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Ancestors of Alfred Lester Gunter


      2428. Thomas Hill232. He married 2429. Margaret Wykes 04 May 1595232.

      2429. Margaret Wykes232, born 232. She was the daughter of 4858. John Wykes.
     
Child of Thomas Hill and Margaret Wykes is:
  1214 i.   Nicholas Hill, born Abt. 1630 in Somerset, England; died Abt. 06 October 1675 in Surrey Co., VA; married (2) Sylvestra Bennett Bet. 1651 - 1673 in Isle of Wight, VA; married (3) Sylvester Bennett Abt. 1653 in (Isle of Wight), VA.


      2430. Edward Bennett, born 02 February 1575/76 in Wiveliscombe, Somersetshire, England; died 30 September 1664 in Isle of Wight Co., VA. He was the son of 4860. Robert Hebert Bennett and 4861. Elizabeth Ednye. He married 2431. Mary Bourne in Wiveliscombe, Somersetshire, England.

      2431. Mary Bourne232, born Bet. 1600 - 1605 in Stanmore Magna, (Middlesex), England232; died Bet. 1637 - 1699 in Isle of Wight Co., VA. She was the daughter of 4862. Jasper Bourne and 4863. Joan Norwood.

Notes for Edward Bennett:
On November 21, 1621, Edward Bennett, a rich merchant of London, obtained a patent for a plantation conditioned on settling two hundred emigrants. His associates in the patent were his brother, Robert Bennett, and nephew, Richard Bennett, Thomas Ayres,(1) Thomas Wiseman, and Richard Wiseman. And in February, 1622, the Sea Flower arrived with one hundred and twenty settlers, headed by Capt. Ralph Hamor, one of the council; Rev. William Bennett and George Harrison, kinsmen of Edward Bennett, and connected with him in his colonization scheme. Their place of settlement was called "Warrascoyack," and sometimes "Edward Bennett's plantation."

On the day this patent was awarded, Arthur Swain, Capt. Nathaniel Basse and others undertook to establish another plantation in the same neighborhood. Capt. Basse came over in person, and his plantation was known as "Basse's Choice," and was situated on Warrascoyack river. The houses were building, when, in March, 1622, occurred the great massacre by the Indians. In the course of a very few hours one-fourth of the white population perished. The mortality in the plantations in Warrascoyack reached a total of fifty-three. Some miraculous escapes are recorded. The Indians came to one Baldwin's house and wounded his wife, but Baldwin, by repeatedly firing his gun so frightened them as "to save both her,his house, himself and divers others." At about the same time they appeared at the house of Master Harrison, half a mile from Baldwin's, where was staying Thomas Hamor, brother of Capt. Ralph Hamor, who also lived near by. The Indians pretended that they came to escort the captain to their king, who was hunting in the woods. The message was sent to the captain, but, he not coming as they expected, they set fire to a tobacco house, and murdered the white people as they rushed out of Harrison's building in order to quench the flames. Many were killed, but Thomas Hamor was saved by a chance delay. He remained to finish a letter, which he was engaged in writing. After concluding the letter, he went out, but seeing the commotion, and receiving an arrow in his back, he returned and barricaded the house. Then the savages set the house on fire, whereupon Hamor, with twenty-two others, fled to Baldwin's house, leaving their own burning.

In the meantime, Capt. Ralph Hamor was in utmost peril. He was on his way to meet the king, who had invited him, and came upon the savages chasing some of the whites. He returned to his new house, where, armed with only spades, axes, and brickbats, he and his company defended themselves till the enemy gave up the seige and departed. At the house of Capt. Basse, however, in the same neighborhood, everybody was slain. Basse, who was in England at the time, escaped.

The consternation occasioned by the massacre was such that the determination was taken to abandon all the plantations but seven or eight, viz., Jamestown, the settlements on the opposite
side of the river (in Surry), Kecaughtan, Newports News, Southampton Hundred (including Hog Island), Flowerdieu Hundred, Sherly Hundred, and the plantation of Mr. Samuel Jordan, at Jordan's Point. All Warrascoyack, from Hog Island down the river shore for fourteen miles, was abandoned. But
vigorous efforst were made by the authorities to dislodge the Indians from the locality. In the fall succeeding the massacre an expedition was sent out under the command of Sir George Yeardley against the savages down the river. He drove out the Nansemonds and Warrascoyacks, burned their houses, and tooktheir corn.

On May 21, 1623, a commission was given to Capt. Roger Smith, who had served twelve or thirteen years in the wars in the Netherlands, to erect a fort on the shore opposite to Tindall's Shoals, where Capt. Samuel Each had a block-house in building.

In the summer of 1623 the governor sent companies in all directions against the Indians. Capt. William Tucker, of Kecaughtan (Hampton), commanded the expedition against the Nansemonds and Warrascoyacks. On the same day, August 2, 1623, all of these commands fell upon the Indians, slaughtered many, cut down their corn, and burnt their houses. A week after, Capt. Tucker went down a second time against the Nansemonds. The proprietors of the abandoned settlements took heart
and were allowed to return to them. The census of February 6, 1623-'24, showed as then living at "Warwicke Squeake" and "Basse's Choice" fifty-three persons; twenty-six had died "since April last." Disease, in fact, proved more destructive to the setelrs than everything else combined. Four-fifths of the colonists, including the new emigrants who arrived, died from this cause in the interval between 1619 and 1625. The census of 1624-'25 showed but thirty-one persons alive at Warrascoyack and Basse's Choice. Among those who had died were Mr. Robert Bennett (brother of Edward Bennett), who had come to the colony, and the first minister, Mr. William Bennett, doubtless one of the samefamily.

After 1625 the colony took a new and more prosperous turn, Richard Bennett and his brother, Philip Bennet, came over also to see about the interests of their uncle, Edward, and their owninterests. Capt. John Hobson now arrived, and Basse, Richard Bennett and Hobson were made members of the council. In 1624 the representative from "Basse's Choice" was John Pollington. In 1629 Warrascoycak (which term came to embrace Basse's Choice and all the other settlements in the Isle of Wight) were Capt.Nathaniel Basse, Richard Bennett, Robert Savin and Thomas Jordan. In March following, they were John Upton, John Atkins, Robert Savin and Thomas Burges. In September, 1632, they were Thomas Jordan and William Hutchinson. In February, 1632-'33, they were John Upton and Robert Savin. All freemen had the right of suffrage till 1671.

In 1634, the plantations in Virginia were divided into eight counties, and "Warrascoyack" was one of these. In 1635 the census showed five hundred and twenty-two persons in the county. In 1658 the tithables amounted to six hundred and seventy-three, which indicated a population of two thousand and
nineteen. In 1637 the name of the county was changed to Isle of Wight. The same year the county of New Norfolk was formed out of Elizabeth City county, which extended on both sides of the river. New Norfolk being divided soon into Lower and Upper Norfolk (Nansemond) counties, acts were passed in 1639-'40 and 1642-'43 to determine their respective boundaries. Isle of Wight county was declared to begin at Lawne's Creek, from thence down the river to the plantation of Richard Hayes, formerly belonging to John Howard, including the said plantation, from thence to extend into the woods southerly to the plantation of William Norvell and Robert Pitt, including the said plantations and families. In 1656, the inhabitants of Terrascoe Neck and the "Ragged Islands," formerly in Nansemond, were added to Isle of Wight. Finally, in 1674, "to settle the long disputes which had arisen between the inhabitants of Isle of Wight and of Nansemond," because of the uncertainty attending the true courses of the dividing creeks and branches, the General Assembly enacted that "a southwest by south line be run from the river side at Hayes' plantation (including that plantation in Isle of Wight) to the creek at or near the plantation called Norvell's Oyster Bank, thence up the creek to Col. Pitt's Creek, thence southwest half a point westerly indefinitely extended, provided, nevertheless, that the house and cleared grounds of Capt. Thomas Godwin, who hath been an ancient inhabitant of Nansemond county, be deemed in the county of Nansemond, anything in this act to the contrary notwithstanding." Till March, 1642-'43, the county had but one parish. Rev. Thomas Faulkner was the minister. In that year, it was divided into two, known as the Upper and Lower Parishes, the former extending from Lawne's Creek to the creek on the eastern side of the bay (Pagan's), dividing the plantations of Samuel Davis and Joseph Cobbs, andthe latter from Pagan's Point, upon the bay, including all the southerly side of the main river. Richard Bennett, however, though obtaining large tracts of land in Maryland, lived most of his life and died in Nansemond, managing to keep in some sort of conformity with the Church of England, for Puritanism did not necessarily mean Congregationalism, or severance from the Church. His grandson, Richard Bennett, was the richest man in Maryland. His uncle, Edward Bennett, of London, left two daughters, one of whom, Mary, married, first, Thomas Bland, of London; second, Luke Cropley. The other, Silvestra, married Major Nicholas Hill, who came to Virginia, and was one of the leading men of Isle of Wight county. Mary, a daughter of the first-named daughter, Mary Bland-Cropley, married James Day of Isle of Wight, Va., and Mary, a daughter of Silvestra Hill, the other daughter of Edward Bennett, married John Jennings, son of the clerk of the same name.

After the restoration of King Charles II, the Quakers had a strong following, especially in the Upper parish. William Edmundson, a friend of George Fox, visited this neighborhood in 1671, and met General Richard Bennett, "who," he said, "received the truth and died in the same, leaving two friends his
executors."

Among the interesting places, the plantation of Edward Bennett deserves notice. His personal share of land appears to have been fifteen hundred acres of land, and by a deed recorded in the secretary's office, dated April 8, 1663, this land was divided between his daughters, Silvestra, the wife of Major Nicholas Hill, and Mary, the wife of Thomas Bland. Silvestra's share was the upper moiety, and began at a locust post on the river side, and ran for length three hundred and twenty poles southwest into the woods, and for breadth three hundred and seventy-five poles up the river to a marked tree in a valley near a place called "The Rocks" (still known as such). Mary's share was the lower moiety. It began at the locust post on the river side, ran down the river by Felgate's Island, and bounded on Pollington's Point (Day's Point?), three lines of Peter Hull's land to a branch of Hutchinson's Creek. Maj. Hill, in 1674, left this land to his son, George Hill, after the death of his wife, Silvestra. Silvestra Hill by her will left 550 acres of this land to Mary Baker, wife of Major Henry Baker.

THE BENNETT FAMILY OF ENGLAND AND VIRGINIA

The Bennetts were in the New World (American Colonies) almost from the beginning. Edward Bennett, an English merchant and trader and a Puritan, descended from the Bennetts of Wiveliscombe, Somerset, England. He and two of his brothers, Robert and Richard, obtained a patent to establish the Puritan plantation "Bennett's Welcome" in the Virginia Colony. On Feb. 1621/2 the "Sea Flower" arrived with 120 settlers, presumably Puritans, led by Capt. Hamor for Edward Bennett's plantation. The settlers quickly busied themselves, preparing the site of the plantation. On 22 March 1621/2, just a month after their arrival, the Indians attacked. There was a huge massacre and the Bennett plantation at Warrascoyak suffered more than most. 53 of the 347 people killed in the massacre were killed at the Bennett plantation. The Indians were in turn massacred and were quiescent for a time. The settlement eventually prospered although Robert and Richard soon died there. Edward Bennett who remained in England except for a short stint in the Colony then appointed his two nephews to run the plantation. Coincidentally their names were the same as Edward's brothers, that is, Robert and Richard. The nephew Richard eventually became the Governor of Virginia.

The Bennett line which about 80 years later intermarried with the Mangums were not so famous as these trader Bennetts. The first one of the line we are sure about is one Thomas Bennett of Warwick County, Virginia. He represented Mulberry Island in the House of Burgesses in 1632. He married Alice, widow of Thomas Pierce. Thomas Pierce was slain in the Indian massacre of 1621/2 in the presence of his wife and child. They were carried off as captives but eventually freed. Thomas must have married her about 1624. They had one son, Richard Bennett Sr. although it is not absolutely certain that Alice was the mother.

Richard Bennett sold land to John Mangum in 1695. This is the first sure record of John Mangum in the colonies although there are tax records as early as 1693 which might refer to John. John married Frances whose maiden name is the subject of some controversy. Richard Bennett Jr. named a granddaughter Frances Mangum in his will. If this is the wife of John, then Frances' maiden name would be Bennett only if her father was the child of Richard Bennett Jr. If Frances' mother was the Bennett then her maiden name is presently Unknown. Some believe, unfortunately without real proof, that John married the daughter of Richard Bennett Jr. who was named Frances. The granddaughter Frances Mangum mentioned in Richard's will would be John & Frances' daughter.


More About Edward Bennett:
Christening: 06 May 1576, Wieliscombe
     
Child of Edward Bennett and Mary Bourne is:
  1215 i.   Sylvestra Bennett, born 25 October 1630 in Isle of Wight, VA; died Abt. 1706 in Isle of Wight Co., VA; married Nicholas Hill Bet. 1651 - 1673 in Isle of Wight, VA.


      2464. Thomas Boddie232, born Abt. 1580 in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England; died 28 April 1627 in Fryerning, Essex, England. He was the son of 4928. John Thomas Boddie and 4929. Thomasine Mildmay. He married 2465. Mary Mildmay.

      2465. Mary Mildmay232, born Abt. 1585 in Walsington, Norfolk, England; died 26 June 1634 in Fryerning, Essex, England. She was the daughter of 4930. Thomas Mildmay and 4931. Olive Nuttall.

Notes for Thomas Boddie:
Source: Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County Virginia by John Bennett Boddie

Thomas Boddie, recorded his Arms impaling Mildmay in the Visitation of the Heralds to Essex .
[drewsmith.FTW]

recorded his arms impaling Mildmay in the Visitation of the Heralds to
Essex in 1612

More About Thomas Boddie:
Burial: 28 April 1627, Fryerning, Essex, England232

More About Mary Mildmay:
Burial: July 1634, Fryerning County, Essex, England232
     
Children of Thomas Boddie and Mary Mildmay are:
  1232 i.   John Boddie, born Abt. 1605 in Mileham, Norfolk, England; died 11 August 1640 in Ingatestone, Essex, England; married Mary Haeward in Ingatestone, Essex, England.
  ii.   Thomas Boddie, born Abt. 1603.
  iii.   Anne Boddie232, born Abt. 1606; died 1635232
  iv.   Robert Boddie232, born Abt. 1616.
  Notes for Robert Boddie:
[drewsmith.FTW]

emigrated to America in 1635 with his brother-in-law Richard Heaward
and settled in Virginia



      2480. Thomas Bennett, born Abt. 1580 in England; died Abt. 1640 in Mulberry Island, Warwick, VA. He was the son of 4960. John Bennett. He married 2481. Alice Pierce Abt. 1624 in Isle of Wight, VA.

      2481. Alice Pierce, born in England; died Aft. 1642 in Isle of Wight Co., VA.

Notes for Thomas Bennett:
Thomas Bennett was a Member of the House of Burgesses as he represented Mulberry Island in 1632 (Burgess Journals 1619-59, p. xiii). Mulberry Island is in Warwick Co., and as Warwick's records were destroyed in the Civil War, nothing more can be found out about Thomas Bennett. However, a clue to his family is found in the will of Anthony Barham, the former Burgess of Mulberry Island who died in England in 1641. (see record for Anthony Barham)

Source: Boddie, 17th Century Isle of Wight Co., Vol 1 pg 290-291

Bennett’s Plantation situated on the Rock Wharf on the present Burwell’s Bay, was patented 11/21/1621 by Edward Bennett, a rich London merchant in partnership with his brother, Robert Bennett, and his nephew, Richard Bennett. Richard Bennett became the first Puritan governor of VA in 1652. Thomas Bennett must have come to America before 1624, prior to Governor Bennett’s arrival. (The Mangums of VA, NC, SC, GA, AL, MS, TN, ARK, TX, UT, by John T Palmer, PhD, Santa Rosa, CA 95409 p. 3)

The Bennetts came to America on the "Sea Flower" in 1622. (The Mangums of VA, NC, SC, GA, AL, MS, TN, ARK, TX, UT, by John T Palmer, PhD, Santa Rosa, CA 95409 p. 3)

Richard Bennett (1625-1709) of Isle of Wight was probably a son of Thomas and Alice Bennett who were residing on the south side of the James River near Lawne’s Creek in 1624. (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie p.289)

10/04/1624, Alice Bennett was a witness before the General Court at the trial of John Proctor for cruelty to his servants. She was sworn and examined as to the beating of Elizabeth Abbott, serving maid of Mr Proctors, and state that she “found her by the waterside by Mr Burrow’s plantation lying behind a boat wrapped in a rug. whereupon this examinat, with Her Husband and Richard Richards carryed her and delivered her to her master. Anthony Barham swore that “he saw Mr Proctor strike Elias Hinton on e of his servants. (VA Mag., 19, p389) (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie p.289)

It seems that Thomas Bennett’s wife, Alice, was formerly the widow of one Pierce, for at General Court in October, 1624, "Elizabeth Pierce chose her father in law (step father), Thomas Bennett, as her guardian". (VA Mag 20, p155). She was unmarried then because John Filmer to who she was engaged had just died and left all his property to her. This was the reason for her choosing a guardian. It is probably that this Elizabeth Pierce afterwards married Anthony Barham. (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie p.290)

General Court held November 1, 1624, Jamestown, George Fadom reported that "about the 4th of July last past", he had written a will for John Philimore(Filmer), who "signed and sealed it". But when Phillimore died the will could not be found. Fadom testified that "said Phillimore did give all of his estate to Elizabeth (Pierse) to whom he was assured and meant to have marriage". One Sully, to whom Fadom had read the will, also said that Phillimore had bequeathed to said Elizabeth all of his "goods, lands and Chattells". Others also gave testimony. Whereupon the court ordered that the guardianship and administration of the lands and goods of John Phillimore be granted to "any friende whome the said Elizabeth Peerce shal choose to her use." Elizabeth "made choyce of Thomas Bennett, her father in law(stepfather). (Minutes of the Court, 27) (Submitted by Barham researcher: Bill Barham)

Thomas Bennett was a Member of the House of Burgesses as he represented Mulberry Island in 1632 (Burgess Journals 1619-59, p. xiii)

Apr...Justinian Cooper, Gent.,to Alice Bennett, widow, for 1 calf and 1 barrel of corn...150 acres between Castle Creek and Cypress Swamp and bounded by Stocker. Justinian Cooper (ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY VIRGINIA DEEDS 1647-1719, COURT ORDERS1693-1695 and GUARDIAN ACCOUNTS 1740-1767 abstracts by William Lindsay Hopkins, p.1:2)

Will of Anthony Barham of Mulberry Island, VA 9/13/1641 - mentions: Wife Elizabeth, daug Elizabeth, mother Bennett 5 pounds; brother in law Richard Bennett 5 pounds, sister Mrs Mary Duke, sister Groves 40s, friend Edward Major; gossip William Butler, Mrs Joane Pierce wife of Mr William Pierce, god daug Sara Butler d/o Wm Butler (NEGR Vol 42 p393)

June 10, 1642, George Hardy received a grant of 300 acres on the easternmost side of Lawne’s Creek adjacent to Alice Bennett (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie p 293)

Jun 19, 1642, John Stocker patented 200 acres adjoining Mr Hardy’s land and the widow Bennett. (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie p293)

Apr 2, 1644 Alice Bennett purchased 150 acres from her neighbor Justinian Cooper for a cow and a calf and a barrel of corn. (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie p293)

19 Jul 1647...Alice Bennett to Mary Jackson and Sarah Jackson, the daughters of Richard Jackson...150 acres of land. Alice(X)Bennett (ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY VIRGINIA DEEDS 1647-1719, COURT ORDERS1693-1695 and GUARDIAN ACCOUNTS 1740-1767 abstracts by William Lindsay Hopkins)

Jul 17, 1648 Capt George Hardy patented 500 acres "lying on east side of Lawne’s Creeke extending to main river and along the great river to a creek dividing the same from land of Alice Bennett." (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie, p.293)

Col Arthur Smith in 1666 made a deed to land at "Blackwater" inherited by his wife Sarah Jackson from her grandmother Alice Bennett. (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie, p.294)

Jun 19, 1666 Capt George Hardy made a deed to land which belonged to his wife Mary who he refers to as the "daughter of Richard Jackson, dec." (Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight Co, VA, by John Bennett Boddie, p294)

Alice Pierse was the widow of Thomas Pierse. Thomas Pierse was slain at the Indian Massacre of 3/26/1721-22 at Martin’s Hundred. Thomas Bennett & Alice Pierse, her fourth marriage, had one child, Richard Bennett, Sr. (The Mangums of VA, NC, SC, GA, AL, MS, TN, ARK, TX, UT, by John T Palmer, PhD, Santa Rosa, CA 95409 p. 4)
The Muster of Thomas Bennett.
Thomas Bennett, aged 38, in the Neptune 1618.
Mary Bennett, aged 18, in the Southampton 1622.
Roger Heford, aged 22, in the Returne 1623.
Benjamine Simes,(1), aged 33 in the ---------.

Thomas Bennett was an immigrant from England. He is claimed in 1635 as a head right by Richard Bennett who later became the governor of the Virginia Colony in the 1650's. The 1624 muster roll of the Virginia Colony identifies two Thomas Bennett's one with wife Mary and the other with wife Margery. One of these was the mother of Thomas' son Richard Bennett. Thomas Bennett resided near Lawne's Creek on the South side of the James River in 1624. He was a member of the House of Burgesses representing Mulberry island in 1632.
His second wife, Alice Pierce, widow of Thomas Pierce. Thomas Pierce was the Sergeant at Arms of the first legislative assembly of Virginia which met on 07/30/1619. He had arrived on the "William and Thomas" which sailed for Virginia in August of 1618. This ship was a "magazine ship", containing supplies for the colony. He apparently traveled with his wife Alice and daughter Elizabeth. Thomas appears to have been a relative of Lt. William Pierce, of the Seaventure (1609), who served under Yeardly, Captain of the Governor's Company of soldiers. Later William Pierce was Lt. Governor in 1629 and a member of the Virginia Council in 1631. His daughter Jane Pierce was the third wife of John Rolfe. Thomas Pierce established the next plantation south of Martin's Hundred along the upper side of the James River. On 03/22/1621/2 the Indians attacked throughout the colony. Thomas Pierce , his wife, child, two other men and a French boy were officially reported as killed at this plantation. Edward Pierce, "Merchantaylor of London" and Ann, his sister, petitioned for administration of his estate on 10/02/1622. However, Alice and her daughter apparently survived the attack, and it is thought they were two of the twenty captives that were ransomed from the Indians. The only other of these twenty who have been identified are Mrs. Boyce and Jane Dickenson, both widows of men slain at Martin's Hundred. These captives were held for 10 months. The colonists, unable to recapture these women by pursuit, destroyed all of the Indian cornfields in retaliation, reducing the Indians and their captives to starvation. Chanco, the Indian convert, who had given the alarm to Jamestown in advance of the Indian attack, negotiated the release of the captives, in return for promises that the Indian fields would not be destroyed and for beads given in trade.

Seventeenth Century, Isle of Wight County, Virginia; by John Bennett Boddie, Chicago Law Printing Company, Chicago.















  Notes for Alice Pierce:
Pierce was not her birth name, but was her former married name. "Thomas Pierse was slain at the Indian Massacre of March 26, 1721/22 at Martin's Hundred. Records show that Thomas Pierce and "his wife and childe" were all killed, however many of the women and children were not killed but held captive by the Indians. Later records prove that Alice Pierse, widow, who married Thomas Bennett was the widow of Thomas Pierse of Virginia, 'Sargent at Armes of America's First Constitutional Convention and First Legislative Assembly in 1610.' In the General Court of October 1624, Elizabeth Pierce, probably the 'childe' reported killed, chose her step-father, Thomas Bennett, to be her guardian. Elizabeth had been engaged to John Filmer who died leaving all his property to her. Elizabeth Pierce later married 1) Anthony Barham and 2) Richard Jackson."
Alice Bennett, seemingly the "Mother Bennett" of Anthony Barham's will, in 1641 was residing in the vicinity of Lawne's Creek, for on June 10, 1642, George Hardy received a grant of 300 acres upon the easternmost side of Lawne's Creek adjacent to Alice Bennett.
Boddie, 17th Century Isle of Wight Co., Vol 1 pg 289-290
ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY RECORDS
ABSTRACTS OF IMPORTANT DEEDS, WILLS AND ORDERS, OF
RECORD IN CLERK'S OFFICE OF ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY.
Justinian Cooper to Alice Bennett, widow, 150 acres for a cow, calf and one bbl. of corn. 19 Charles I.

Widow Pierce, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth SNAYLE. (see below) As recorded in Adventurers of Purse and Person, p. 269; Thomas BENNETT, and his wife Alice (Widow Pierce) were living near Lawne's Creek in Isle of Wight Co., Virginia in 1624, for on October 10, of that year she testified before the General Court in a trial of John Proctor, her neighbor charged with cruelty to his servants. At the same trial her second husband is identified as Thomas BENNETT, etc. Thomas BENNETT was born in Wivelscombe, Co. Somerset, England, having come on the Neptune in 1618, a member of the House of Burgesses from Mulberry Island in 1632. In records of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, these Land Grants are found: Richard Young, 350 acres, November 25, 1636, up the river side from the great Indian field, etc., from transportation of seven person: Henry SNEALE, Elizabeth SNEALE his wife, and Elizabeth, John, Dorothy, Alice and Mary SNEALE. The following year Henry SNAILE was granted 50 acres November 23, 1637, north on Pagan Creek, etc. Due by assignment of the right of one servant called William Taylor from Lt. John Upton. John and Elizabeth SNEALE (SNAYLE) had daughter Alice who married second Thomas BENNETT whose daughter Alice, married second John HARDY. Their son, John HARDY, Jr. married Rebecca, surname Unknown and their daughter, Mary HARDY married , first, Col. John Hinton."-Family Lines and Kindred Line by Adelle Harper."

"Adelle Harper in her book, Family Lines, states that John Hardy of Chowan Co., NC was the son of John Hardy II and Alice Bennett. She does not show any sources for this connection, but her devotion to show this descent in her book should not be over-looked. Today with the flow of information through the Internet perhaps we can solve this mystery...please consider the Hardy page a work in progress. As new information is found I will put them on my pages to deepen our understanding of who our Hardy ancestors were. And if in the end it is determined that John Hardy was not the son of John Hardy II and Alice Bennett I will be the first to show that. I do want to point out that others who descend from John Hardy and Charity O'Dyer, thought to be the parents of John Hardy of Chowan Co., also descend from the Hardy's of Isle of Wight Co., Virginia and these family's were notorious for intermarring."




     
Children of Thomas Bennett and Alice Pierce are:
  1240 i.   Richard Bennett, Sr., born Abt. 1625 in Isle of Wight, VA (of Blackwater); died 04 December 1709 in Surry Co., VA; married (1) Sarah Lancaster in VA; married (2) Anne Barham Abt. 1659 in Upper Parish, Isle of Wight Co., VA.
  ii.   Mary Bennett, married Richard Jackson.
  iii.   Alice Bennett, born in Isle of Wight Co., VA; died in Isle of Wight Co., VA; married John Hardy; born Abt. 1637 in England; died 09 June 1677 in Isle of Wight Co., VA.
  Notes for John Hardy:
The Hardy Family History were among the landed gentry of England in the early eleventh century, and were descended from the Norman Knight, De Hardie. The name has been variously spelt, Hardy, Hardie, Hardey or Hardee. There have been many Naval Officers, but the name is rarely found in the Army list of England. There are several portaraits of this distiguished family hanging in Greenwich Naval Art Gallery.
The first authentic record of this family begins with:
I. Sir John deHardy, Lord Mayor of London, died 1543; married Mary Stanley, daughter of George Stanley, Knight of the Garter and K.B., Lord Strange, and his wife, Joan, Baroness Strange, daughter of John, Lord Strage and Jacquetta Wydville.
II. Sir Michael deHardy, of Wetwant born 1530, and died 1595; married Lady Alice (Allison), daughter of Sir Matthew deShelton.
III. Sir Richard Hardy, Esq. of Yorkshire born 1567, and died 1645; married Alice, daughter of Robert Wilson.
IV.John Hardy, of Bedfordshire, England, born 1613 and died 1670; married 1632, Olive Council, born 1615, and died 1675. They came from England to Virginia about 1666, and were granted land in Isle of Wright County. Their sons had preceded them, coming to Virginia about 1652.

The first authentic record that we find of this family in Virginia,
is of George Hardy, who came to the Colony prior to 1636, at which date he is spoken of as a "Shipwright". In 1644 he patented 300 acres, and in 1648, 500 acres situated upon Lawne's Creek, in Isle of Wight County. He was the owner of the famous Hardy Mill, which was owned by the family for generations.

He served as a member of the House of Burgesses from 1641--52. He was a liberal supporter of the Established Church. He made his will March 14, 1665, and names his loving wife, to whom he leaves all his land, housing etc. for her life time then to divided between his nephews, George Hardy, Jr., Christian Wilson and Thomas Hardy. This and other records are proof that this George was a brother of John Hardy, of Isle of Wight Co. Virginia.

John Hardy, in 1666 received a grant for 1,150 acres of land in Isle of Wight County. He was a prominent, influential citizen and churchman. He married 1632 in England, Olive Council born 1615 and died 1675. Had among other issue

Col. John Hardy, born in England about 1637, had his will probated June 1677, in Isle of Wight County. He was a prominent, influential citizen and churchman, a member of the House of Burgesses in 1668 and a Justice of the County Court about 1673. He married Alice Bennett, the Widow Johnson, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Snayle.

As recorded in 'Adventurers of Purse and Person', p. 269; Thomas, and his wife Alice (widow Pierce) were living near Lawne's Creek in Isle of Wight Co., Virginia in 1624, for on October 10, of that year she testified before the General Court in a trial of John Proctor, her neighbor charged with cruelty to his servants. At the same trial her second husband is identified as Thomas Bennett, etc. Thomas Bennett was born in Wivelscombe, Co. Somerset, England, having come on the Neptune in 1618, a member of the House of Burgesses from Mulberry Island in 1632.

In records of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, these Land Grants are found:

Richard Young, 350 acres, November 25, 1636, up the river side from the great Indian field, etc., for transportation of seven persons: Henry Sneale, Elizabeth Sneale his wife, and Elizabeth, John, Dorothy, Alice and Mary Sneale.

The following year Henry Snaile was granted 50 acres November 23, 1637, north of Pagan Creek, etc., Due by assignment of the right of one servant called William Taylor from Lt. John Upton

John and Elizabeth Sneale (Snayle) had daughter Alice who married second Thomas Bennett whose daughter Alice, married second John Hardy.

Their son, John Hardy, Jr. married Rebecca, surname Unknown, their daughter, Mary Hardy married, first, Col. John Hinton




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