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Ancestors of Andrea Kay Warner


      1867. Sarah KENNEDY. She was the daughter of 3734. John CANNADY.

Notes for Alexander FLEMING:
It may be a coincidence, but (1) two daughters of Peter Smith (LW&T dated 1738), Mary and Abigail, married Flemings; (2) one of these was >probably William Fleming because his 1767 LW&T names wife Abigail; (3) William may have been the William (1706), son of Alexander and Sarah (Kennedy) Fleming; (4) one Elizabeth Fleming (1710) was the youngest child of Alexander and Sarah (Kennedy) Fleming; (5) Peter Smith willed land in Prince William Co, VA, including some on Bull Run, to Smith
children: Thomas, James, William, and Abigail (Fleming).

As I say, this could be a coincidence, but it would give you a Thomas Smith in the right age range,and with land in Prince William Co, VA with some ties to Flemings. Here's what little I have, and you can
decide whether to follow up.

Alexander Fleming married Sarah Kennedy, daughter of John Kennedy and niece of William Kennedy of old Rappahannock Co, VA; both Kennedys dec'd by 1692.

>Alexander Fleming (d 1711)
m: Sarah Kennedy, d/o John Kennedy (Cannady)
Children:
John 1690
Margaret 1692
Alexander 1696
Sarah 1698
William 1706
Charles 1708
Elizabeth 1710

Elizabeth was born the year her father died. She is not named in the 1710 will. 1710, Feb 18: Elizabeth Fleming, daughter of Alexander and Sarah, born (North Farnham Parish Register).

* Will of Alexander Flemmon (Fleming), Richmond Co [D: 11 Nov 1710]. Wife Sarah. Children: John, Alexander, William, Charles, Margaret. Other heirs: Samuel Kennedy, Anne Kennedy. Witnesses: Jane Foushee, William Smith, Will Barber. Inventory: 10 March 1711.

* 1696, Oct. 21: Peter Smith's land adjoined John (and Elizabeth) Bayly in Cople Parish, Westmoreland Co.

* Peter Smith made a LW&T in Westmoreland Co, VA [D: 10 Jan 1738; P: 12 May 1741]. Owned land in Westmoreland Co and Prince William Co. Daughters: Mary Smith and Abigail Smith had married Flemings. Abigail got land in Prince William Co. Peter Smith got land in Westmoreland Co. James Smith got 325 acres on Bull Run in Prince William Co. Thomas Smith and William Smith got 325 acres in Prince William Co. Anne Bailey is named as a granddaughter, so a Smith daughter married a
Bailey, but her mother's name is not given. Daughter Anne Smith was deceased; she had married a Thomas. Daughter Hannah Smith had married a Ware. Daughter Martha Smith had married a McClanahan. Son John Smith's heirs got each one shilling.
>
* 1767: William Fleming will, Westmoreland Co [D: 7 Jan 1767; P: 28 Apr 1767]. Wife: Abigail. Sons: John Fleming and William Fleming. Daughters: Elizabeth Fleming (wife of Thaddeus Jackson), Peggy Fleming (wife of Rhodam Pritchett), and Martha Fleming.

It is speculative, but John Fleming may have married Mary Smith.

* John Fleming will, Westmoreland Co [D: 15 Nov 1744; P: 26 Feb 1744/1745]. James Bailey executor. Children: Sarah, Anne, Peter (minor), Thomas, and William. Peter Fleming to be put in the care of
>John Bailey. [Note: Speculation is based on possibility that Peter Fleming may have been named for his grandfather Peter Smith.]

Geographical Notes: Westmoreland and Richmond Counties, VA, are on that peninsula known as the "Northern Neck", between the Potomac River and the Rappahannock River. Rappahannock Co, VA, included what became counties on both sides of the Rappahannock River, including Richmond Co (1692). It is often referred to as "Old" Rapphannock Co because it no longer exists. North Farnaham Parish church is in Richmond Co, and the Register (edited by G. H. S. King) is a valuable genealogical
resource.

In 1692, Richmond Co was organized from Rappahanock Co. Until 1730 court met at Naylor's. From 1730 on, the county seat has been at what was first called Richmond County Courthouse and renamed in 1831
Warsaw, about 57 miles from Fredericksburg, VA. The North Farnham Parish church is another 10 miles southeast of Warsaw.

In Feb 1730, Richmond Co, VA Account Book, Part I, pp 38 ff., relates a boundary dispute between Thomas and James Samford on the one side and Newman Brockenbrough on the other. The line in question had been established in 1669 by James Samford and John Kennedy, both now deceased. "Flemings Landing" was one of the landmarks used to locate the land. Totesky Creek and Richardson Creek are mentioned also and are easily found on a modern map on the north side of the Rappahannock
River in Richmond Co several miles southwest of Farnham where the North Farnham Parish church stands. I suggest that the Flemings were from around there.

There appear to have been two Alexander Flemings, apparently unrelated. Captain Alexander Fleming married three times and had no male heirs. His estate was called "Westfalia". He is known to have
made a will (lost) in 1668. M1: _____ _____; m2 _____ _____; m3: Joyce _____ (widow Hoskins). Children: Alexia, Elizabeth, Joyce. This is second-hand and I cannot add or verify.

The terms "Fleming" and "Flemish" refer to Flanders, a former country now included in northern France and Belgium. And, while this may point to the ultimate origin of the surname, it could go quite a way back. So you are right to be skeptical of extravagant claims that are not supported by solid evidence. Scotland, or Scotland by way of Northern Ireland, is not an unreasonable speculation.

If this is too muddy, I apologize. I collected these scraps back in >1993 while looking at my Hammond, Samford, and Baylis ancestors who >were apparently neighbors of the Flemings. Flemings, Baileys, Hammonds and others eventually migrated to North Carolina and from there some to Lancaster Co, SC. So I really cannot add more. I was going through GenForum last night looking at every surname I could think of, mostly at recent postings, and posted little notes along the way.

This was posted by Donald Maring. Wow!!! Happy New Year. Ann

     
Child of Alexander FLEMING and Sarah KENNEDY is:
  933 i.   Elizabeth FLEMING, born ca 1710; married Thomas SMITH.


      1896. Richard CANTRILL, born May 1666 in Bakewell, Derbyshire, England; died Bef. 1730. He married 1897. Dorothy JONES ca 1693 in Philadelphia PA.

      1897. Dorothy JONES, born ca 1672 in Wales; died 1732 in Philadelphia, PA. She was the daughter of 3794. Ellis JONES and 3795. Jane EVANS(?).

Notes for Richard CANTRILL:
Dorothy came to America in 1682 on the Submission, the last of William Penn's 23 ships which brought the first Quakers to Pennsylvania. Richard was in Philadelphia by 1689. He received three acres between 5th and 6th STreets, and was to build a one a half story brick house on it, as well as plant an apple orchard and build a fence. Dorothy married Richard "out of meeting", but evidently returned because daughter Mary's burial is listed in Friends records. In 1753 a caveat was issued against "surveying the land adjoining Richard Cantrill's Estate issuing to the heirs or executors of the said Richard Cantrill."

A search of the wills and probate records of Philadelphia and of New Castle County, Delaware have failed to reveal a will for Richard. In the Pennsylvania Archives we find a record as follows. "Caveat against surveying of land adjoining Richard Cantrill's estate, issuing to the heirs, or executors of said Richard Cantrill, or any under him, 31 May 1753." As the two sons left the New Castle area in the late 1720s or early 1730 and moved to the valley of Virginia by 1738. Richard may have also made the move.





I recently received a package from Warren Cantrell, noted Cantrell family genealogist. I found the
following paragraphs especially interesting for many reasons. The humorous account of our
Cross-Dressing Grandma is very special to my heart.... But I thought many of you with PEGGE
connections might also find some of the references to them interesting, too.

Richard Cantrill married Dorothy Jones (daughter of Ellis Jones) in the early 1690s. She was born in 1672 in
Wales, England. As she was a Quaker and Richard may have been of the Church of England, to use the Quaker
term, they were married "Out of Meeting". History tells us that Daniel PEGG and Thomas Smith were the
earliest local brickmakers, as we have mentioned above and this was Daniel PEGG, Sr. who owned 200 acres
in the Northern Liberties. We know that he married Martha Allen of Bucks Co., PA. Daniel PEGG, Sr. died in
12 Mo. 23rd day 1702/3. Daniel Jr. inherited the property and continued to manufacture bricks. The family
genealogist stated that Barbara Jones married Daniel PEGGE. From her mother's will, we know there were two
sons, Daniel and Nathan. It is possible that Barbara was the second wife of Daniel PEGGE Sr. When Daniel
PEGG Jr. died in the 1730s and his will was proved 6 Feb. 1732, it mentions no sons, but two nephews Daniel
and John Coats, sons of Thomas Coat (a brickmaker) who married his sister Elizabeth PEGGE. To his wife,
Sarah, he left his other property. From records of marriages in Phil. we find a record where Barbara Jones
married Daniel PEGG 5 Mar 1691. Mary Jones married her cousin, Isaac Jones.

As we mentioned above, Richard returned the rental grant that he had acquired in 1701 in the third month of
1702. The next record we find of Richard and Dorothy Cantrill was in 1703 Delaware Court Proceedings as
extracted by Scharf.



Among the grand jury presentments. "Dorothy", wife of Richard Canterill, presented for masking in men's
clothes the day after Christmas, "walking and dancing in the house of John Simes at 9 or 10 o'clock at night.'"
John Simes, who gave the masquerade party, was presented for keeping a disorderly house, "a nursery of
Debotch ye inhabitants and youth of this city... to ye greef of and disturbance of peaceful minds and propagating
ye Throne of wickedness amongst us." This was in Wilmington, PA (now Delaware).



A search of the wills and probate records of Philadelphia and of New Castle County, Delaware have failed to
reveal a will for Richard. In the Pennsylvania Archives we find a record as follows. "Caveat against surveying of
land adjoining Richard Cantrill's estate, issuing to the heirs, or executors of said Richard Cantrill, or any under
him, 31 May 1753." As the two sons left the New Castle area in the late 1720s or early 1730 and moved to the
valley of Virginia by 1738. Richard may have also made the move.

jrabun@ix.netcom.com


RICHARD CANTRILL

Tradition says that Richard Cantrill was born in Virginia, that his father was Joseph who migrated to Philadelphia from Virginia,
and that said Joseph was a direct descendant of William II. [Taken from Adamic's "My America", page 1. -- Y.C.]

Richard was a resident of Philadelphia, Pa., prior to 1689. In July, 1689, he was appointed administrator to the estate of
Joseph Cantrill, an unmarried nephew who drowned while swimming in the Schuykill River May 10, 1689.

It has been impossible to find records to prove the parentage, or birthplace, of Richard Cantrill, but there is no doubt that he
came from the Derbyshire branch of the English family. His name does not appear in any list of emigrants and he may have
been a descendant of William, or Henry Cantrell, of Virginia [who came to Virginia in 1628 -- Y.C.]. Fisher says in his
"Making of Pennsylvania" that "quite a number of Virginians migrated from that Colony to the Banks of the Delaware before
the settlement of Philadelphia by Penn, in 1678, under the rule of the Duke of York."

From "Pennsylvania Archives" Vol. XIX, Series II:

"At a meeting of the Commissioners, 6th of July, 1692. Present: Captain William Markham, Robert Turner, John Goodson, . .
. Richard Cantrill requesting a warrant for a lot of 30 ft. upon Third Street, near the Burying Ground, was granted."

From the Original Records, Deed Book D, 53, page 50: "Richard Cantrill to Thomas Hall, Sold 30 ft. x 190 ft. May 13,
1693, Third and Market Streets."

In Patent Book A, Vol. II, page 344, there is a lease for twenty-one years (May 5, 1702) made by Edward Shippen, Griffith
Owen and James Logan as Proprietary and Governor in Chief of Pennsylvania and territories thereunto belonging . . . of a . . .

"Certin tract of land between Fifth and Sixth streets containing three acres and sixty perches" (here follows a full description by
metes and bounds) "to Richard Cantrill, Brickmaker, with all woods and underwood and trees, ways, waters, water courses,
liberties, profits, commodities, advantages and opportunities whatsoever." [Note: at South end of Philadelphia, near Delaware.
See also in Vol. 53, page 20, "Pennsylvania History and Biography" -- Y.C.] The rental was forty shillings per year, "current
silver money of the Province." . . . "Said Richard Cantrill shall build, erect and set up a substantial brick house one story and a
half in height and in breadth eighteen feet and in length thirty-six feet; the first story of one brick and a hald and the second
story of one brick, and further that said Richard Cantrill shall make an orchard upon some part of the hereby granted land, with
at least eighty good bearing apple trees planted thereon, and shall also well and sufficiently fence and enclose the said demised
land."

In "Pennsylvania Archives" we find:

"Cantrill, Old Rights: Richard Cantrill, city lot 3 acres, 10 day, 10 month, 1701. Rich. return 3 acres, 3 month 1702".

Later the Archives record a "Caveat against surveying of land adjoining Richard Cantrill's estate, issuing to the heirs, or
executors of the said Richard Cantrill or any under him, May 31, 1753."

No record could be found of the disposition of the estate of Richard Cantrill, either by his heirs or executors, but he evidently
died prior to May 31, 1753.

There is a tradition common in the family that the first Cantrill in Philadelphia had a brick yard and built the first brick house in
that city. Records show that the "first brick house in Philadelphia was owned by Robert Turner in 1684-5," and in the same
year Richard's brother-in-law, Daniel Pegge, also built a brick house on "Pegge's Run." It is possible that Richard had the
contract for erecting both these houses, which would easily account for the tradition in the family. [Note - 1961 - we know
now that Richard got the 3 acres for the avowed purpose of making bricks. In Adamics "My America", Edward Adams
Cantrell says that Joseph was the first Cantrell in Philadelphia. He would have been Richard's father, and very possibly built the
first brick house. -- Y.C.]

In about 1693 Richard Cantrill married Dorothy Jones, daughter of Ellis and Jane Jones, who came to America from either
Flint, or Denbigh, Wales, in the ship Submission, Sept., 1682.

From the log of the Submission:

"Ellis Jones, age 45, Jane Jones, age 40,
Barbara Jones, age 13, Mary Jones, age 12,
Dorothy Jones, age 10, Isaac Jones, age 4 mos."

The "Pennsylvania Historical Magazine," in a list of names of "Important Colonists, who came in the Submission," mentions
Ellis Jones. He was a resident of Bucks county, 1684, but did not remain there long, and in the Welsh Tract Purchases his
name appears as having purchased one hundred acres in Nantonell parish, Radnor. Barbara Jones married Daniel Pegge of
"Pegge's Run;" Mary Jones married her cousin Isaac Jones, and Dorothy Jones married Richard Cantrill.

Ellis Jones and his family were Quakers and as Richard belonged to the Church of England, Richard and Dorothy were
married, to use a Quaker term, "Out of Meeting."

Dorothy Jones Cantrill seems to have been a young lade of considerable spirit and independence of character. She not only
married the man of her choice, irrespective of her religious training, but later evidence is found of her love of gayety and society
in an old history of Philadelphia, where she figures at a masquerade ball, much to the horror of her more quiet Quaker friends.
She seems to have inherited her love of society from her mother for the name of Jane Jones appears as a witness to the
marriage of a great many Quakers of her day, and the Quaker weddings were probably the principal events affording those of
that sect an expression to their social instinct.

The will of Jane Jones, relict of Ellis Jones, executed at Philadelphia, Aug. 3, 1730, and recorded at Philadelphia, Dec. 27,
1730, [S.C.Christie has Dec. 27, 1732 -- E.K.] mentions her grandchildren: "Joseph Cantril, Zebulon Cantril, and Dorothy
Cantril" to each of whom she bequeaths: "One English shilling, or the value of it in coyn current".

Children of Richard and Dorothy Cantrill:

The Records of the Race Street Meeting House contain the following under "Burial of those not Friends: Mary, Jan 6, 1695,
parents Richard and Dorothy Cantrill."

Joseph was born about 1695.

Zebulon was born about 1697. Zebulon is from whom the Cantralls of central Illinois are descended.

Dorothy, of whom we have no record.

JOSEPH CANTRILL, a nephew of Richard Cantrill, was drowned in the Schuykill river May 10, 1689. In a petition made to
Governor Blackwell by Richard Cantrill for letters of administration to the small estate of Joseph Cantrill, it is set forth that
Richard Cantrill is an uncle and nearest of kin in the province to Joseph, but that Joseph has older and younger brothers in
Derbyshire, England.

  Notes for Dorothy JONES:
Among the grand jury presentments. "Dorothy", wife of Richard Canterill, presented for masking in men's
clothes the day after Christmas, "walking and dancing in the house of John Simes at 9 or 10 o'clock at night.' John Simes, who gave the masquerade party, was presented for keeping a disorderly house, "a nursery of Debotch ye inhabitants and youth of this city... to ye greef of and disturbance of peaceful minds and propagating ye Throne of wickedness amongst us." This was in Wilmington, PA (now Delaware).
     
Children of Richard CANTRILL and Dorothy JONES are:
  i.   Mary Cantrill.
  ii.   Zebulon Cantrill.
  iii.   Dorothy Cantrill.
  948 iv.   Joseph CANTRELL, born ca 1695 in Philadelphia, PA; married Catherine HEATH Bef. 1720.


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