War

                of      

                         Rebellion

Charge to the Sons of Confederate Veterans:

 

"To you, Sons of Confederate Veterans, we submit the vindication of the Cause for which we fought; to your strength will be given the defense of the Confederate soldier's good name, the guardianship of his history, the emulation of his virtues, the perpetuation of those principles he loved and which made him glorious and which you also cherish. Remember, it is your duty to see that the true history of the South is presented to future generations."

 

- Lt. General Stephen Dill Lee, Commander General United Confederate Veterans, New Orleans, Louisiana, 1906

 

   The Federal Census of 1860 Georgia gives us a total population of  1,023,801, with the number of white inhabitants 576,719. The 447,002 blacks made up forty-four percent of the total. The black Georgian was invariably a slave; the number of "free persons of color" was infinitesimally small: 1,225. At the other extreme of the social scale there were very few planters who counted their acres by the hundreds and their slaves by the score. The population density of North Georgia in 1860 was only sixteen Persons per square mile---about the same as the State of Utah today.

 

 

Confederate States Army Units........... 

 

Smiths’s Legion ‘Georgia Partisan Rangers’ 21st Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Tennessee, C.S.A.

Ancestors.......

    Rufus Phelps(slave owner)                   from Floyd County Georgia Company F

    John Davis(non slave owner)                from Floyd County Georgia Company F

    John Davis(non slave owner)                from Floyd County Georgia Company F

 

redesigned in March 1863 as..............

 

65th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Tennessee, C.S.A.

Ancestors........

    John Davis (non slave owner)               from Floyd County Georgia William G. Foster’ Company D

    George W. Davis(non slave owner)      from Floyd County Georgia William G. Foster’ Company D

    Joseph H.  Davis(non slave owner)       from Floyd County Georgia William G. Foster’ Company D

    Aquilla Phillip Milam(slave owner)    from Floyd County Georgia William G. Foster’ Company D

    Williamson Phelps(slave owner)         from Floyd County Georgia William G. Foster’ Company D

 

William G. Foster’s (Foster’s Mill, Black Bluff Rd Floyd County Georgia) Company D of the 65th under General Gist’s Brigade was organized May 17, 1862 with 137 men from Floyd County Georgia. This Company lost 37% of its strength by the end of the War.

 

6th Georgia Cavalry, Army of Tennessee, C.S.A.

Ancestors........

    Charley Newton Murdock(slave owner)     from Floyd County Georgia Company G ‘Sardis Volunteers’

    James R. Murdock(slave owner)                 from Floyd County Georgia Company G ‘Sardis Volunteers’

    John Davis(non slave owner)                        from Floyd County Georgia Company E ‘Sardis Volunteers’

 

Beginning as the ‘First Georgia Partisan Rangers’, on May 21, 1862, this unit’s name was changed on July 1, 1862, to ‘Smith’s Legion, Georgia Partisan Rangers.’ The unit consisted of a Cavalry and Infantry Battalion. For a time, it was under the command of Col. Sumner J. Smith.

The Cavalry Battalion, consisting of six companies, raised some of its members from Union, Polk, Floyd, Gilmer and Towns counties. It was attached to the Department of East Tennessee and was involved in the Kentucky Campaign. In the spring of 1863, the Cavalry Battalion merged with the 6th Georgia Cavalry Regiment. Its commanders were Lt. Col John R. Hart and Major Benjamin F. Brown.

 

The Infantry Battalion recruited many of its men from Gilmer, Fannin, Floyd, Lumpkin, Union, Pickens, White, Towns, and Habersham counties. Assigned to the Department of East Tennessee, it served in Kentucky and later was stationed in Cumberland Gap and Louden, Tennessee. During the spring of 1863, the Infantry Battalion merged into the 65th Georgia Infantry Regiment.

After serving in East Tennessee, the 65th Georgia Volunteer Infantry was attached to the Army of Tennessee’ Brigades of J.H. Kelley, J.K. Jackson, and S.R. Gist. The 65th fought with the Army from Chickamauga through Nashville. In December 1863, it consisted of 291 men and 226 arms. Its strength was further reduced until it surrended at the end of the War in North Carolina. The field officers were Colonels John S. Fain, Robert H. Moore, and William G. Foster(Floyd Co); Lt Colonel Jacob W. Pearcy, and Major Samuel F. Williams.

 

The 65th Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry, CSA, saw action in East Tennessee from May 1862 through the Battle of Chickamauga, September 19-20, 1863, as recorded in the Official Records:

- May 1, 1862 under Col Sumner J. Smith formed as Smith’s Legion Georgia Volunteers

- May 1, 1862 under Lt. Col J.S. Fain in Louden, Tennessee, Fain’s Battalion

- March 19, 1863 under Lt. Col J.S. Fain in Louden, Tennessee, Smith’s Georgia Legion

- March 25, 1863 under Col J.S. Fain ‘reorganized’ as Co. F, 65th Georgia Volunteer Infantry

- April 25, 1863 under Lt. Col R.H. Moore in Louden, Tennessee, Fain’s Georgia Regiment

- June 17, 1863 under Lt. Col R.H. Moore in Warburg, TN, 65th GVI ordered to Jacksborough, TN

- June 23, 1863 under Col R.H. Moore stationed Kingston, Tennessee

- June 26, 1863 ‘resist Federals at Travisville, fall back to Louden’

- July 31, 1863 under Col R.H. Moore, Army of East Tennessee, M.G. Buckner 2nd Brigade

- August 13, 1863 65th Georgia Regiment ordered from Knoxville to Jacksborough

- August 21, 1863  65th Georgia Regiment ordered from Jacksborough to Cumberland Gap

- August 21, 1863 65th Georgia Regiment ordered to Big Creek Gap

- August 24, 1863 65th Georgia Regiment ordered from Turkey Creek to Louden, Tennessee

- October 31, 1863 under Col R.H. Moore Army of TN, Kelly Brigade(thru Battle of Chickamauga)

 

From the time the Unit was formed in May 1862 through the Battle of Missionary Ridge in November 1863 (17 months) the Unit had ‘officially’ lost about 50% of its strength. It lost 50% of its remaining strength over the next 7 months through the Battle of Atlanta in July 1864. When the Unit  surrendered in Greensboro, NC, in May 1865, the ‘official’ strength was about 20% of its original strength.

 

35th Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

Ancestors........

    Richard F. Murdock(slave owner)                   from Floyd Co Ga   Chattooga Mountaineers  Company I

    Joseph M.  Murdock(slave owner)                  from Floyd Co Ga   Chattooga Mountaineers  Company I

    John Robert Murdock(slave owner)               from Floyd Co Ga   Chattooga Mountaineers  Company I

    Richard F. Gaines(slave owner)                       from Floyd Co Ga   Chattooga Mountaineers  Company I

    Franklin Gaines(slave owner)                         from Floyd Co Ga   Chattooga Mountaineers  Company I

    William L. Gaines(slave owner)                      from Floyd Co Ga   Chattooga Mountaineers  Company I

    Chesley David Gaines(slave owner)                from Floyd Co Ga   Chattooga Mountaineers  Company I

 

Company I commanded by Capt. W. L. Groves, from Chattooga County.

 

--November 1, 1861 35th was formed in Richmond, Virginia consisting of  both Company I and K

    with 48 officers and 692 enlisted men assigned to Brigadier General French, and stationed at

    Evans’ Port Virginia supporting the river batteries.

--March 1862 followed the Army of the Potomac to the line of Rappahannock, and was stationed      near Fredericksburg, Virginia under General J.J. Pettigrew.

--April 1862 participated in the removable to the Peninsula, and formed a part of the reserve troops,              commanded by Major General G. W. Smith, which brought up the rear in the famous retreat from         Yorktown.

--May 30, 1862 under the command of Col. E.L. Thomas was first engaged at Seven Pines VA with               an attack on the right of the enemy with a loss of 23 men killed and 50 wounded including the            death of Lt. Col. G. A. Bull .

--June 26, 1862 35th under the command of Col. E.L. Thomas part of Brig. Gen. Anderson’s force                charged the enemy near Mechanicsville VA with a loss of 18 men killed and 61 wounded including            the death of  Adjutant, J. H. Ware and  Col. Thomas wounded.

--August 9, 1862 35th under the command of Maj. Holt  of Jackson’s campaign engaged the enemy at         Cedar Run VA with a loss of  9 men killed and 17 wounded.

--August 1862 to May 1863 the 35th participated in various engagements from Richmond VA to    Maryland and back to Rappahannock under the command of Maj. Holt with a loss of  32 men              killed and 96 wounded. This regiment spent it’s 2nd winter in Virginia near Guinea’s Station. 

--May 3, 1863 35th under the command of Capt. Duke at the Battle of Chancillorsville was engaged              charging the enemy from their position, driving them over a mile, taking their breastworks, and            capturing many prisoners with a loss of  8 men killed and 27 wounded.

--June 1863 35th began to march into Pennsylvania.   

--July 1, 1863 at Gettysburg the 35th was detached to guard a wagon train and then placed between               the corps’ of  Ewell and Hill to hold the center and prevent the former from being outflanked with         the result of only witnessing the 1st day’s engagement. On the 2nd day the 35th was deployed as             skirmishers in front of Pender’s Division. On the night of the 2nd day Thomas’ Brigade took a     position in a hollow between opposing lines. On the 3rd day General Thomas ordered his brigade               forward and the 35th under Lt. Col. McCulloh participated in the charge of Picket and Heth. On           the 5th day the 35th leaving Pennsylvania falling back to Hagerstown and the crossing the     Potomac with the army into Virginia with a loss of  9 men killed, 53 wounded and 57 missing.    

--May 4, 1864 the 35th engaged Gen. U.S. Grant’s Federal Forces in the Wilderness VA with a loss              of  4 men killed,  22 wounded and 23 missing.

--May 12, 1864 the 35th at Spottsylvania VA participated in retaking the works lost by Johnson’s                 Division supporting Gordon’s Brigade in its charge across the breastworks where Maj. Williams      was mortally wounded  with a loss of  10 men killed,  37 wounded and 15 missing.

--May 19, 1864 the 35th at Jerica Ford VA engaged Warren’s Federal Forces and withdrawing at                 night  with a loss of  10 men killed,  28 wounded and 21 missing.

--June 14, 1864 the 35th at Hames’ Shop VA drove back a Federal Cavalry Unit with a loss of  2     men killed,  28 wounded and 21 missing.

 

8th Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

“The Fighting 8th”

 

Ancestors.......

   George W. Milam(slave owner)            from Floyd County Georgia Rome Light Guards Company A

   Monroe Phelps(slave owner)                 from Floyd County Georgia Rome Light Guards Company A

   John H. Cooper(non slave owner)         from Floyd County Georgia Miller’s Rifles Company I   

   James P. Cooper(non slave owner)      from Floyd County Georgia Company I  Floyd Infantry

 

Rome Light Guards formed in Floyd County Georgia under the commands of  Capt. E.J. Magruder, S.H. Hall and James T. Moore

Miller’s Rifles formed in Floyd County Georgia under the commands of  Capt. John R. Towers and Dunlap S. Scott

Floyd Infantry formed in Floyd County Georgia under the commands of   John F. Cooper,  John H. Reece, George N. Yarborough, William H. Henderson and J.P. Duke

 

The 8th Georgia Infantry initially assigned to Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s Division of the Army of the Shenandoah, 2nd Brigade, commanded by Col. Francis S. Bartow and ordered to Harper’s Ferry, Virginia and then became part of D.R. Jones’ Brigade, 3rd (Toombs’) Division,  Army of Northern Virginia in July of 1862 the 8th became a part of Gen. George T. “Tige” Anderson’s Brigade, in

which it remained for the remainder of the War.  The 8th was briefly in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida in August and September of 1863 for the Chicamauga Campaign, and returned to the Army of Northern Virginia in May of 1864. The 8th Georgia Infantry participated in nearly every battle in which General Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia was engaged, and surrendered with him on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox, Virginia.

 

--July 1861 the 8th suffered the highest casualty rate of any Confederate unit in the battle of  First               Manassas VA.

--April, May 1862 the 8th at the Seige of Yorktown, Virginia. On April 16th, the Federals attacked               at Dam #1, the center of Gen. Magruder’s (Rome Floyd Co Ga resident) line and after initial                 sucess were met by the Georgia Regiments 7th under Col. Anderson & the 8th under Col. Lucius          M. Lamar made a charge and drove the Federals from the pits and across the pond.

--May 1862 the 8th at the Mechanicsville, Virginia.

--June, July 1862 the 8th engaged in Seven Days’ Battles was part of George T. Anderson’s 3rd    Brigade, First Division, Magruder’s Corps, Army of Northern Virgina. At this time, Anderson’s     Brigade was composed of the 1st Georgia (Regulars), and 7th, 8th, 9th, and 11th Georgia        Volunteer Regiments with 28 men killed and 63 wounded.

--August 1862  Rappahannock Station

--August 1862  Second Manassas

--September 1862  Sharpsburg

--December 1862  Fredericksburg

--April-May 1863  Suffolk Campaign

--June-July 1863  Gettysburg

--August-September 1863  Morris Island and Charleston Operations

--September 1863  Chicamauga

--September-November 1863  Chattanooga Siege

--November-December 1863  Knoxville Siege

--May-June 1864  Wilderness Campaign

--June 1864-April 1865  Petersburg and Richmond Defenses

--April 9, 1865  Appomattox Court House; battle flag carried back to Rome Floyd County Georgia after the surrender in Lt. Col. E. J. Magruder’s boot, and is believed to be the one now in possession of Mr. Towers, descendant of the 8th’s Colonel John R. Towers. 

 

29th Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

Ancestors.......

   Russell Cooper(non slave owner)         from Floyd County Georgia Company D Berry Infantry

   James P. Cooper(non slave owner)      from Floyd County Georgia Company D Berry Infantry

 

2nd Lt. Thomas Foster Hooper’s Company D of the 29th Georgia, Berry Infantry was formed May 17, 1862 in Floyd County Georgia from Company I of the 29th Georgia. Company I  was at the bombardment of Fort Walker at Hilton Head South Carolina November 7,  1861, the Battle of Chickamauga in North Georgia September 19-20, 1863, Battle of Resaca May 14-15, 1864, Pine Mtn. Battle outside of Atlanta, Georgia and at the Battle of Franklin Tennessee July 7, 1864.

 

24th Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

Ancestors.......

    Tilman H. Carter Jr.(non slave owner)   from Hall County Georgia Company I *‘Glade Guards’

   Seaborn J. Carter(non slave owner)        from Hall County Georgia Company I *‘Glade Guards’

    Lewis W. Carter(non slave owner)          from Hall County Georgia Company I *‘Glade Guards

                                                                                                       *also called ‘Volunteer Rifles’

 

31st Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

Ancestors.......

   David T. Cooper(non slave owner)    from Forsyth County Georgia Company I  

   William H. Cooper(slave owner)      from Gwinnett County Georgia   

 

39th Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

Ancestors.......

   Williamson Phelps(slave owner)         from Floyd County Georgia Company H

 

Georgia State Guards

Ancestors.......

    A. J. Cooper(slave owner)                         from Walton County Georgia  12th Battalion Co A & F   

   William J. Youngblood(slave owner)      from Floyd County Georgia  Cherokee Artillary   

   Michael W. Youngblood(slave owner)     from Floyd County Georgia  Cherokee Artillary   

   Jefferson John Milam(slave owner)        from Floyd County Georgia Troutman’s’ Co E Floyd Legion

   Rufus Phelps(slave owner)                        from Floyd County Georgia Troutman’s’ Co E Floyd Legion

 

 

ANCESTORS................................................  

                                                                     

Tilman H. Carter Jr..........

(2nd Cousin 3 Times Removed) brother of Seaborn J. Carter great grandson of Thomas Carter, writer’s Great Great Great Great Grandfather; Confederate Private enlisted from Hall County Georgia Company I Glade Guards Volunteer Rifles 24th Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

 

Seaborn J. Carter ..........

(2nd Cousin 3 Times Removed) brother of Tilman H. Carter Jr. and great grandson of Thomas Carter, writer’s Great Great Great Great Grandfather; Confederate Private enlisted from Hall County Georgia Company I Glade Guards Volunteer Rifles 24th Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

 

Lewis W. Carter ..........

(2nd Cousin 3 Times Removed) 1st cousin of Tilman H. Carter Jr. and great grandson of Thomas Carter, writer’s Great Great Great Great Grandfather; Confederate Private enlisted from Hall County Georgia Company I Glade Guards Volunteer Rifles 24th Georgia Regiment Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

 

 

A. J. Cooper.........

(3rd Cousin 2 Times Removed) great grandson of William Cooper, writer’s Great Great Great Great Grandfather; Confederate Private enlisted in the Walton County Georgia State Guards  12th Battalion Company A & F.

 

David T. Cooper.........

(1st Cousin 3 Times Removed) Grandson of Ransom Cooper, writer’s Great Great Great Grandfather; Confederate Private enlisted in Gwinnett County Georgia Company I  31st Georgia Infantry; died November 10, 1862 in service and buried in Forsyth County Georgia; cause of death unknown...died in Confederate Hospital in Knoxville TN, his wife went to nurse him and arrived on Saturday and he died on Monday. .. she brought him back to Forsyth County for burial in the family plot.

 

James Powers Cooper.........

(2nd Cousin 3 Times Removed) great grandson of William Cooper, writer’s Great Great Great Great Grandfather and brother of John Harvey Cooper; Confederate Private enlisted October 3, 1863 in Floyd County Georgia Company D 21st Georgia Regiment Berry Infantry; transfered to Company A Floyd Legion  August, 1864; listed in Camp I 1st Regiment in Old Soldiers’ Home Floyd County Georgia  1910 .

 

John Harvey Cooper.........

(2nd Cousin 3 Times Removed) great grandson of William Cooper, writer’s Great Great Great Great Grandfather and brother of James Powers Cooper; Confederate Private enlisted April, 1861 in Floyd County Georgia Company I 1st Georgia Regiment Floyd County Cavalry.

 

Russell Cooper.........

(2 Greats Grand Uncle) Son of Ransom Cooper, writer’s Great Great Great Grandfather; ‘mustered’ in August 1, 1863 for 6 months in Vann’s Valley near Cave Spring in southern part of Floyd County Georgia as a Confederate Private in Capt. A.A. Terhune’s Company Floyd Legion in the Georgia State Guards; promoted to 2nd Corporal December 22, 1863 in the Berry Infantry Company D, 29th Georgia Regiment and consequently assigned horse with value of $59.20 and 40 cents per day; died as POW at Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Indiana and buried in a mass Confederate Cemetery called Crown Hill, formerly called Green Lawn (all remains moved to new site)

 

William H. Cooper.........

(3rd Cousin 2 Times Removed) great grandson of William Cooper, writer’s Great Great Great Great Grandfather; Confederate Private enlisted May 1863 in Gwinnett County Georgia Company I  31st Georgia Infantry; died Septrmber 12, 1864 in service; cause of death unknown.

 

 

Charley Newton Murdock................

(Great Grand Uncle) Son of Isaac Murdock, writer’s Great Great Grandfather, Confederate Recruit at age 15 in the Sardis Volunteers Company G 6th Georgia Cavalry. This Company was formed at Sardis Presbyterian Church at Coosa Floyd County Georgia May 9, 1861; moved to Texas after the War.

 

Richard Furman Murdock..............

(Great Grand Uncle) Son of Isaac Murdock, writer’s Great Great Grandfather, Confederate Recruit  who joined on March 4, 1862 at age 18 with the Chattooga Mountaineers Company I  35th Georgia Regiment Army of Northern Virginia. Captured at Spotsylvania, Virginia on May 12, 1864; paroled at Fort Deleware in February 1865; exchanged at Boulware & Cox’s Whorves, James River Virginia March 10, 1865.        

 

James R. Murdock...............

(1st Cousin 3 Times Removed) Son of David Murdock, writer’s 2 Greats Grand Uncle, Confederate Private, enlisted March 3, 1862 in Chattooga County Georgia,  6th Georgia Calvary.

 

Joseph M. Murdock................

(1st Cousin 3 Times Removed) Son of David Murdock, writer’s 2 Greats Grand Uncle, Confederate Private, enlisted March 3, 1862 in Chattooga County Georgia in Company I 35th Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia, “Chattooga Mountaineers”, died while home on sick furlough May2, 1863.

 

John Robert Murdock................

(1st Cousin 3 Times Removed) Son of Jeptha Daniel Murdock, writer’s 2 Greats Grand Uncle, Confederate Private, enlisted February 19, 1862 in Chattooga County Georgia in Company I 35th Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia, “Chattooga Mountaineers”, lost 2 fingers on left hand at Staunton Virginia June 22, 1862, captured Petersburg Virginia February 1862.

 

 

John Davis....................

(Great Grandfather) Confederate Private joined June 24, 1861 at age 19 in Floyd County Georgia Company F Smith's Legion 21st Regiment Georgia Volunteers Infantry. Transferred Company B Floyd Sharpshooters Army of Northern Virginia. Transferred to Company D 65th Georgia in March,1863; sick in hospital October 20, 1863; never wounded or captured; fought at Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Resaca (65th Georgia Regiment assigned to Brig. General John  R. Jackson's Brigade of Major General William H.T. Walker's Division of General Hardee's Corps which repulsed a Union attack at the little known Battle of Rome's Crossroads on May 16 1864 covering the evacuation of the Confederate supply wagons through Calhoun  following Resaca; this battle took place at the present UGA Experiment Station where a marker is located on Highway 53 detailing the action), Kinnesaw Mtn. and Franklin, Tennessee (Franklin Battle: capture of Degress' Battery on July 7,1864,under the command of Captain W. Green Foster); Present at roll call on August 31, 1864. Surrendered with his command at Greensboro, North Carolina in April 1865. "The hardest fighting of the regiment was at Franklin, Tennessee, where the color bearers were killed. After the first fall, Col. Foster picked up the colors and was almost instantly shot through the arm, and the staff of the flag was shot off. Private Davis then picked up the colors, and carried them along until the flag was stuck on the breastworks captured by the regiment. At the surrender the color bearer tore the colors from the staff, and stuffed them in his boot, thus keeping possession of them",**Rome Newspaper 1910.  John Davis was awarded the "Southern Cross of the Legion of Honor" (see Application page -20.09-) which is described by the "Daughters of the Confederacy" as those who distinguished themselves by remarkable feats of courage"; was member of Confederate Veterans in 1890 from Fouche Floyd County Georgia Camp #368 . 

 

Joseph A. Davis.................

(2 Greats Grand Uncle)  Brother of  John Davis (writer’s great grandfather); and George W. Davis; Confederate Corporal; enlisted 1861 and surrendered 1865, Captain Morton's Company, Foster's Regiment, Cheatham's Division; wounded New Hope Church on May 25, 1864. 

 

George W. Davis.................

(2 Greats Grand Uncle)  Brother of  John Davis (writer’s great grandfather) and Joseph A. Davis; Confederate Recruit; enlisted April 1864 from Chattooga County Georgia in Company D 65th Georgia Infantry( same unit as brother John) ; sent home on sick furlough November 1, 1864, not recovered enough to rejoin his command at Surrender.

 

 

John Davis...............

(Great Grand Uncle) Son of Wiley Davis(writer’s great great grandfather); Confederate Private; enlisted  1861/06/24 in old Company E 21st Georgia Regiment Sardis Volunteers; transferred to 6th Georgia Calvary 1863/03; present at roll call 1863/12/31 and 1864/08/31.

 

 

Jefferson John Milam................

(Great Grand Uncle) Brother of  Martha (Mattie) A. Milam(writer’s great grandmother); enlisted  August 15, 1863  Confederate Private in Troutman’s Company E Floyd Legion State Guards; paid $200 for his horse.

 

George Washington Milam................

(Great Grand Uncle) Brother of  Martha (Mattie) A. Milam(writer’s great grandmother); Confederate Private in the Rome Light Guards; captured at Stone Mountain Georgia on October 26, 1864; released at Camp Chase on June 12, 1865 at age 25; Private Company A  8th Georgia Infantry.

 

Aquilla Phillip Milam.............

(Great Grand Uncle) Son of William W. Milam, (writer’s great great grandfather); Confederate Private who joined on April 22, 1863 at age 17. Was in same Regiment as his brothers-in-law John Davis, Joseph A. Davis & George W. Davis (Col. W. Green Foster of Coosa area of Floyd County Georgia). Died of diarrhea on July 22, 1864 at age 18 in Griffin, Georgia.

 

 

Monroe Phelps

(1st Cousin 3 Times Removed) Grandson of Aquilla Phillip Phelps (writer’s great great grandfather); Confederate Private 8th Georgia Infantry Company A , killed 1862/07/01 at Battle of Malvern Hill

 

Rufus Phelps

(1st Cousin 3 Times Removed) Grandson of Aquilla Phillip Phelps (writer’s great great grandfather);  Confederate Private 8th Georgia Infantry Company A , killed 1862/07/01 at Battle of Malvern Hill

 

Williamson Phelps

(1st Cousin 3 Times Removed) Grandson of Aquilla Phillip Phelps (writer’s great great grandfather); Confederate Private Company F Smith's Legion 21st Regiment Georgia Volunteers Infantry, enlisted August 20, 1862, transferred March 1863 to Company D 65th Georgia  1863/03, transferred Company H 39th Georgia Regiment 1864/08/01, captured/parole 1865/03/13 Salisbury North Carolina

 

 

Richard Furman Gaines.............

(2 Greats Grand Uncle) Brother of Elizabeth C. Gaines (writer’s great great grandmother); joined on February 15, 1862 with the Chattooga Mountaineers Company I 35th Georgia Regiment Army of Northern Virginia, this is the same Regiment as his nephew Richard Furman Murdock; wounded in the knee at Fredericksburg Virginia December 13, 1862 in the knee; furloughed for 30 days from January 26, 1863; wound bothered him the rest of his life.

 

Franklin Gaines.............

(1st Cousin 4 Times Removed) 1st Cousin of Elizabeth C. Gaines (writer’s great great grandmother); joined the Chattooga Mountaineers Company I 35th Georgia Regiment Army of Northern Virginia.

 

William Lankford Gaines.............

(1st Cousin 4 Times Removed) 1st Cousin of Elizabeth C. Gaines, (writer’s great great grandmother); joined the Chattooga Mountaineers Company I 35th Georgia Regiment Army of Northern Virginia.

 

Chesley Davis Gaines.............

(2 Greats Grand Uncle) Brother of Elizabeth C. Gaines (writer’s great great grandmother); joined the Chattooga Mountaineers Company I 35th Georgia Regiment Army of Northern Virginia.

 

 

William J. Youngblood................

(Great Grand Uncle) Son of Willis Youngblood (writer’s great great grandfather); Confederate Private of the Cherokee Artillary from Floyd County Georgia who died as a POW in 1864.

 

Michael W. Youngblood................

(2 Greats Grand Uncle) Son of Peter Youngblood (writer’s great great great grandfather); Confederate Private; took “Oath of Amnesty” July 14, 1865 in Floyd County Georgia.