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View Tree for Emperor and Chief Wahunsunacock PowhatanEmperor and Chief Wahunsunacock Powhatan (b. 1530, d. 1618)

Emperor and Chief Wahunsunacock Powhatan (son of King Potowomek and Unknown) was born 1530 in Wewowococmo (Powhatan Renape Nation), and died 1618 in King William, Virginia Pamunkey Resevation. He married Winganuske Nonoma on 1592 in James City, Virginia, daughter of Unknown Powhatan and Unknown.

 Includes NotesNotes for Emperor and Chief Wahunsunacock Powhatan:



Powhatan (1547-1618)
Chief of the Powhatan Confederacy
Drawing by Kasmin Torres

Powhatan, was the father of POCAHONTAS and an intimate friend of Captain John Smith and John Rolfe. At the time of the English settlement of Jamestown (1607), Powhatan was consolidating 30 or more tribes of the confederacy from his capital, Werowocomoco, on the Pamunkey River, land which later became Gloucester and Mathews Counties. Records have shown that he ruled the tribes in 8,000 square miles of country, with 8,000 subjects, of whom about 2,400 were fighting men. Without written laws, or agreements, this mighty "savage" leader ruled with wisdom and foresight beyond his time.

Powhatan was initially friendly to the English colonists, but upon learning that John Smith was interested in metals and in finding a waterway leading to the western ocean, Powhatan perceived the English as dangerous and decided to remove them from his territory. When Smith was captured by the Indians at Werowocomoco


In 1618 died the great Powhatan, full of years and satiated with fighting and the savage delights of life. He had many names and titles; his own people sometimes called him Ottaniack, sometimes Mamauatonick, and usually in his presence Wahunsenasawk. He ruled, by inheritance and conquest, with many chiefs under him, over a large territory with not defined borders, lying on the James, the York, the Rappahannock, the Potomac, and the Pawtuxet Rivers. He had several seats, at which he alternately lived with his many wives and guard of bowmen, the chief of which at the arrival of the English was Werowomocomo, on the Pamunkey (York) River. His state has been sufficiently described. He is said to have had a hundred wives, and generally a dozen--the youngest--personally attending him. When he had a mind to add to his harem he seems to have had the ancient oriental custom of sending into all his dominions for the fairest maidens to be brought from whom to select. And he gave the wives of whom he was tired to his favorites.
He ruled, by inheritance and conquest, with many chiefs under him, over a large territory with not defined borders, lying on the James, the York, the Rappahannock, the Potomac, and the Pawtuxet Rivers. He had several seats, at which he alternately lived with his many wives and guard of bowmen, the chief of which at the arrival of the English was Werowomocomo, on the Pamunkey (York) River. His state has been sufficiently described. He is said to have had a hundred wives, and generally a dozen--the youngest--personally attending him. When he had a mind to add to his harem he seems to have had the ancient oriental custom of sending into all his dominions for the fairest maidens to be brought from whom to select. And he gave the wives of whom he was tired to his favorites.
Strachey makes a striking description of him as he appeared about 1610: "He is a goodly old man not yet shrincking, though well beaten with cold and stormeye winters, in which he hath been patient of many necessityes and attempts of his fortune to make his name and famely great. He is supposed to be little lesse than eighty yeares old, I dare not saye how much more; others saye he is of a tall stature and cleane lymbes, of a sad aspect, rownd fatt visaged, with graie haires, but plaine and thin, hanging upon his broad showlders; some few haires upon his chin, and so on his upper lippe: he hath been a strong and able salvadge, synowye, vigilant, ambitious, subtile to enlarge his dominions:.... cruell he hath been, and quarellous as well with his own wcrowanccs for trifles, and that to strike a terrour and awe into them of his power and condicion, as also with his neighbors in his younger days, though now delighted in security and pleasure, and therefore stands upon reasonable conditions of peace with all the great and absolute werowances about him, and is likewise more quietly settled amongst his own."
It was at this advanced age that he had the twelve favorite young wives whom Strachey names. All his people obeyed him with fear and adoration, presenting anything he ordered at his feet, and trembling if he frowned. His punishments were cruel; offenders were beaten to death before him, or tied to trees and dismembered joint by joint, or broiled to death on burning coals. Strachey wondered how such a barbarous prince should put on such ostentation of majesty, yet he accounted for it as belonging to the necessary divinity that doth hedge in a king: "Such is (I believe) the impression of the divine nature, and however these (as other heathens forsaken by the true light) have not that porcion of the knowing blessed Christian spiritt, yet I am perswaded there is an infused kind of divinities and extraordinary (appointed that it shall be so by the King of kings) to such as are his ymedyate instruments on earth."

More About Emperor and Chief Wahunsunacock Powhatan:
Burial: 1618, Jamestown, Virginia Powhatan Nation.
Fact 1 (2): The Emperor was purpoted to have at least 100 Children only 22 are listed..

More About Emperor and Chief Wahunsunacock Powhatan and Winganuske Nonoma:
Marriage: 1592, James City, Virginia.

Children of Emperor and Chief Wahunsunacock Powhatan and Winganuske Nonoma are:
  1. +Pochahontas Amonata Rebecca Matoaka Powhatan, b. September 17, 1595, Wewowococmo Powhatan Renape Nation, d. March 21, 1616/17, Gravesend Kent, England.
  2. Mantequos Powhatan, b. 1596, d. date unknown.
  3. Taux (Tanx) Powhatan, b. 1597, d. date unknown.
  4. Parahunt Matoaks, b. 1581, d. date unknown.
  5. Pochins Matoaka (Kekoughtan noblewoman), b. 1583, d. date unknown.
  6. Mehtafe Matoaka, b. 1599, d. date unknown.
  7. Nataquos Matoaka, b. 1599, d. date unknown.
  8. Matachannnu Matoaka, b. 1587, d. date unknown.
  9. Namonack Matoaka, b. 1598, d. date unknown.
  10. Cleopatra Matoaka, b. 1599, d. date unknown.
  11. Tahacoope QUIQOUGHCOHANNOCK Matoaka, b. 1600, d. date unknown.
  12. Sixth Son Powhatan, b. 1601, d. date unknown.
  13. Seventh Dau Powhatan, b. 1602, d. date unknown.
  14. Seventh Son Powhatan, b. 1602, d. date unknown.
  15. Eighth Dau Matoaka, b. 1603, d. date unknown.
  16. Eighth Son Powhatan, b. 1603, d. date unknown.
  17. Ninth Dau Powhatan, b. 1604, d. date unknown.
  18. Ninth Powhatan, b. 1604, d. date unknown.
  19. Tenth Dau Powhatan, b. 1605, d. date unknown.
  20. Tenth Son Powhatan, b. 1605, d. date unknown.
  21. Eleven Son Powhatan, b. 1606, d. date unknown.
  22. Twelth Powhatan, b. 1607, d. date unknown.
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