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Page 174 of 597


Ancestors of Kayrle Jessica Beaugrand


      196. Richard Ferguson, born Bet. 1723 - 1725 in Westchester Co., New York; died Abt. 1791 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada. He was the son of 392. Richard Ferguson and 393. Eleanor. He married 197. Rachel Bef. 1752 in Westchester, New York.

      197. Rachel, born in Westchester Co., New York; died Unknown in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada.

Notes for Richard Ferguson:
      1770 -- Richard Ferguson lived at Ft. Edwards, New York, USA. In 1774, he settled on Jessups Lands in Jessups Burgh. In 1775, he leased 300 acres from Gov. Robinson at Cannon's Neck. He had 2 houses, oxen, cattle -- in partnership with his son, Israel.
      1776 -- He began carrying British dispatches and became a recruiting agent for the Loyalists movement. In 1777, he was taken prisoner on Lake George while on his way to Ticonderoga and (with several other prisoners) he was put on board a batteau ordered to center of the American fleet. Because the night was dark and stormy, they were able to escape. Richard went to Diamont Point to warn of the rebel intentions. After Burgoyne's defeat, he went to Canada and was employed as an Intelligence Agent in the Colonies.
      1778 -- His wife, a son and his daughters (who had all been incarcerated) were released and came to Canada to be with their father. Sons Israel, Richard and Farrington were all in the King's Rangers. On October 13, 1779, Haldimand Papers mention that Richard Ferguson was bringing intelligence and submitting certificate of his services in protection of Loyalists. He was working under Capt. James Rogers, commander of the King's Rangers. April 10, 1880, there is reference to a note sent to Maj. Robert Mathews by Capt. Rogers which Richard Ferguson had entrusted to Roger's men. April 29, 1780, "Capt. James Rogers (St. John's) to Maj. R. Mathews: Richard Ferguson arrived with 13 recruits. He conducted John W. Myers to Ballstown and thinks he got safely to York or near it. It is said that Amboy, New Jersey, was burned by King's troops. Ferguson took Squire prisoner and brought him in. He says, 'country people are in great distress due to lack of necessaries,' and also requests his half-pay. Richard Ferguson complained that Myers was operating in the same area as he was and that it was endangering him due to the repeated manhunts out for Myers by the Rebels.
      July 30, 1781 -- St. John's Loyalist List shows Richard, his wife and one son above six years of age, total three persons: 1 1/2 rations. Notation reads: "an old man."
September 14, 1784 -- Loyalist List "Return of Refugees and disbanded troops lodged at St. Johns" shows Richard with wife only and "Remains by permission from His Execellency, the Commander-In-Chief."
      1790s -- Died. He had been granted 550 acres of land at Marysburgh and at Sophiasburgh, Prince Edward County. Picton papers put land near Carrying Place (the Indian name for a portage).
      In compensation claim re: USA land, the three oldest sons are noted as "native Americans" -- believe all the children were born in the United States of America.
      He was an early settler of Nine Partners, Dutchess Co. On Jan. 10, 1745 he was a witness on a deed in lot 32 for 3412 acres (D 3:422). He had a daughter born locally in 1759. In 1759, Bartholomew Hogaboom of Beekman sued Richard Ferguson and was awarded 40Lb. (Sept. 1759, WRITS) Mary Hogaboom, administratrix, sued Richard Ferguson (Oct. 1760, WRITS). James Adams and Mary his wife, late Mary Hogaboom, administrators of the estate of Bartholomew Hogaboom, dec'd, sued Richard Ferguson (CP Oct. 1761). He or his father recorded his ear mark in Crum Elbow 1/21/1750-1; a crop in the left ear and two half-pennies under the right ear. The mark was transferred to Aron Boughter 12/25/1767. He kept an account at the Schenk store and on 11/3/1764 he bought rum, a pair of shoes and 2.5 yards of cloth (Day Book B 134). His account, as kept in Ledger B, ran from 7/17/1674 through 11/4/1766. He charged sundries and "2 felt hattes" and paid with sundries, a book and bushels of wheat for a total of 3Lb2/10 and took out a note for his balance of llLb/19/2 (Ledger A 261). His account included purchases made 6/24/1765 of 19s 3p for soap and other items (Day Book B 536). Richard Forkison bought rum and pins at the Mabbett store abt. 1762. A road description of 1768 noted he was near the road to Filkintown (CEPR71). He left Nine Partners area before the Revolution and settled near Ft. Edward and was referred to as Richard Sr. in Loyalist records. They had settled on Jessup's Land in Jessupsburg in 1774, which they quitted after making some improvements. Then went to Cameron's Neck. they cleared between 8-10 acres. They had 300 acres on Cameron's Neck, Albany Co. They had an agreement for a lease from Gov. Robinson in 1775, before the war broke out and settled on the land. When a witness left it, they had cleared 60 acres. Before he went away, 2 horses were taken. When he went away, he left the things mentioned in the Schedule on the Lands. His younger brothers would have joing the British when he did, but were too young (only 12 and 13). When Israel went away, his mother and sisters and one of his brothers were thrown in Gaol. She came to Canada as soon as she was released. His father came to Canada in 1978. Israel Ferguson is authorized by all the family to receive what may be allowed for their losses. Israel produced a release from his father to show he gives up all his Right to Compensation to his sons and Israel received 1/2pay as Lt., Richard as Ensign. A side note of this commentary states: "Good People."
      Lt. Philip Lansing, Witness: "Knew the family. Remember the father employed in carrying Despatches of Consequence, giving an acct. of the Rebel Army to Canada in the year 1776. They were a very Loyal Family. Israel and his two brother served in the Rangers. The mother and sisters were imprisoned at Albany. The whole family came as soon as they coule get away into Canada. They had catle and various things taken from them by the Rebels."
      Lt. Walter Sutherland, Witness: "Knew all the three brother and the father. The whole family were Loyal. The brothers all served. They had a farm on Cremme's Neck. They had it before the Rebellion. Witness was at the place in 1778. thinks there were 40-50 acres clear. They had very good furniture and utensils and a good deal of it. Speaks ofa fine yoke of oxen and cows."
      Another account notes: "The Fergusons were natives of America who lived at Ft. Edward, where they owned a farm on 300 acres in partnership with their father, also called Richard. the brothers claimed a loss of 388Lb sterling and rec'd 48Lb sterling." (LAR) The father gave a deposition 11/20/1787 to the effect that his son's testimony was correct (ALC153).
      His wife was probably the Rachel Ferguson mentioned in the minutes of the Albany Committee 9/8/1779: "Rachel Ferguson having been some time since confined for harboring & entertaining a Number of Tories who come down from Canada with an intention of Murdering the Defenseless Inhabitants on the Western Frontiers of this State, was brought before the Board [;] ordered that she be liberated from Confinement on entering into a Recognizance for her future Good Behavior and appearance at the next Court of General Sessions of the peace to be Held in October & then & there to answer such charges as shall be alleged against her & not to depart the Court without Leave.
      Rachel Ferguson on Recognizance      200Lb
      Robert Yates her bail in            200Lb
      Nicholas Howe D                  200Lb
      Stephen Howe D                  200Lb"
      Sgt. Richard Ferguson was on a return of Disbanded Troops and Loyalists settled in Cataraqui Township No. 3 (Fredericksburgh, CN) on 10/6/1785. The roll notes "his land not run out" and he was there with one woman. He was listed at this location again in 1785. As Richard Ferguson, Sr. he was there between July 1-August 31, 1786. Jacob Ferguson was one away on the list. Richard Ferguson, Pensioner, was on a "General Return of Refugee Loyalists in the Province of Quebec Exclusive of those Wuartered and residing in the Upper Posts." This return was abt. 9/1783. A Richard Ferguson was awarded 550 acres as a pensioner.
      From Canniff's Notes: Mr. VanDusen's grandfather was an old veteran, settled with the sons on Ferguson's Point. On one occasion, they went up the country in a log canoe in the woods to Hallowell Bay (site of Picton Glenwood Cemetery). Here gone on this distant trip some time returned and pronounced the place uninhabitable. "It will never be settled in man's time, nothing but a mosquito hole." Had been shown the spot where they landed in the head of the bay. (notes sent by Paul D. Cole/colebgp@kingston.net)

More About Richard Ferguson:
Affiliation: United Empire Loyalist (UEL)
Burial: Unknown, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell
Source2: The Settlers Of the Beekman Patent, by F. Doherty, Sr.
Source3: Paul D. Cole/colebgp@kingston.net

More About Rachel:
Burial: Unknown, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy by Rae Marie Campbell, UE

More About Richard Ferguson and Rachel:
Marriage: Bef. 1752, Westchester, New York
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell
     
Children of Richard Ferguson and Rachel are:
  i.   Israel Ferguson, born Abt. 1752 in Westchester Co., New York; died 1791 in Ernestown, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; married Nancy Singleton Unknown in Westchester or Albany Co., New York; born 1752 in Probably New York; died Aft. 1843 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada.
  Notes for Israel Ferguson:
      1775 -- Israel was a farmer who was leasing land from the Governor of New York (at Albany) at Jessup's Burgh and Cannon's Neck, New York with his father, Richard. It's believed he was married prior to this as there were two houses on the land.
      1777 -- He joined with the British at Skenesborough as a Lieutenant in the King's Rangers. His land and possessions in New York were taken by the Rebels.
      April 29, 1780, from Capt. James Rogers, St. John's to Maj. Robert Mathews: Ferguson reports nearly 300 men are engaged and only waiting for guides. Wants permission to send men for the purpose.
      August 3, 1780, from Israel Ferguson, St. John's to Maj. Robert Mathews (Quebec): Inform His Execllency of my return. I took dispatches Maj. Carleton gave me. No one was at the rendezvous. I returned after getting provisions, but hired a man to go to Saratoga for intelligence, expecially newspapers. If none available, he is to go to Albany to ensure a weekly delivery to Saratoga, and thence to Benjamin Fairchild's. Enclosed is an account of my expenses on different scouts. I have never had any support or "underpay."
      August 4, 1780, from Capt. James Rogers, St. Johns to Maj. Robert Mathews: Ferguson should be on pay as he has had full complement of men since 1st April. (An allowance of 2 shillings and 6 pence a day was made to messengers "sent into the enemy country", according to a communication between Maj. Mathews at Quebec to Sir John Johnson.)
      September 4, 1780 -- Israel Ferguson left the colonies and was at St. John's. Intelligence of recent battle and the defeat of Gates and at Camden. Movements of Oneidas. Between September 22 and October 5, families of Loyalist fathers who were already in Canada had to be across the lines.
      November 9, 1780 -- Lt. Ferguson's Account recorded: Arrived at Ballstown 26th July at 'a Loyalist house' and remained there until the 30th. Then received intelligence that Mr. Mitchel, the object of his scout had already gone to Schenectady. Ferguson decided to capture him at a good location on the rod between the town and the bridge. He then posted two men separately where they had long views of the road -- one was the only man among them who knew Mitchel personally. Ferguson and his associate hid on the far side of the bridge. many people passed before Maj. Mitchel and his Lieutenant appeared. The spotter behaved with suspicious slowness and did not fire his warning shot until Mitchel was over the bridge and abreast of Ferguson. The horses were startled by the shot and in the confusion, Mitchel escaped. Afraid that his own party would be pursued and captured, Israel aborted the mission and led them to their cache of packs. To mislead pursuers, they avoided the shortest rout out and headed back to base by a longer route. On the way, he spied a 14-year old Indian, unaware of their presence. Israel divided his group. Two would go east for two hours and two would go west for two hours. Both parties were then to turn north and head for Canada. Israel and "a Loyalist" arrifed safe at St. John's. The other two are not yet arrived, but he is optimistic, as the "Loyalist" is an excellent pilot and the soldier "most active and vigorous." It is not clear which party was led by teh Indian boy, but it was likely the other group, because Israel implies the devious ways of the Indians may have led to delay. He commented that a few hundred yards head start and a knowledge of woodcraft is a great advantage in such situations. A "steady and approved Loyalist", who owns a public house (tavern) and oftern overhears Rebel conversations, told Israel that he had heard from a Rebel named Reineck, who had accompanied German prisoners to Schenectady, about a Rebel contact in the St. Lawrence Suburb of Montreal named Malcomb. Reineck had recommended this man as reliable to the Rebel General Clint. malcomb has helped a number of excapers by hiding them temporarily.
      1781 -- Loyalist List shows Israel's age as 29 years.
      1782 -- Listed as Quartermaster for disbanding King's Rangers.
      May 7, 1783 -- Maj. James Rogers, Lt. Israel Ferguson, Lt. Solomon Johns, and Ensign William Buel, St. John's to Sir John Johnson: On behalf of the corps, they requested transfer to his 2nd Battalion, if his establishment is not full. If full already, would the Governor allow formation of a new company?
      December 11, 1783 -- Israel Ferguson to Robert Mathews: Requesting help and advice. He received his Lietenant's warrant ("a beating warrant", i.e., for recruiting) from Maj. Rogers on May 20, 1779. Received no pay from government until October 24, 1780, then received half-pay to November 25, 1781. It was six months before he received this. Had "upwards of" 20 effective men in service and nearly a full company before he received half-pay. From the beginning, he acted as adjutant and quartermaster for the corps, because someone had to do it. He did it "assiduously." In spite of theis, he has had no considerations, no pay for stationery. If you consider this worth reporting, please tell the Governor.
      December 17, 1783 -- Israel Ferguson (Montreal) to Robert Mathews concerning an allowance being made as acting adjutant and quartermaster. Enclosed a sketch, making comparison with instructions to Sir John Johnson's 1st Battalion paymaster, Capt. Daly.
      September 14, 1784 -- the Loyalist List Return of Refuges and disbanded troops lodged at St. John's shows Israel as having wife and one son and one daughter, both over ten years. "Man gone to Cataraqui to prepare a house for his family." Lot 15, Con. 1, east side of East Lake, 200 acres; also had 200 acres in Ernestown, plus 1600 acres petitioned for. As officer, he was entitled to 2,000 acres total.
      1788 -- In his statement re: lands claims, Israel lists residence as Bay of Quinte, although he had gone into partnership with his brother-in-law, George Singleton, in Thurlow Township, where they set up a fur-trading posting at the mough of the Moira River. Singleton, his wife (Margaret nee Cannif), a man-servant and his wife, and Israel's own family settled on Lots #5 and #6, 1st and 2nd Concessions, Thurlow Township. They wanted to trade with the Indians -- built a large log house, added storeroom for furs and maple sugar (this was also a big "trade" item). Any records found to day show only Lot #5 to be Singleton's name -- no land noted in this area under Ferguson's name.
      From Annotated Gazeteer of Hastings County: Belleville (originally called Singleton's Creeek, then Meyer's Creek [from 1793-1816], the villate was also called the town of Moira or the village of Thurlow) - Sidney/Thurlow: First settled by Alexander Chisholm, Capt. George Singleton, Lt. Israel Ferguson, William Bell, John taylor, John Simpson, Capt. John Meeyerss (first lumber & grist mills), Simon & James McNabb, John McIntosh, Roswell Leavens. Hastings Militia was formed about 1800. Belleville is the chief city and seat of government for Hastings Co.
      From Pioneers of Hastings County/Excerpts from the illus. Historical Atlas of the Counties of Hastings and Prince Edward, 1878: The township of Thurlow or the 9th town is bounded on the south by the Bay of Quinte, on the west by the township of Sidney, on the north by Huntingdon and on the east by Tyendinnnaga. The Moira River, named after the Earl of Moira, afterward Marquis of Hastings, or Sagottaska, it's original Indian name, runs through the township in a south-westerly direction. Though not certain, it is believed the name of the township was derived from some titled nobleman who had held an office under the British Govt.
      During the year 1787, Louis Kotte surveyed and laid out the front concessionn of Thurlow which was taken up by Capt. John Singleton, Lt. Ferguuson, an Indian Trader, Davidd Vanderhyden, John & Alex Chisholmm, and probably Capt. John Walter Myers, who it is said, located upon the front oof Thurlow previous to his removall to Sidney.
      In 1789, a large number of loyalists from the U.S. arrive. Among these we find the names of Russell Pitman, Archibald McKinzie, Solomonn Hazelton, ??? McMichael, William Cook, Sedic Thrasher, Asa Turner, Stephen & Laurence Bagley, John Taylor, William Reed & his sons - Samuel, William, John, & Solomon, Richard Smith, John Longwell, Conelly and Sherardd. These were followed afterward by the families of Richard Canniff and Robert Thompson.
      In 1790, Capt. Myers build a new sawmill and afterwards a grist mill on thee east bank of the Moira River, which was in all probability the foundation of the present day city of Belleville, then known as Myers Creek.
      1789 -- On a trip to Kingston for supplies, Singletook ill and died on September 23 at Ernestown, as did the man-servant. Israel also took ill and repordedly died by Christmas of that year, although his brother puts the time as about the beginning of the year 1791. Canniff recorded that Ferguson's body was kept in the storehouse until the spring and was the first person buried in Old Taylor Burying Grounds at Bellville. A listing of the tombstones for that Cemetery don't show one for Israel.
      1791 -- Land claim of 200 acres, Con. 1, Lot 18, east of Carrying Place was noted in rocords of Marysburgh for Isreal Ferguson.
      1796 -- Brother Richard petitioned for Israel's balance of 1600 acres. In a letter to Peter Hunter, from Lt. Richard Ferguson, Jr. who was the administrator of Israel's estate, sets out the case for receiving the balance of land due "to the use of the Heirs of the said deceased."
      December 8, 1801 -- It was recommended that the residue be granted to Capt. Richard Ferguson of the Royal Canadian Volunteers.
      July 12, 1802 -- The Governor approved but no issue until a claim established by a report of the Commissioners. At this time, Ferguson was handling the matter from Hallowell Township. The matter probably went into his hands because Richard was a career soldier.
      1843 -- Israel's wife Nancy was still living in the Quinte area - according to the testimony she gave at the divorce precedings of Richard, Jr. and Frederica Grant.
      1791 -- Land claim of 200 acres, Con. 1, Lot 18,east of Carrying Place was noted in records of Marysburgh for Israel Ferguson.
      1796 -- Brother Richard petitioned for Israel's balance of 1600 acres. In a letter to Peter Hunter, from Lt. Richard Ferguson, Jr., who was the administrator of Israel's estate, sets out the case for receiving the balance of land due "to the use of the Heirs of the said deceased."
      December 8, 1801 -- It was recommended that the residue be granted to Capt. Richard Ferguson of the Royal Canadian Volunteers.
      July 12, 1802 -- The Governor approves but no issue until a claim established by a report of the Commissioners. At this time, Farrington was handling the matter from Hallowell township. The matter probably went into his hands because Richard was a career soldier.
      1843 -- Israel's wife, Nancy, was still living in the Quinte area, according to testimony she gave at the divorce proceedings of Richard, Jr., and Frederica Grant. -- Information from Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae Marie Campbell, UE
      Notes from Wendy Daxon's research (2/9/2000): In 1787 Lt. I. Ferguson and his brother-in-law, Capt. G. Singleton joined in partnership to start a trading post. Ferguson needed to purchase his half of the buisness from Singleton, so all members of Ferguson's family surrended their land rights as Loyalists to Isael so he could raise the money. Israel had served in Sir John Johnson's Regement/The King's Royal Rangers of New York (aka as the Queen's Rangers). When he drew his land lot as a Loyalist, he made his claim as an officer in the Queen's Rangers. His land lot was in Fredericksburgh.
      On January 11, 1778, claim was filed for losses to the Ferguson family in the Revolutionary War. In the Spring of 1778, the claim money was received. They chose to sell part of their land allotment in Fredericksburgh. In Spring of 1778, Israel Ferguson applied for and received half-pay as a disbanded officer. His brother Richard (who was in the Secret Service) also settled on the Bay of Quinte.
      The Winter of 1788-89 was a very severe winter after a draught in the summer of 1788 brought on "The Hungry Year" (1798). No one's crops were good, food was scarce and even game was scarce (due to lack of food for the foraging animals). Furguson and Singleton went bankrupt. Singleton died that winter and Israel was left to care for both families. He was so overworked (trying to keep both families going on with no food for his own well-being) he got sick and died in November, 1789. The women had to store his body in an outbuilding, frozen till Spring when he could be buried. He was the first person buried in the Old Taylor Burying Grounds. The two widows lived together to survive.
      He was on the roll for Disbanded Troops (etc.) in Cataraqui 10/6/1784 with himself, one woman and two servants. A note in the roll states: "On his way up to the Kings Lands." Richard Ferguson, Jr. was three away from him on this list. He was also listed in Catarqui in 1785 as Lt. Israel Ferguson. In July-August 1786 he was walso on this roll but with one female over 10 years, in addition to himself and his wife. he presented the case for his father and brothers, as noted before, and was a witness for other applicants: on 2/27/1786 he appeared at the Commission in Montreal to thestify in behalf of Gysbert Sharpe who "possessed part of the patent of Kinderhook under his father's will." Israel testified: "Remebers that in 1776 G. Sharpe was possessed of good house and barn and farmo of 200 acres and more. There was 30-40 acres cleared and under good improvements. He hand a negro wench and cattle about his farm. He livied comfortably and well." He produced a certificate in the case of Stephen and Daniel Burritt of Arlington, VT in favor of their getting a claim. The record shoes at Montreal, 1/28/1788: "Produced certificate from Lt. Ferguson that Claim't served 3 years and to his having discharged his Duty as a good soldier & subject on every occasion." he was on a Muster Roll of 1/27/1784 of Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers of the King's Rangers. He was the Lieut. in Major's Co., Capt. James Breakenridge. There were only four volunteers in this Co.: Richard, Farrington, Assa (Arra) and Robert Ferguson.
      He joined with the British forces at Skenesborough in 1777. He worked as a recruiter and courier during the Revolution. He was with the Kings Rangers under Lt. Col. Robert Rogers' command, with Maj. James Rogers. He was at first a refugee from the Mohawk Valley in NY, and probably served early on in Johnson's regiment.
      In 1777, he was taken prisoner on Lake George in transit from Ft. George to Ticonderoga, by rebels from Col. Brown's army. He was detained overnight and the following day he was to accompany the fleet. Along with other prisoners, he was put aboard a batteaux and ordered to the center of the fleet (consisting of a small sloop with 3 12-pounders, and 3 gunboats, 2 barges, and 17 batteaux, well-manned). Night came and it was stormy, disrupting the rebels manning the vessels and they had the opportunty to escape with their boat and all the prisoners aboard. They went ot Dimond Island and reported information to Capt. Chevy, commander of the Island, about the unexpected enemy approach. Israel then went to Ft. George to inform Lt. Ewin, commander, of the enemy approach.
      After the defeat of Gen. Burgoyne, he went to Canada (5/1/1778-5/20/1779) and was constantly employed in carrying intelligence from Canada to the colonies. May 20, 1779, he was appointed to the Kings' Rangers (commanded by Maj. James Rogers) and served 15 months and 5 days w/o pay and brought into service 30 men at his own expense. After that he received Ensign's pay for 2 months and recruited about 40 more men. Oct. 25, 1780, he received Lt.'s pay till 12/25/1783, acting as Lt. Adj. and Quartermaster to the Kings' Rangers w/o compensation other than Lt. pay.

  More About Israel Ferguson:
Burial: Unknown, Old Taylor Burying Grounds, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Military service: Bet. 1777 - 1784, Kings Rangers, Maj. James Rogers
Residence: Abt. 1786, Thurlow, Ontario, Canada
Source: The Settlers Of the Beekman Patent, by F. Doherty, Sr.
Source2: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell
Source3: Rona L. Byam/rleeb@telusplanet.net
Source4: Old UEL list, appendix B, p. 173

  Notes for Nancy Singleton:
Nancy was still alive and living in the Quinte area because she testified at the divorce precedingsof Richard, Jr., and Fredrica Grant.


  More About Nancy Singleton:
Burial: Unknown, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae Marie Campbell/raemarie@sympatico.ca

  More About Israel Ferguson and Nancy Singleton:
Marriage: Unknown, Westchester or Albany Co., New York

  ii.   Anna Ferguson, born Abt. 1760 in New York; died Abt. 1850 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada.
  Notes for Anna Ferguson:
      Confirmed in records as sister of Israel, Farrington, and Richard. She witnessed the marriage of Richard to Frederica in 1784. In 1843, whe was still living in Picton area and appears not to have married.


  More About Anna Ferguson:
Burial: Unknown, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell

  iii.   Richard Ferguson, born December 23, 1762 in Ft. Edward, Albany Co., New York; died July 21, 1842 in Elizabethtown Township, Ontario, Canada; married (1) Frederica Grant March 11, 1784 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; born Abt. 1760 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; died August 06, 1847 in Kingston, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; married (2) Clarissa Sherwood March 27, 1823 in Ogdensburg, Oswegatchie Township, New York; born Abt. 1800; died 1890 in Elizabethtown Township, Ontario, Canada.
  Notes for Richard Ferguson:
      Richard Ferguson, Jr. is also known as Geroge Richard Ferguson.
      1778 -- Joined with the British as Ensign in King's Rangers (served to 1783).     
      1784 -- Married Frederica Grant at St. John's, Quebec on March 11, by Rev. Robert Gilmore, Chaplain of King's Rangers under Maj. James Rogers. Granted land in Marysburgh and Sophiasburgh, near Bay of Quite; listed as a farmer.
      1788 -- Listed in compensation claim as still lving in Bay of Quinte area.
      1794 -- Served as Captain in Royal Canadian Volunteers, commissioned as Lieutenant in December of that year.
      1802 -- Listed as Captain in Royal Canadian Volunteers at Niagara; residence at Cavan. Separated from Frederica at this point.
      1803 -- Justice of the Peace at Vaughan Township.
      1805 to 1815 -- WIth Canadian Fencibles -- 41st (temporary Capt.). Stationed and lived at York. Made full Captain after Battle of Chateauguay, "due to his spirited defence of the lines in 1813." In 1817, he was put on half-pay as the unit was being slowly disbanded.
      March 27, 1823 -- Married Clarissa Sherwood at Ogdensburg, Oswegatchie Township, New York. Lived at Leeds, Elizabethtown Township, Ontario, Cananda.
      May 23, 1839 -- Officially divorced from Frederica Grant. Richard was to pay Frederica 50 pounds/year for the first two years, then 66 pounds, 13 shillings, 4 pence/year thereafter.
      1842 -- Died at Elizabethtown Township, Leeds. Buried at Maitland, Augusta Parish.
      1843 -- Frederica petitioned for widow's pension amid confusion as to why Richard changed his name to George R. (probably to marry Clarissa before his divorce was official).
      August 9, 1847 -- Frederica Grant died at her home in Kingston area.
      Autumn 1890 -- (will executed November 14). Clarissa died.
      There is no mention of children in either Richard or Clarissa's will. Estate went to neice and nephew of Clarissa. No mention of children of Frederica.
      Joined British as Ensign in King's Rangers (served till 1783).
      1784 -- Married Frederica Grant at St. John's Quebec on March 11, by Rev. Robert Gilmore, Chaplain of King's Rangers under Maj. James Rogers. Granted land in marysburgh and Sophiasburgh, near Bay of Quinte; listed as a farmer.
      1788 -- Listed in compensation claim as still living in bay of Quinte area.
      October 13, 1794 to June 15, 1796 -- in Royal Canadian Volunteers, commissioned as Lieutenant in December 1794.
      1802 -- Listed as Captain in Royal Canadian Volunteers at Niagara; residence at Cavan. Separated from Frederica at this time.
      1803 -- Served as Justice of Peace at Vaughan Township.
      1805 to 1815 -- With Canadian Fencibles, 41st, as a temporary Captain. Stationed and lived at York.
      1815 -- Made full Captain after Battle of Chateauguay, "due to his spirited defence of the lines in 1813."
      1817 -- Was put on half-pay as the unit was being slowly disbanded.
      March 27, 1823, he married Clarissa Sherwood at Ogdensburg, Oswegatchie Township, New York. He lived at Leeds, Elizabethtown Township, Ontario.
      May 23, 1839, his divorce from Frederica was official. Richard was to pay Frederica 50 pounds/year for the first 2 years, then 66 pounds, 13 shillings, 4 pence/year after that.
      1842 -- He died at Elizabethtown Township, Leeds. He is buried at Maintland, Augusta Parish.
      1843 -- Frederica petitioned for widow's pension amid confusion as to why Richard changed his name to George R. (probably to marry Clarissa before his divorce was official).
      August 9, 1847, Frederica Grant died in her home in Kingston area.
      Autumn 1890 -- (will executed November 14,1890) -- Clarissa died. There is no mention of children in either Richard or Clarissa's wills. Estate went to a neice and nephew of Clarissa. No mention of children with Frederica.
     


  More About Richard Ferguson:
Burial: Unknown, Elizabethtown Township, Ontario, Canada
Military service: Bet. 1778 - 1783, Ensign, King's Rangers

  More About Frederica Grant:
Burial: Unknown, Kingston, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Cause of Death: Advance age
Medical Information: Death Notice from the Church 1837-1849
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell

  More About Richard Ferguson and Frederica Grant:
Marriage: March 11, 1784, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada

  iv.   Farrington Ferguson, born Abt. 1765 in Crum Elbow,Dutchess Co., New York; died 1842 in Hallowell Township, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; married Elizabeth Cole Bet. 1789 - 1792 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; born November 16, 1770 in Long Island, New York; died December 04, 1866 in Black Creek, Marysburgh, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada.
  Notes for Farrington Ferguson:
      Notes from Wendy Daxon (2/9/2000): In 1800, Jonathan (John) Ferguson UEL and his son Jonathan settle the south side of East Lake, Prince Edward Co. They are soon joined by Farnton (Farrinton) Ferguson and Charles Ferguson. On the north side of East Lake were Roswell (Rozell) Ferguson UEL.
      Listed as son of Richard Ferguson in 1790 WestChester Co., NY Census.
      Born probably at Crum Elbow where his father was taxed through 6/1767 and removed with the family to Albany near Ft. Edward. As noted, he was too young to join the British when his brother Israel did, joined in 1779. He was on the Cataraqui Roll of Loyalists in 10/1784 as a single man. He was next to Arra & Rozel Ferguson. He was there in 1785, again adjacent to Arra & Rozel Ferguson. In July/August 1786, he was still there listed as a single man, as were Arra & Rozel Ferguson. Farrington Ferguson (the 3d) took refuge in Hallowell, Ontario, Canada after the Revolution and had a number of children. He was most likely the man who married Elizabeth (b. 11/16/1770, baptized 12/3/1770 in Poughkeepsie, daughter of Daniel & Maria (DeLong) Cole. [PRCH]).

  More About Farrington Ferguson:
Burial: Unknown, Hallowell Township, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Military service: 1779, Joined the King's Rangers @ Skenesborough, NY
Military service2: Bet. 1828 - 1829, Upper Canada Militia Nominal Rolls, 2nd Regiment, Prince Edward Militia; promoted Capt. 8/29/1823
Residence: 1774, Jessupsburg, NY
Residence2: 1775, Cameron's Neck, Albany Co., New York; leased from Gov. Robinson.
Residence3: Abt. 1786, Marysburgh & Sophiasburg, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Source: Wendy Daxon@Lmail.cencol.on.ca
Source2: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell
Source3: The Settlers Of the Beekman Patent, by F. Doherty, Sr.
Source4: Paul D. Cole/colebgp@kingston.net
Source5: Old UEL list, appendix B, p. 173
Will: Co. Registry Office, Picton, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada

  More About Elizabeth Cole:
Baptism: December 03, 1770, Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., New York
Burial: Unknown, Marysburgh, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Fact: Alternate birthplace: Poughkeepsie, NY; per Paul Cole/colebgp@kingston.net
Fact2: Alternate death date: 9/4/1866; per Paul Cole/colebgp@kingston.net
Source: Wendy Daxon@Lmail.cencol.on.ca
Source2: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell
Source3: The Settlers Of the Beekman Patent, by F. Doherty, Sr.

  More About Farrington Ferguson and Elizabeth Cole:
Marriage: Bet. 1789 - 1792, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada

  v.   Millicent Ferguson, born May 04, 1766 in Westchester or Albany Co., New York; died April 07, 1829 in Adolphustown, Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada; married (1) Jacob Hoover May 19, 1789 in Adolphustown, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; born in Dutchess Co., New York; died Abt. 1790 in Adolphstown, Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada; married (2) Conrad VanDusen July 31, 1791 in St. Paul's, Kingston, Frontenac Co., Ontario, Canada; born April 23, 1751 in Dover Township,Albany Co., New York; died November 23, 1827 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada.
  More About Millicent Ferguson:
Burial: Unknown, Adolphustown, Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
Source: The Settlers Of the Beekman Patent, by F. Doherty, Sr.
Source2: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell
Source3: Van Dusen Family History

  Notes for Jacob Hoover:
      Jacob Hover was a descendant from Jonas Huber (Hoover) from the Swiss Canton of Aargau. President Herbert Hoover's father, Jesse Clark Hoover, a blacksmith, married Hulda Randall Minthorn, a Canadian from Norwich, Ontario. He was also descended from Jonas Huber (from The Trail of the Black Walnut, by G. Elmore Reaman)

  More About Jacob Hoover:
Burial: Unknown, Adolphstown, Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
Fact: (Stamped Book), s/o Caspar LBM, 1790, 100; no bounty land, 1786; P. list (Old UEL Loyalist list, Appdx. B. p. 195)
Immigration: Bet. 1783 - 1784, From NYC on the ship Hope
Military service: Revolutionary War; filed claim No. 866 in 9/1787 for lost property
Real Estate: 1778, Property in Albany Co., NY sequestered by Commrs of So. Dist of Albany Co., NY; was sold for L27 18s 0d
Source: VanDusen Family History

  More About Jacob Hoover and Millicent Ferguson:
Clergyman: Reverend John Langhorn
Fact: Groom from Marysburg; Bride from Adolphus Town
Marriage: May 19, 1789, Adolphustown, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Source: Marriage record of Rev. John Langhorn, Ontario Hist. Soc., Vol. 1, pg. 14-70
Witnesses: Henry Hover, Juol Fergusson, Cathe Vandusen

  98 vi.   Arra Ferguson, born September 23, 1769 in Westchester or Albany Co., New York; died February 28, 1853 in Picton, Prince Edwards Co., Ontario, Canada; married Catherine Shorts April 07, 1793 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada.
  vii.   Rachel Ferguson, born Bet. 1772 - 1782 in Albany Co., New York; died 1849 in Northumberland Co., Ontario, Canada; married Richard Hare June 20, 1797 in Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; born Abt. 1777 in Albany Co., New York; died February 09, 1863 in Cobourg, Northumberland Co., Ontario, Canada.
  More About Rachel Ferguson:
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell
Source2: The Settlers Of the Beekman Patent, by F. Doherty, Sr.

  Notes for Richard Hare:
      Richard Hare was one of the founding directors when the Grafton Harbor Co. was formed in 1836 and was one of Grafton's first settlers. (per personal correspondance with C. Hanson, husband of Sarah A. Hare's (who married William Webster) great granddaughter, 3/2000 email).Settled in Haldimand Township were children were born.

  More About Richard Hare:
Burial: Unknown, Old Methodist Cemetery, Gafton, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Military service: 1828, Northumberland Co. Militia, 4th Co.
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae Marie Campbell/raemarie@sympatico.ca

  More About Richard Hare and Rachel Ferguson:
Marriage: June 20, 1797, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell

  viii.   Rozel Ferguson, born Abt. 1750 in Westchester or Albany Co., New York; died Bet. 1827 - 1828 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; married Mary Unknown Unknown in Hallowell Township, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; born Unknown in Marysburgh, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada; died 1822 in Hallowell Township, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada.
  Notes for Rozel Ferguson:
      1784 -- Settled in Marysburgh Township, Prince Edward Co.
      1794 -- Lived in Hallowell Township, Prince Edward Co.
      1798 -- Clerk of Hallowell Township.
      1800 -- Had land leases with Richard, Jr. in bay of Quinte area.
      He was a Loyalists like his brothers. He was listed as a single man at Cataraqui 10/6/1784 and was next to Arra & Farrington Ferguson. In 1785, he was also there, again next to Arra & Farrington Ferguson and was the same in July/August 1786. After the War, he lived at Marysburgh & Sophiasburgh and was noted as son of Richard Ferguson. He had a UE Land Board Cert. in 1794 for 200 acres. A later Roswell Ferguson married Mary, daughter of William & Hannah (Lossing) Rankin of Athol.

  More About Rozel Ferguson:
AKA (Facts Pg): Bazel, Roswell ... many corrupted spellings
Burial: Unknown, Hallowell Township, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada
Source: Richard Ferguson, Loyalist Spy, by Rae M. Campbell
Source2: The Settlers Of the Beekman Patent, by F. Doherty, Sr.

  More About Mary Unknown:
Burial: Unknown, Hallowell Township, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada

  More About Rozel Ferguson and Mary Unknown:
Marriage: Unknown, Hallowell Township, Prince Edward Co., Ontario, Canada




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