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Ancestors of Thomas Wilson Martin

Generation No. 7


      72. David Shapley, born June 08, 1771 in Hancock, Berkshire, Mass; died December 08, 1839 in Madison Co, New York. He was the son of 144. David Shapley and 145. Rebecca Bishop. He married 73. Lydia Moseley Burdick Bef. 1800.

      73. Lydia Moseley Burdick, born March 01, 1770 in Lebanon Twp, Madison, New York; died December 03, 1839 in Madison Co,New York.
     
Children of David Shapley and Lydia Burdick are:
  36 i.   Calvin Harlow Shapley, born December 11, 1800 in Lebanon Twp, Madison, New York; died Abt. 1868 in McHenry, Illinois; married Louisa A. Sutherland Abt. 1831 in Illinois.
  ii.   Lewis Shapley, born March 18, 1807; died October 18, 1831.
  More About Lewis Shapley:
Record Change: December 12, 2001



      74. Silas Sutherland, born August 03, 1772 in Sutherland Falls, Rutland Co., VT.; died February 12, 1835 in Madison, New york. He was the son of 148. John Sutherland and 149. Mary Germond. He married 75. Lucy Foster.

      75. Lucy Foster, born November 24, 1772 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut; died April 07, 1811 in Saratoga, New york. She was the daughter of 150. Thomas Foster and 151. Elizabeth Berry.
     
Child of Silas Sutherland and Lucy Foster is:
  37 i.   Louisa A. Sutherland, born December 13, 1806 in Chenango, New York; died Abt. 1875 in McHenry, Illinois; married Calvin Harlow Shapley Abt. 1831 in Illinois.


      76. Peter Carmichael, born April 03, 1774 in Sand Lake, NY; died April 04, 1822 in Sand Lake, NY. He was the son of 152. John Carmichael and 153. Esther Canfield. He married 77. Mary Squires Waters July 26, 1795 in Troy, NY.

      77. Mary Squires Waters, born July 30, 1777 in Troy, NY; died January 16, 1848 in Sand Lake, NY.
     
Children of Peter Carmichael and Mary Waters are:
  38 i.   Hezikiah Carmichael, born Abt. 1800 in West Sand Lake, Rensselas Co., NY; died in , , Illinois; married Emily Half 1826 in Rensselaer, New York.
  ii.   John Peter Carmichael, born April 14, 1816 in West Sand Lake, Rensselas Co., NY; died May 11, 1870 in Rockford, Winnebago Co., ILL.


      82. Lewis Jr. Solomon, born April 01, 1778 in Franklin Co., North Carolina; died July 28, 1849 in North Palmyra Twp., Macoupin Co., IL. He was the son of 164. Lewis Solomon and 165. Martha. He married 83. Sarah Bowden Abt. 1798 in Franklin Co., North Carolina.

      83. Sarah Bowden, born 1779 in Franklin Co., North Carolina; died February 26, 1849 in North Palmyra Twp., Macoupin Co., IL. She was the daughter of 166. John Bowden and 167. Mary Polly Underwood.

Notes for Lewis Jr. Solomon:
Lewis Solomon, born in Franklin county, North Carolina, in 1780, about three years before the close of the war of the Revolution. He was raised in the same county, and married Sarah Bowden, daughter of John Bowden, a well-to-do and prominent citizen of Franklin county. This marriage occurred about the year 1798. In 1811 he moved form North Carolina to Logan county, Kentucky, where he lived one year, and in 1821 moved to Muhlenburgh county, where the family resided as long as they lived in that state. The six oldest children were born in North Carolina, and Judge Solomon, the seventh child, was the first born after the removal to Kentucky. Their home in Muhlenburgh county was in a rough and poor district of country.

More About LEWIS SOLOMON:
Minister: Bet. 1825 - 1850, one of first Baptist ministers in North Palmyra, Macoupin Co.

     
Children of Lewis Solomon and Sarah Bowden are:
  i.   Arial McCoy Solomon, born October 04, 1821 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; died February 06, 1901 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married Jane Dorman April 04, 1841 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born Abt. 1826 in Tennessee; died April 16, 1886 in Macoupin Co., Illinois.
  ii.   Jesse J. Solomon, born September 19, 1822 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; died January 06, 1863 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married Nancy Susan Hollingsworth May 11, 1843 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born 1823 in Tennessee; died November 30, 1871 in Macoupin Co., Illinois.
  iii.   Dempsey Noble Solomon, born January 11, 1821 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; died March 25, 1900 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married Elizabeth C. Newell June 04, 1846 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born September 10, 1823 in Franklin, Simpson Co., Kentucky; died June 10, 1892 in Macoupin Co., Illinois.
  iv.   Asher Solomon, born May 17, 1817 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; died in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (1) Narcissa Prows February 01, 1837 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born Abt. 1820; died Bef. 1845 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (2) Sarah Jane Cherry September 30, 1845 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born 1830 in Tennessee; died WFT Est. 1862-1924 in Macoupin Co., Illinois.
  v.   James Solomon, born July 28, 1810 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; died August 29, 1881 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (1) Pheba Hodges July 18, 1830 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born February 1816; died August 22, 1841 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (2) Easter H. Lemarr September 19, 1841 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born May 1827 in Tennessee; died September 02, 1852 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (3) Sarah Moss October 17, 1848 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born 1817 in Illinois; died WFT Est. 1853-1912.
  vi.   Lewis Solomon, born April 01, 1812 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; died April 01, 1886 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (1) Nancy Ann Fink June 23, 1836 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born February 22, 1818 in Lexington, Shelby Co., Kentucky; died September 18, 1863 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (2) Mary Ann Baker May 08, 1866 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born Abt. 1820 in Illinois; died WFT Est. 1870-1915.
  Notes for Lewis Solomon:
Lewis Solomon was in the U. S. Army in 1832, 3 Regiment Whitesides Brigade, Black Hawk Indian War.

JUDGE SOLOMON, one of the oldest settlers of Macoupin county, and a man who has been intimately identified with the history of this part of the state, was born in Muhlenburgh county, Kentucky, April 1, 1812. The family from whom he is descended is of Welsh and English origin. On their emigration to America his masters settled in Maryland and North Carolina. They were living in North Carolina at a date previous to the Revolutionary war, in which his grandfather, Lewis Solomon, took part. He was one of that daring band under the gallant Marion, which did such good service in the campaigns in South Carolina, striking terror into the hearts of the British invaders. While the family were living in North Carolina, a party of Tories came to the house during the latter part of the war to capture some articles for the use of the British army. Judge Solomon's grandmother was a woman of remarkable bravery and determination of character, but prudently submitted to the confiscation of various household stores. When the Tories, however, seized some yarn on which she set a high value, her anger and indignation got the better of her prudence, and seizing the poker she drove the Tories triumphantly from the house.

The father of the subject of this sketch, was Lewis Solomon, born in Franklin county, North Carolina, in 1780, about three years before the close of the war of the Revolution. He was raised in the same county, and married Sarah Bowden, daughter of John Bowden, a well-to-do and prominent citizen of Franklin county. This marriage occurred about the year1798. In 1811 he moved form North Carolina to Logan county, Kentucky, where he lived one year, and in 1821 moved to Muhlenburgh county, where the family resided as long as they lived in that state. The six oldest children were born in North Carolina, and Judge Solomon, the seventh child, was the first born after the removal to Kentucky. Their home in Muhlenburgh county was in a rough and poor district of country. Judge Solomon for a few months attended a subscription school kept by a man named Shelton, and this was the only schooling he received in Kentucky. In 1825 the family came to Illinois. In that day facilities for travel were very limited. A one-horse cart was hired for the journey for ten dollars, and in this vehicle all their goods were placed. With the exception of the mother and the three youngest children, who had places in the cart, the members of the family (twelve in all) walked. The journey was tedious and wearisome. On reaching this state a settlement was made in Morgan county, near Jacksonville. His father had lost all his means by the breaking of the Commonwealth Bank of Kentucky, and on coming to Illinois had no money with which to enter or purchase land. The winter of 1825-6 was spent in a small log cabin, part of the floor of which was composed of mother earth. In the spring of 1826, they moved to the head of Sandy, five miles from Jacksonville, and raised a crop, cultivating the ground with a shaft plow with a wooden mold-board, and similar primitive agricultural appliances. In the spring of 1827 the family came to Macoupin county, and settled in Palmyra township, three miles north of Palmyra. Judge Solomon's father lived there engaged in farming till his death in August, 1849. His mother died the preceding February.

Judge Solomon was in his thirteenth year when he came to Illinois, and in his fifteenth when he came to Macoupin county. When his father moved to this county only three settlements had been made in North Palmyra township, and consequently no schools had been established. For a few days in the summer fo 1829, he attended a school kept by his brother-in-law, James Howard. But his opportunities for acquiring an education were limited, and a few months would comprise all the instruction he ever received. He was a boy of bright faculties, learned rapidly, and in boyhood laid the foundation of a good education. He especially excelled in mathematics - his favorite study. He and his brothers were hired out by the month, and were also the principal dependence of their father in carrying on the farm. His father borrowed the money with which to enter the first eighty acres of land paying the exorbitant interest of twenty-five per cent, and when he died owned a farm of two hundred and fifty-six acres. In the year 1832 when twenty years of age, Judge Solomon volunteered in the Black Hawk war. He enlisted as a private in the company commanded by Capt. John Harris, in the third regiment of which A. B. DeWitt was colonel. He left Jacksonville April 25, 1832; rendezvoused at Beardstown; reached the Mississippi at the present town of Oquawka; thence marched to the mouth of Rock river, where they were mustered into the United States service, with Gen. Atkinson in command. The force next marched to Dixon, from which place a detachment of 250 advanced twenty miles, and attacked the Indians, but were repulsed by Black Hawk. The next day the main army (in which was Judge Solomon), advanced to the battle ground, and buried the dead. They returned to Dixon. Supplies from down the river had failed to arrive, and the men in his regiment were five days without bread. The regiment and the men in his regiment were five days without bread. The regiment afterward took twelve days rations, marched up Rock river, crossed over to the Fox, and returned home by way of Ottawa. During his two months' campaign he experienced considerable hardships. On starting out he weighed 150 pounds, and on reaching home had lost twenty-five. Soon after his return he was elected corporal in the militia. Subsequently he was chosen captain, and not long afterwards major of the 62d regiment, 2d battalion. While holding these positions he gave much attention to military tactics, and was considered one of the best militia officers in the state.

When about twenty-one he engaged in farming on his own account. He had been paid thirty-six dollars for his services during the Black Hawk war, and sixteen dollars he borrowed from his brother-in-law, and paid for it by making rails at forty cents a hundred. With this money he entered forty acres of land, a quarter of a mile west of the town of Palmyra. He also grubbed land for his brother-in-law, who paid him by giving him one-quarter of what he raised on his farm of about forty additional acres. He chopped wood at Jacksonville in 1834 for forty cents a cord and boarded himself, and the succeeding winter took a contract to cut 500 cords at fifty cents a cord. From the proceeds of his first work he obtained good clothing, and from his last contract he made enough money to enter forty additional acres of land. In the summer of 1835 he went to the lead mines of Galena, but was unsuccessful in making money, and returned home. In the fall of 1835 he visited relatives in Kentucky, and the next winter made rails to fence his land in Palmyra township, having determined to settle down in some permanent location. Accordingly, in the spring fo 1836 he bought a team on credit, began breaking prairie, built a cabin, and June 23, 1856, married Nancy Ann Fink, a native of Kentucky, daughter of John Fink, one of the early settlers of Barr township. He bought ten additional acres of land, endeavored to get his farm into as good a condition as possible, and kept a sharp look out for business advantages, so that in 1849, the year his father died, he had four or five hundred dollars surplus money. He then purchased the interest of the other heirs in his father's estate, and in the spring of 1850, moved to the homestead farm, where he lived till 1854. He had intended moving to the Military tract, but finding no location to suit him in that country, he purchased 360 acres of land in sections four, eight, and nine, North Palmyra township, for five thousand dollars cash. This farm, which has fine improvements, has since been his home. He is the owner of the largest body of land in the possession of one man in North Palmyra township, consisting of a few acres less than eight hundred.

His first wife died September 18, 1863. He was married again May 8, 1866, to Mrs. Mary Ann Butcher. Her maiden name was Baker. She was born in Morgan county, in February, 1831. By his first marriage he had twelve children, of whom nine grew to maturity, as follows: Louisa, who married Henry Yowell; her husband died in 1864; Francis Marion, who is farming in North Palmyra township; Thomas Jefferson, who died December 3, 1875; Dempsey N. who is farming in North Palmyra township, and in 1878 represented that township in the Board of Supervisors; Annie E., Martha, John L., Lafayette, and Allen B.

In his political belief he has always been a democrat. At Jacksonville, on his return from the Black Hawk war in the fall of 1832, he cast his first vote for Andrew Jackson, for President. He has been a democrat and his political hopes and sympathies have been closely allied to the party which has numbered among its advocates such illustrious men as Jefferson and Jackson. On financial questions his views have coincided with those of the national greenback party, but he advocates the old, well settled and first established principles of democracy. He was a Union man and a leading war democrat during the Rebellion. He assisted in sending to the front forty-three men from Palmyra precinct, two of whom were substitutes, for three years; whom he placed in the field with his own means. Judge Solomon is a man who has received numerous tokens of the public confidence and the esteem of the people. The first position to which he was chosen was in 1839, when he was elected to the comparatively humble office of constable, the duties of which he discharged for four years. He was appointed by the county court in 1839, and in 1840 assessor, and assessed one-third of the county. He was elected justice of the peace in 1843, and held the office till his resignation in 1854. His first election to the legislature occurred in 1852, when he was chosen representative on the democratic ticket with John A. Chesnut as the opposing Whig candidate. From 1857 to 1861 he acted as county judge. In 1861, he as elected a member of the constitutional convention, the nomination being tendered him by the democratic convention without his making any effort to secure it. In 1870 he was elected to the state senate from the district embracing Macoupin, Montgomery, Shelby and Christian counties. While in the legislature Judge solomon as an active and efficient member, devoting his attention to legislation which would secure the best interests of the people. While he was in the house the democrats were in the majority. While a member of the constitutional convention he served on several important committees, among them the committee on revision. In the senate the republicans controlled the organization of the body, but he served on three or four important committees, among which were the committees on revenue, on charitable institutions, and on fees and salaries. He took a moderate stand, and his views commanded the respect of the republican majority, among which he had considerable influence. He was the author of the bill giving land owners a right to redeem lands sold at tax sales at twenty-five per cent, addition the first six months, fifty per cent, the first twelve months, one hundred per cent for two years, and after that no redemption; the previous law requiring an addition of one hundred per cent penalty any time after the sale. He was also author of the bill giving counties a right to work county convicts. Politically he has acted from conscientious motives. In his views he has been moderate rather than partisan, and when a candidate has always received a considerable republican vote from his friends in the county. As a public officer he endeavored to discharge the duties of his position without regard to party, and in an impartial and honest manner, and he has always retired to private life conscious of having done his best to serve the interests of the people. Scarcely a man in the county has held so many public positions or received so many marks of popular favor. Upon his character for honesty and integrity there has never breathed suspicion. His life has been open to the view of the citizens of the county, and not a stain can be found on his record as a public officer or as a private citizen. He is a man of unquestioned morality, and though not a member of any religious denomination, has liberally supported the churches of his part of the county. He believes that Christianity consists in deeds, not in words, and that he is the best Christian who lives a life of the strictest rectitude, and who does the most good to his fellow men.




  vii.   Philemon Bennett Solomon, born May 25, 1814 in Logan Co., Kentucky; died November 18, 1885 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (1) Mary E. Good June 01, 1845 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born Abt. 1814 in Illinois; died 1855 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (2) Fannie Smith February 05, 1856 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; born Abt. 1833 in North Carolina; died WFT Est. 1862-1927.
  Notes for Philemon Bennett Solomon:
In 1845 he was contracted to build the Methodist Church.

He was Justice of the Peace in 1846 for Chesterfield.

Was Postmaster before 1885 and was appointed by Abraham Lincoln.


  viii.   Henry Solomon, born December 06, 1799 in Franklin Co., North Carolina; died August 21, 1876 in Macoupin Co., Illinois; married (1) Rebecca James January 02, 1821 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; born Abt. 1800; died 1823 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; married (2) Elizabeth Prowse June 17, 1824 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; born 1806 in Kentucky; died July 17, 1888 in Macoupin Co., Illinois.
  41 ix.   Drusilla Jane Soloman, born July 02, 1801 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky; died August 24, 1876 in Antioch, Contra Costa Co, CA; married Elijah Wells December 14, 1821 in Muhlenberg Co., Kentucky.


      84. James LeMarr, born Abt. 1754 in Queen Anne County, Maryland; died April 27, 1821 in Claiborne County, Tennessee. He was the son of 168. Luke LeMarr and 169. Naomy Amy Swift. He married 85. Mary Taylor Abt. 1798 in Russell Co., VA.

      85. Mary Taylor, born Bet. 1770 - 1780; died Aft. 1830 in Claiborne County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of 170. James Taylor and 171. Rachel.

Notes for James LeMarr:
He married Mary Taylor in probably Russell Co., VA. Mary was born BET. 1770-1780. Mary was the daughter of James Taylor and Rachel ?. Mary died AFT. 1830 in Claiborne Co., TN.

There is a land grant 1793 in Washington Co.,VA for 100 acres for James Lemar. The name David Cain is in the document and James Lemar is listed as the assignee of David Cain. The original patent is dated 1783 and the patent was not issued until 1793. The patent states the land beside Alexander Montogomery, Robert Tate, and the land where James Lemar now lives on.

1793 MAY 16- LAND GRANT TO JAMES LEMAR FOR 100 ACRES IN WASHINGTON CO VA /GRANTS 28 PAGE 303

"Russell County Deed Book 2" by Tom Colley Deed Book 2 page 256 of deed book 2 Tate Deed To Davis- 12/26/1796 40 acres for 25 pounds-the land lying between James Lemars(***) & James Overton-Land they now live on

"Russell Co.,VA Deed Book 3, 1798-1806" by Thomas Colley Taylor et Al to Price 200 acres 12 Oct 1803: Indenture between James Taylor and Milley, his wife, Joseph Taylor, James Lemarr and Mary, his wife, Heirs and coheirs of James Taylor, deceased, all of Russell County of the one part and Francis Price (of Russell County) of the other part...$800...Land in Russell Co. on both sides of Mockeson Creek a branch of the North Fork of Holston River and bounded...corner to James King Carr's land as was; which he formerly lived on...bank of the Mill pond...containing 200 acres m/l which said Tract...being their part allotment of 2 tracts of land which was granted to the said James Taylor, Dec'd., from this Commonwealth the first bearing the date 20 Jul 1787 and the second 18 Oct 1791.... Sig: James Taylor, Milly Taylor, Joseph Taylor, James Lemarr, Mary Lemarr Wit:Nathan Ellington, Daniel Price, Nelson White Acknowledgement/Recorded: February Court 1804...on Oaths of (above named witnesses)

Implied Marriages Of Russell County, Virginia compiled by Mary D Fugate C.G.R.S. James Lemarr: 12 Oct 1803; Mary heir & legatee of James Taylor (Fugate's reference Russell Co. Deed Book 3 page 458 (This book tries to provide possible marriages implied from deeds, wills, and such of marriages not recorded.)

"Russell Co.,VA Deed Book 3, 1798-1806" by Thomas Colley Tate et Aux. to Lemarr 30 acres 26 Mar 1806: Indenture between Robert Tate & Mary, his wife and James Lemar (all of Russell Co.)....$1...land in Russell Co. on both sides of big Mockerson Creek and Bounded: beginning at a stake at the crossing of the STATE and Walkers lines on the North side of the said Creek at a place known by the name of the deep fording....containing 30 acres m/l..... Sig: Robert Tate, Mary Tate Acknowledgement/Recorded: April Court 1806...Mary, having been first prvily examined....

" Russell County Virginia Deed Book 4 1806-1814" by Tom Colley; Iberian Publishing Company; Athens, GA 1996: Deed Book 4 page 451 Lemarr deed to Taylor 100 acres 01 Oct 1811: Indenture between James Lemarr & Mary his wife of Russell County and State of Virginia... and John Taylor of Lee Co., and State aforesaid... L110...land in Russell Co. on both sides of big mochenson creek...Beginning:..corner to William Hullums land he now lives on and with a line thereof....crossing the creek to a spanish oak on a spur of Clinch mountain and along the same...bank on the creek corner to a survey made by Robert Tate and with his line...leaving sd. line...crossing the walnut hollow to the Beginning. containing 100 acres more or less.

Sig: James Lemarr, Mary Lemarr Acknowledgement/Recorded: 01 Oct 1811... Mary... having been first privily examined.

CLAIBORNE CO.,TN DEED BOOK D PG 38 NATHANIEL NORVELL TO JAMES LEMARR 1812 $500 150 ACRES
This indenture made this twenty eight day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twelve between Nathaniel Norvell of the county of Claiborne and the State of Tennessee of the one part and James Lemarr of the same place of the other part Witnesseth that the said Nathaniel Norville for and in consideratiion of the sum of five hundred dollars to him in hand paid the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath for himself and his heirs bargained sold set over conveyed and confirmed and by these presents doth bargain grant sell convey and confirm unto the said James Lemarr a certain piece or parcel of land situate lying and being in the county of Claiborne in the state aforesaid in Henderson and companys Powell Valley Large Survey...Beginning on a black oak in a hollow on the lot line then with said line to a black oak on the top of the dividing ridge then along the top of the said ridge to a black oak-corner to Peter Ausmus near a mud fieldwhere Robert Jones once lived then to two black oaks another corner of Peter Ausmuses then along said Peters line (now known by the name of Latin Ewels line and corner) to three white oak saplings all from one root then along said Ewels line to a Hickory by the line of the road then up the said road to a hickory at the mouth of a hollow thence up the said hollow to the above mentioned lot linethe place of beginning containing one hundred and fifty acres be the same more or less together with all wood woods water waters mines and minerals ways and priviledges herewith ???? and appurtenances, unto the said land belonging or in any wise appurtaining to the same or any part thereof and all the estate right title interest property claim and demand him the sd. Nathaniel Norville his heirs executors administrators and assigns unto the said James Lemarr his heirs executors administrators assigns to have and to hold the said one hundred and fifty acres of land witht he appurtenances unto the said James Lemarr his heirs and assigns forever as an estate of inheritance in fee simple..Lastly I the said Nathaniel Norville do bind myself my Heirs unto the said James Lemarr his heirs to warrant and forever defend the said tract or parcell of land free from the lawful claim or claims of all and any other person or persons lawfully claiming or claim the same or any part thereof either in law or equity in testamony whereof the said Nathaniel Norville hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year above written log sealed and delivered in the presents of us:
Wm Rogers
John Cameron Nathaniel Norville seale
James Rogers

Registered this 26Day of Nov 1812 Wm Rogers register of Claiborne County

1782 WASHINGTON CO.,VA TAX LISTS
Name Tithes Horses Cattle Slaves Slave Names Captain Barnett's Precinct
Lemare, John 1 2 6
Lemare, James 1 2 -
Lemare, Luke 1 5 5
Lemare, William 1 5 4
Lemare, Gallant 1 3 -

1787 RUSSELL COUNTY VIRGINIA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST, SAMUEL RITCHIE'S LIST LOWER DISTRICT:
Lemar, James 1
Lemar, John 1
Lemar, Luke 1

1788 RUSSELL COUNTY VIRGINIA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST LOWER DISTRICT, SAMUEL RITCHIE'S LIST:
Lemar, John (1)
Lemar, Luke (1)

1789 RUSSELL COUNTY VIRGINIA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST LOWER DISTRICT, SAMUEL RITCHIE'S LIST:
Lemar, James (1)
Lemar, John (1)
Lemar, Luke (1)

Names found in the 1790 Russell Co., Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Lemar, James Lower
Lemar, John Lower
Lemar, Luke Lower

1792 RUSSELL COUNTY VIRGINIA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST LOWER DISTRICT, JOHN CARTER'S LIST:
Lamarr, John (1)
Lemar, James (1)

1793 RUSSELL COUNTY VIRGINIA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST LOWER DISTRICT, JOHN CARTER'S LIST:
Lemar, James (1)
Lemar, John (2)

1794 RUSSELL COUNTY VIRGINIA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST LOWER DISTRICT, PATRICK PORTER'S LIST:
James Lemar (1)
John Lemar (1)

1795 Russell County Virginia Personal Property Tax List Lower District Robert Tate, Jr., Commissioner:
James Lemarr-1
John Lemarr-2

1796 Russell County Virginia Personal Property Tax List LOWER DISTRICT, ROBERT TATE'S LIST:
Lamarr, John (1)
Lemarr, James (1)

1797 Russell County Virginia Personal Property Tax List LOWER DISTRICT, ROBERT TATE'S LIST:
Lamarr, James (1)

1798 Russell County Virginia Personal Property Tax List Lower District, Robert Tate's List:
Lemarr, James (2)

1799 Russell County Virginia Personal Property Tax List Lower District, Robert Tate's List:
Lemarr, James (2)

1800 Russell County Virginia Personal Property Tax List Lower District James Dickenson's List:
Lemarr, James

1810 Russell County Personal Property Tax List:
Leman, James (obviously these are a transcription mistake for the tax list listed online at the Russell Co.,VA Genweb site.)
Leman, John

1830 CLAIBORNE CO.,TN CENSUS
JAMES LAMAR PG 137 13110001-1011002001
(James from Md to DE to TN ; listed as father of Samuel and Shelby Lemar in Harold D. Lemar book.)

MARY LAMAR PG 142 1-1001 PG 142 ( Mary LeMarr, mother of Isaac N LeMarr Sr. of IL and James Madison LeMarr of TN)
MARY LAMAR 1011-00001001 6 HOUSES AWAY FROM PREVIOUS MARY PG 142 (Widow of James Lemar-Mary Taylor Lemar from Russell Co.,VA) JAMES LAMAR 01001-21001 2 HOUSES AWAY FROM OLDER MARY PG 142 (James Taylor Lemar, brother 1st Mary and son of older Mary Taylor Lemar above)

1840 CLAIBORNE CO.,TN CENSUS
JAMES LEMARR PG 227 001310001-00101001001
(James from MD to DE to TN and son of Gallent LeMar II)

JAMES F LEMARR PG 227 2101001-112101 (James Taylor Lemar-taken from census book transcription with the F probably transcribed for the T)
MARY LEMAR PG 228 211-110001 (Mary LeMarr, mother of Isaac N LeMarr Sr of IL. and James Madison LeMarr of TN.)

WILLIAM LEMARR PG 223 00001-10001( a son of the other James Lemar from MD-DE-TN, son of Gallent Lemar II that married Tabitha Robinson on 2/24/1838 in Claiborne Co.,TN. This William LeMarr along with brother James LeMarr sell some of their father'sland in 1844 after his decease. )

Claiborne Co.,TN Records: James Lemare taxes of .31 1/4 in Nov. 1807 (This is obviously James the son of Gallent Lemar II)
John Lemare bought 200 acres from Thomas Mclaine in Feb 1808 BK A PG 386 (This is the son of Luke.)
James Lemare, Jr. was a juror for August term 1814 (This is our James Lemar of MD-DE-TN)
A James LeMar died in 1821, oaths by Jessee Cain and John Linch. (This is our James Lemar son of Luke.)

Claiborne County, Tennessee, Minutes of Court & Pleas & Quarter Sessions page 268 August 11, 1823 Ordered by the court that Frederick Bollinger be appointed overseer of the road from the walnut and hickory end of James Rogers precinct Crossing through the gap of the ridge by David Snuffers. Robert Gibsons lain and have for hands William Hooper, Charles Noey Hooper, Jacob Cassel, Alfred Lynch, John Lynch, Aaron Lynch, Jessee Cain, James Cain, George Beeler, William Nations, George Sharp, James L. LeMare, Joseph Morning, Valentine Boroff, Samuel Rogers.

Also on page 299, Nov 16, 1823, the same order lists a James LeMar along with a James T. LeMare, and a John Bratcher.
(Note that the mother of James Madison Lemar's wife, Obedience Davis, was a Bratcher, daughter of Charles Bratcher. The John Bratcher is the uncle of Mary Obedience Davis the wife of James Madison LeMarr. The James T Lemarr is James Taylor LeMarr. The James LeMarr is the James from MD-DE-TN).

1830 Claiborne Co.,TN census MARY LAMAR 1011-00001001
(Listed 6 HOUSES AWAY FROM DAUGHTER, PREVIOUSLY LISTED MARY PG 142 AND 2 HOUSES FROM SON JAMES TAYLOR LEMAR.)
(1 MALE UNDER 5, 1 MALE 10-15, 1 MALE 15-20, 1 FEMALE 20-30, 1 FEMALE 50-60)
(James Taylor Lemar Hopper, Mathew Lemar, Isham Lemar, Martha Lemar, Widow Mary Taylor Lemar)

There is no record found for the Widow Mary Taylor LeMarr's decease in Claiborne Co.,TN.
As previously stated a John Linch and Jesse Cain gave oaths to the decease of James Lemarr and were the administrators of the will of James LeMarr. The will was presented in court but not recorded in the Claiborne Co.,TN Court Minute Books or the Will Books. The Davis Creek Church Minutes listed the actual death date for James LeMarr.

Notes from http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/7054/Families/LeMarr/i0009688.htm#i9688
     
Child of James LeMarr and Mary Taylor is:
  42 i.   James Taylor LeMarr, born July 21, 1800 in Russell Co., VA; died Bet. 1850 - 1860 in Macoupin, Illinois; married Martha Ann (Patsy) Cain September 02, 1821 in Claiborne Co., TN.


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