COUMBE'S CHRONICLE

Updated September 6, 2000

Dione Malvene Coumbe
293, London Road
Dover, Kent CT17 0SY
Great Britain-England
01304 211636
DioneDover@aol.com

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As family folk lore would have it, some time in the late 10th. century, the Cumba clan moved from darkest Somerset into the more welcoming parts of Devon and Cornwall, where it was firmly believed the streets were paved with gelt. Doubtless they were also considering how best to continue to support the Christian faith as regular Benefactors of the Monastry of Bec in Normandy. The move seems to have been accomplished over several centuries, according to the literature and records extant of the times. Within 400 years they spread across most of Devon and a good portion of north and eastern Cornwall and in the next three centuries were known to be involved in the Countys' pastimes of smuggliing and wrecking. Farming being a profitable sideline. Throughout they were diverse in their affiliations holding loyalty to Catholicism, Protestantism, the Monarchy, Cromwell, the Restoration and enjoying dalliances with the Masonic Orders in between. It is believed emigration probably began in the 16th. century with seafaring members joining buccaneers in the Caribbean, more leaving to enjoy piracy with favourites of Queen Elizabeth I, such as Sir Francis Drake and Sir John Frobisher and others. With the downturn in Cornish fortunes, the Enclosure Acts and the advent of the Industrial Revolution, Coumbe's travelled out of the County in greater numbers, moving to London, the United States, Australia, New Zealand and New Guinea. They probably moved elsewhere too, but as yet we do not know where these might be. Today, thanks to the painstaking work of a few people and now the amazing technological facilities available, it's possible to bring together if only briefly and in passing, the various family groups throughout the world. " CC", COUMBE'S CHRONICLE, came about because of the growing number of people within the Coumbe family who have expressed an interest in, and hope to contribute, to research on the family. Some of you may know of many other groups who are studying Coombe as a name, which frankly is a very useful thing to be aware of. Coumbe has undergone several manglings, sometimes within three generations. In addition, it's been muddled frequently with the Cornish word for valley. Coumbe's have also married and been known as Coombes, Cooms, Koons, Cumbes, Combes and Comb(s). In this study we have taken the name Coumbe as being the "peg" on which all else hangs. Descendents in a Coombe (et al) family who originate from a Coumbe family are assumed to be the victims of an illiterate recorder at some time in their history, unless we learn otherwise to the contrary. Some may have excellent reasons for dropping or changing the "u" or skewing their paternal surname generally and we hope to discover these reasons too. They promise to be a lot more interesting............... This magazine, we hope, will become a "must have" for anyone interested in the Coumbe family and we also hope everyone who reads it will want to contribute either documented studies, anecdotes, family folk lore, photographs and any other type of illustration. It would be very pleasing also to have news of you, from wherever you may be in the world and any suggestions for inclusions in the magazine which will be issued, presently, on an ad hoc basis. We hope you will email for a copy to be sent snail mail, enjoy it and pass its contents on to anyone interested.

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