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View Tree for John MorrisonJohn Morrison (b. September 25, 1783, d. November 21, 1851)

John Morrison (son of John Morrison and Sarah Potts)72 was born September 25, 1783 in Iredell Co, NC, and died November 21, 1851 in Stephensburg, Hardin Co, KY73. He married Mary Kirkpatrick on April 23, 1815 in Stephensburg, Hardin Co, KY74, daughter of Joseph Kirkpatrick and Eleanor Friend.

 Includes NotesNotes for John Morrison:
John moved to Kentucky with his brother William. I have been unable to discover what year they went or what motivated them to go but it is evident that John moved to Kentucky with his brother William around 1800.

John served in the war of 1812 first under Lieutenant Colonel John Thomas and after his promotion, Aaron Hart in the Second Regiment of Kentucky Mounted Militia with many other Hardin County men. Many of the exploits of this war are related in Haycoft's History of Elizabethtown.

John and William eventually married sisters, Polly and Susanna Kirkpatrick.

In a book titled, "Kentucky Land Grants", by Willard Rouse Jillson, Sc.D. , Vol I, Part 1, page 211, a listing for a grant of 400 acres names John Morrison. The full record is in book 12, page 417. The grant was dated April 29, 1797, given for military service and the watercourse named is Green River. As John was only 14 years old when the grant was given, it is probable that this grant was given to his father and then gave it to his sons John and William, resulting in their moving to Kentucky.

John and William may also have been influenced by their neighbor in North Carolina, Daniel Boone who later explored and had many adventures in Kentucky. Another family who became neighbors of the Morrisons in Kentucky was the Abraham Lincoln family. I relate some of the interesting facts about both the Boone and the Lincoln families where there are parallels to the Morrison families's.

It seems that the Lincoln family was also friends with the Boone family. The families of Boone and Lincoln had been closely allied for many years. Several marriages had taken place between them, and their names occur in each other's wills as friends and executors.

The records of a Virginia county show that he was possessed of a valuable estate, which was divided among five sons, one of whom, named Abraham, emigrated to Kentucky about 1780.

Thomas, the youngest son, seems to have been below the average of the family in enterprise and other qualities that command success. He was an uneducated carpenter and a farmer. He married Nancy Hanks Lincoln on June 12, 1806. The young couple began housekeeping with little means. On the stormy morning of Sunday, February 12, Nancy gave birth to a boy. He was born on a bed of poles covered with corn husks. The baby was named Abraham after his grandfather. The birth took place in the Lincolns' rough-hewn cabin on Nolin Creek near Hodgenville, Kentucky. Nancy had little or no schooling and could not write. She was a handsome young woman of twenty-three, of appearance and intellect superior to her lowly fortunes.

The pioneer Lincoln, acquired by means of cash and land-warrants a large estate in Kentucky, as is shown by the records of Jefferson and Campbell Counties. About 1784 he was killed by Indians while working with his three sons--Mordee, Josiah, and Thomas--in clearing the forest. His widow removed after his death to Washington County, and there brought up her family. The two elder sons became reputable citizens, and the two daughters married in a decent condition of life. Nancy Hanks, a niece of the man with whom he learned his trade.

In 1811 the Lincolns moved to a farm on Knob Creek which was also near Hodgenville. Abraham attended a short amount of time in a log school house.

Thomas Lincoln remained in Kentucky until 1816, when he removed to the still newer country of Indiana, and settled in a rich and fertile forest country near Little Pigeon creek, not far distant from the Ohio river. The family suffered from diseases incident to pioneer life, and Mrs. Lincoln died in 1818 at the age of thirty-five. Thomas Lincoln, while on a visit to Kentucky, married a worthy, industrious, and intelligent widow named Sarah Bush Johnston. She was a woman of admirable order and system in her habits, and brought to the home of the pioneer in the Indiana timber many of the comforts of civilized life. The neighborhood was one of the roughest. The president once said of it : "It was a wild region, with many bears and other wild animals still in the woods, and there were some schools, so called; but no qualification was ever required of a teacher beyond readin', writin', and cipherin' to the rule of three. If a straggler supposed to understand Latin happened to sojourn in the neighborhood, he was looked upon as a wizard. There was absolutely nothing to excite ambition for education." After that the Lincoln's moved further north and there is no indication that the Morrison's had any further contact with the Lincoln,s.

John bought 50 acres of land in what is presently LaRue County, but later bought around 600 acres in the Stephensburg, Hardin County area, sometime around 1842.

Not much more has been located about John's life. However, his will does give some insight into the type of life that he and his family lived.

The will of John states, "I, John Morrison of the State of Kentucky and County of Hardin, do hereby make my last will and Testament in manner and form following, that is to say; 1st - I will that all the personable part of my estate be immediately sold after my decease and out of the moneys arising therefrom, all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid. 2nd - After the payment of my debts and funeral expenses, I give to my wife, Mary Morrison, one third part of my personal estate during the time of her natural life and after her decease, I give the same to my children, hereinafter mentioned, equally to be divided among them and to be enjoyed by them forever. I also, give to my wife,above named during the term of her natural life, my slave and her increase at the death of my wife, I desire that my slave and her increase be sold to the highest bidder and the money arising from the sale to be equally divided between my children. My wife is to be in the house with her son, John M. Morrison, and receive the ownership (cannot read) and to keep her slaves with her. John M. Morrison is to support her and her slaves. Should my wife wish to change her home and use with any of the children, she can do so and take her slaves with her and still obtain the claim on the house & support from the farm. I, also, desire that (cannot read) if any, should be paid (cannot read, too dim).

4thly, I give and deed to my son, William Morrison, one hundred and eighty acres , Lot No. 4 in another property, (cannot read) of the land.

5thly, I give and deed to my son, Joseph M. Morrison, one hundred and seven acres of land, Lot No. 3. Also, give twenty one acres, more or less, the (cannot read), this property equal to the balance of the (cannot read).

6thly, I give and deed to my daughter, Mary Morrison, eighty-eight acres of land, Lot No. 1. Also, twenty-one acres of Knol land adjoining John's. Also, 1 bay horse 5 years old, 1 cherry bureau, 1 cow, 1 sow, and pigs, 3 sheep, 1 bedstead, bed and bedding. 1 little wheel and a chean.

7thly, I give and desire my executor to give my son, John Morrison, one hundred and forty seven acres of land, Lot No. 4, also give twelve acres Knol land off of the East end. Also, one bay horse, 6 years old, 1red heifer, 2 years old, 1 sow, one pig, 3 sheep, 1 axe, and (cannot read) plough and Bedstead, bed and bedding, 2 chairs.

8thly, All the rest of my Estate, both real and personal of what nature or kind whatever, having be not herein particularly disposed of, I desire may be equal divided among my several children herein before named, which I gave to them, their heirs, executors , administrators, and assigns forever. And lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my son, William Morrison, and friend, Charles S. Claggett my executors of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all other former will & testaments by me heretofore made.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my sear this 23rd day of October, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and fifty one. Signed, sealed & published, and declared as and for the last will and testament of the above named, John Morrison, in the presence of us Charles Claggett and Lemuel English.

At a County Court began and held for the County of Hardin at the Courthouse in Elizabethtown on Monday the 16th of November, 1851, the foregoing Instrument of writing purporting to be the last Will and Testament of John Morrison, deceased, was produced in court and proven by the oaths of Charles S. Claggett & Lemuel English, the subscribing witnesses thereto, to be the true last Will and Testament of John Morrison, deceased, and the same to be recorded."
Recorded in Will Book F, Page 231-June 9, 1823
Schedule of Bonds and Notes, Page 233

More About John Morrison:
Burial: Unknown, Family burial grounds.

More About John Morrison and Mary Kirkpatrick:
Marriage: April 23, 1815, Stephensburg, Hardin Co, KY.74

Children of John Morrison and Mary Kirkpatrick are:
  1. +William Morrison, b. October 13, 1820, Hardin Co, KY75, d. December 11, 1909, Hardin Co, KY.
  2. Lucinda Morrison, b. March 13, 1816, Hardin Co, KY, d. Abt. 1888, Hardin Co, KY.
  3. James R Morrison, b. July 16, 1818, Hardin Co, KY, d. March 11, 1842, Hardin Co, KY.
  4. Thomas Morrison, b. November 07, 1822, Hardin Co, KY, d. March 11, 1842, Hardin Co, KY.
  5. Joseph Monroe Morrison, b. June 29, 1825, Hardin Co, KY, d. January 17, 1899, Grayson Co, KY.
  6. Mary J Morrison, b. February 16, 1829, Hardin Co, KY, d. November 18, 1877, Hardin Co, KY.
  7. John Morgan Morrison, b. December 09, 1831, Hardin Co, KY, d. March 05, 1900, Hardin Co, KY.
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