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Descendants of Harmon Dick




Generation No. 1


1. HARMON1 DICK1 was born Abt. 1755 in /near Loch Lomond, Scotland1, and died May 01, 1825 in Roaring Spring, Pennsylvania1. He married MARGARET ? Bef. 1789. She was born March 12, 1775 in \?\2, and died May 16, 1839 in \?\2.

Notes for H
ARMON DICK:
Harmon Dick is buried in Lower Cemetery on the Kensinger farm south of Roaring Spring. The farm is currently (7/99) up for sale and the fate of the private cemetery is unknown at this time. Harmon's tombstone -- of red sandstone -- is incised
                        HD Died
                        May 1, 1825

Harmon Dick served with Rahl's Regiment, Hessians; captured 26 December 1776, at Trenton, NJ. Mr. Sollenberger, a Blair County historian, describes Harmon as a Hessian soldier, captured and joined the Continental Army. In Bedford County Archives, Volume 5, James Biser Whisker, PH.D., Professor at West Virginia University, shows Harman (sic) living in Woodberry Township in 1817.

History of Rahl's Regiment:
"Grenadier Regiment von Rahl, to 1776: Grenadier Regiment von Wollwarth, 1776-1778: Grenadier Regiment von Trumbach, 1778-1780: Grenadier Regiment d'Angelelli, 1780 to war's end (Hesse Cassel) Arrived at New York, August, 1776, fighting at Fort Washington and White Plains. Surprised at Trenton, N.J., December 1776, after which survivors were posted to the Combined Battalion von Loos for the 1777 campaign. Upon return to New York, 1778, returned to old designation after being split into two battalions, December, 1777. Sent to East Florida, November, 1778, and then to the defense of Savannah, where the regiment lost heavily. Sent to Charleston, July, 1780. Returned to New York, November 1782 and to Germany, 1783. Uniform: Red collar and cuffs, no lapels, yellow small clothes, brass grenadier caps, red stocks; officers' lace, gold.
      CHIEFS:            Colonel J. G. Rahl, to December, 1776
                  Colonel W. F. von Wollwarth, 1776-1778
                  Lieutenant Colonel L. von Trumbach, 1778-1782
                  le Marquis d'Angelelli, 1782 to war's end

      COMMANDER:      Colonel J. G. Rahl, to December, 1776
                  Colonel W. F. von Wollwarth, 1776-1778
                  Colonel J. C. von Koehler, 1778-1782
                  Colonel M. Hatzfeld, 1782 to war's end
(Philip R. N. Kathcer. Encyclopedia of British, Provincial, and German Army Units 1775-1783. Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company, 1973. p. 122)

Houman [sic] Dick is listed on the 1785 tax list for Frankstown Township, Bedford County, PA. (James Biser Whisker, ed. Bedford County Archives, Volume 4. Apollo, PA: Closson Press, 1988. p.97)

"13 April 1811, letters of administration to Catharine Lower and John LOWER and estate of JOHN LOWER, Sr., dec'd.,Woodberry Twp. Bondsmen: Herman [sic] Dick, John Ulry" (James Biser Whisker, ed. "Letters of Administration and Related Papers." Bedford County Archives, Volume 1, Apollo, PA; Closson Press, 1985. p.2.)

Harmon Dick, farmer, is listed on the 1814 tax list for Woodberry Township, Bedford County, PA. (James Biser Whisker, ed. Bedford County Archives, Volume 4. Apollo, PA; Closson Press, 1988. p. 109.)

Harman [sic] Dick is listed on the 1817 tax list for Woodberry Township, Bedford County, PA. (James Biser Whisker, ed. Bedford County Archives, Volume 5, Apollo, PA: Closson Press, 1989. p. 45.)

Harmon made his will on 3 March 1825. It is recorded in Will Book 2, pages 166-167, Bedford County, PA. The will was probated on 14 May 1825.

"DICK, HARMON, late of Woodberry Twp. Will date not given; prob. May 14, 1825. Wife Margred [sic]; dau. Catharine (to 4 grandchildren); dau. Elisabeth (to 4 grandchildren); dau. Peggy (to 1 grandchild; son [sic] Christian; dau. [sic] Catharine Stull. Exrs.: George B. Spang, Harman Farber. Wits.: Edw. Cowen, Jacob Yolty. pp. 166-167." (Floyd G. Hoenstine, ed. "Abstracts of Bedford Co. Wills." Your Family Tree, Vol. XXVII, No. 2. Hollidaysburg, PA: Hoenstine Rental Library. Spring 1981. p. 52.) Christian Dick and Catharine Stull were Harmon's grandchildren.)


      Will Book 2, p. 166-167
Bedford Co., Pa.

HARMON DICK’S WILL

In the name of God Amen. I Harmon Dick of Woodberry Township, Bedford County and State of Pennsylvania being sick and weak in body but of sound mind memory and understanding praised be God for it and considering the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time thereof and to the end I may be the better prepared to leave this world whenever it shall please God to call me hence do therefore make and declare this my Last Will and Testament in manner following that is to say first and principally, I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God my creator hoping for free pardon and remission of all my sins and to enjoy everlasting happiness in the heavenly kingdom through Jesus Christ my Savior my body I commit to the earth at the discretion of my executors herein after named. Item I give and bequeath to my true and beloved wife Margaret Dick the third part of my Estate Real and personal. Besides two horses two cows and one heiffer and three Beds and bedsteads of which she sees proper to take one stove and pipe one table and chest the clock and cubbert and my will that she shall have my Plantation for own use for the space of term of time of five years after my decease provided she remains my widow during that time or term of years, after that time she is to have one acre and an half of ground at the spring up in the meadow from the house she is also to have the timber of the place to build a house and stable and also wood for fire during her natural life and then no fire wood to be given to said house any more. It is also my will that my executors make a free deed of conveyance to her for said one and an half acre of ground to her forever. And after the expiration of the five years it is my will that my Plantation shall be sold by my executors in the best way they think it prudent, It is further my will that my executors put the one third of the purchase money on Interest and also the one third of the payments as they become due for the use of my widow. Item I give and bequeath unto each of my grand children of my daughter Catharine four in number twelve dollars unto my grand children of my daughter Elizabeth four in number each twelve dollars, unto my grand children of my daughter Peggy one in number twelve dollars. I further give and bequeath unto my grand children Christian Dick and Catharine Stull each of them fifty Dollars. I further order that my Executors make sale of all my personal property soon after my decease except no grain shall be sold of no kind. Item I devise and bequeath all the rest and residue of my estate both real and personal to be equally divided among my children in equal portion share and share alike and I make or order George B. Spang. and Harmon Farber executors of this my last will and testament revoke and annulling all former wills, by me heretofore made ratifying and confirming this and none other to be my last will and testament. In testimony where of I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal this third day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty five.
Harmon Dick

Signed sealed published and declared by Harmon Dick the above name testator as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as Witness thence to; Edward Cowen, Jacob Yolty.

Bedford County ss. Personally appeared before the Subscriber Register for the probate of wills and granting letters of Administration in and for said county Edward Cowen and Jacob Poth the subscribing witness to the foregoing instrument of writing who being duly sworn according to law do depose and say that they were personally present and heard and saw the testator Harmon Dick sign and declare the foregoing instrument of writing as and for his last will and testament that at the time thereof the testator was of sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding according to the best of these deponents knowledge and belief and that they subscribed their names there as witnesses in the presence of the testator and at his request.

Sworn to and subscribed the 14th day of May A.D. 1825 Edward Cowen

Jacob Yolty

Coram Job Mann Register

Registered 14th Kay A.D. 1825 Job Mann Register. Be it remembered that on the 14th day of May A.D. 1825 Letters testamentary were granted to Harman Farber one of the Executors on the foregoing witnessed to having first been duly affirmed according to Law.




DICK, Herman: Snowberger farm Roaring Spring PA " Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Vol.1, p.52 Serial: 11670; Volume: 3" (from Jennifer (Feathers) Spryn: She was searching on ancestry.com when they were giving the free 30 trial and found this in the military records) .

About 1783 Harmon Dick and his wife, Margaret, settled on a farm south of Roaring Spring on Halter Creek in Pennsylvania, which in 1933 was owned by Frank Smith, then Clair Smith, and presently is owned by Claud Dick (b. 1887). In 1789 Harmon was assessed in Woodbury Township, Bedford Co., PA as having 150 acres, two horses, and two cows. The first property transaction that has been found occurred on March 16, 1797. At that time, Harmon Dick purchased two tracts of land located in Morrison's Cove for the sum of $2080.50 from Rumford and Mary (Whitlock) Dawes. One tract was called "Baltimore" consisting of 227 acres less 6% for roads and the other tract was called "England" consisting of 219 acres less 6% for roads. In 1719 this land was sold to Samuel Lindsey, who sold it to Benjamin Davies in 1770. In 1778 Issac Whitlock purchased the land and upon his death the land was inherited by his daughter and her husband, Rumford & Mary (Whitlocck) Dawes, who then sold it to Harmon Dick. Harmon sold a portion of the land to Michael Pote soon after he bought it. In December of 1797 Harmon sold 98 acres of the tract called "England" to Valentine Hay for the sum of $223.54. The next transaction is with Harmon Dick's heirs when his heirs exchanged, for the sum of $1800.00, their rights to approximately 125 acres of land and assigned it to their mother, Margaret Dick. When Harmon Dick settled along Halter Creek it was Bedford Township, Bedford Co., PA. Bedford County ran the whole way to the Ohio-Pennsylvania border. No towns were settled near there at that time. The first post office was started in 1820 named Morris Cove and it was about 15 miles away. In 1864 Spang's Mill opened a post office. Spang's Mill originally was Neff's Mill and later became Roaring Spring in 1868. This is about 5-6 miles away. In 1878 Baker's Summit opened a post office. Baker's Summit is about 3 miles away and was originally Bakersfield. After Bedford Township it was Woodbury Township, Bedford Co., PA, then when Blair County was formed it became Woodbury Township, Blair County. Then Taylor Township was formed and the area changed to Taylor Township, Blair County, PA. Now what complicates matters worse for about eight years the Ore Hill post office, which is about 1-1/2 miles away covered some of this area. Twentyfive years ago the area could get their mail either from Baker's Summit R.D. or Roaring Spring R.D. The farm Harmon Dick settled on is along the present Bedford Co. - Blair Co. lines and the mail is Roaring Spring R.D.
(Carol M. McFarland, Dick's Harmony: The Story of Harmon & Margaret Dick & Their Descendant's, 1986)



Notes for M
ARGARET ?:
Margaret's maiden name has never been found.
     
Children of H
ARMON DICK and MARGARET ? are:
  i.   JACOB I.2 DICK, b. Abt. 1789, Taylor Twp., Blair Co., Pennsylvania, Roaring Spring, PA; d. Bet. 1786 - 1800, Taylor Twp., Blair Co., Pennsylvania, Roaring Spring, PA.3.
  Notes for JACOB I. DICK:
Harry Cowen Dick, in an address at the Dick Reunion, August, 1933, referred to this son. No proofs of his existence are known. Following is the summary of Harry C. Dick's speech.


HARRY C DICK'S ADDRESS AT REUNION 1933

From an account of the Dick Reunion held in Appleman's Grove near Baker's Summit, PA, August 1933.

A synopsis of Harry C. Dick's address:

Harmon Dick first settled in Morrison's Cove in 1786. Harmon Dick was born near Loch Lomond, Scotland, 1756, emigrated to Hesse Castle, Germany, came to America with the Hessians who were hired by the British Government to subdue the American colonists then in revolt. They stopped at Trenton to celebrate their Christmas festivities in December 1776, under Colonel Rahl. Washington crossed the Delaware River on Christmas night. The river was blocked with ice and snow, as we know. He swept by the British on country roads, appeared at Trenton, captured 1000 prisoners, slew their leader and returned to Valley Forge with the loss of only four men, two killed and two frozen to death. Among those prisoners was a man who stood 6 feet 2 inches in his stocking feet, and tipped the scales at 253 pounds dressed. He immediately took the oath of allegiance to the United Colonies and was a staunch friend of Washington, and was ever afterward loyal to the American cause. He became a federalist at the organization of the Federal Government. His name was Harmon Dick, the progenitor of the Dick clan. He settled and homesteaded on a farm now occupied by Frank Smith, on the Halter Creek, near Roaring Spring. There he reared a large family, so large that they ran out of names and had two sons named Jacob, the oldest and the youngest. Tradition says a pestilence destroyed so many lives between 1786 and 1800 that they feared the community would be exterminated by the dreaded disease, but superstition found a cure. Jacob, the oldest son, was the first to succumb to the epidemic. Many others followed.

The settlers repaired to the Lower Cemetery, near Roaring Spring, where Jacob was buried, opened his grave, raised his coffin, opened it and viewed the corpse, when they beheld this barefaced young boy had grown a long white beard, his hair extending over his shoulders, but the body, when exposed to the atmosphere, quickly crumbled to dust. They closed the coffin, reinterred it and the pestilence apparently ceased at once, and the remainder of the Dicks lived and would be living yet had they not died of other causes. It was then that Jacob, the younger was born. In time to come he settled near Cherry Tree, Indiana County, and is the ancestor of the Dicks in that county. I remember of meeting him once in 1872. I was 5 years and he was then an old man. Harmon Dick's other sons made their homes in different states of the Union, except two who remained in Taylor Township.


Samuel Dick lived on a portion of the same farm and operated a sawmill, erecting many houses, barns, and other buildings from the lumber produced by his mill. His children were John, Michael, Jacob, William, Margaret, Susan, Ester, and Catherine. John was the ancestor of the Dicks now living in Huntingdon, Fulton, and Bedford Counties.

Michael C. Dick's children were Samuel, Fred, William, John, Henry, Harvey, Porter, Sarah, Annie, and Jennie.

Jacob C. Dick's family consisted of three boys; Edward, Lyman and Harry. Edward died in 1916 in Illinois. His wife, son Forrest, and daughter June reside there. Lyman lost his life in the Paper Mill in 1886, Edgar being his only living child. Harry is living in Taylor Township.

Mr. Dick called attention to the fact that five of the Dicks met with accidental death. Lyman, as stated, was accidentally killed at the D. M. Bare Paper Mill in 1886. William was killed by a fall of clay at Sara Bank, Ore Hill. His son William was sawed to pieces accidentally while working on a sawmill near the Barley Church, Bakers Summit. Grant died of gun shot wounds accidentally inflicted, and Frank was killed by coming in contact with a high tension wire while at work at the brick plant in Claysburg.




  ii.   CATHERINE DICK, b. Abt. 1791; d. Bef. 1825.
  Notes for CATHERINE DICK:
According to Harmon's will, Catharine had 4 children at the time of his death.


  iii.   ELIZABETH DICK, b. Abt. 1792; d. Bef. 1825.
  Notes for ELIZABETH DICK:
According to Harmon's will, Elizabeth had 4 children at the time of his death.

  iv.   PEGGY DICK, b. Abt. 1793; d. Bef. 1825.
  Notes for PEGGY DICK:
According to Harmon's will, Peggy had one child at the time of his death.


  v.   UNKNOWN DICK, b. Abt. 1794; d. Unknown.
2. vi.   GEORGE DICK, SR., b. October 10, 1796, Bedford County, Greenfield Township, PA; d. April 20, 1887, Richland County, Ohio.
3. vii.   JOHN DICK, b. Abt. 1800, Roaring Spring, Pennsylvania; d. May 10, 1844, Green Twp., Indiana County, PA.
4. viii.   SAMUEL DICK, b. July 26, 1802, Halter Creek, Taylor Twp., Blair Co., PA; d. June 30, 1868, Roaring Spring, Pennsylvania.
5. ix.   DANIEL DICK, b. January 10, 1804, Taylor Twp., Blair Co., Pennsylvania, (then Bedford County), PA/Blair Co., PA; d. April 21, 1858, Taylor Twp., Blair Co., Pennsylvania.
6. x.   SIMON DICK, b. June 05, 1805; d. April 03, 1856.
  xi.   JULIAN DICK, b. Abt. 1806; d. Unknown; m. GEORGE BROWN; d. Unknown.
  xii.   JACOB C. DICK, b. Abt. 1807; d. Aft. 18723.
  Notes for JACOB C. DICK:
HARRY C DICK'S ADDRESS AT REUNION 1933

The following is an excerpt from an account of the Dick Reunion held in Appleman's Grove near Baker's Summit, PA, August 1933.

Tradition says a pestilence destroyed so many lives between 1786 and 1800 that they feared the community would be exterminated by the dreaded disease, but superstition found a cure. Jacob, the oldest son, was the first to succumb to the epidemic. Many others followed.

The settlers repaired to the Lower Cemetery, near Roaring Spring, where Jacob was buried, opened his grave, raised his coffin, opened it and viewed the corpse, when they beheld this barefaced young boy had grown a long white beard, his hair extending over his shoulders, but the body, when exposed to the atmosphere, quickly crumbled to dust. They closed the coffin, reinterred it and the pestilence apparently ceased at once, and the remainder of the Dicks lived and would be living yet had they not died of other causes. It was then that Jacob, the younger was born. In time to come he settled near Cherry Tree, Indiana County, and is the ancestor of the Dicks in that county. I remember of meeting him once in 1872.

  xiii.   BARBARA DICK, b. Abt. 1809; d. Unknown; m. DAVID BROWN; d. Unknown.
7. xiv.   MARY DICK, b. Abt. 1810; d. Unknown, Conemaugh Twp., Cambria County, PA.
8. xv.   PARENT OF CHRISTIAN AND CATHERINE DICK, d. Unknown.


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