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Joseph Jackson. He married Anne Jarvis.

 Includes NotesNotes for Joseph Jackson:
JOSEPH JACKSON (21) is the oldest proven Jackson ancestor of this author. According to “Pioneers of Wiregrass Georgia,” “Joseph Jackson was born about 1830,” (obviously a typo for 1730) and that he was born “probably in Bedford County, Virginia, parentage unknown.” In 1806, Joseph Jackson was excused from jury duty for being over the age of 60 - this record confirms that Joseph Jackson was born prior to 1746. We now also know that Joseph’s daughter, Ursula Jackson, was born in 1772 - this implies that Joseph Jackson was born between 1732 and 1752 (other birthdates of Joseph’s children are speculative dates). Although proof is lacking, this author believes that the birthdates of Joseph Jackson and his sons are later dates than many Olliff reseachers have concluded. This author believes that Joseph Jackson was born around 1740 which is about ten years later than most estimates. “Pioneers of Wiregrass Georgia," continues by stating: “He was related, to some degree, to Jarvis Jackson of Bedford County, Virginia (Q. V.), but, just how, is unknown.” In 1799, Joseph was married to a woman named Sarah. According to a 1799 Deed of Gift, the witness of the deed, John Bonnell, “saw Joseph Jackson and Sarah Jackson, his wife, sign” the deed. Early Olliff researchers, Dorothy Brannen and Camilla (Akins) Lanier, show that Joseph Jackson married Anne Jarvis (this is no longer believed to be the case). There was a Joseph Jackson (born 1705) who married Ann Jarvis (obviously way too early to be our Joseph Jackson).

There is a recent book published on the Jackson families of Bedford County, Virginia by Lyle Keith Williams which was published in December of 1991 (and is now out of print). The Jackson line included in this book is amazingly similar to the author’s Jackson ancestry as presented by many Olliff descendants. The book by Lyle Williams states that a Joseph Jackson (born 1705) married Ann Jarvis. This suggests that the Joseph Jackson (born 1705) would be a generation earlier than that the author’s Joseph Jackson (born 1740). The Williams book also states that Joseph Jackson (born 1705) died around 1774 and it is known that the author’s Joseph Jackson died after 1805. The Williams book shows five known children of Joseph Jackson (born 1705) and Ann (Jarvis) Jackson: Jarvis Jackson (1728 - 1802), Joseph Jackson (born 1735), John Jackson (born 1739), Ann Jackson (born 1740) and Hannah Jackson (born 1742). It would have fit neatly to have the Joseph Jackson (born 1735) be the same Joseph Jackson (born 1740) that is the ancestor of the authors. Unfortunately, Joseph Jackson (born 1735) is shown in the Williams book to have married on August 27, 1760 to Susannah Carter in Goochland County, Virginia. Joseph and Susannah had one known son: William Jackson (born January 4, 1765). It further states that Joseph Jackson (born 1735) died in Kentucky. The above information in Lyle William’s book would have to be in error for our Joseph Jackson (born 1740) to be the son of Joseph Jackson (born 1705) and Ann (Jarvis) Jackson. However, this connection should not be ruled out and warrants further research.

Other Olliff researchers have indicated that our Joseph Jackson (born 1740) could be the son of Jarvis Jackson (the son of Joseph Jackson and Anne Jarvis). The will of Jarvis Jackson was probated on June 28, 1802 in Bedford County, Virginia and clearly lists a son, Joseph Jackson. The connection between Jarvis Jackson (born 1740) and our Joseph Jackson (born 1740) is primarily based on solid evidence that shows Jarvis Jackson’s daughter, Lucy (Jackson) Eubanks, and her husband, Stephen Eubanks, living in Camden County, Georgia during the same time period that our Joseph Jackson (born 1740) resided in Camden County, Georgia. On April 27, 1805, Stephen Eubanks of Camden County, Georgia appointed Jarvis Deal of Jackson County, Georgia power of attorney in matters concerning the estate of Jarvis Jackson. Another supporting fact is that our Joseph Jackson (born 1740) named a son Jarvis Jackson. Unfortunately, this Joseph Jackson (son of Jarvis Jackson) was married to Charlotte and appears to have moved to Kentucky. In 1805, “Joseph Jackson and his wife Charlotte” were selling land in Bedford County, Virginia (this deed lists the children of Jarvis Jackson selling land together). On September 5, 1805, “this indenture was produced in court and acknowledged by Ann Williams, Thomas Thorp, Elenor Thorp, Joseph Jackson, John Jackson and Mary Jackson” in Madison County, Kentucky. However, this connection should not be ruled out and warrants further research.

There is evidence that the author’s ancestor, Joseph Jackson (born 1740), may have served in the Revolutionary War. The book, “Georgia’s Roster of the Revolution,” contains a “certificate of James Jackson, Colonel, stating that Joseph Jackson was Georgia soldier of the Continental Line, eligible for 500 acres.” Another book, “The Revolutionary Records of the State of Georgia,” shows that “Joseph Jackson received a grant for 400 acres of land in Wilkes Co., signed by the governor of Georgia in council in Savannah, 15 December 1784.” Unfortunately, establishing that these two references are for the author’s ancestor, Joseph Jackson (born 1730), is currently beyond the scope of this book. For those wishing to establish a Revolutionary War veteran as an ancestor, the service of Joseph Jackson should be researched to same level of John Shears Olliff. On February 6, 1783, “a petition from Joseph Jackson was read before the House (Legislature) and was referred to committee.” In August of 1783, an entry in the House Journal shows “Petition No. 126 of Joseph Jackson setting forth his having been plundered by a party in a Boat, commanded by Whitney and Quality, belonging to Mr. Richard Leake of Savannah, praying for relief. Postponed and referred to court of law.” Again, it appears that these two references are probably the author’s ancestor, Joseph Jackson (born 1730), but this connection is not well documented.

According to the 1805 deed in Screven County, Georgia, Joseph Jackson’s children sold 913 acres of land, including land “originally granted unto Joseph Jackson” on October 3, 1785. Since Screven County was created out of Effingham County and Burke County in 1793, it is probable that the land was originally granted in Effingham County (when part of that county in 1785) and was sold in Screven County (when part of that county in 1805). On December 19, 1785, Joseph Jackson purchased 100 acres of land in Effingham County, Georgia from William Shepherd. This deed indicates that William Shepard, planter, sold land to Joseph Jackson, blacksmith, both of Effingham County, Georgia. This land was located on Colson’s branch, on the north side of Great Ogeechee and was bounded by vacant on all sides. Witnesses were Benjamin Lanier, J. P., and Daniel Bonnell, J. P. On January 5, 1787, Joseph Jackson was granted 350 acres of land in Effingham County, Georgia. This was land bounded by owned by William Shepherd on the west and by Isaac Ford on the south. Joseph Jackson had land recorded in the Effingham County, Georgia Land Plat Book where 250 acres of “Oak and Hickory Land” was listed. This land had a Warrant dated March 12, 1787 and was surveyed on August 28, 1788. This land was bounded on the northeast by the Savannah River and on the southeast formerly by Thomas Keysee and Samuel Hudson, now by Abraham Ravots.

According to C. S. Miller, Joseph Jackson held political office as a “state legislator” from 1786 to 1789. The political service is also documented in a December 11, 1788 article in “The Georgia Gazette” which states: “Joseph Jackson is named as one of 10 members of the Assembly for Effingham County.” According to C. S. Miller, Joseph Jackson’s political career continued as “Effingham’s representative to Georgia’s 1789 Constitutional Convention.” On May 21, 1789, Joseph Jackson was granted 250 acres of land in Effingham County, Georgia. This land was bounded on the northeast by the Savannah River and the southwest by Abraham Ravots. In 1790, it appears that Joseph Jackson was a Justice of the Peace as the “Annals of Georgia” states: “Matthew Jones, planter, to William Rushing, planter, both of Effingham Co. Deed dated Dec. 7. 1790 for 100 acres adjoining lands of grantee. Witnesses: Joseph Jackson, J. P., Benjamin Lanier, J. P.” In 1791, Joseph again signs as a witness with the annotation of Justice of the Peace as the “Annals of Georgia” states: “Jos. Jackson, J. P. is a witness to the deed of the sale of land from John Rushing of Ebenezer to William Rushing of Eff. Co. Deed dated April 22, 1791.” In 1791, Joseph Jackson apparently served on a jury as an August 11, 1791 article in “The Georgia Gazette” states: “The Presentments of the Grand Jury for the County of Effingham, August 8, 1791 is printed and Joseph Jackson is named as a member of the Jury.”

On September 1, 1792, Joseph Jackson purchased 36 acres of land from the Estate of Isaac Ford (via Sheriff Thomas Lane and Stephen Ford, administrator for the estate of Isaac Ford). Part of tract granted Isaac Ford lying on Colson’s branch, now known as Jackson’s branch and adjoining grantee. Witnesses were Michael Dickson, James Caswell and Josiah Jackson. Joseph Jackson applied for a land grant as shown in the Plat Book of Effingham County, Georgia. This Plat Book indicates that Joseph Jackson had 300 acres of “pine land” that where the warrant was dated on April 15, 1793 and the land was surveyed on May 11, 1793. John “Olive” and Joel Jackson were the chain carriers for the survey. This land was bounded on the north by the Great Ogechee River, on the west by Joseph Jackson, on the west by N. W. Jones and on the northwest by Allen Dickson.

In 1793, Screven County was created out of Effingham and Burke Counties and it it appears that Joseph Jackson resided in what became Screven County. On July 21, 1794, “Michael Dickson, Planter, sold to Joseph Jackson, Blacksmith, for 51 pounds sterling, 154 acres on Ogeechee and in the county of Screven, formerly part of Effingham County.” Plat Books of Screven County, Georgia indicate that Joseph Jackson received 166 acres of land: Warrant dated January 3, 1794 and Survey dated May 1, 1795. Josiah Jackson and Mathew Driggers were chain carriers for the survey. In 1797, Joseph Jackson sold 17 acres of land for $17.00 to John Bonnell in Screven County, Georgia. This 17 acres was originally granted to Joseph Jackson. In 1798, Joseph Jackson, Blacksmith, purchased 140 acres in Screven County, Georgia from Stephen French, Carpenter, for the some of $40.00. It appears that Joseph Jackson still owned land in Effingham County, Georgia after Screven County was created from Effingham County in 1793. On July 8, 1798, Joseph Jackson was granted 300 acres in Effingham County, Georgia. This land was bounded on the north by A. Dickson, on the west by J. Jackson and on the south by N. W. Jones. Also on July 8, 1798, Joseph Jackson was granted another 166 acres of land in Screven County, Georgia. This land was bounded on the northwest by Mr. Rushings and Thomas Woods, on the northeast by Mr. Driggers, on the southwest by Mr. Douglas and on the southeast by Mr. Jermain.

In 1799, Joseph Jackson gave his children 913 acres of land in Screven County, Georgia in a “deed of gift.” When later sold by his children in 1805, this land was described further described as multiple tracts of land: 1) 100 acres originally granted to William Shepheard on October 14, 1784 and then sold to Joseph Jackson on December 18, 1785; 2) 350 acres originally granted to Joseph Jackson on October 3, 1785; 3) 300 acres of land originally granted to Joseph Jackson; 4) 140 acres of land originally granted to Allen Dickson on July 8, 1788; 5) 36 acres of land originally granted to Isaac Ford conveyed from the estate of Isaac Ford to Joseph Jackson. These tracts combined are 926 acres (13 acres more than being transferred - probably because of the 17 acres that Joseph Jackson sold to John Bonnell in 1797). On December 4, 1802, “Joseph Jackson of Camden County” sold 166 acres in Screven County, Georgia to James Caswell of Screven County, Georgia. “Pioneers of Wiregrass Georgia” mentions that “Mr. Jackson was on a voting list in Camden County October 3, 1803. He was defeated in a race for State Representative in that election.” It appears that Joseph Jackson may have participated in the 1805 Georgia Land Lottery. Joseph Jackson was shown as a “Camden County Registrant, 1805 Georgia Land Lottery.”

The children of Joseph Jackson were clearly stated in the 1799 deed of gift from Joseph Jackson to his children and again in the 1805 deed where his children sold this 913 acres. The 1799 deed describes the transfer of land “between Joseph Jackson of the County of Screven in the State of Georgia of the one part and Jarvis Jackson, Josiah Jackson, Joanah Oliiff, Ursula Jackson, Joel Jackson and Mary Jackson, children of the aforesaid Joseph Jackson of the other part.” The 1805 deed describes the sale of this land from “Jarvis Jackson and Joannah Oliff of Bulloch County, Joel Jackson and Mary Jackson of Screven County and Evan Harvey of Bal(d)win County” to John Bonnell. According to these 1799 and 1805 deeds, Joseph and Sarah Jackson were the parents of six children:

Joannah Jackson (21.1), b. 1755
Jarvis Jackson (21.2), b. 1758
Mary Jackson (21.3), b. 1779, Georgia
Ursula Jackson (21.4), b. January 11, 1772
Joel Jackson (21.5)
Josiah Jackson

The Askew Family Bible, in possession of Mr. Metts of Statesboro, Georgia, shows “William Askew (son of Thomas Askew and Margaret his lawful wife) was married to Louisa Jackson, daughter of Joseph Jackson and Sarah his wife, on August 23, 1798. He was born January 1, 1775; she was born September 7, 1781. Unfortunately, Louisa is not listed in the 1799 Deed of Gift or the 1805 deed selling the 1799 deed of gift. Therefore, Joseph and Sarah Jackson may have been the parents of another daughter:

“Pioneers of Wiregrass Georgia” shows that Joseph Jackson “was excused from Jury Duty March 3, 1806, being over 60 years of age.” This 1806 court record is the last known document of Joseph Jackson. Joseph Jackson may have died in Camden County, Georgia around 1806 (where and when he was excused from jury duty). Joannah Jackson married John Shears Olliff, the oldest proven Olliff ancestor of the authors. For additional information on their descendants, see the sketch of John Shears Olliff (1). Josiah Jackson was living in Effingham County, Georgia in 1792 when he witnessed two deeds in that county. In 1799, Josiah Jackson is listed as a son of Joseph Jackson in the deed where Joseph Jackson gave his children 913 acres of land. In 1800, Josiah Jackson and his brother, Joel Jackson, obtained their sister’s power of attorney (Ursula Jackson) to sell the land that were given to them by their father, Joseph Jackson. In 1805, Josiah Jackson is not mentioned in the list of children selling the 913 acres that was give to Josiah Jackson and his siblings in 1799. Since Josiah Jackson is not included in the 1805 and no further documenation has been located concering him, there is a strong possibility that Josiah Jackson died between 1800 and 1805 or moved away from the area during that timeframe.

References (Primary Sources - Effingham and Screven Counties, Georgia): 1) Deed Book A, Pages 167 and 168, Effingham County, Georgia, William Shepherd to Joseph Jackson, 100 acres, December 17, 1785; 2) Land Grant, Page 333, State of Georgia to Joseph Jackson, 350 acres, Registered January 5, 1787, Effingham County; 3) Plat Book, Page 291, Effingham County, Georgia, 250 acres, Warrant dated March 12, 1787, Survey dated August 28, 1788, recorded August 28, 1788; 4) Land Grant, State of Georgia to Joseph Jackson, 250 acres, Registered January 21, 1789, Effingham County, Page 135; 5) Deed Book A, Pages 192 and 193, Effingham County, Georgia, Estate of Isaac Ford to Joseph Jackson, 36 acres, September 1, 1792; 6) Plat Book, Page 124, Effingham County, Georgia, 300 acres, Warrant dated April 25, 1793, Survey dated May 11, 1793, recorded July 15, 1793; 7) Deed Book A, Page 11, Michael Dickson to Joseph Jackson, Screven County, Georgia, 154 acres, 1794; 8) Plat Book 1, Page 70, Joseph Jackson, Screven County, Georgia, 166 acres, Warrant dated February 3, 1794, Survey dated May 1, 1795; 9) Deed Book A, Screven County, Georgia, 17 acres, Joseph Jackson to John Bonnell, May 7, 1797, Pages 214 and 215; 10) Deed Book A, Pages 396 and 397, Screven County, Georgia, Stephen French to Joseph Jackson, 140 acres, 1798; 11) Land Grant, State of Georgia to Joseph Jackson, 166 acres, Registered January 8, 1798, Screven County, Page 173; 12) Land Grant, State of Georgia to Joseph Jackson, 300 acres, Registered January 8, 1798, Effingham County, Page 178; 13) Deed Book A, Page 212, Joseph Jackson to Jarvis Jackson, Josiah Jackson,Joanah Oliff, Ursela Jackson, Joel Jackson and Mary Jackson, 913 acres, 1799; 14) Deed Book A, Page 356, Screven County, Georgia, Joseph Jackson of Camden County, Georgia to James Caswell of Screven County, Georgia, 166 acres, 1802; 15) Deed Book A, Pages 398 and 399, Screven County, Georgia, Jarvis Jackson and Joannah Olliff of Bulloch County, Joel Jackson and Mary Jackson of Screven County, Evan Harvey of Baldwin County, Screven County, Georgia to John Bonnell, 913 acres, 1805 (this was originally stated incorrectly as probate records of Joseph Jackson)



Children of Joseph Jackson and Anne Jarvis are:
  1. +Johannah Jackson, b. 1755.
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