He first worked at Imboden and later at Stonega. He had charge of their meat department. He retired in 1950 and for the past three years has been located on a small farm he purchased at Penville, Clay County, Indiana. He grows corn and wheat principally. Last year on a ten acre tract it is estimated he grew 1400 bushels of corn. He finds time outside of his farm duties to work two hours a day in a meat market. The MOORES still owns [sic] residential property in Big Stone Gap and are preparing to move back here and make their permanent home some time within the next year.
Mr. MOORE said that he regretted to quit working for the Stonega Company as he received the very best treatment while in their employ for so many years.
Those present at the anniversary besides Mr. and Mrs. MOORE were: Mrs. Edith SMITH and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert SMITH of Wise; Mr. and Mrs. Clarence HEATON and daughter Carol, of Muncie, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. James BLEVINS, of Penville, Ind. and two sons; Mr. and Mrs. Bascom GARRISON, two sons and one daughter; Mrs. Lester MILLER and four daughters of Kingsport, Tenn.; Mr. and Mrs. R. C. MOORE, daughter and son of Bristol, Va. and Mr. and Mrs. Quinton WILSON of Kingsport.

From "The Post," Big Stone Gap, Virginia, unk. date: LONG THE TRAIL OF THE LONESOME PINE By Lindsay Horton
BIG STONE GAP, Va. (Spl.) -- Mr. and Mrs. C. T. MOORE of Pennville, Clay County, Indiana, came back to Big Stone Gap last week to spend a few days visiting among their relatives and many friends, and also to observe their fiftieth wedding anniversary last Sunday.
The happy occasion was marked by all of their children, fourteen grandchildren and three great grandchildren gathering at the home of their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Bascomb [sic] GARRISON. This was the first time all of their children had been together in more than 25 years. All brought refreshments and a large table was filled to overflowing with many good things to eat. They had planned to have an outdoor picnic but rain prevented this. Mr. and Mrs. MOORE said it was the happiest event of their life time. Both were born and reared near Big Stone Gap and they not only enjoyed being with their relatives again but had the pleasure of meeting up again with a large circle of friends. Mr. MOORE, who is now 69, is a retired employee of the Stonega Coke and Coal Company, and has been residing in Pennville, Ind., the past three and a half years, where he purchased a small farm shortly after his retirement in 1950. He had charge of the meat department in one of the company's stores for 27 years. Said he regretted very much to retire as his employes [sic] were exceptionally good to him throughout the several years he was connected with them.
On his farm in Indiana he grows principally corn and wheat for which he has a ready market. Last season his corn crop averaged above one hundred bushels to the acre. It was estimated that his corn yielded in the neighborhood of fourteen hundred bushels on a ten acre tract. He can't keep his hands away from the meat counter and outside his farm duties finds time to work two hours daily at a market in Pennville. He still owns residential property in Big Stone Gap and is now planning to return here some time within the next year to make his permanent home, although he likes Indiana very much.
Mrs. MOORE is a daughter of the late Pearl MORRIS who died in 1940 after a very active career as a coal prospector for the Stonega Coke and Coal Company and the Virginia Coal and Iron Company. He located the openings of very nearly every operation of the company. He was known as a typical mountaineer and has tramped over nearly every foot of the vast acreage of coal land in this part of Virginia and in parts of Kantucky [sic]. He was a very tall man and presented an interesting picture wearing a broad-brimmed hat, high-top boots and possessed a long flowing beard. He could be seen on his way to the mountains many times with a sack of grub and a long squirrel rifle slung across his shoulder. Sometimes he would be gone two or three days before showing up again.
"Uncle" Pearl, as he was called by most all his friends, and he had many of them, often stopped on the street long enought to talk with me a few minutes. I had a great liking for him as his stories were very interesting to me. He was a very stern sort of a fellow and always boasted that his word was his bond. Said he never promised anything to anybody without carrying it out. I asked him one time where he spent the nights in making his rounds over Black Mountain where no families lived within a radius of several miles. He said he usually came up on an old abandoned cabin and would broil some bacon in the open fire place to eat along with a hunk of corn bread and onions he always carried in a sack. Then he would make a bed of leaves and sleep as sound as if he were at home. He had a great liking for dogs and would always welcome a fox hounds to his cabin, when they sought a place to rest after a long chase through the mountains. Often he could be seen coming home with a string of squirrels brought down by his long rifle.
But 'Uncle' Pearl didn't like publicity and refused to allow me to write any kind of story about him, being as close friends as we were. Very often newspaper men came to Big Stone Gap to get his picture and write something about him, which of course have been [sic] very interesting. They even came to me wanting an introduction but I knew better than to take them to his home. One photographer for a newspaper offered him $50.00 for a photograph but he was promptly turned down.
I remember well on one occasion when airplanes first came to Big Stone Gap. A bottom of land just across the ball park was used as a temporary flying field where several thousand people would gather and watch the planes take off every few minues with passengers for a short flight over town and the surrounding mountains, the lowest price being $5. If you wanted to cross the mountain another $2.50 or $5.00 would be added to the regular fee. I was invited to take several rides free but always shook my head.
"Uncle" Pearl MORRIS' home was located just across Powell River from the west end of the flying field and he had several lots surrounding his home under cultivation, one of the largest plots having a nice crop of corn nearing the roasting ear stage. A man by the name of SHORES owned the only cabin plane then in which he could take two passengers. Two colored men hopped into the plane which raced down the field. Just as the plane left the ground it appeared to me it would not gain the necessary altitude and sure enough a forced landing was made in the middle of Uncle Pearl's corn field.
In less time than it takes tell about it hundreds of people hurried to the place to view the partially wrecked plane and to see if anyone was injured. Fortunately no one was hurt. But in gathering there the crowd had trampled down every hill of corn and done much damage to the surrounding fence. Uncle Pearl flew mad as a hornet, grabbed his long squirrel rifle and rushed out, and ordered the crowd away with a threatening gesture of his gun. He also demanded full damage from SHORES and ordered him not to removed the plane until every penny of it was paid. In order to see that his demand was carried out to the letter, Uncle Pearl stood guard over the plane until it was removed the next day.
During the last few months of life Uncle Pearl and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. MORRIS moved into the home to take care of them until their death [sic -- note: Pearl and Peggy MORRIS moved in with Charles and Eliza MOORE].
Those present at the fiftieth wedding anniversary were the following children: Mrs. Edith SMITH and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert SMITH of Wise; Mr. and Mrs. Clarence HEATON and daughter, Carol, of Muncie, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. James BLEVINS and twin sons of Pennville, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. Bascomb [sic] GARRSION, two sons and one daughter of Big Stone Gap; Mrs. Lester MILLER and four daughters of Kingsport, Tenn.; Mr. and Mrs. R. C. MOORE and son and daughter, of Bristol, Va.; Mr. and Mrs. Quinton WILSON, of Kingsport.

  More About Eliza Jane Morris:
Burial: 1974, Glencoe Cem., Big Stone Gap, Wise Co, VA
Census 1: 1900, Lee Co, VA; Liza J., dau, age 12, b. aug 1887 VA
Census 2: 1910, Wise Co, VA; Eliza J., wife, age 23, b. VA, md 1x, 7 yrs, 2 ch/2 living
Census 3: 1920, Wise Co, VA; Eliza, wife, age 33, b. VA
Census 4: 1930, Wise Co, VA; Eliza J., wife, age 42, b. VA, md@18

  Notes for Charles Thomas Moore:
Beverly Reach Perry; March 2002;
Copy of Family Bible in Vergie MOORE GARRISON's notes:
Edith MOORE b. Imboden, Va. April 29 1904 m. June 24th 1923
Elsie MOORE b. Legg, Va. Jan 9 1909 m. Oct. 19th, 1933
Margie MOORE b. Inman, Va. March 1st 1911 m. Feb. 1, 1942
Virgie MOORE b. Lindon Va. July 18th 1912 m. June 2, 1935
Mary Catherine MOORE b. East Stone Gap, Va. May 3rd 1914 d. May 10th 1914
Richard Cecil MOORE b. East Stone Gap, Va. July 2nd 1915 d. July 19, 1968
Elise MOORE b. Big Stone Gap, Va. May 1st 1918 m. Dec. 22nd 1934
Velma Ruth MOORE b. Glamorgan, Va. Sept. 16th 1923 m. Nov. 14th 1945

From "The Post," Big Stone Gap, Virginia, unk. date: CHARLES MOORE FUNERAL IN KEOKEE; Charles Thomas MOORE, 77, died suddenly at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, March 10, at his home. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Eliza Jane MOORE, a son, Cecil MOORE of Bristol, Tenn.; Six daughters, Mrs. Edith SMITH, Big Stone Gap; Mrs. Elsie HESTON and Mrs. Margie BLEVINS, Lexington, Fayette Co, KY, [sic] and Mrs. Elsie [sic] MILLER and Mrs. Velma WILSON of Kingsport: 17 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the Oak Grove Primitive Baptist Church in Keokee. The Reverends FLANARY and ADDINGTON presided. Grandsons served as pallbearers with granddaughters and friends of the family serving as flower bearers. Burial followed in the Glencoe Cemetery in Big Stone Gap. Mr. MOORE retired twelve years ago from the Stonega Coke and Coal Company, where he had worked as meat cutter for over 40 years. [Note: Margie BLEVINS was from Indiana and Vergie GARRISON, who was omitted was from Lexington, Kentucky. The correct name for Mrs. MILLER is Elise.]

From an unkown newspaper, possibly "The Post": CHARLES THOMAS MOORE BIG STONE GAP, Va. -- Charles Thomas MOORE, 77, died at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at his home in Big Stone Gap. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Eliza Jane MOORE, Big Stone Gap; one son, Cecil MOORE, Bristol, Tenn.; six daughters, Mrs. Edith SMITH, Big Stone Gap, Mrs. Elsie HEATON and Mrs. Margie BLEVINS, Tennville, [sic] Ind., Mrs. Virgie GARRISON, Lexington, Fayette Co, KY, Mrs. Elis [sic] MILLER and Velma WILSON, Kingsport. Funeral arrangements are incomplete and will be announced later by the Holding Funeral Home of Big Stone Gap.

From "The Post," Big Stone Gap, Virginia, unk. date: KEOKEE NEWS; -- The following poem was composed as a tribute to an aged friend, Charles T. MOORE, 77, of Big Stone Gap, who passed away unexpectedly at his home on Saturday morning.
GIVEN TREASURE
At the old Oak Grove Church, Friends were gathered once more.
In tribute to a friend, Upon another shore.
His presence still lingers, In the Church everywhere.
In the hearts of loved ones, Our thoughts are always there.
As long as there is time, Loved ones come and go,
God gives each a tresure, To share with those we know.
Funeral services for Mr. MOORE were held at the Oak Grove Primitive Baptist Church in Keokee on Monday afternoon. A large number of folks attended. To the family we extend sincere sympathy.

  More About Charles Thomas Moore:
Date born 2: Abt. 1880, Exeter, Wise Co, VA
Burial: 1962, Glencoe Cem., Big Stone Gap, Wise Co, VA
Census 1: 1900, Lee Co, VA; Charley L., son, age 15, b. dec 1883 VA
Census 2: 1910, Wise Co, VA; Richmond, dist 135; hh 144-144; Charles T. Moore, head, age 24, b. VA, md 1x, 7 yrs
Census 3: 1920, Wise Co, VA; Gladeville, dist 170; hh 376-380; Charley T. Moore, head, age 35, b. VA
Census 4: 1930, Wise Co, VA; Big Stone Gap, dist 19; hh 431-454; Charlie T. Moore, head, age 44. b. VA, md@19
WWI Draft Registration: 12 Sep 1918, Wise Co, VA; Charles Thomas Moore of Big Stone Gap, Wise Co, VA; age 33, b. 28 dec 1884, meat cutter, wife; Eliza J. Moore of Big Stone Gap; white; height and build med; not color of eyes or hair

  More About Charles Moore and Eliza Morris:
Marriage: 02 Apr 1903, Harlan Co, KY (Source: (1) Perry, Beverly Reach, "Electronic," Beverly added birth and death dates and location for all previously existing children, and added Mary Catherine Moore, who was not on our prior list. Also added middle names.; Marriage index of Harlan Co, KY; bk A-160? Groom is Charley Moore; Bride is Eliza J. Morris., (2) Elton C. Bingham. et a;, Harlan Co, KY Marriage Book A, http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyharlan/Harlan_Ky_Marriage_Book_A.html, P. 160/161.)

  730 iv.   Florence Almira Morris, born 20 Mar 1888 in Wise Co, VA (Source: Images provided courtesy Lila Reach, Family Bible of Richard Pearl Morris, jr., Births - Florence A. Morris - 20 Mar 1889 .); died 20 Mar 1972 in Dryden, Lee Co, VA (Source: SSDI (Soc Sec Death Index), 230-12-9735 issued bef 1951 VA; gives birth date as 20 mar 1888.). She married John Sherman McConnell 22 Mar 1905 in Klondike, Harlan Co, KY (Source: Marriage record, bk A-172/173.); born 01 Aug 1884 in Lee Co, VA (Source: World War I Draft Registration Cards.); died 1937.
  More About Florence Almira Morris:
Date born 2: 21 Mar 1889, Pigeon Creek, Wise Co, VA
Census 1: 1900, Lee Co, VA; Florence A., dau, age 12, b. mar 1888 VA
Census 2: 1910, Wise Co, VA; Florence, wife, age 22, m1, 5 yrs, 2 ch/2 living, b. VA
Census 3: 1920, Lee Co, VA; Florence, wife, age 31, b. VA
Census 4: 1930, Lee Co, VA; Florence (indexed as plorence) wife, age 43, b. VA, md@17

  More About John Sherman McConnell:
Date born 2: Aug 1885, VA
Date born 3: 01 Aug 1886, VA (Source: Langford, Carolyn <langforda@bellsouth.net>.)
Died 2: 15 Jun 1934 (Source: Langford, Carolyn <langforda@bellsouth.net>.)
Census 1: 1895, Wise Co, VA; School census, Richmond dist; John S., age 8, in hh of James and Rebecca McConnell
Census 2: 1900, Wise Co, VA; John S., son, age 14, b. aug 1886? VA
Census 3: 1910, Wise Co, VA; dist 136, hh 633-646; Sherman McConnell, head, age 23, m1, 5 yrs, b. VA
Census 4: 1920, Lee Co, VA; Rocky Sta; dist 44; hh 94-95 (next door to his parents; John S. McConnell, age 44, b. VA
Census 5: 1930, Lee Co, VA; Yokum Station; dist 18; hh 12-12-; Sherman McConnell (indexed as Shannon), head, age 44, b. VA, md@18
WWI Draft Registration: 12 Sep 1918, Lee Co, VA; Sherman McConnell of Johnsons Mill, Lee Co, VA; age 34, b. 1 aug 1884, coal miner, nearest rel; Florence McConnell of Johnsons Mill; height and build med; eyes br; hair dk brown

  More About John McConnell and Florence Morris:
Marriage: 22 Mar 1905, Klondike, Harlan Co, KY (Source: Marriage record, bk A-172/173.)

  731 v.   Clyde (adopted) Morris, born Abt. 1914 in VA.
  More About Clyde (adopted) Morris:
Census 1: 1930, Wise Co, VA; Clyde, adopted son, age 16, b. va
Census 2: 1920, Wise Co, VA; Clyde, son, age 6, b. va




Page 48 of 387

Prev Page Prev Item Contents Index Go to Page Home Page Next Item Next Page


Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com