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View Tree for Francis (Immigrant) FincherFrancis (Immigrant) Fincher (b. 1626, d. 6-1684)

Francis (Immigrant) Fincher388, 389, 390 was born 1626, and died 6-1684 in Londongrove PA391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 400. He married Mary Achelley on 6-03-1678 in England401.

 Includes NotesNotes for Francis (Immigrant) Fincher:
[948171.ftw]

born 1626-8
a quaker, who migrated to Philadelphia Pennsylvania, from Worcestershire,
England on March 14, 1863
England------PA
after 1679--before March 28, 1680
WFT Vol. 4, #1236
SOURCE: FINCHER FAMILY TREE
The Immigrant Francis Fincher
Francis "The Immigrant", was one of the early settlers with a land grant
from William Penn. He was considered a friend of William Penn's. He was
asked to be the speaker of the First Assembly of PA in 1684, but
declined. He took an active part in politics and government. He is
referenced in the book, "History of York Co., Pa." by John Gibson.
Chicago 1886 (772, 207p):286-7, 289.
the Colonial Society of Pennsylvania 1950, page 95, shows membership for
Francis & Mary (Achelly) Fincher, John & Martha (Taylor) Fincher, Joseph
& Rebecca (Fincher) Bennett, James & Rebecca (Bennett) Rankin, Abraham &
Catherine (Coppenheffer) Rankin, John & Ann (Moore) Rankin, William
Washington & Maria Amelia (Jefferies) Rankin, and John Hall Rankin.
I believe alot of other information can be found on this man though the
PAA history resources. William Penn's journals, Early History of
Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, History of Chester Co., etc. Lord willing,
I will check them out one day.
TheLevering Familly History and Genealogy tells alot about the land
Francis andMary owned in PA. The orginal land patent was granted to
Francis from Wm Penn, by a warrant dated 25 April 1684. It was confirmed
to Francis by a deed from Penn's Commissioners, dated 4 Nov. 1691. It
consisted of at least 300 acres, and was described as follows by Wickert
Levering of the county of Philadelphia, Yeoman, as follow:
"All tract of land situate on the east of Schoolkill, in "the county
aforesaid, begining at a White Oak on the River "Schoolkill; thence by
the land now in tenure of the said "Wickert, east-northeast, five hundred
and thirty perches to a post "standing in the line of Germantown land;
Thence North-West and "by north, by the said Germantown land, ninety one
pershes to "another corner post; Thence West South-West, by the land late
of "James Claypoole, five hundred and fifteen perches, to the said
"Schoolkill, begining, containing three hundred acres of land."
This 300 acres was ppurchased by Wickert Levering from Christopher
Sebthorp, of Philadelphia, Brazier,and Mary his wife, late widow of
Francis Fincher. It was conveyed for the sum of sixty pounds. This
purchase gave Levering 500 continous acres, which today is part of the
"Pride of the Philadelphians", Fairmount Park, which included the
Levering Cemetery.
It is not know, yet, which ship Francis emigrated on, but it could be
that he traveled from England with Wm Penn. If this istrue, the
following story will be of great interest. It was found in 1749, having
been kept in the achrives of an Old Quaker Meeting in Rhode Island. It
was printed in the New York Learner and Teacher, and is as follows:
"SEPTEMBER YE 15, 1682
To ye aged and Beloed,
MR. JOHN HIGGINSON.
There be now at sea, a ship called the Welcome, which has on board an
hundred or more of themheretics and malignants called Quakers, with W.
Penn, who is the chief scamp, at the head of them.
The genral court has accordingly given secret orders toMaster malachi
Huscott, of the brig Porpoise to waylay the said Welcome, shyly, as near
the cape of Cod as may be, and make captive the said Penn and hisungodly
crew, so that the Lord may be glorified, and not mocked on the soilof
this new country with the heathen worship of these people.
Much soil canbe made by selling the whole lot to Barbadoes, where slaves
fetch good prices in rum and sugar, and we shall not only do the Lord
great servie by punishing the wicked, but we shall make great good for
his minister and people.
Master Huscott feels hopeful, and I will set down the news when the ship
comes back.
Yours in ye bowels of Christ,
COTTON MATHEIt is not known, yet, which ship Francis emigrated on, but it could be that he traveled from England with William Penn. If this is true, the following story will be of great interest. It was found in 1749, having been kept in the archives of an old Quaker Meeting in Rhode Island. It was printed in the New York Learner and Teacher, and is as follows:
"SEPTEMBER YE 15, 1682.
To ye aged and Beloved,
MR. JOHN HIGGINSON.
There be now at sea, a ship called the Welcome, which has on board an hundred or more of the heretics and malignant called Quakers, with W. Penn, who is the chief scamp, at the head of them.
The general court has accordingly given secret orders to Master Malachi Huscott, of the brig Porpoise to waylay the said Welcome, slyly, as near the cape of Cod as may be, and make captive the said Penn and his ungodly crew, so that the Lord may be glorified, and not mocked on the soil of this new country with the heathen worship of these people.
Much spoil can be made by selling the whole lot to Barbados, where slaves fetch good prices in rum and sugar, and we shall not only do the Lord great service by punishing the wicked, but we shall make great good for his minister and people.
Master Huscott feels hopeful, and I will set down the news when the ship comes back.
Yours in ye bowels of Christ,
COTTON MATHER.
Francis Fincher, a Quaker from Worcester, England, arrived at Philadelphia, Pa., 7 mo., 28th day,1683 aboard the ship Bristol Comfort accompanied by his second wife, Mary (Achelley) Fincher, his small children and servants. He was called a glover. He came from Worcester, England, where along with his Quaker friends, he was severely persecuted for his religious beliefs.

In The Collection of the Suffering of the People Called Quakers, by Besse, are several accounts of Francis Fincher's hardships. Under caption 1662, Besse says: "On the 12th of the month called January, Friends being peaceably met at the House of Robert Smith in Worcester, a marshal with a File of musketeers (being of those called the Clergy-Band) came, and in an hostile manner forced all the men there met, being eighteen, to go with them. They showed no Order or Warrant, but guarded them through several streets to their Captain's House, who ordered the Soldiers to carry them to the Marshal's. They were kept about three Days and three Nights, it being the time of a General Sessions there, at which, though they were never called to appear or answer for themselves, an Indictment was found against them, upon the Evidence of but one man, and he an infamous Person, who had been formerly arraigned for Murder, and was afterwards distracted (insane). From the Marshal's they were removed to the Town Gaol and there remained. Their names were ..... Francis Fincher (listed among others)."

After a long account of the trial, this follows: "In like manner, at the same assizes, John Pike . . . . Francis Fincher (and others) were convicted of being at a meeting and sentenced to pay 5 pounds each, or to be sent to the House of Correction for three months."

Besse tells of another attack on the Quakers in 1670 at Grafton-Flyford coming with a warrant and "from Francis Fincher was taken all His Goods for a fine of 20 pounds. They said Francis Fincher was taken on his knees in prayer and having heard that he was fined 20 pounds went to Justice Packington at Bowling Green to expostulate the case with him, whether he thought Prayer to God a Breach of the Law. Packington told him he might pray at home, and that he stood convicted on Oath of the informers. Francis, with Christian Boldness, exhorted him to Justice and Equity, which when Sands, the other Justice, who was also at Bowls, heard he threatened Francis, that if he did not hold his tongue, he would send him where he would be Loathe to go. A short time after, the officers brought three carts to his House and carried away the best of his goods, took possession of the rest, and sold all, and within a few weeks after he was taken from his family (he having a wife and several small children) and committed him to Worcester Gaol where he lay several months."

Again in 1681 Francis Fincher was sent to Worcester Gaol having been taken praying in the street, being kept out of the meeting place by Constables.

Small wonder that Francis Fincher was glad to come to a land where Quakers were welcome. Records show that he was a First Purchaser from William Penn. In May 1682 he had purchased 1,250 acres in the province of Pennsylvania (Samuel Hazard's Annals of Penna. - 1609-1682 - Philadelphia 1850, appendix p. 639; Pennsylvania Archives, Vol. 1, p. 42.)

"First purchasers" were entitled to both land in the country and "liberty" land in the city of Philadelphia. The location of his city land is given in Welsh Settlements of Pennsylvania, by Charles Browning, 1912, p. 438. In describing the early roads of Pennsylvania, it mentions Fincher's land on the Schuylkell River. "Fincher's land was bounded on the west by a street or road, the one to the ferry, and he also bought land bounded on the south by this road. That is, Fincher had 35 acres on the upper side of Market Street and across the street was the Haverford Friends' Burying Ground."

Francis Fincher only lived one year after coming to America, but during that time he was active in the affairs of Pennsylvania. He was elected a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly from Philadelphia in 1684. At the session of the Assembly held at New Castle, 3rd month, 10, 1684, he was elected Speaker, but declined to serve. The record states "Francis Fincher, a member of the House, being chosen Speaker by major Votes of the House; he in modest manner was pleased to refuse that Choice, with the humble acknowledgement of his own insufficiency for so great an undertaking." (Pennsylvania Archives, Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives of Province of Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, p. 46). He died three months later, 6 mo., 1684.

In 1953 Evelyn Fincher [co-author of Fincher in the USA, 1683-1900] had a short time in England and visited Chaucer House London, where she saw Dr. Howard Collier's manuscript on the Finchers, and made brief notes. Dr. Collier, a prominent Quaker physician of Worcester, England, has worked on the Finchers there. He said that Francis Fincher was a Worcester skinner and glover who lived in Kingston (Worcester) and belonged to a well-known Puritan family that resided at Shell and Himbleton. At the time that Francis was a widower with small children he was an important man in that part of the County that lies between Pershore and Droctwich and Worcester. He was born 1626 on property called "Tomes" in Himbleton. His mother's name was Alice Hart; father known as Francis the Elder, died in 1649 when Francis, the Quaker, was 23 years old. His first wife was Elizabeth, and that marriage probably took place prior to 1660.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[FINCHER 1.FTW]

It is not known, yet, which ship Francis emigrated on, but it could be that he traveled from England with William Penn. If this is true, the following story will be of great interest. It was found in 1749, having been kept in the archives of an old Quaker Meeting in Rhode Island. It was printed in the New York Learner and Teacher, and is as follows:
"SEPTEMBER YE 15, 1682.
To ye aged and Beloved,
MR. JOHN HIGGINSON.
There be now at sea, a ship called the Welcome, which has on board an hundred or more of the heretics and malignant called Quakers, with W. Penn, who is the chief scamp, at the head of them.
The general court has accordingly given secret orders to Master Malachi Huscott, of the brig Porpoise to waylay the said Welcome, slyly, as near the cape of Cod as may be, and make captive the said Penn and his ungodly crew, so that the Lord may be glorified, and not mocked on the soil of this new country with the heathen worship of these people.
Much spoil can be made by selling the whole lot to Barbados, where slaves fetch good prices in rum and sugar, and we shall not only do the Lord great service by punishing the wicked, but we shall make great good for his minister and people.
Master Huscott feels hopeful, and I will set down the news when the ship comes back.
Yours in ye bowels of Christ,
COTTON MATHER.
Francis Fincher, a Quaker from Worcester, England, arrived at Philadelphia, Pa., 7 mo., 28th day,1683 aboard the ship Bristol Comfort accompanied by his second wife, Mary (Achelley) Fincher, his small children and servants. He was called a glover. He came from Worcester, England, where along with his Quaker friends, he was severely persecuted for his religious beliefs.

In The Collection of the Suffering of the People Called Quakers, by Besse, are several accounts of Francis Fincher's hardships. Under caption 1662, Besse says: "On the 12th of the month called January, Friends being peaceably met at the House of Robert Smith in Worcester, a marshal with a File of musketeers (being of those called the Clergy-Band) came, and in an hostile manner forced all the men there met, being eighteen, to go with them. They showed no Order or Warrant, but guarded them through several streets to their Captain's House, who ordered the Soldiers to carry them to the Marshal's. They were kept about three Days and three Nights, it being the time of a General Sessions there, at which, though they were never called to appear or answer for themselves, an Indictment was found against them, upon the Evidence of but one man, and he an infamous Person, who had been formerly arraigned for Murder, and was afterwards distracted (insane). From the Marshal's they were removed to the Town Gaol and there remained. Their names were ..... Francis Fincher (listed among others)."

After a long account of the trial, this follows: "In like manner, at the same assizes, John Pike . . . . Francis Fincher (and others) were convicted of being at a meeting and sentenced to pay 5 pounds each, or to be sent to the House of Correction for three months."

Besse tells of another attack on the Quakers in 1670 at Grafton-Flyford coming with a warrant and "from Francis Fincher was taken all His Goods for a fine of 20 pounds. They said Francis Fincher was taken on his knees in prayer and having heard that he was fined 20 pounds went to Justice Packington at Bowling Green to expostulate the case with him, whether he thought Prayer to God a Breach of the Law. Packington told him he might pray at home, and that he stood convicted on Oath of the informers. Francis, with Christian Boldness, exhorted him to Justice and Equity, which when Sands, the other Justice, who was also at Bowls, heard he threatened Francis, that if he did not hold his tongue, he would send him where he would be Loathe to go. A short time after, the officers brought three carts to his House and carried away the best of his goods, took possession of the rest, and sold all, and within a few weeks after he was taken from his family (he having a wife and several small children) and committed him to Worcester Gaol where he lay several months."

Again in 1681 Francis Fincher was sent to Worcester Gaol having been taken praying in the street, being kept out of the meeting place by Constables.

Small wonder that Francis Fincher was glad to come to a land where Quakers were welcome. Records show that he was a First Purchaser from William Penn. In May 1682 he had purchased 1,250 acres in the province of Pennsylvania (Samuel Hazard's Annals of Penna. - 1609-1682 - Philadelphia 1850, appendix p. 639; Pennsylvania Archives, Vol. 1, p. 42.)

"First purchasers" were entitled to both land in the country and "liberty" land in the city of Philadelphia. The location of his city land is given in Welsh Settlements of Pennsylvania, by Charles Browning, 1912, p. 438. In describing the early roads of Pennsylvania, it mentions Fincher's land on the Schuylkell River. "Fincher's land was bounded on the west by a street or road, the one to the ferry, and he also bought land bounded on the south by this road. That is, Fincher had 35 acres on the upper side of Market Street and across the street was the Haverford Friends' Burying Ground."

Francis Fincher only lived one year after coming to America, but during that time he was active in the affairs of Pennsylvania. He was elected a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly from Philadelphia in 1684. At the session of the Assembly held at New Castle, 3rd month, 10, 1684, he was elected Speaker, but declined to serve. The record states "Francis Fincher, a member of the House, being chosen Speaker by major Votes of the House; he in modest manner was pleased to refuse that Choice, with the humble acknowledgement of his own insufficiency for so great an undertaking." (Pennsylvania Archives, Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives of Province of Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, p. 46). He died three months later, 6 mo., 1684.

In 1953 Evelyn Fincher [co-author of Fincher in the USA, 1683-1900] had a short time in England and visited Chaucer House London, where she saw Dr. Howard Collier's manuscript on the Finchers, and made brief notes. Dr. Collier, a prominent Quaker physician of Worcester, England, has worked on the Finchers there. He said that Francis Fincher was a Worcester skinner and glover who lived in Kingston (Worcester) and belonged to a well-known Puritan family that resided at Shell and Himbleton. At the time that Francis was a widower with small children he was an important man in that part of the County that lies between Pershore and Droctwich and Worcester. He was born 1626 on property called "Tomes" in Himbleton. His mother's name was Alice Hart; father known as Francis the Elder, died in 1649 when Francis, the Quaker, was 23 years old. His first wife was Elizabeth, and that marriage probably took place prior to 1660.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[FINCHER 1.FTW]

It is not known, yet, which ship Francis emigrated on, but it could be that he traveled from England with William Penn. If this is true, the following story will be of great interest. It was found in 1749, having been kept in the archives of an old Quaker Meeting in Rhode Island. It was printed in the New York Learner and Teacher, and is as follows:
"SEPTEMBER YE 15, 1682.
To ye aged and Beloved,
MR. JOHN HIGGINSON.
There be now at sea, a ship called the Welcome, which has on board an hundred or more of the heretics and malignant called Quakers, with W. Penn, who is the chief scamp, at the head of them.
The general court has accordingly given secret orders to Master Malachi Huscott, of the brig Porpoise to waylay the said Welcome, slyly, as near the cape of Cod as may be, and make captive the said Penn and his ungodly crew, so that the Lord may be glorified, and not mocked on the soil of this new country with the heathen worship of these people.
Much spoil can be made by selling the whole lot to Barbados, where slaves fetch good prices in rum and sugar, and we shall not only do the Lord great service by punishing the wicked, but we shall make great good for his minister and people.
Master Huscott feels hopeful, and I will set down the news when the ship comes back.
Yours in ye bowels of Christ,
COTTON MATHER.
Francis Fincher, a Quaker from Worcester, England, arrived at Philadelphia, Pa., 7 mo., 28th day,1683 aboard the ship Bristol Comfort accompanied by his second wife, Mary (Achelley) Fincher, his small children and servants. He was called a glover. He came from Worcester, England, where along with his Quaker friends, he was severely persecuted for his religious beliefs.

In The Collection of the Suffering of the People Called Quakers, by Besse, are several accounts of Francis Fincher's hardships. Under caption 1662, Besse says: "On the 12th of the month called January, Friends being peaceably met at the House of Robert Smith in Worcester, a marshal with a File of musketeers (being of those called the Clergy-Band) came, and in an hostile manner forced all the men there met, being eighteen, to go with them. They showed no Order or Warrant, but guarded them through several streets to their Captain's House, who ordered the Soldiers to carry them to the Marshal's. They were kept about three Days and three Nights, it being the time of a General Sessions there, at which, though they were never called to appear or answer for themselves, an Indictment was found against them, upon the Evidence of but one man, and he an infamous Person, who had been formerly arraigned for Murder, and was afterwards distracted (insane). From the Marshal's they were removed to the Town Gaol and there remained. Their names were ..... Francis Fincher (listed among others)."

After a long account of the trial, this follows: "In like manner, at the same assizes, John Pike . . . . Francis Fincher (and others) were convicted of being at a meeting and sentenced to pay 5 pounds each, or to be sent to the House of Correction for three months."

Besse tells of another attack on the Quakers in 1670 at Grafton-Flyford coming with a warrant and "from Francis Fincher was taken all His Goods for a fine of 20 pounds. They said Francis Fincher was taken on his knees in prayer and having heard that he was fined 20 pounds went to Justice Packington at Bowling Green to expostulate the case with him, whether he thought Prayer to God a Breach of the Law. Packington told him he might pray at home, and that he stood convicted on Oath of the informers. Francis, with Christian Boldness, exhorted him to Justice and Equity, which when Sands, the other Justice, who was also at Bowls, heard he threatened Francis, that if he did not hold his tongue, he would send him where he would be Loathe to go. A short time after, the officers brought three carts to his House and carried away the best of his goods, took possession of the rest, and sold all, and within a few weeks after he was taken from his family (he having a wife and several small children) and committed him to Worcester Gaol where he lay several months."

Again in 1681 Francis Fincher was sent to Worcester Gaol having been taken praying in the street, being kept out of the meeting place by Constables.

Small wonder that Francis Fincher was glad to come to a land where Quakers were welcome. Records show that he was a First Purchaser from William Penn. In May 1682 he had purchased 1,250 acres in the province of Pennsylvania (Samuel Hazard's Annals of Penna. - 1609-1682 - Philadelphia 1850, appendix p. 639; Pennsylvania Archives, Vol. 1, p. 42.)

"First purchasers" were entitled to both land in the country and "liberty" land in the city of Philadelphia. The location of his city land is given in Welsh Settlements of Pennsylvania, by Charles Browning, 1912, p. 438. In describing the early roads of Pennsylvania, it mentions Fincher's land on the Schuylkell River. "Fincher's land was bounded on the west by a street or road, the one to the ferry, and he also bought land bounded on the south by this road. That is, Fincher had 35 acres on the upper side of Market Street and across the street was the Haverford Friends' Burying Ground."

Francis Fincher only lived one year after coming to America, but during that time he was active in the affairs of Pennsylvania. He was elected a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly from Philadelphia in 1684. At the session of the Assembly held at New Castle, 3rd month, 10, 1684, he was elected Speaker, but declined to serve. The record states "Francis Fincher, a member of the House, being chosen Speaker by major Votes of the House; he in modest manner was pleased to refuse that Choice, with the humble acknowledgement of his own insufficiency for so great an undertaking." (Pennsylvania Archives, Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives of Province of Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, p. 46). He died three months later, 6 mo., 1684.

In 1953 Evelyn Fincher [co-author of Fincher in the USA, 1683-1900] had a short time in England and visited Chaucer House London, where she saw Dr. Howard Collier's manuscript on the Finchers, and made brief notes. Dr. Collier, a prominent Quaker physician of Worcester, England, has worked on the Finchers there. He said that Francis Fincher was a Worcester skinner and glover who lived in Kingston (Worcester) and belonged to a well-known Puritan family that resided at Shell and Himbleton. At the time that Francis was a widower with small children he was an important man in that part of the County that lies between Pershore and Droctwich and Worcester. He was born 1626 on property called "Tomes" in Himbleton. His mother's name was Alice Hart; father known as Francis the Elder, died in 1649 when Francis, the Quaker, was 23 years old. His first wife was Elizabeth, and that marriage probably took place prior to 1660.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[1014601.ftw]

Francis, " The Immigrant ", was one of the early settlers with a land grant From from William Penn. He was considered a friend of William Penn's. He was asked to be the speaker of the First Assembly of PA in 1684, but declined. He took an active part in politics and government. He is referenced in the book, "Hi story of York Co., Pa." by John Gibson. Chicago 1886 (772, 207p.) :286-7, 289 . The Colonial Society of Pennsylvania 1950, page 95, shows membership for F Francis & Mary (Achelly) Fincher, John & Martha(Taylor) Fincher, Joseph & Rebeca ca ( Fincher) Bennett, James & Rebecca (Bennett) Rankin, Abraham & Catherine ( Coppenheffer) Rankin, John & Ann (Moore) Rankin, William Washington & Maria Am Amelia (Jefferies) Rankin, and John Hall Rankin. I believe a lot of other information can be found on this man though the PA history resources. William Penn's journals, Early History of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, History of Chester Co., etc. Lord willing, I will check them out one day. An alternate marria date for Francis and Mary would be 03 April, 1678, and an alternate date of death as August, 1684. Source: Keven D. Marshall, San Jose, CA. KMarsh6100 @@aol.com The Levering Family History and Genealogy tells a lot about the land that Francis and Mary owned in Pennsylvania. The original land patent was granted anted to Francis from William Penn, by a warrant dated 25 April 1684. It was confirmed to Francis by a Deed from Penn's Commissioners, dated 4 November 169 1. It consisted of 1,250 acres, (Source: Kevin D. Marshall, San Jose, CA KM arsh6100@@aol.com) of which 300 acres was described as follows by Wickert Leve ring of the county of Philadelphia, Yoeman, as follows: "All that tract of l and situate on the east side of Schoolkill, in "the county aforesaid, beginning g at a White Oak on the River "Schoolkill; thence by the land now in the tenure of the said "Wickert, east-northeast, five hundred and thirty perches to a p Post "standing in the line of Germantown land; Thence North-West and "by north, by the said Germantown land, ninety one perishes to "another corner post; Then West South-West, by the land late of " James Claypoole, five hundred and F fifteen perches, to the said "Schoolkill, beginning, containing three hundred a acres of land." This 300 acres was purchased by Wickert Levering from Christoph Christopher Sebthorp, of Philadelphia, Brazier, and Mary his wife, late widow of Franc is Fincher. It was conveyed for the sum of sixty pounds. This purchase gave Levering 500 continuous acres, which today is part of the " Pride of the Phila Philadelphians", Fairmount Park, which includes the Levering Cemetery. Francis arrived in Philadelphia, PA 28 July 1683 aboard the ship "Bristol Comfort", leaving Worcester, England after being persecuted for his religious beliefs. The following story will be of great interest. It was found in 1749, having been kept in the archives of an old Quaker Meeting in Rhode Island. It was printed in the New York Learner and Teacher, and is as follows: "SEPTEMBER YE 15, 16 82. To ye aged and Beloved, MR. JOHN HIGGINSON. There be now at sea, a ship ca called the Welcome, which has on board an hundred or more of the heretics and ma malignant called Quakers, with W. Penn, who is the chief scamp, at the head of them. The general court has accordingly given secret orders to Master Malachi Huscott, of the brig Porpoise to waylay the said Welcome, slyly, as near the cape of Cod as may be, and make captive the said Penn and his ungodly crew, so that the Lord may be glorified, and not mocked on the soil of this new country with the heathen worship of these people. Much spoil can be made by selling the whole lot to Barbados, where slaves fetch good prices in rum and sugar, a and we shall not only do the Lord great service by punishing the wicked, but we shall make great good for his minister and people. Master Huscott feels hope hopeful, and I will set down the news when the ship[2098803.ftw]

[fincher.ftw]

[1014601.ftw]

Francis, " The Immigrant ", was one of the early settlers with a land grant From William Penn. He was considered a friend of William Penn's. He was asked to be the speaker of the First Assembly of PA in 1684, but declined. He took an active part in politics and government. He is referenced in the book, "Hi story of York Co., Pa." by John Gibson. Chicago 1886 (772, 207p.) :286-7, 289 . The Colonial Society of Pennsylvania 1950, page 95, shows membership for F Francis & Mary (Achelly) Fincher, John & Martha(Taylor) Fincher, Joseph & Rebecca ca ( Fincher) Bennet

More About Francis (Immigrant) Fincher:
Date born 2: 1626, England, Himbleton, Tomes.402, 403
Date born 3: 1626, Himbleton Tomes England.404
Date born 4: 1626, Himbleton, Tomes, England.405
Date born 5: 1626, Kingston Worcester England.406
Date born 6: 1626, Kingston, Worcester, England.407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413
Burial: 1684, Newcastle PA.414, 415, 416
Christening: 10-01-1626, Himbleton, Worcester, England.417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 423
Died 2: 1684
Died 3: 6-1684, Philadelphia, PA.423
Fact 1: one of the early settlers with a land grant from William Penn.424
Fact 2: asked to be the speaker of the First Assembly of PA in 1684.424
Fact 3: referenced in the book, "History of York Co., Pa." by John Gibson. Chicago 1886.424
Fact 4: land patent was granted to Francis from William Penn,a warrant dated 4/25/1684.424
Fact 5: confirmed to Francis by a Deed from Penn's Commissioners 11/4/1691.424
Fact 6: 300 acres.424
Immigration: 1683, Himbleton, England to Philadelphia, PA.425, 426, 427
Occupation: Skinner and Glover.428, 429, 430
Record Change 1: 4-11-2002431
Record Change 2: 9-13-2004432
Record Change 3: 9-15-2004432

More About Francis (Immigrant) Fincher and Mary Achelley:
Marriage 1: 6-03-1678, England.433
Marriage 2: 1659, Tomes, Himbleton, England.434
Marriage 3: 1660, England, Himbleton, Tomes.435
Marriage 4: 4-03-1678, England.436
Marriage 5: 4-03-1678, Kingston, Worcester, England.437, 438, 439
Marriage 6: 6-03-1678, Kingston Worcester England.440
Marriage 7: 6-03-1678, Kingston, Worcester, England.440
Single: 6-03-1678, Kingston Worcester England.441

Children of Francis (Immigrant) Fincher and Mary Achelley are:
  1. +John Fincher, b. 1679, Worcester, England442, 443, d. 1747, Londongrove PA444, 445, 446, 447, 448, 449, 450, 451.
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