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View Tree for Mary BarrettMary Barrett (b. Abt. 1610, d. 01 Jun 1660)

Mary Barrett19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23 was born Abt. 1610 in London, London, England, and died 01 Jun 1660 in Boston, Suffolk, Ma24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28. She married William Dyer on 27 Oct 1633 in St. Martin in the Fields, London, England29, 30, 31.

 Includes NotesNotes for Mary Barrett:
"The date and place of baptism/birth of Mary Barrett is unknown. About 1610 and London is speculative." [Johan Winsser ]

NEHGR Vol 114 p208 "The Story of Jane Hawkins" tells of Jane Hawkins, around 1637-1653 who was banished from the community (Boston) for "practicing Medicine" to live in the woods. While at Portsmouth, as a mid-wife, she, with Anne Hutchinson, had assisted at the birth of the so-called 'monster' of Mary Dyer.... as related in John Winthrop's "History of New England" (1853),
2:10-11, 1:313ff

The "Tradition" of Mary Dyer & Lady Arabella Stuart:
The April 1944 issue of the New England Historic and Genealogical Society's Register (Vol. 98) published an article by Alice Eugenie Ortiz entitled "Tradition of Mary Dyer, Quaker Martyr" which had been contributed by Mrs. Harry Clark Boden. Mrs. Borden herself stated that there was NO PROOF whatsoever for her theory - simply that it was one conceivable way to account for Mary's early whereabouts.

Andrews Moriarty refuted this theory quite soundly in his article, "The True Story of Mary Dyer" (NEHGS Register) Vol. 104, January 1950). He states that "NO PROOF is offered that the Lady Arabella ever "had" issue except a vague statement from Mr. Hardy's (Life of Lady Arabella Stuart) of a rumor that such was the case." Furthermore, Moriarty points out that "there never was such a tradition [of this lineage] among Mary Dyer's descendants, but that it was a quite modern story, emanating from an English gentleman, Mr. F. M. Dyer of Macclesfield [sic -]. for "Frederick Nathaniel" Dyer who was an American - his father was born in Rhode Island - and who moved to England to do research]....who, not so many years ago, sent the story of his beliefs to the descendants of Mary Dyer in this country. ... This 'tradition' does not even have the authority of age ... this being so, the story, without more evidence, is not worthy of serious consideration." Moriarty further takes the (then) editor of the Register to task for even accepting the article for publication, as it appeared four years after the July, 1940 issue (Vol. 94) which published the marriage record of Mary and William Dyer from the parish register of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London, which clearly identified her as Mary BARRETT.

"A Brother Found: A Clue to the Ancestry of Mary (Barrett) Dyer, The Quaker Martyr". by Johan Winsser:
NEHGR, Volume 158, January 2004, #629, Pages 27-28. (Partial Quote)
It is now clear that Mary Dyer had a brother, a fact that adds further evidence to debunk the Arabella tale and provides a clue to her true ancestry. In 1634 the Prerogative Court of Canterbury recorded the probate administration of William Barret, which granted the commission jointly to William Dyer of Saint Martin-in-the-Fields, fishmonger, and his wife Marie Dyer alias Barret, explicitly described as the sister of William Barret. The following year (1635) William & Mary (Barrett) Dyer settled in Boston.

William Dyre wrote a pathetic letter to the Massachusetts authorities, complaining bitterly of their treatment of his wife. It is found in the Chamberlain Collection in the Boston Public Library, and was published in the Nation, May 29, 1902, through the offices of Mr. Worthington C. Ford.
William Dyre writes:
"Having received some letters from my wife, I am given to understand of her commitment to close prison.....
"Though wet to the skin, she was thrust into a room wherein was nothing to sit or lie upon but dust. Had your dog been wet, you would have afforded it a chimney corner to dry itself, or had your hogs been penned in a sty, you would have afforded them some dry straw, or else you would have wanted mercy to your beast, but alas, Christians now with you are used worse than hogs or dogs.......
"Even the worst of men, the Bishops themselves, denied not the visitation and relief of friends to their wants which I myself, have oft experienced by visiting Mr. Prime, Mr. Smart and other eminent (.....) when he was commanded close in the Tower. I had resort once or twice a week and never fetched before authority to ask me whereof I came to the Tower or King's Bench or Gate House....
"Hath not people in America the same liberty as beasts and birds have to pass the land or air without examination?......... It is not to be forgotten the former cruelties you used towards her when she came from England, having been tossed at sea all winter, but a little refreshment that had by cross winds at Barbadoes, yet as soon as come into Harbour shut up in prison and there kept.......for no transgression at all, only that Mr. Bellingham then as now, said she was a Quaker.........
"Where your law or rule to keep a man's wife from him seven or eight weeks and a mother from her children, in a capacity of a close prison, which admits of no baylement?......."
"so saith her husband W. Dyre"
"Newport, this 30th August, 1659
"To ye Court of Assistants now assembled at Boston this 6th September, 1659."
This was endorsed: "To ye Court of Assistants, delivered into ye Court by his wife, Mary Dyre, 7th, 7th mo. 58." (Sep.7,1659)

Mary, wife of William, suffered martyrdom at Boston, Suffolk, May 32, 1660. [Rhode Island Friends Record - Deaths, pg.99]

RI Historical Cemeteries Transcription Project Index shows: Mary Dyer, - 31 May 1660, Newport, RI (NT600)

The Hartford Courant Newspaper, Saturday, March 11, 2000: "Women who made a difference. Names of the 19 women to be inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame October 7 were announced this week" "Mary Barret Dyer (birth year unknown-1660) She defied Puritan church autorities in Colonial Boston to gain religious freedom for Quakers. Her death by hanging helped establish the right to worship freely in the Colonies.""The date and place of baptism/birth of Mary Barrett is unknown. About 1610 and London is speculative." [Johan Winsser ]

NEHGR Vol 114 p208 "The Story of Jane Hawkins" tells of Jane Hawkins, around 1637-1653 who was banished from the community (Boston) for "practicing Medicine" to live in the woods. While at Portsmouth, as a mid-wife, she, with Anne Hutchinson, had assisted at the birth of the so-called 'monster' of Mary Dyer.... as related in John Winthrop's "History of New England" (1853),
2:10-11, 1:313ff

The "Tradition" of Mary Dyer & Lady Arabella Stuart:
The April 1944 issue of the New England Historic and Genealogical Society's Register (Vol. 98) published an article by Alice Eugenie Ortiz entitled "Tradition of Mary Dyer, Quaker Martyr" which had been contributed by Mrs. Harry Clark Boden. Mrs. Borden herself stated that there was NO PROOF whatsoever for her theory - simply that it was one conceivable way to account for Mary's early whereabouts.

Andrews Moriarty refuted this theory quite soundly in his article, "The True Story of Mary Dyer" (NEHGS Register) Vol. 104, January 1950). He states that "NO PROOF is offered that the Lady Arabella ever "had" issue except a vague statement from Mr. Hardy's (Life of Lady Arabella Stuart) of a rumor that such was the case." Furthermore, Moriarty points out that "there never was such a tradition [of this lineage] among Mary Dyer's descendants, but that it was a quite modern story, emanating from an English gentleman, Mr. F. M. Dyer of Macclesfield [sic -]. for "Frederick Nathaniel" Dyer who was an American - his father was born in Rhode Island - and who moved to England to do research]....who, not so many years ago, sent the story of his beliefs to the descendants of Mary Dyer in this country. ... This 'tradition' does not even have the authority of age ... this being so, the story, without more evidence, is not worthy of serious consideration." Moriarty further takes the (then) editor of the Register to task for even accepting the article for publication, as it appeared four years after the July, 1940 issue (Vol. 94) which published the marriage record of Mary and William Dyer from the parish register of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London, which clearly identified her as Mary BARRETT.

"A Brother Found: A Clue to the Ancestry of Mary (Barrett) Dyer, The Quaker Martyr". by Johan Winsser:
NEHGR, Volume 158, January 2004, #629, Pages 27-28. (Partial Quote)
It is now clear that Mary Dyer had a brother, a fact that adds further evidence to debunk the Arabella tale and provides a clue to her true ancestry. In 1634 the Prerogative Court of Canterbury recorded the probate administration of William Barret, which granted the commission jointly to William Dyer of Saint Martin-in-the-Fields, fishmonger, and his wife Marie Dyer alias Barret, explicitly described as the sister of William Barret. The following year (1635) William & Mary (Barrett) Dyer settled in Boston.

William Dyre wrote a pathetic letter to the Massachusetts authorities, complaining bitterly of their treatment of his wife. It is found in the Chamberlain Collection in the Boston Public Library, and was published in the Nation, May 29, 1902, through the offices of Mr. Worthington C. Ford.
William Dyre writes:
"Having received some letters from my wife, I am given to understand of her commitment to close prison.....
"Though wet to the skin, she was thrust into a room wherein was nothing to sit or lie upon but dust. Had your dog been wet, you would have afforded it a chimney corner to dry itself, or had your hogs been penned in a sty, you would have afforded them some dry straw, or else you would have wanted mercy to your beast, but alas, Christians now with you are used worse than hogs or dogs.......
"Even the worst of men, the Bishops themselves, denied not the visitation and relief of friends to their wants which I myself, have oft experienced by visiting Mr. Prime, Mr. Smart and other eminent (.....) when he was commanded close in the Tower. I had resort once or twice a week and never fetched before authority to ask me whereof I came to the Tower or King's Bench or Gate House....
"Hath not people in America the same liberty as beasts and birds have to pass the land or air without examination?......... It is not to be forgotten the former cruelties you used towards her when she came from England, having been tossed at sea all winter, but a little refreshment that had by cross winds at Barbadoes, yet as soon as come into Harbour shut up in prison and there kept.......for no transgression at all, only that Mr. Bellingham then as now, said she was a Quaker.........
"Where your law or rule to keep a man's wife from him seven or eight weeks and a mother from her children, in a capacity of a close prison, which admits of no baylement?......."
"so saith her husband W. Dyre"
"Newport, this 30th August, 1659
"To ye Court of Assistants now assembled at Boston this 6th September, 1659."
This was endorsed: "To ye Court of Assistants, delivered into ye Court by his wife, Mary Dyre, 7th, 7th mo. 58." (Sep.7,1659)

Mary, wife of William, suffered martyrdom at Boston, Suffolk, May 32, 1660. [Rhode Island Friends Record - Deaths, pg.99]

RI Historical Cemeteries Transcription Project Index shows: Mary Dyer, - 31 May 1660, Newport, RI (NT600)

The Hartford Courant Newspaper, Saturday, March 11, 2000: "Women who made a difference. Names of the 19 women to be inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame October 7 were announced this week" "Mary Barret Dyer (birth year unknown-1660) She defied Puritan church autorities in Colonial Boston to gain religious freedom for Quakers. Her death by hanging helped establish the right to worship freely in the Colonies."
Source: New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 94, July 1940, Page 300

The Marriage Record of Mary Dyre The Quaker Martyr - The Parish Registers of St. Martin in the Fields, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, contain the following marriage record:
October 27, 1633 Gulielmus Dyer and Maria Barret
There seems no doubt that this is the record of the marriage of William Dyre (as he consistantly spelled his name) and wife Mary, the Quaker martyr.
The date of their marriage was known to be between mid-summer 1633, when William Dyre's nine-year apprenticeship in London ended, and December 1635, when his son Samuel was baptized in Boston in New England.
It was through the professional services of Mr. Richard Holworthy of London that the record of William Dyre's apprenticeship was found. Through his efforts, also, the baptismal record of William Dyre was discovered. Therefore, when Mr. Holworthy wrote: "There seems to me to be no doubt as to the wife of William Dyre and I want to congratulate you on having this information," there need be no hesitation in offering the marriage record for publication.
Mary Dyre's maiden name of BARRETT explains why her son Samuel named a son of his, BARRETT Dyer.
The Registers of St. Martin-in-the- Fields record the baptism, October 24, 1634 of "William Diar, son of William and Marie," These records show that William and Mary Dyre emigrated to America not earlier than very late in 1634.
The details of the baptismal and apprenticeship records of William Dyre and other facts of his life and that of his wife may be found in an article written by Mr. William Allan Dyer and published in the Rhode Island Historical Society's Collections for January 1937. His efforts quite as much as those of the writer made possible the discovery of the marriage record, and it was Mr. Dyer who conducted the correspondence with Mr. Holworthy. Acknowledgement is also due the Harleian Society of London, as it was from their publication for 1936 that the Parish Records of St. Martin-in-the-Fields were obtained.

Brookline, Norfolk, Mass.Theresa E. Dyer
==================================================================================
Source: New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 104, January 1950, Page 42
THE TRUE STORY OF MARY DYER
By G. Andrews Moriarty, A.M., LLB., F.A.S.G., F.S.A.

Finally, we are able to prove who Mary Dyer was, thanks to Miss Theresa E. Dyer, of Brookline, Norfolk, Mass., who published in The Register for July 1940 (vol. 94, p.300) the marriage record of William and Mary from the parish register of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London (cf. also Harl. Soc., 1936).
On 27 Oct. 1633 William Dyer married Mary BARRET. In this connection it should be noted that Samuel Dyer, son of William and Mary, named his sixth son BARRETT, obviously for his mother's family (cf. Austin's Gen. Dic. of Rhode Island, p.291)"The date and place of baptism/birth of Mary Barrett is unknown. About 1610 and London is speculative." [Johan Winsser ]

NEHGR Vol 114 p208 "The Story of Jane Hawkins" tells of Jane Hawkins, around 1637-1653 who was banished from the community (Boston) for "practicing Medicine" to live in the woods. While at Portsmouth, as a mid-wife, she, with Anne Hutchinson, had assisted at the birth of the so-called 'monster' of Mary Dyer.... as related in John Winthrop's "History of New England" (1853),
2:10-11, 1:313ff

The "Tradition" of Mary Dyer & Lady Arabella Stuart:
The April 1944 issue of the New England Historic and Genealogical Society's Register (Vol. 98) published an article by Alice Eugenie Ortiz entitled "Tradition of Mary Dyer, Quaker Martyr" which had been contributed by Mrs. Harry Clark Boden. Mrs. Borden herself stated that there was NO PROOF whatsoever for her theory - simply that it was one conceivable way to account for Mary's early whereabouts.

Andrews Moriarty refuted this theory quite soundly in his article, "The True Story of Mary Dyer" (NEHGS Register) Vol. 104, January 1950). He states that "NO PROOF is offered that the Lady Arabella ever "had" issue except a vague statement from Mr. Hardy's (Life of Lady Arabella Stuart) of a rumor that such was the case." Furthermore, Moriarty points out that "there never was such a tradition [of this lineage] among Mary Dyer's descendants, but that it was a quite modern story, emanating from an English gentleman, Mr. F. M. Dyer of Macclesfield [sic -]. for "Frederick Nathaniel" Dyer who was an American - his father was born in Rhode Island - and who moved to England to do research]....who, not so many years ago, sent the story of his beliefs to the descendants of Mary Dyer in this country. ... This 'tradition' does not even have the authority of age ... this being so, the story, without more evidence, is not worthy of serious consideration." Moriarty further takes the (then) editor of the Register to task for even accepting the article for publication, as it appeared four years after the July, 1940 issue (Vol. 94) which published the marriage record of Mary and William Dyer from the parish register of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London, which clearly identified her as Mary BARRETT.

"A Brother Found: A Clue to the Ancestry of Mary (Barrett) Dyer, The Quaker Martyr". by Johan Winsser:
NEHGR, Volume 158, January 2004, #629, Pages 27-28. (Partial Quote)
It is now clear that Mary Dyer had a brother, a fact that adds further evidence to debunk the Arabella tale and provides a clue to her true ancestry. In 1634 the Prerogative Court of Canterbury recorded the probate administration of William Barret, which granted the commission jointly to William Dyer of Saint Martin-in-the-Fields, fishmonger, and his wife Marie Dyer alias Barret, explicitly described as the sister of William Barret. The following year (1635) William & Mary (Barrett) Dyer settled in Boston.

William Dyre wrote a pathetic letter to the Massachusetts authorities, complaining bitterly of their treatment of his wife. It is found in the Chamberlain Collection in the Boston Public Library, and was published in the Nation, May 29, 1902, through the offices of Mr. Worthington C. Ford.
William Dyre writes:
"Having received some letters from my wife, I am given to understand of her commitment to close prison.....
"Though wet to the skin, she was thrust into a room wherein was nothing to sit or lie upon but dust. Had your dog been wet, you would have afforded it a chimney corner to dry itself, or had your hogs been penned in a sty, you would have afforded them some dry straw, or else you would have wanted mercy to your beast, but alas, Christians now with you are used worse than hogs or dogs.......
"Even the worst of men, the Bishops themselves, denied not the visitation and relief of friends to their wants which I myself, have oft experienced by visiting Mr. Prime, Mr. Smart and other eminent (.....) when he was commanded close in the Tower. I had resort once or twice a week and never fetched before authority to ask me whereof I came to the Tower or King's Bench or Gate House....
"Hath not people in America the same liberty as beasts and birds have to pass the land or air without examination?......... It is not to be forgotten the former cruelties you used towards her when she came from England, having been tossed at sea all winter, but a little refreshment that had by cross winds at Barbadoes, yet as soon as come into Harbour shut up in prison and there kept.......for no transgression at all, only that Mr. Bellingham then as now, said she was a Quaker.........
"Where your law or rule to keep a man's wife from him seven or eight weeks and a mother from her children, in a capacity of a close prison, which admits of no baylement?......."
"so saith her husband W. Dyre"
"Newport, this 30th August, 1659
"To ye Court of Assistants now assembled at Boston this 6th September, 1659."
This was endorsed: "To ye Court of Assistants, delivered into ye Court by his wife, Mary Dyre, 7th, 7th mo. 58." (Sep.7,1659)

Mary, wife of William, suffered martyrdom at Boston, Suffolk, May 32, 1660. [Rhode Island Friends Record - Deaths, pg.99]

RI Historical Cemeteries Transcription Project Index shows: Mary Dyer, - 31 May 1660, Newport, RI (NT600)

The Hartford Courant Newspaper, Saturday, March 11, 2000: "Women who made a difference. Names of the 19 women to be inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame October 7 were announced this week" "Mary Barret Dyer (birth year unknown-1660) She defied Puritan church autorities in Colonial Boston to gain religious freedom for Quakers. Her death by hanging helped establish the right to worship freely in the Colonies."
Source: New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 94, July 1940, Page 300

The Marriage Record of Mary Dyre The Quaker Martyr - The Parish Registers of St. Martin in the Fields, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, contain the following marriage record:
October 27, 1633 Gulielmus Dyer and Maria Barret
There seems no doubt that this is the record of the marriage of William Dyre (as he consistantly spelled his name) and wife Mary, the Quaker martyr.
The date of their marriage was known to be between mid-summer 1633, when William Dyre's nine-year apprenticeship in London ended, and December 1635, when his son Samuel was baptized in Boston in New England.
It was through the professional services of Mr. Richard Holworthy of London that the record of William Dyre's apprenticeship was found. Through his efforts, also, the baptismal record of William Dyre was discovered. Therefore, when Mr. Holworthy wrote: "There seems to me to be no doubt as to the wife of William Dyre and I want to congratulate you on having this information," there need be no hesitation in offering the marriage record for publication.
Mary Dyre's maiden name of BARRETT explains why her son Samuel named a son of his, BARRETT Dyer.
The Registers of St. Martin-in-the- Fields record the baptism, October 24, 1634 of "William Diar, son of William and Marie," These records show that William and Mary Dyre emigrated to America not earlier than very late in 1634.
The details of the baptismal and apprenticeship records of William Dyre and other facts of his life and that of his wife may be found in an article written by Mr. William Allan Dyer and published in the Rhode Island Historical Society's Collections for January 1937. His efforts quite as much as those of the writer made possible the discovery of the marriage record, and it was Mr. Dyer who conducted the correspondence with Mr. Holworthy. Acknowledgement is also due the Harleian Society of London, as it was from their publication for 1936 that the Parish Records of St. Martin-in-the-Fields were obtained.

Brookline, Norfolk, Mass.Theresa E. Dyer
==================================================================================
Source: New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 104, January 1950, Page 42
THE TRUE STORY OF MARY DYER
By G. Andrews Moriarty, A.M., LLB., F.A.S.G., F.S.A.

Finally, we are able to prove who Mary Dyer was, thanks to Miss Theresa E. Dyer, of Brookline, Norfolk, Mass., who published in The Register for July 1940 (vol. 94, p.300) the marriage record of William and Mary from the parish register of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London (cf. also Harl. Soc., 1936).
On 27 Oct. 1633 William Dyer married Mary BARRET. In this connection it should be noted that Samuel Dyer, son of William and Mary, named his sixth son BARRETT, obviously for his mother's family (cf. Austin's Gen. Dic. of Rhode Island, p.291)"The date and place of baptism/birth of Mary Barrett is unknown. About 1610 and London is speculative." [Johan Winsser ]

NEHGR Vol 114 p208 "The Story of Jane Hawkins" tells of Jane Hawkins, around 1637-1653 who was banished from the community (Boston) for "practicing Medicine" to live in the woods. While at Portsmouth, as a mid-wife, she, with Anne Hutchinson, had assisted at the birth of the so-called 'monster' of Mary Dyer.... as related in John Winthrop's "History of New England" (1853),
2:10-11, 1:313ff

The "Tradition" of Mary Dyer & Lady Arabella Stuart:
The April 1944 issue of the New England Historic and Genealogical Society's Register (Vol. 98) published an article by Alice Eugenie Ortiz entitled "Tradition of Mary Dyer, Quaker Martyr" which had been contributed by Mrs. Harry Clark Boden. Mrs. Borden herself stated that there was NO PROOF whatsoever for her theory - simply that it was one conceivable way to account for Mary's early whereabouts.

Andrews Moriarty refuted this theory quite soundly in his article, "The True Story of Mary Dyer" (NEHGS Register) Vol. 104, January 1950). He states that "NO PROOF is offered that the Lady Arabella ever "had" issue except a vague statement from Mr. Hardy's (Life of Lady Arabella Stuart) of a rumor that such was the case." Furthermore, Moriarty points out that "there never was such a tradition [of this lineage] among Mary Dyer's descendants, but that it was a quite modern story, emanating from an English gentleman, Mr. F. M. Dyer of Macclesfield [sic -]. for "Frederick Nathaniel" Dyer who was an American - his father was born in Rhode Island - and who moved to England to do research]....who, not so many years ago, sent the story of his beliefs to the descendants of Mary Dyer in this country. ... This 'tradition' does not even have the authority of age ... this being so, the story, without more evidence, is not worthy of serious consideration." Moriarty further takes the (then) editor of the Register to task for even accepting the article for publication, as it appeared four years after the July, 1940 issue (Vol. 94) which published the marriage record of Mary and William Dyer from the parish register of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London, which clearly identified her as Mary BARRETT.

"A Brother Found: A Clue to the Ancestry of Mary (Barrett) Dyer, The Quaker Martyr". by Johan Winsser:
NEHGR, Volume 158, January 2004, #629, Pages 27-28. (Partial Quote)
It is now clear that Mary Dyer had a brother, a fact that adds further evidence to debunk the Arabella tale and provides a clue to her true ancestry. In 1634 the Prerogative Court of Canterbury recorded the probate administration of William Barret, which granted the commission jointly to William Dyer of Saint Martin-in-the-Fields, fishmonger, and his wife Marie Dyer alias Barret, explicitly described as the sister of William Barret. The following year (1635) William & Mary (Barrett) Dyer settled in Boston.

William Dyre wrote a pathetic letter to the Massachusetts authorities, complaining bitterly of their treatment of his wife. It is found in the Chamberlain Collection in the Boston Public Library, and was published in the Nation, May 29, 1902, through the offices of Mr. Worthington C. Ford.
William Dyre writes:
"Having received some letters from my wife, I am given to understand of her commitment to close prison.....
"Though wet to the skin, she was thrust into a room wherein was nothing to sit or lie upon but dust. Had your dog been wet, you would have afforded it a chimney corner to dry itself, or had your hogs been penned in a sty, you would have afforded them some dry straw, or else you would have wanted mercy to your beast, but alas, Christians now with you are used worse than hogs or dogs.......
"Even the worst of men, the Bishops themselves, denied not the visitation and relief of friends to their wants which I myself, have oft experienced by visiting Mr. Prime, Mr. Smart and other eminent (.....) when he was commanded close in the Tower. I had resort once or twice a week and never fetched before authority to ask me whereof I came to the Tower or King's Bench or Gate House....
"Hath not people in America the same liberty as beasts and birds have to pass the land or air without examination?......... It is not to be forgotten the former cruelties you used towards her when she came from England, having been tossed at sea all winter, but a little refreshment that had by cross winds at Barbadoes, yet as soon as come into Harbour shut up in prison and there kept.......for no transgression at all, only that Mr. Bellingham then as now, said she was a Quaker.........
"Where your law or rule to keep a man's wife from him seven or eight weeks and a mother from her children, in a capacity of a close prison, which admits of no baylement?......."
"so saith her husband W. Dyre"
"Newport, this 30th August, 1659
"To ye Court of Assistants now assembled at Boston this 6th September, 1659."
This was endorsed: "To ye Court of Assistants, delivered into ye Court by his wife, Mary Dyre, 7th, 7th mo. 58." (Sep.7,1659)

Mary, wife of William, suffered martyrdom at Boston, Suffolk, May 32, 1660. [Rhode Island Friends Record - Deaths, pg.99]

RI Historical Cemeteries Transcription Project Index shows: Mary Dyer, - 31 May 1660, Newport, RI (NT600)

The Hartford Courant Newspaper, Saturday, March 11, 2000: "Women who made a difference. Names of the 19 women to be inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame October 7 were announced this week" "Mary Barret Dyer (birth year unknown-1660) She defied Puritan church autorities in Colonial Boston to gain religious freedom for Quakers. Her death by hanging helped establish the right to worship freely in the Colonies."
Source: New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 94, July 1940, Page 300

The Marriage Record of Mary Dyre The Quaker Martyr - The Parish Registers of St. Martin in the Fields, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, contain the following marriage record:
October 27, 1633 Gulielmus Dyer and Maria Barret
There seems no doubt that this is the record of the marriage of William Dyre (as he consistantly spelled his name) and wife Mary, the Quaker martyr.
The date of their marriage was known to be between mid-summer 1633, when William Dyre's nine-year apprenticeship in London ended, and December 1635, when his son Samuel was baptized in Boston in New England.
It was through the professional services of Mr. Richard Holworthy of London that the record of William Dyre's apprenticeship was found. Through his efforts, also, the baptismal record of William Dyre was discovered. Therefore, when Mr. Holworthy wrote: "There seems

More About Mary Barrett:
Burial: 1660, NEWPORT LOCATION UNKNOWN NEWPORT *LOST* FROM QUAKER DEATH RECORDS.32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32

More About Mary Barrett and William Dyer:
Marriage 1: 27 Oct 1633, St. Martin in the Fields, London, England.33, 34, 35
Marriage 2: 27 Oct 1633, St. Martin in the Fields, London, England.35, 36, 37

 Includes NotesMarriage Notes for Mary Barrett and William Dyer:
Source: New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 94, July 1940, Page 300

The Marriage Record of Mary Dyre The Quaker Martyr - The Parish Registers of St. Martin in the Fields, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, contain the following marriage record:
October 27, 1633 Gulielmus Dyer and Maria Barret
There seems no doubt that this is the record of the marriage of William Dyre (as he consistantly spelled his name) and wife Mary, the Quaker martyr.
The date of their marriage was known to be between mid-summer 1633, when William Dyre's nine-year apprenticeship in London ended, and December 1635, when his son Samuel was baptized in Boston in New England.
It was through the professional services of Mr. Richard Holworthy of London that the record of William Dyre's apprenticeship was found. Through his efforts, also, the baptismal record of William Dyre was discovered. Therefore, when Mr. Holworthy wrote: "There seems to me to be no doubt as to the wife of William Dyre and I want to congratulate you on having this information," there need be no hesitation in offering the marriage record for publication.
Mary Dyre's maiden name of BARRETT explains why her son Samuel named a son of his, BARRETT Dyer.
The Registers of St. Martin-in-the- Fields record the baptism, October 24, 1634 of "William Diar, son of William and Marie," These records show that William and Mary Dyre emigrated to America not earlier than very late in 1634.
The details of the baptismal and apprenticeship records of William Dyre and other facts of his life and that of his wife may be found in an article written by Mr. William Allan Dyer and published in the Rhode Island Historical Society's Collections for January 1937. His efforts quite as much as those of the writer made possible the discovery of the marriage record, and it was Mr. Dyer who conducted the correspondence with Mr. Holworthy. Acknowledgement is also due the Harleian Society of London, as it was from their publication for 1936 that the Parish Records of St. Martin-in-the-Fields were obtained.

Brookline, Norfolk, Mass.Theresa E. Dyer
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Source: New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 104, January 1950, Page 42
THE TRUE STORY OF MARY DYER
By G. Andrews Moriarty, A.M., LLB., F.A.S.G., F.S.A.

Finally, we are able to prove who Mary Dyer was, thanks to Miss Theresa E. Dyer, of Brookline, Norfolk, Mass., who published in The Register for July 1940 (vol. 94, p.300) the marriage record of William and Mary from the parish register of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London (cf. also Harl. Soc., 1936).
On 27 Oct. 1633 William Dyer married Mary BARRET. In this connection it should be noted that Samuel Dyer, son of William and Mary, named his sixth son BARRETT, obviously for his mother's family (cf. Austin's Gen. Dic. of Rhode Island, p.291)

Children of Mary Barrett and William Dyer are:
  1. William Dyer, b. 24 Oct 1634, London, England, d. 27 Oct 1634, London, England.
  2. +Samuel Dyer, b. Bef. 20 Dec 1635, Boston, Suffolk, Ma38, 38, 39, d. Abt. 1678, Kingstown, Washington, Ri.
  3. Mary Dyer, b. Abt. 1639, Newport, Newport, Ri, d. Aft. 26 Jan 1679, Delaware.
  4. William Dyer Major, b. Abt. 1642, Newport, Newport, Ri40, 40, 40, 40, 40, 41, d. Bef. 05 Jun 1688, Sussex County, Pa (now Delaware)42, 43, 44, 44, 44, 44, 45, 46.
  5. Mahershallalhashbaz Dyer, b. Abt. 1643, Boston, Suffolk, Ma47, 47, d. Bef. 1670.
  6. Henry Levi Dyer, b. Abt. 1647, Rhode Island, d. Feb 1690, Newport, Newport, Ri48, 49.
  7. Charles Dyer, b. Abt. 1650, Rhode Island, d. 15 May 1709, Newport, Newport, Ri50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 55, 55, 56, 57, 58.
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