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Descendants of Stephen Hopkins




Generation No. 1


1. STEPHEN1 HOPKINS was born Abt. 1580 in England, and died 1644 in Plymouth, (Plymouth), MA. He married (1) MARY in England. He married (2) ELIZABETH FISHER February 19, 1617/18 in St. Mary Matfellon, Whitechapel, London, England.

Notes for S
TEPHEN HOPKINS:
It is believed that Stephen is the same Stephen Hopkins who on 15 May 1609 saidled aboard the Sea Venture for VA, via bermuda and wrecked on the shore of that island.

Page 406 of 'Bradford's Mayflower Passenger List' names "Mr. Steven Hopkins, and Elizabeth, his wife, and 2 children, caled Giles, and Constanta, a doughter, both bya former wife; and 2 more by his wife, caled Damaris and Oceanus; the last was borne at sea; and two servants, called Edward Doty and Edward Litster." Page 408 reads, "Mr. Hopkins and his wife are now both dead, but they lived above 20 years in this place, andhad one sone and 4 doughters borne here. Ther sone became a seaman, and dyed at Barbadoes; one daughter dyed here, and 2 are maried; one of them hath 2 children; and one is yet to mary. So their increase which still survives are 5. But his sone Giles is maried, and hath 4 children. His doughter Constanta is also maried, and hath 12 children, all of them living, and one of them maried."

The Mayflower Compact was signed while the Mayflower was anchored at Cape Cod (Provincetown Harbor) on 11 November 1620 (21 November 1620 New Syle). It was signed by all free adult males and some, not all, servants. Stephen Hopkins, his son Giles and both of his servants Edward Doty and Edward Lister were among the signers.

He was a prominant man among the settlers. He acted as interpreter between the settlers and the Indians, something he may have learned when he had been here before. On 22 May 1627, during the division of lands, Stephen drew 7th lot. They were to recieve in addition to other livestock, "the calfe of this yeare to come of the black cow, which fell to John Shaw and his company."

The food supply in the early years was almost always critically low. Thanks to the Wampanoags, the settlers learned how to plant Indian crops, which ultimately helped them avoid starvation. Winslow described the process: "We set the last spring (1621) some twentie Acres of Indian Corne and sowed some six Acres of Barly and Pease, and according to the manner of the Indians, we manured our ground with Herings or rather Shadds." But the first crops were not sufficient. All was not without cheer though. In the fall of 1621, prior to the arrival of the Fortune, the small group of survivors celebrated what has come to be known as the first Thanksgiving. This event was described by Edward Winslow: "Our harvest being gotten in, our Governour sent foure men on fowling, that so we might after a more speciall manner rejoyce together, after we had gathered the fruit of our labours; they foure in one day killed as much fowle, as with a little helpe beside, served the Company almost a weeke, at which time amoungst other Recreations, we exercised our Armes, many of the Indians coming amoungst us, and amoungst the rest their greatest King Massasoyt, with some nintie men, whom for three dayes we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deere, which they brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governour, and upon the Captaine, and others. And although it be not alwayes so plentifull, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodnesse of God, we are so farre from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plentie." (Winslow was writing to attract new settlers and he might have overstated the settlers' being in general "so farre from want". This is all we have from contemporary records about the first "Thanksgiving," which was really more of a harvest festival. The word "thanksgiving" which was not used in Winslow's description, more commonly meant a day of fast and prayer." Even when new ships arrived in 1623, Bradford described how the new settlers found the old. "They were in a very low condition...But for food they were all alike, save some that had got a few pease of the ship that was last hear. The best dish they could present their friends with was a lobster, or a peece of fish without bread or anything els but a cupp of fair spring water," and he added, "God fedd them out of the sea for the most parte." Relations with the Indians, at least the nearby Wampanoags under the supreme chief, Massasoit, were good. Samoset, who was not a Wampanoag, but came from Maine, had learned some English from fishing ships, and he walkeed in on the settlers shortly after their arrival at Plymouth and offered to help them. Through Samoset, they learned also of Squanto, who was "a native of this place," but who haad been taken by a ship to England. Samoset stayed his first night at Stephen Hopkins's house, probably because Hopkins had had familiarity with Indians when he was in Virginia years earlier. Another early celebration was noted in a September 1623 letter from Emmanuel Altham, captain of the Little James, on the occasion of Governor William Bradford's marriage to Alice (Carpenter) Southworth: "And now to say somewhat of the great cheer we had at the Governor's marriage. We had about twelve pasty venison, besides other, pieces of roasted venison and other such good cheer in such quantity that I could wish you some of our share. For here we have the best grapes that ever you (saw) - and the biggest, and divers sorts of plums and nuts which our business will not suffer us to look for.' "
("Plymouth Colony Its History & People 1620-1691 'The Old Comers 1620-1627, A Time to Plant' " page 22, 24, 25

Stephen's will was written 6 June 1644 and probated 17 July 1644, having died between these two dates.





BIBLIOGRAPHY - MAYFLOWER AND HER CREW



It might be noted that the only primary source descriptions of the Mayflower crossing are in Bradford, chapter 9, and a very short version in Mourt's Relation.



Arber, Edward, ed. The Story of the Pilgrim Fathers. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1897 (reprint New York: Kraus Reprint, 1967)

Baker, William A. The New Mayflower: Her Design and Construction. Barre: Barre Gazette, 1958.

Baker, William A. "The Mayflower Problem." The American Neptune 14(1): 5-17. January, 1954.

Banks, Charles E. The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers. Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Co., 1980.

Banks, Charles E. "The Officers and Crew of the Mayflower, 1620-21." Massachusetts Historical Society Proceedings 60: 210-221. April, 1927.

Banks, Charles E. "William Mullins and Giles Heale." Massachusetts Historical Society Proceedings 60: 144-150. February, 1927.

Bowman, George Ernest. "A Genuine Mayflower Relic." The Mayflower Descendant 34(1): 1-7. January, 1937.

Bradford, William.. Of Plymouth Plantation, 1620-1647. Edited by Samuel E. Morison. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1952.

Brown, Alexander, ed. The Genesis of the United States. 2 vol. New York: Russell & Russell, 1964.

Cooper, Winifred. Harwich, the Mayflower and Christopher Jones. London: Phillimore, 1970.

Heath, Dwight B., ed. A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth (Mourt's Relation). New York: Corinth Books, 1963. Reprint. Cambridge: Applewood Books, 1986.

Hollingsworth, Harry. "John Alden - Beer Brewer of Windsor?" The American Genealogist 53(3): 235-240. July, 1977.

Horrocks, J. W. "The ‘Mayflower’." Mariner’s Mirror 8:2-9; 81-88; 140-147; 237-245; 354-362. 1922-3.

Hutchinson, J. R. "The ‘Mayflower,’ Her Identity and Tonnage." New England Historical and Genealogical Register 70: 337-342. October, 1916.

Marsden, R. G. "The ‘Mayflower’." English Historical Review 19: 669-680. October, 1904.

Nickerson, W. Sears. Land Ho! - 1620 : A Seaman’s Story of the Mayflower Her Construction, Her Navigation and Her First Landfall. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1931.

Weaver, Leonard T. The Harwich Story. Harwich: The Author, 1975.

Williams, Alicia Crane. "John Alden: Theories on English Ancestry." The Mayflower Descendant 39(2): 111-122 ; 40(2): 133-136 ; 41(2):201. July, 1989-

Wright, Irene A. "John Clark of the Mayflower." Massachusetts Historical Society Proceedings 54 : 61-76. November, 1920.

Wright, Irene A. "Spanish Policy toward Virginia, 1606-1612: Jamestown, Ecija, and John Clark of the Mayflower." The American Historical Review 25(3): 448-479. April, 1920.

CFT 8/97



Other N.E. Crossings and Related Material

Higginson, Francis. "Higginson’s Journal of his Voyage to New England." Chronicles of the First Planters of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay. Alexander Young, ed. Boston: Little & Brown, 1846.

James, Sydney V., ed. Three Visitors to Early Plymouth. Plymouth, Mass.: Plimoth Plantation, 1963.

Josselyn, John. "An Account of Two Voyages to New England." Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Ser. III, Vol. 3. Cambridge: Metcalf & Co., 1833.

"A Letter of William Bradford and Isaac Allerton, 1623." American Historical Review. Vol. 8, pp. 294-301.

"Letters of John Bridge and Emmanuel Altham," Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Ser. III, Vol. 44 (1910), pp. 178-189.

Mather, Richard. "Journal of Richard Mather, 1635. His Life and Death, 1670." Collections of the Dorchester Antiquarian and Historical Society, #3. Boston: David Clapp, 1850.

Morton, Nathaniel. New-Englands Memoriall. Boston: The Club of Odd Volumes, 1903.

Thrower, W.R. Life at Sea in the Age of Sail. London: Phillimore, 1972.

Waters, David W. The Art of Navigation in England in Elizabethan and Early Stuart Times. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1958.

Winthrop, John. The History of New England from 1630 to 1649. 2 vols. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1853.



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Chapter IX

Of Their Voyage, and How they Passed the Sea; and of their Safe Arrival at Cape Cod

September 6. These troubles being blown over, and now all being compact together in one ship, they put to sea again with a prosperous wind, which continued divers days together, which was some encouragement unto them; yet, according to the usual manner, many were afflicted with seasickness. And I may not omit here a special work of God’s providence. There was a proud and very profane young man, one of the seamen, of a lusty, able body, which made him the more haughty; he would alway be contemning the poor people in their sickness and cursing them daily with grievous execrations; and did not let to tell them that that he hoped to help to cast half of them overboard before they came to their journey’s end, and to make merry with what they had; and if he were by any gently reproved, he would curse and swear most bitterly. But it pleased God before they came half seas over, to smite this young man with a grievous disease, of which he died in a desperate manner, and so was himself the first that was thrown overboard. Thus his curses light on his own head, and it was an astonishment to all his fellows for they noted it to be the just hand of God upon him.

After they had enjoyed fair winds and weather for a season, they were encountered many times with cross winds and met with many fierce storms with which the ship was shroudly [an old form of shrewdly in its original meaning wickedly] shaken, and her upper works made very leaky; and one of the main beams in the midships was bowed and cracked, which put them in some fear that the ship could not be able to perform the voyage. So some of the chief of the company, perceiving the mariners to fear the sufficiency of the ship as appeared by their mutterings, they entered into serious consultation with the mater and other officers of the ship, to consider in time of the danger, and rather to return than to cast themselves into a desperate and inevitable peril. And truly there was great distraction and difference of opinion amongst the mariners themselves; fain would they do what could be done for their wages sake (being now near half seas over) and on the other hand they were loath to hazard their lives too desperately. But in examining of all opinions, the master and others affirmed they knew the ship to be strong and firm under water; and for the buckling of the main beam, there had been a great iron screw the passengers brought out of Holland, which would raise the beam into place; the which being done, the carpenter and master affirmed that with a post put under it, set firm in the lower deck and otherwise bound, he would make sufficient. And as for the decks and upper works, they would caulk them as well as they could, and though with the working of the ship they would not long keep staunch, yet there would otherwise be no great danger, if they did not overpress her with sails. So they committed themselves to the will of God and resolved to proceed.

In sundry of these storms the winds were so fierce and the seas so high, as they could not bear a knot of sail, but were forced to hull [drift with no sail] for divers days together. And in one of them, as they thus lay at hull in a mighty storm, a lusty young man called John Howland, coming upon some occasion above the gratings was, with a seele [roll or pitch] of the ship, thrown into the sea; but it pleased God that he caught hold of the topsail halyards which hung overboard and ran out at length. Yet he held his hold (though sundry fathoms under water) till he was hauled up by the same rope to the brim of the water, and then with a boat hook and other means got into the ship again and his life saved. And though he was something ill with it, yet he lived many years after and became a profitable member both in church and commonwealth. In all this voyage there died but one of the passengers, which was William Butten, a youth, servant to Samuel Fuller, when they drew near the coast.

But to omit things (that I may be brief) after long beating at sea they fell with that land which is called Cape Cod; the which being made and certainly known to be it, they were not a little joyful. After some deliberation had amongst themselves and with the master of the ship, they tacked about and resolved to stand for the southward (the wind and weather being fair) to find some place about Hudson’s River for their habitation. But after they had sailed the course about half the day, they fell amongst dangerous shoals and roaring breakers, and they were so far entangled therewith as they conceived themselves to be in great danger; and the wind shrinking upon them withal, they resolved to bear up again for the Cape and thought themselves happy to get out of those dangers before night overtook them, as by God’s good providence they did. An the next day they got into the Cape harbor [now Provincetown Harbor] where they rid in safety. . . Being thus arrived in a good harbor, and brought safe to land they fell upon their knees and blessed the God of Heaven, who had brought them over the vast and furious ocean, and delivered them from all the perils and miseries thereof, again to set their feet on the firm and stable earth, their proper element.

William Bradford. Of Plymouth Plantation. Samuel Eliot Morison, ed. New York: Knopf, 1952, pp. 58 - 61.


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Wednesday, the sixth of September, the wind coming out east-north-east, a fine small gale, we loosed from Plymouth [Devon, England], having been kindly entertained and courteously used by divers friends there dwelling, and after many difficulties in boisterous storms, at length, by God’s providence, upon the ninth of November following, by the break of day we espied land which we deemed to be Cape Cod, and so afterward it proved. And the appearance of it much comforted us, especially seeing so goodly a land, and wooded to the brink of the sea. It caused us to rejoice together, and praise God that had given us once again to see land. And thus we made our course south-south-west, purposing to go to a river ten leagues to the south of the Cape, but at night the wind being contrary, we put round again for the bay of Cape Cod. And upon the 11th of November we came to an anchor in the bay, which is a good harbor and pleasant bay, circled round, except in the entrance which is about four miles over from land to land, compassed about to the very sea with oaks, pines, juniper, sassafras, and other sweet wood. It is a harbor wherein a thousand sail of ships may safely ride. There we relieved ourselves with wood and water, and refreshed our people, while our shallop was fitted to coast the bay, to search for a habitation. There was the greatest store of fowl that ever we saw.

A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth: Mourt’s Relation (1622) Dwight B. Heath, ed. New York: Corinth Books, 1963, pp. 15-16.


Bibliography - Stephen Hopkins

De Costa, B.F. "Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower." The New England Historical and Genealogical Register. 133: 300-305. July, 1879.

Hayward, Kendall Payne. "The Adventure of Stephen Hopkins." The Mayflower Quarterly 51(1): 5-9. February, 1985.

Hodges, Margaret. Hopkins of the Mayflower. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1972.

Johnson, Caleb."The True Origin of Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower," The American Genealogist July 1998, Vol. 73, No. 3.

Jourdain, Silvester. "A Discovery of the Bermudas, Otherwise Called the Isle of Devils." in Wright, Louis B., ed. A Voyage to Virginia in 1609. Charlottesville: University of Virginia, 1964.

Kolb, Avery. "The Tempest." American Heritage. 34(3) : 26-35. April/May, 1983.

Maitland, Charmian. "Stephen Hopkins in England." The Mayflower Quarterly 51(1): 7-9. February, 1985.

Stachey, William. "A True Repository of the Wreck and Redemption of Sir Thomas Gates, Knight." in Wright, Louis B., ed. A Voyage to Virginia in 1609. Charlottesville: University of Virginia, 1964.





New Stephen Hopkins Discoveries


In the July 1998 issue of The American Genealogist, "The True Origin of Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower: With Evidence of His Earlier Presence in Virginia". My article proves that Stephen Hopkins was not born at Wortley, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucester, England, as has been the prevailing theory for the past 70 years, and shows where in England he actually was from. It identifies the baptism records of Constance and Giles Hopkins, as well as an additional baptism of a child heretofore unknown. It disproves the Constance Dudley myth, and correctly identifies the name of Stephen Hopkins' first wife. It also corrects a number of inaccuracies which have been published on the Hopkins family over the past century, and adds a few little-known facts about the family. And finally, the first historical documentation for the tradition that Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower was the same man as Stephen Hopkins of the Sea Venture which went to Jamestown, Virginia in 1609 is presented. Caleb Johnson's Mayflower Web Pages

New discoveries regarding Stephen Hopkins have recently been made, which disprove most all information that has been previously published on his English origins, and add significant new facts.  This new information is published in an article authored by myself in the July 1998 issue of The American Genealogist 73:161-171.  This web page has been updated with the basic facts from my discoveries, but for the details please read the article.  Unfortunately the article was so popular it is now out of print with the publisher.  To get a copy, please bring the article citation to your local library's reference desk and request an interlibrary loan of the article (assuming they do not already subscribe to The American Genealogist).


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BORN:  about 1578, probably in Hampshire, England
DIED:   between 6 June and 17 July 1644, Plymouth
MARRIED:

•Mary, before 1604, probably in Hampshire, England.  NOTE:  He did not marry Constance Dudley, a claim which I disproved in my article mentioned above. •Elizabeth Fisher, 19 February 1617/18, St. Mary Matfellon, Whitechapel, Middlesex, England




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CHILDREN by first wife:
NAMEBAPTISMDEATHMARRIAGEElizabeth13 May (or March*) 1604, Hursley, Hampshire, England

*This baptism record was originally read as May by three noted genealogists, but Ernie Christensen recently examined the record and believes it should actually be March.  The record will be re-examined further before a final conclusion is reached by the Mayflower Web Pages.

living in 1613, probably died before 1620 unmarried Constance11 May 1606, Hursley, Hampshire, England mid-October 1677, Eastham, MA Nicholas Snow, before 22 May 1627, Plymouth Giles30 January 1607/8, Hursley, Hampshire, England between 5 March 1688/9 and 16 April 1690, Eastham, MA Catherine Whelden, 9 October 1639, Plymouth

CHILDREN by Elizabeth:
NAME BIRTH DEATH MARRIAGE
Damaris c1618/19, England probably after 1627, Plymouth unmarried Oceanus aboard the Mayflower between 6 September and 11 November, 1620 before 1627, Plymouth unmarried Caleb c1623, Plymouth died in Barbados of starvation, between 1644 and 1651unknown Deborah c1625, Plymouth before 1674 Andrew Ring, 23 April 1646, Plymouth Damaris probably after 1627, Plymouth between January 1665/6 and 18 November 1669, Plymouth Jacob Cooke, after 10 June 1646 Ruth Plymouth after 30 November 1644 unmarried Elizabeth Plymouth after October, 1657, apparently had disappeared and was thought dead by 5 October 1659 unmarried

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ANCESTRAL SUMMARY:

IMPORTANT NOTE:  The Mayflower Quarterly has published a number of factually baseless articles on Stephen Hopkins' genealogy, most recently in the November 1997 and August 1998 issues.  These articles should not be used by anyone concerned about genealogical accuracy; they were briefly corrected in the November 1998 issue, page 350-351 and 353.  Additionally, there is a highly erroneous biography published by Margaret Hodges, titled Hopkins of the Mayflower: Portrait of a Dissenter.  The genealogical information in these works are flat out wrong, and easily proven so with primary source documentation.

Stephen Hopkins was not from Wortley, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, as has been previously published in numerous books and articles, and the claim he married a woman named Constance Dudley is complete fiction.  This alleged origin was disproven in my article, "The True English Origins of Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower", published in The American Genealogist 73:161-171.  The Wotton-under-Edge claim was never factually sound to begin with, based simply on a few name coincidences and wild speculations.

The baptism records of Stephen Hopkins' children Giles and Constance, as well as an additional child Elizabeth, were discovered in the parish registers of Hursley, Hampshire, England.  Below is a scan of the  Hursley parish register for 1606 showing Constance Hopkins' baptism in the original records.  For those of you who can't read the handwriting, it says:  "undecimo de May, Constancia filia Steph. Hopkins fuit baptizata", which translates into English as "Eleventh day of May, Constance daughter of Steph. Hopkins was baptized."

And there in Hursley, on 9 May 1613, Mary Hopkins the wife of Stephen was buried.  Mary's children Giles, Constance, and Elizabeth are all named in her probate estate papers dated 10 May 1613 and on file at the Hampshire Records Office (file: 1613AD/046).

The claim Stephen had a son William is based on Wotton-under-Edge records, and is invalid since that Hopkins family had no connection with the Mayflower.  The claim that Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower had a son Stephen baptized at St. Stephen Coleman Street, London on 22 December 1609 is also wrong--no such baptism record exists.  This baptism is apparently an error for a real baptism which is found on 3 December 1609 at the parish of St. Katherine Coleman, London.  This child died on 19 February 1609/10, and the father had another child named John Hopkins, baptized on 14 April 1611.  Since Stephen Hopkins the Mayflower passenger was in Virginia at the time this child was conceived and later baptized, he could not have fathered it.  The name Stephen Hopkins is quite common--there are at least five of them in London during this time period.  This is just another man named Stephen Hopkins, and there is no connection with the Mayflower passenger of the same name.

Will of Stephen Hopkins
Will of Gyles Hopkins


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BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY:

Stephen Hopkins was one of only a few passengers on the Mayflower to have made a prior trip to America. He came in 1609 on the Sea Venture headed for Jamestown, Virginia. But instead, they were marooned on an island following a hurricane, and the 150 passengers were stranded for nine months. Hopkins led an uprising, challenging the governor's authority, and was sentenced to death. But he begged and moaned about the ruin of his wife and children, and so was pardoned out of sympathy. The company eventually managed to build a ship, and escaped the island. After spending several years in Jamestown, Hopkins returned to England sometime between 1613 and 1617.

Stephen Hopkins brought with him on the Mayflower his wife Elizabeth, children Giles and Constance by his first marriage, and Damaris by his second marriage. A son Oceanus was born while the Mayflower was at sea. Stephen participated in the early exploring missions and was an "ambassador" along with Myles Standish for early Indian relations.

Stephen Hopkins is mentioned in a letter written by William Bradford and Isaac Allerton on 8 September 1623, which was found in uncalendered papers at the Public Records Office in London.  The letter was presented as evidence for the defense in the 1624 court case Stevens and Fell vs. the Little James.  The letter is published in American Historical Review, 8(1903):294-301.  The short section about Stephen Hopkins reads as follows (spelling modernized):

About Hopkins and his men we are come to this issue.  The men we retain in the general according to his resignation and equity of the thing.  And about that recconing of 20 odd pounds, we have brought it to this pass, he is to have - 6 - " - payed by you there, and the rest to be quit; it is for nails and such other things as we have had of his brother here for the companies use, and upon promise of payment by us, we desire you will accordingly do it.

Another little-known reference to Stephen Hopkins, which also alludes to his two servants (Edward Doty and Edward Leister), is found in the Minutes for the Council of New England, on 5 May 1623 (reprinted from Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, April 1867, pp. 93-94):

Touching the difference between Mr. Hopkins and Mr. Peirce, Mr. Hopkins alleadgeth that hee hath paid to Mr Peirce for Transportation of himselfe and two persons more, and Likewise for ihs goods, wch Peirce acknowledgeth, but alleadgeth, that by reason of his unfortunate returne, the rest of the passengers that went upon the Like Conditions have been contented to allow unto 40s a person towards his Loss, and therefore desireth that Master Hopkyns may doe the like, which Mr. Hopkins at length agreed unto, soe as Mr. Peirce and his Associates will accept of £6 for 3 passengers out of £20 his Adventure wch he hath in their Joynt Stock.  And therefore they both pray that the Councell will bee pleased to write to the Associates to accept thereof, which they are pleased to doe.

In 1636, Hopkins was fined for the battery of John Tisdale, in 1637 he was found guilty of allowing men to drink on a Sunday at his house, and in 1638 he was fined for not dealing fairly with an apprentice-girl, Dorothy Temple. He was also charged with several other minor crimes, including selling glass at too high a price, selling illegal intoxicants, and allowing men to get drunk at his house. However, this in no way indicated he was disloyal to the Colony--in fact he was Assistant governor from 1633 until 1636, and he volunteered to fight in the Pequot War of 1637.


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SOURCES:

Caleb Johnson, "The True Origins of Mayflower Passenger Stephen Hopkins," The American Genealogist, 73(1998):161-171.

John D. Austin, Mayflower Families for Five Generations: Stephen Hopkins, volume 6 (Plymouth: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1992).

Eugene Aubrey Stratton, Plymouth Colony, Its History and Its People, 1620-1691 (Ancestor Publishers, Salt Lake City, 1986).

William Bradford and Edward Winslow.  A Relation or Journal of the Beginning and Proceedings of the English Plantation settled at Plymouth . . . (John Bellamie: London, 1622).

William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, ed. Samuel Morison (New York: Random House, 1952).

Annie Lash Jester, Adventurers of Purse and Person--Virginia 1607-1625, p. 213-217.


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Mayflower Web Pages.  Caleb Johnson © 1998

SONS & DAUGHTERS OF THE PILGRIMS
Page 268

I, Myrtie Clark Baldwin, 34 Anson Street, Derby, Conn.; born  
Orange, Conn.; married Noyes Darling Baldwin; hereby apply  
for membership in The Society of the Sons and Daughters of the  
Pilgrims by right of descent from Stephen Hopkins and son,  
Giles, born in England, died 1684. Service: Came to Plymouth  
in Mayflower, 1621.  

Notes for M
ARY:
And there in Hursley, on 9 May 1613, Mary Hopkins the wife of Stephen was buried.  Mary's children Giles, Constance, and Elizabeth are all named in her probate estate papers dated 10 May 1613 and on file at the Hampshire Records Office (file: 1613AD/046).


Revelutionary War Soldiers Descended From STEPHEN HOPKINS of the Mayflower

Isaac Snow (Jonathan Snow, Nicholas Snow, Mark Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Mark Snow (Jonathan Snow, Nicholas Snow, Mark Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Nicolas Snow (Nathaniel Snow, Nicholas Snow, Mark Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Joseph Snow (Thankful Snow, Nicholas Snow, Mark Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Reuben Hinckley (Lydia Snow, Thomas Snow, Mark Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Elknah Hinckley (Lydia Snow, Thomas Snow, Mark Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Thomas Snow (Thomas Snow, Thomas Snow, Mark Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

David Snow (Jonathan Snow, Prence Snow, Mark Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Daniel Paine (Jonathan Paine, Thomas Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Edward White (Abigail Paine, Thomas Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Ephraim Paine (Joshua Paine, Thomas Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Barnabas Paine (Joshua Paine, Thomas Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Elisha Cleveland (Abigail Paine, Elisha Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Josiah Cleveland (Abigail Paine, Elisha Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

John Cleveland (Abigail Paine, Elisha Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Ebenezer Cleveland (Abigail Paine, Elisha Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Aaron Cleveland (Abigail Paine, Elisha Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Abraham Paine (Abraham Paine, Elisha Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Elisha Paine (Elisha Paine, Elisha Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Barnabas Freeman (Mary Paine, John Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Ebenezer Cook (Mercy Paine, John Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Joseph Paine (Richard Paine, Joseph Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Jeremiah Walker (Jeremiah Walker, Jabez Walker, Sarah Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Solomon Smith (Susanna Snow, Benjamin Snow, Joseph Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Simeon Brown (Joseph Brown, Ruth Snow, Joseph Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Joshua Cook (Zilpha Brown, Ruth Snow, Joseph Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Israel Higgins (Ruth Brown, Ruth Snow, Joseph Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Silvenis Higgins (Ruth Brown, Ruth Snow, Joseph Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

William Smith (Mercy Snow, Stephen Snow, Joseph Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS) [died in action]

Benjamin Smith (Ruth Snow, Stephen Snow, Joseph Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Heman King (Ebenezer King, Bathshuah Snow, Joseph Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Benjamin Smith (John Smith, Bethiah Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Thomas Smith (John Smith, Bethiah Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Seth Smith (Seth Smith, Bethiah Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Ebenezer Snow (Susanna Snow, Ebenezer Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Aaron Snow (Susanna Snow, Ebenezer Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Jedediah Snow (Susanna Snow, Ebenezer Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Elnathan Snow (Thomas Snow, Ebenezer Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Nathaniel Snow (Nathaniel Snow, Ebenezer Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Samuel Snow (Nathaniel Snow, Ebenezer Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Moses Snow (Aaron Snow, Ebenezer Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Ensign Nickerson (Bathshuah Snow, Ebenezer Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Solomon Wright (Phebe Smalley, Rebecca Snow, John Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Samuel Nye (Mary Snow, John Snow, John Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

John Snow (Isaac Snow, John Snow, John Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Elisha Snow (Isaac Snow, John Snow, John Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Joseph Snow (Isaac Snow, John Snow, John Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Samuel Snow (Isaac Snow, John Snow, John Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Sylvanus Snow (Anthony Snow, John Snow, John Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Ephraim Harding (Nathan Harding, Hannah Rogers, Elizabeth Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

David Smalley (James Smalley, Rebecca Snow, John Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Edward Snow (Silvanus Snow, Jabez Snow, Jabez Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS) also (Hannah Cole, Israel Cole, Mary Paine, Mary Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

David Godfrey (David Godfrey, Deborah Cooke, Deborah Hopkins, Giles Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

John Yates (Thankful King, Roger King, Bathshua Snow, Stephen Snow, Constance Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

James Doty (Edward Doty, John Doty, John Doty, Elizabeth Cooke, Damaris Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Joseph Hopkins (Jonathan Hopkins, Joseph Hopkins, Stephen Hopkins, Gyles Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Jonathan Hopkins (Joseph Hopkins,Stephen Hopkins, Gyles Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Tisdale Hodges (Mercy Cooke, John Cooke, Caleb Cooke, Damaris Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

Miles Cook (Thomas Cook, Thomas Cooke, Richard Cooke, Deborah Hopkins, Giles Hopkins, STEPHEN HOPKINS)

More About M
ARY:
Burial: May 09, 1613, Hursley, (Hapshire), England
Probate: May 10, 1613, Hapshire Records Office File #1613AD/046.
     
Children of S
TEPHEN HOPKINS and MARY are:
  i.   ELIZABETH2 HOPKINS, b. May 13, 1604, Hursley, (Hapshire), England (Source: Parish Registers. Hursley, Eng.); d. Bef. 1620.
  Notes for ELIZABETH HOPKINS:
Elizabeth was alive in 1613 at the time of her mother's death.

2. ii.   CONSTANCE HOPKINS, b. May 11, 1606, Hursley, (Hapshire), England; d. October 1677, Eastham, MA.
3. iii.   GILES HOPKINS, b. January 30, 1607/08, Hursley, (Hapshire), England; d. Aft. March 05, 1687/88, Eastham, MA.
     
Children of STEPHEN HOPKINS and ELIZABETH FISHER are:
  iv.   DAMARIS2 HOPKINS.
  Notes for DAMARIS HOPKINS:
Damaris traveled with her family aboard the 1620 Mayflower. Died young.

  v.   OCEANUS HOPKINS, b. 1620, Plymouth, (Plymouth), MA; d. 1620, Plymouth, (Plymouth), MA.
  Notes for OCEANUS HOPKINS:
Oceanus Hopkins " was born on the 1620 Mayflower while at sea - hence the first name. He died without issue before the 1627 division." ("Plymouth Colony Its History & People 1620-1691" Page 308). Oceanus died the first year between 16 September and 11 November 1620. " Log of the Mayflower"

  More About OCEANUS HOPKINS:
Burial: Plymouth, MA
Fact 12: Was born aboard the Mayflower during its voyage.

  vi.   CALEB HOPKINS, d. Barbados.
  Notes for CALEB HOPKINS:
Caleb, a seaman, died at Barbados as an adult without issue.

  More About CALEB HOPKINS:
Occupation: Seaman

  vii.   DEBORAH HOPKINS, b. Aft. 1620; m. ANDREW RING.
  viii.   DAMARIS HOPKINS, b. Aft. 1620; m. JACOB COOKE.
  ix.   RUTH HOPKINS, b. Aft. 1620.
  Notes for RUTH HOPKINS:
Ruth died having born no children.



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