Starting Sept. 5, 2014, Genealogy.com will be making a big change. GenForum message boards, Family Tree Maker homepages, and the most popular articles will be preserved in a read-only format, while several other features will no longer be available, including member subscriptions and the Shop.
 
Learn more


Home Page |Surname List |Index of Individuals |InterneTree |Sources


View Tree for Samuel HowardSamuel Howard (b. July 02, 1762, d. December 05, 1840)

Samuel Howard (son of Samuel Howard and Frances Dryden) was born July 02, 1762 in Buckingham County, VA, and died December 05, 1840 in Harlan County, KY. He married Chloe Osborne on June 1780 in Buckingham County, VA166, daughter of Ephraim Osborne and Elizabeth Wells Howard.

 Includes NotesNotes for Samuel Howard:
Buried in Gross Cemetery, Wilhoit, KY. He was a Revolutionary War Veteran, Pension S30491; Virginia - Later moved to Wix Howard Cemetery in Loyall, Ky (along with Chloe)

2/20/97 from Archives in Frankfort in a file called "Howards." On the sheet is stamped, "donated to KGS from the estate of Harry D. Jones May 1989."

In the early 1700s three Howard brothers immigrated from England to America, settling first in Maryland and later in Virginia. From Virginia their descendants emigrated to Kentucky. In 1794 the first permanent settlers in Harlan County were Howards. (Johnson's History of Kentucky)

Shortly after they settled in Harlan County, some of the Howard children began quarreling with Turner children. Finally the parents became involved to such an extent that a feud developed. The last battle between them was fought at Baxter in Harlan County.

The Howards and 33 other men were in town, waiting inside the building for the Turners. The Turners and 100 men were in the nearby hills gathering for the battle. The Sheriff, who was a preacher, had been sent to arrest theTurners, but because of their overwhelming number, he could do nothing. He pleaded with the men as they removed their shoes and waded the river into the Howards' territory. Removing his own shoes, the Sheriff followed and made the men kneel down beside the stream for prayer before the battle.

Early morning fog lay in the valley, and all but hid the men as they moved like shadows to their battle stations. Suddenly, the Howards discovered their enemy and bullets began to sing, cutting limbs and tree leaves above the men's heads. From the pines and laurels the Turner guns answered and the battle was on.

One tale was told of a Turner bullet that went through the wall of a house and bounced off the opposite wall to fall in the floor, near Jim Howard's wife, who picked it up and kept it as a souvenir.

One man, caught in the vicinity of the battle, became so frightened that he hid in a fodder shock for a day and night. Half exhausted from fear and overcome by hunger and thirst, he finally crept out and fled.

The feud was eventually settled, and today both Howards and Turners live peacefully together in Leslie County as friends and neighbors.

The Howards were said to have owned twenty or thirty slaves. The story is told of one of the Howards in pioneer times sending a woman slave to place animal skins in a nearby stream to soak overnight. That night a flash flood came and washed the skins away, whereupon Mr. Howard beat his slave until she died. It was said that this man's farm never produced a crop after that.

Benjamin Howard called "Revolutionary Ben," was one of the early settlers in Harlan County. John Howard, born 1774, evidently no relation, lived nearby. Their children intermarried. They had brothers, Thomas and James, who emigrated to Perry County.

Ephraim Howard born 1811, is listed in the Census of Harlan County as a fifteen year old, then married. His mother was evidently the daughter of Ephraim Osborne of Wallens Creek. He moved to Horse Branch, near Camp Branch in Leslie County before the county was formed. He marrieid Fannie Napier, daughter of Edmond and Sarah Howard Napier. Their children were Andrew born 1832, Elizabeth born 1836, Hughes born 1834, Irvin born 1843, Rebecca born 1841, Nercipa (Nercia) born 1846, Sally born 1848, Chloie, Bertha, and Mary Jane. Fannie and Ephraim are the grandparents of Jim and Will Mattingly.

Samuel Howard (1762 - 1840) was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He married Chloe Osborne in 1784. They lived at Mt. Pleasant in Harlan County.

Their children were: Andrew; Dread; Adron or Adrian (1784 - 1862) married Hannah Lewis 1804; Samuel married Elizabeth A. Brittain; Wixey; John born 1785, married Mary Brock; Wilkerson born 1798, married Mary Jones; Sarah married a Napier; Elizabeth married a Napier; Mary married Henry Hensley; Nancy married Lewis Hensley. (Information from Military Record Volume 113, Page 108, Pension Records, DAR Library.)

Adron was the great grandfather of Henry Kenis Howard. Henry K. Howard, son of Jon L. and Ara Sizemore, was born in Leslie County on November 12, 1887. His grandfather, William Howard, was Circuit Court Clerk of Leslie County from 1900 to his death in 1902. William's father, Adron, was a brother to Samuel Howard, who was born in 1792 in Buckingham County, Virginia.

Henry K. married Nancy Morgan, daughter of Hughes. They had eight children. Three sons fought in World War II, only one of whom was wounded.

In 1906 Henry K. took a test given by the Superintendent of Public Instruction at Frankfort, and became a school teacher in and around Helton for 13 years. Harry Valentine was the Superintendent of Schools in Leslie County at that time.

In 1918, Henry K. ran river rafts. He remembered one in particular which was 28 (500 feet) long of oak and poplar logs. He hired 13 men to take it to Miller Creek on the Kentucky River, whre he received $500 for it.

In 1935 Henry K. became a merchant for the next 25 years. He owned two yoke of oxen and hauled his merchandise by wagon from Pineville. He sold sugar and coffee for 8 1/2 cents a pound.

Henry K. and his sister Rebecca Smith, born October 13, 1892, are two of the oldest senior citizens living in Leslie County today. (Information from C. A. Dixon, Bige Morgan, Jim Mattingly, Sudie F. Spillman, Henry K. Howard and Military Records DAR).

2/20/97 same as above:
The following is a clipping from a Harlan paper. Samuel Clay Howard, son of Wilson and Rebecca Howard, was born March 4, 1849 at Rhea, Poor Fork, Ky - his father was born in 1810 and came from Ross Point, Ky. His mother came from Coon Creek, Leslie County. His great grandfather, Samuel Hoard ( the "w" has since been added to the name) came to Harlan County in 1796 four years after Kentucky was changed from a county of Virginia, in to Kentucky State. He was the first white settler who ever came to Harlan. His son Wix Howard born in 1797 is the first white child that anyone has any recollection of ever having been born in Harlan County.

When he first came to Harlan he had bad luck with his crops and corn would not ripen because the frost always caught it, so he went back to his farm near Pennington Gap. After six years, he started to go to Ohio to buy a farm and stopped on his way in Harlan to spend the night and decided to stay here. He lived about where Sheriff J. H.Blair's home is located and when Sheriff Blair excavated to build a retaining wall, they found a pair of rusty scissors. The Howards had to carry water from a spring in a hollow nearby, and one day the little boy went down to the spring to wash and laid his hat on a log nearby, an Indian raised from behind the log, and made a grab for the lad, who was too agile for him, and he ran about 75 yards before the indian fell behind. He went home and told the family and they got their guns, but could find no trace of the indian, except that he had taken the hat belonging to the boy.

Samuel Howard served seven years in the Virginia Division under General George Washington and when they had Cornwallis surrounded at Yorktown, he said the Americans nearly starved, as well as the British. Whenever they would kill a dear, they were glad to eat the insides and all, and if a man received a piece of beef the size of his hand, it was considered good rations. He said the ground was low and swampy and they would build up a brush heap, pile blankets on the top and sleep that way. He said when Cornwallis surrendered, he took the point of his sword and handed the hilt to General Washington. He (Mr. Hoard) could have touched them. General Washington took the sword, examined it and returned it to Lord Cornwallis with the coment that it was a good blade. When Cornwallis gave up his sword, he exclaimed, "Cornwallis is taken. Root, Hog _ or die." So the expression has come down today.

When Mr. Hoard settled in Harlan County, they killed bear meat for their summer bacon. Up on the head of Beech Fork Creek was better mast, where the bears fed, and there Mr. Hoard camped one night and the next morning before breakfast time, he had killed seven bears for his bacon. He said he could have killed many more but he only picked the fat ones. He said you could hear them feeding and munching the mast a good ways off.

The day Samuel Clay Howard was born was March 4, 1849. The day that General Zachary Taylor was sworn in at the inauguration. Mr. Howard lived on Poor Fork, working on the farm until he was a boy 26 years of age, when he moved to Harlan and entered the mercantile business, buying the site that is now the Midland ______ Store. That was in March 1875 and there wre only four stores in town, and about ten citizens. There was one store at Poor Fork, making five in the county at that time. Harlan was then the county seat.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
There were 2 Howard brothers who served in the Revolutionary War and were from Wilkes County Georgia - if interested write the compiler for a copy of these. Their names were James and Thomas Howard.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
1/9/97 found the following at the Middletown Library:
Samuel Howard assisted in establishing American independence while a private in Capt. Mayo Cannington's Company; was transferred to Capt. James Boytop's company, Col. Flemings' Virginia Regiment. At Valley Forge. Discharged in March. Enlisted 1780 or 1781 and served 3 months as a private in Capt. Jesse Sanders Company, Col. Dicks Virginia Regiment. Was with Silas Matthews' Virginia Company at Yorktown when Cornwallis surrendered.

According to Graves of Revolutionary War Patriots, Samuel Howard is buried in the Howard-Hensley cemetery 3 miles north of Harlan, Harlan County, Kentucky 33
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6. SAMUEL4 HOWARD (SAMUEL3, JAMES2, FRANCIS1) was born July 02, 1762 in Buckingham Co VA, and
died December 05, 1840 in Harlan Co KY. He married CHLOE OSBORNE June 1780 in Buckingham Co,
VA, daughter of EPHRAIM OSBORNE and ELIZABETH HOWARD. She was born 1762 in Greenbair Co, VA,
and died 1840 in Harlan Co KY.

Notes for SAMUEL HOWARD:
_FA1: 1840 Wix Howard Cemetery in Loyall,KY
_FA2: Pension papers#S 30492 under Hord
_FA3: 1932 grave marked by DAR in Loyall, KY
_FA4: 1778 enlisted
_FA5: 1792 Mount Pleasant, Harlan Co.

Obtained from History of Harlan County, Kentucky by Fuson

Samuel Howard served in the 4th Regiment under Colonel Kalliane Van Renselear, April 27, 1784
Certificate # L 2-517-D-5.

Headstone Inscription Samuel Howard, Virginia Private, Carrington Company, Fleming Virginia
Regiment, Revolutionary War.

Samuel Howard served in the 4th Regiment under Colonel Kalliane Van Renselear, April 27, 1784.

Samuel Howard©

Samuel HOWARD and his wife Chloe left many many descendants in southeast Kentucky and for them we
quote the following deed from Harlan County Court records, book A, page 25:

Samuel Hord Sr
to
John Hord, Andrew Hord, Adron Hord, Samuel Hord, Jr., Wilkerson Hord, Dread Hord, Sarah Napier &
Elizabeth Napier.

This Indenture made this 27th day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and
twenty between Samuel Hord Sr of the county of Harlan and state of Kentucky of the one part and John
Hord, Andrew Hord, Adron Hord, Samuel Hord Jr, Wilkerson Hord and Dredd Hord, Sarah Napier and
Elizabeth Napier all of the county of Harlan and State aforesaid and Mary Hensley the wife of Henry
Hensley and Nancy Hensley the wife of Lewis Hensley of the county of Buncum and State of North
Carolina of the other part. Witnesseth that Samuel Hord Sr for and in consideration of the sum of one dollar
to him in hand paid the receipt whereof he doth hereby acknowledge doth here by bargain, sell alien and
confirm unto John Hord, Andrew Hord, Adron Hord, Samuel Hord Jr, Wilkerson Hord and Dredd Hord,
Sarah Napier and Elizabeth Napier, Mary Hensley and Nancy Hensley, jointly and severely their heirs and
assigns forever a certain piece or parcel of land, situate lying and being in the county of Harlan on the most
Northeast side of Martins fork of Cumberland River containing one half acre of land leaving a certain lick
or any other prospect within the original survey of 150 acres prospect for salt in the center of a square. It is
to be understood that the above named John Hord, Andrew Hord, Adron Hord, Samuel Jr, Wilkerson Hord
and Dredd Hord and Sarah Napier, Elizabeth Napier, Mary Hensley and Nancy Hensley them or their
agents or Attorneys shall attend at the seat of Justice in the aforesaid County of Harlan and enter into article
of agreement and annex their signature there to which shall vest one tenth part in each demised or above
named persons of the interest arising by virtue of salt and any one or more that omits complying with the
above conditions by the first day of September next their part shall become forfeited, otherwise to have and
hold the said piece or parcel of land aforesaid to the above named persons their heirs and assigns forever,
and the said Samuel Hord Sr for himself and his heirs executors and administrators do warrant and forever
defend the said piece or parcel of land with all its appurtenances to the above named persons their heirs &
forever against the claims of all and every person whatever claiming by through or under him but against
no other person. In testimony where of I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal The day and date
written above

Samuel Hord {seal}

Copyright Notice: All files on this site are copyrighted by their creator. They may be linked to but may not
be reproduced on another site without specific permission from Holly Fee-Timm [ holly ft@bright.net].
Although public information is not in and of itself copyrightable, the format in which they are presented,
the notes and comments, etc., are. It is however, quite permissible to print or save the files to a personal
computer for personal use ONLY.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
email comments to hollyft@bright.net Last edited on December 23rd, 1997

Harlan County Court Records page 3/4

John HOWARD* Sr & Sussanah his wife and Samuel HOWARD* Sr & Cloey his wife to The Harlan
County Court 24 April 1820 for $5 - 12 acres & 34 poles on the north side of the Cumberland River ... they
stipulate that a road shall run through their lands, north and South, one chain west from the brink of the
Indian mount ... free access of the citizens of the Town of Mount Pleasant to the water — *heading of the
deed uses HOWARD, body of the deed uses HORD

page 20

Samuel HORD Sr & Cloey his wife to John N HORD 27 February 1821 for $1000 - 134 acres on both
sides of Clover Fork ... to junction of Martins Fork and Clover Fork

page 21

John N HORD to Samuel HORD 20 Jan 1821 for $1000 - 64 acres on the north side of the Cumberland
River, patent in name of Joshua MUNCY Jr dated 1 Sep 1816, 212 miles from the mouth of Poor Fork

page 21/22

Samuel HORD Sr to Wilkerson HORD 27 February 1821 for $500 - 50 acres both sides of Martins Fork to
junction of Martins Fork & Clover Fork

page 24/25

Samuel HORD Sr to John HORD, Andrew HORD, Adron HORD, Samuel HORD Jr, Wilkerson HORD,
Dred HORD, Sarah NAPIER, Elizabeth NAPIER, all of Harlan County and to Mary HENSLEY wife of
Henry and Nancy HENSLEY wife of Lewis of Buncombe County, North Carolina 27 Dec 1820 for $1 - A
1/10th interest each in a 1/2 acre salt lick on the north east side of Martins Fork

page 44/45

George BRITTAIN to John GRIFFITTS 18 Dec 1822 for $50 - Land on Poor Fork

page 45

George BRITTAIN to Edward NAPIER 15 Dec 1822 for $140 - Land on Poor Fork at Laurel Mountain

page 51

Samuel HORD Jr to Samuel MARK 19 May 1823 for $62 - Mount Pleasant town lot #22,1/4 acre being the
lot reserved to Samuel HORD Sr, the former proprietor of the public ground in said town

page 97/98

Samuel HORD SR to Samuel HORD Jr 24 Sep 1825 for $100 - 64 acres on the Cumberland River about 2
˝ miles below the mouth of Poor Fork Witness: George BRITTAIN

page 100

Samuel HORD Sr to Andrew HORD 26 Oct 1824 for $100 - 50 acres south side Cumberland River above
the mouth of Poor Fork

page 102

Samuel HORD Jr to Andrew HORD 28 February 1825 for $300 - 57 acre survey dated 29 Jun 1815 on
Cumberland River Witness: Abraham LOCK

page 153/154

Samuel HORD Sr to Samuel HORD Jr 1 April 1826 for $1000 - 64 acres by patent dated 2 Sep 1816 in the
name of Joshua MUNCY Jr on the north side of the Cumberland River about 2 ˝ miles from the mouth of
the Poor Fork

page 154/155

Samuel HOWARD Jr to Dreaden HOWARD 4 February 1826 for $300 - 85 acres on the south side of the
Cumberland River including the plantation where Samuel now lives

page 158/159

Samuel HOWARD Power of Attorney to Edmond NAPIER 25 Dec 1826 - To "ask, demand, sue for,
recover and receive of John BARNETT [BARRETT?] of Nelson County, Virginia, or his estate thereof or
also to lawfully act and receive of Charles S BARRETT [BARNETT?] of Amhurst County, Virginia..."
This document follows the lines of a power of attorney involving an inheritance although it does not
specifically mention one. [This item is discussed further in Harlan Footprints Volume III/3, page 139]

from Melanie Gross 13 Jul 1999

Buried at Wix Howard Cemetery at Loyall Ky.

Samuel Howards grave marker reads: Samuel Howard, Virginia Private. Carrington Company, Fleming Va.
Regiment, Revolutionary War 5 Dec 1840

More About SAMUEL HOWARD:
Burial: Samuel Howard Cemetery/later moved to Wix Howard Cemetery

Military: Revolutionary War Soldier/private in Virginia Militia
Here is what I have. Samuel Howard b. 1762 Buckingham, VA d. Dec. 5, 1840 Harlan Co. KY buried
Gross Cem, Wilhoit Co., KY m. abt 1784 Chloe Osborn. Samuel was a Rev. War Veteran.
Here are their children:
1. Andrew b. abt 1782 m. Sarah Metcalf
2. Adron b. Feb 22, 1893 m. Hannah Lewis
3. John N. b. 1785 m. Mary Brock
4. Mary b. 1788 m. Henry Hensley
5. Nancy b. 1790 m. Lewis Hensley
6. Sarah b. 1792 m. Edmund Napier
7. Samuel Jr. b. 1794 m. Elizabeth Brittain
8. Wilkerson b. 1796 m. Polly Jones
9. Elizabeth b. 1800 m.James Napier
10.Dryden "Dred" b. 1801 m.1.Juliann Napier 2.Sarah Harris Hensley
11.Hiram b. 1802 m.Elizabeth Napier

Samuel Howard served in the Revalotionary War, Pention File # S30491 in the Virginia branch of the
Army.

Samuel Hoard( later changed to Howard), and some of his relatives are said to be the first settlers in Knox,
(later changed to Harlan), county Kentucky. He can to Knox Co., by way of Virginia. He built a log home
with a mud and stone chimney, at the foot of Ivy Hill. The object in those days was to settle near wood and
water. His brother settled and built a log house on the George Green Hill. They raised potatoes and a few
other vegtables, and depended on bear, wild turkey and other game for meat. The spring near Samuel's
house never went dry, the mountain water came from Ivy Hill. Sometimes Indians would lay in wait at the
spring, because they knew that sooner or later someone would come for water. Samuel secured a patent for
his land. At the time the whole Harlan Valley was covered with cane, he cleared some of the bottom land
and planted corn, but it would not ripen. He moved his family back to Hickory Flat,near Pennington Gap
and lived there for 6 or 7 years before moving back to Knox County. He returned in the spring of the year
and staked land on Pine Mountain and Nolan's Branch. Other pioneers were starting to move into the
county by this time, from the surrounding states, mostly Virginia. Others that were in the county at the time
of the Revalotionary War were; Epriam Osborn, ( our ancestor), Carr Bailey, Berry Cawood, Lewis Green,
James Hall, Stephen Jones, Henry Smith, and Henry Shackleford.

Samuel was also a Revolutionary War soldier serving in the Virginia Militia, as a private.
He and his wife were buried in the Samuel Howard Cemetery, but were later moved to the Wix Howard
Cemetery located at Loyall Kentucky, his grave maker reads: Samuel Howard, Virginia Private. Carrington
Company, Fleming Va. Regiment, Revolutionary War 5 Dec 1840

Samuel and his wife Chloe were first buried at the Samuel Howard Cemetery on the Hensley Farm
but in 1970 when Hwy 119 was to be built the bodies were removed to the Wix Howard Cemetery
in Loyall, Harlan Co, KY


Ky's most distinguished pioneers was Samuel Sr. Howard, one of the first settlers in Harlan Co.,KY He
served seven years with Gen. George Washington in the REV War. He is listed in the DAR Centenniel
Edition as Pvt from VA

The folllowing article is from the KY EXPLORER (genealogy magazine) written by Mrs. Naomi Howard
Spillman, 12446 Grindley Dr. Sterling Heights, MI 48312

Samuel Howard Sr. was born in 1762 in Buckingham Co.VA. He was enlisted in 1778 in Capt. Mayo
Carrington's company. He marched from Woodson's Ferry on the James River in Buckingham Co. VA
where he joined the army under General George Washington in 1778 He was at Yorktown standing just a
few feet away when Cornwallis surrendered to Washington. Washington took Cornwallis' sword, looked at
it closely and gave it back to Cornwallis saying "It's a very fine blade". (This tidbit of history has been
passed down through the Howard family) Samuel moved to KY in 1796, four years after KY was changed
from a county of VA into the state of KY. He was the first white settler to come to Harlan Co.,KY where he
was active in many community affairs. He applied for his Revolutionary pension in Harlan Co.,KY in 1834
at the age of 72. He died 12-5-1840. and was buried at the Highbanks Cemetery on the Hensley farm near
Cumberland, KY.( It is interesting to note here that Samuel Howard killed John Hensley and tried and set
free!) Due to the building of Highway #119 in the 1970's Samuel, Chloe(his wife) and their infant child
were moved to the Wix Howard cemetery at Loyall, KY where they are presently interred. Samuel and
Chloe leave a long line of descendents all over the US and Canada. The Harlan Co.Ky Court House has a
plague placed on the square in front of it by the Mountain Trail Chapter of the DAR which says"To the
memory, of the Soldiers and Patriots of the American Revolution." The following men are listed on the
plaque:
CARL BAILEY JR., JAMES HALL, JESSE BROCK, SAMUEL HOWARD, BARRY CAWOOD,
STEPHEN JONES, LEWIS GREEN, EPHRAIM OSBOURNE, HENRY SHACKLEFORD, HENRY
SMITH.
**************************************************************************************
Ephriam Osbourne Sr. married Elizabeth Howard. JP DOWARD'S guess is that Elizabeth was related to
Samuel Howard in some way. Ky's most distinguished pioneers was Samuel Sr. Howard, one of the first
settlers in Harlan Co.,KY He served seven years with Gen. George Washington in the REV War. He is
listed in the DAR Centenniel Edition as Pvt from VA
**************************************************************************************
************
It was said that Samuel Howard Sr. killed a John Hensley
*************************************************************
Note:
!DOCUMENTATION: "Pioneer Families of Leslie County"
"THE HOWARD FAMILY"
The Howard name is older than the records of the eleventh century. The roots of the name are quite old.
The name Howard was found among the Vikings who invaded England and France in the eighth century.
One of the earliest records of the name Howard is found to have royal blood in their veins. The
Earle of Wiltshire, Sir Thomas Boleyn, who was a relative of Ann Beleyn, the mother of Queen Elizabeth
and wife of Henry VIII, married a Howard, the daughter of Thomas Howard. The founder of the house of
Howard was Sir William Howard, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas during the reign of King Edward I in
the fourteenth century. Sir William was the son of John Howard. The Howards, among the
nobility of England, are practically legion. Since the name Howard was found among the Vikings who
invaded England and France, the meaning of the name was "swordkeeper or armorer. A sword-keeper
was also a spirit-keeper or armorer." A sword-keeper was also a spirit-keeper, for the pagan Vikings
regarded their souls and their swords as almost one and the same thing. When the Normans became
Christianized, the name Howard only survived as a surname from the custom of taking the given name of a
father as the surname of his son. The name Howard returned to popularity a few generations later and today
Howard is used both as a surname and as a given name. The Howards have made many contributions to our
America's heritage. "A study of the Social Security files in 1964 shows that the Howard family is the sixty-
second most common family in the nation." The name Howard was also called Hoard. Some records still
have it listed as Hoard. William Howard was one of the first Howards to come to America. William
Howard left England and came to America in the early 1800's. He came because he wanted freedom. He
settled first in North Carolina then migrated into Virginia. No records have been found to prove that
Samuel Howard is a descendant of William Howard, but traditions claim that he could have been. Samuel
Howard Sr. was born in 1762 in Buckingham County, Virginia. In 1778 he enlisted in the Revolutionary
War as a private in Captain May Carrington's Company, was transferred to Captain James Baytop's
Company of Colonel Fleming's Virginia regiment which was at Valley Forge.
Samuel Howard served seven years in the Virginia Division under General George Washington when they
had Cornwallis surrounded at York Town. When cornwallis surrendered he took the point of his sword and
handed the hilt to General Washington. Samuel Howard could have touched them. General Washington
took the sword, examined it and returned it to Lord Cornwallis with the comment
that it was a good blade. When Cornwallis gave up his sword, he exclaimed, "Cornwallis is taken. Root,
Hog, or die." So the expression has come down today. Samuel Howard left the service before he got his
discharge. He filed an affidavit at Washington. In getting up his proof for a pension, he stated
that he got that throught the hat at Dismal Swamp. Samuel Howard was married to Chloe Osborne in 1784.
In 1796 Samuel Howard, his wife and two of his brothers left Virginia and crossed the mountain into
Kentucy. One brother went over in the Sandy Valley and the other one went to Madison County. Samuel
came to Harlan County. Samuel Howard and his wife, Chloe, were the first white settlers in Harlan County,
Kentucky. A son, Wix Howard, born in 1797, was supposed to be the first white child born in Harlan
County. When Samuel first came to Harlan, he and his family lived under a cliff. He had bad luck with his
crops. The corn would not ripen because of early frost so he went back to Birginia. After six years he left
Virginia and started to Ohio to buy a farm. He stopped on his way in Harlan to spend the night and decided
to remain in Harlan County. He constructed a log house about four miles from what is now the town of
Harlan. He killed bear for their summer bacon. On the head of Beech Fork Creek in what is now Leslie
County was better mast where the bears fed and there Mr. Howard camped one night. The next morning
before breakfast he went out and killed seven bears. Little did Samuel Howard realize that when he made
his first home under a cliff that he was laying the foundation of what was to become one of Kentucky's
most progressive counties. From his descendants came a sturdy stock of people who are scattered over the
USA.

More About SAMUEL HOWARD:
Burial: 1840, Headstone in the Wix Howard Cemetery in Loyall, Harlan Co, KY
Comment 1: Headstone at Wix Howard Cemetery has name , dates and the words Highbank Cem
Military: Served in Pvt Carrington Co, Flemings VA Pect REV War






More About Samuel Howard:
Burial: Unknown, Wix Howard Cemetery in Loyall, Harlan County, Ky.
Military service: Revolutionary War Soldier/private in Virginia Militia (Patriot).

More About Samuel Howard and Chloe Osborne:
Marriage: June 1780, Buckingham County, VA.166

Children of Samuel Howard and Chloe Osborne are:
  1. +Nancy Howard, b. Abt. 1782, Virginia, d. date unknown.
  2. +Dryden Howard, b. 1801, Lee County, Virginia, d. Aft. 1870, Breathitt County Kentucky.
Created with Family Tree Maker


Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com