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Ancestors of Wilma Margrette "Willie" Ferguson


      1351614676. Count of Meulan Robert MEULAN, born 965 in Mellent, Normandy, , France7543. He was the son of 2703229352. Robert I MEULENT. He married 1351614677. Alix De VEXIN 989.

      1351614677. Alix De VEXIN, born 970 in Mellent, Normandy, , France7543. She was the daughter of 2703229354. Count of Vexin Gauthier II Of VEXIN and 2703229355. Adele De SENLIS.

Notes for Count of Meulan Robert MEULAN:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836

  Notes for Alix De VEXIN:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836_P_CCINFO 1-49535
_P_CCINFO 1-49563
_P_CCINFO 1-49356
_P_CCINFO 1-43032
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836

More About Robert MEULAN and Alix De VEXIN:
Marriage: 989
     
Child of Robert MEULAN and Alix De VEXIN is:
  675807338 i.   Count Waleran of MEULAN, born 990 in Mellent, Normandy, , France; died 08 Oct 1069; married (1) Oda De CONTEVILLE 1017 in , , , France; married (2) Oda De CONTEVILLE 1017 in , , , France.


      1351614678. Earl of Comwyn Jean De CONTEVILLE, born 969 in Conteville, , , France7543. He was the son of 2703229356. UNKNOWN Baldwin. He married 1351614679. Mrs-Jean De CONTEVILLE.

      1351614679. Mrs-Jean De CONTEVILLE, born 974 in Mellent, Normandy, , France7543.

Notes for Earl of Comwyn Jean De CONTEVILLE:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836

  Notes for Mrs-Jean De CONTEVILLE:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836_P_CCINFO 1-49535
_P_CCINFO 1-49563
_P_CCINFO 1-49356
_P_CCINFO 1-43032
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836
     
Children of Jean De CONTEVILLE and Mrs-Jean De CONTEVILLE are:
  675807339 i.   Oda De CONTEVILLE, born 994 in Mellent, Normandy, , France; married Count Waleran of MEULAN 1017 in , , , France.
  ii.   Harlevin De CONTEVILLE, born 1001 in Conteville, , , France7543; married (1) Harlette De FALAISE 1035; born 1003 in Falaise, Clavados, , France7543; died 10507543; married (2) Harlette De FALAISE 1035; born 1003 in Falaise, Clavados, , France7543; died 10507543; married (3) UNKNOWN Fredefeudis 1041 in , , , France.
  Notes for Harlevin De CONTEVILLE:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836_P_CCINFO 1-49535
_P_CCINFO 1-49563
_P_CCINFO 1-49356
_P_CCINFO 1-43032
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836

  Notes for Harlette De FALAISE:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836

  More About Harlevin De CONTEVILLE and Harlette De FALAISE:
Marriage: 1035



      1351614688. King of Leinster Dermot Of LEINSTER, born 995 in Leinster, , , Ireland7543. He married 1351614689. Dearbhforghaill Of LEINSTER.

      1351614689. Dearbhforghaill Of LEINSTER, born 1000 in , , , Ireland7543; died 10807543. She was the daughter of 2703229378. KING OF LEINSTER Morough O'Brien Of LEINSTER and 2703229379. Mrs-Morough Of LEINSTER.

Notes for King of Leinster Dermot Of LEINSTER:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836

  Notes for Dearbhforghaill Of LEINSTER:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836_P_CCINFO 1-49535
_P_CCINFO 1-49563
_P_CCINFO 1-49356
_P_CCINFO 1-43032
_P_CCINFO 1-27786
_P_CCINFO 1-13307
_P_CCINFO 1-13272
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836
     
Child of Dermot LEINSTER and Dearbhforghaill LEINSTER is:
  675807344 i.   King of Leinster Murchadh Of LEINSTER, born 1025 in Leinster, , , Ireland; died 1090; married (1) Darbforgaill Of LEINSTER; married (2) Darbforgaill Of LEINSTER.


      1351614704. Gillacaemphin O'TOOLE, born 1005 in , , , Ireland7543; died 10567543. He was the son of 2703229408. Gillachomhghaill O'TOOLE and 2703229409. Mrs-Gillacomghall O'TOOLE. He married 1351614705. Mrs-Gillacaemphin O'TOOLE.

      1351614705. Mrs-Gillacaemphin O'TOOLE, born 1010 in , , , Ireland7543.

Notes for Gillacaemphin O'TOOLE:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836

  Notes for Mrs-Gillacaemphin O'TOOLE:
[WILMA M. FERGUSON_ferreol geoffrey count of gastinois_EGROV~16GM.ged]

_P_CCINFO 1-101836
     
Child of Gillacaemphin O'TOOLE and Mrs-Gillacaemphin O'TOOLE is:
  675807352 i.   Donncuan O'TOOLE, born 1030 in , , , Ireland; married Mrs-Donncuan O'TOOLE.


      1409286144. Airard Fitz-Stephen7544, born Abt. 1036 in Normandy, France7544; died in At Sea7544. He married 1409286145. Uknown.

      1409286145. Uknown, born Abt. 1030 in Normandy, France.

Notes for Airard Fitz-Stephen:
A NOBLEMAN OF NORMANDY Indiana FRANCE, IMMIGRATED TO ENGLAND WITH WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR Indiana 1066. WHEN WILLIAM THE NORMAN INVADED ENGLAND, QUEEN MATILDA PRESENTED HIM WITH A MAGNIFICENT SHIP CALLED THE "MORA" COMMANDED BY AIRARD FITZ-STEPHEN A NOBLEMAN OF NORMANDY. A SON THOMAS COMMANDED THE "WHITE SHIP." THOMAS FITZ-STEPHEN HAD TWO SONS: 1ST SON RALPH / HIS HEIR, FOUNDER OF THE ENGLISH LINE; 2ND STEPHEN, FOUNDER OF THE WELSH AND IRISH LINES.

******************Stevens Ancestry in England*************************
For the following STEVENS ancestry to the early 11th century, together with additional details on each generation, refer to the compilation of Don W. Stephens. As with many lineages in England prior to 1600, differences appear in the published compilations of this family. See the above cited compilation shows Thomas STEVENS, husband of Mary WALLE, as the son of Anthony STEVENS and Katherine BROKE, while elsewhere he is shown as son of Thomas STEVENS and Elizabeth STONE, daughter of John STONE (b. ca 1535) - in either case Thomas STEVENS, husband of Mary WALLE, is shown as grandson of Edward STEVENS and Jane FOWLER. This compiler will leave to others more qualified the presentation of the pre-America lineage, and the following is presented only as a suggestion, with no claim of accuracy. The principal information source from the pre-America lineage is Stevens-Stephens Genealogy and Family History, compiled by Clarence Perry Stevens, et al. (1968).

Airard FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1036)
Thomas FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1058, d. 1120)
Ralph FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1090)
Ralph FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1122, d. 1190)
Fitz Ralph FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1154)
John FITZ-STEPHEN (b. 1186)
Henry FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1218)
Henry FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1250)
John FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1282)
John STEPHENS (b. ca 1314)
Richard STEPHENS (b. ca 1346, d. 1390)
John STEPHENS (b. ca 1378) married Margaret DEDBROKE (b. ca 1381)
John STEPHENS (b. ca 1400, d. post 1442) married Alice
Thomas STEPHENS (b. ca 1420)
John STEPHENS (b. 1459)
Henry STEPHENS (b. ca 1497, d. Jan. 9, 1551/2) married Ms. LUGG
Edward STEVENS (b. 1523, d. Oct. 22, 1587), Lord of Eastington Manor, married Joan FOWLER (b. 1529, d. Aug. 5, 1587), daughter of Richard FOWLER and Margery BENNETT.
Anthony STEVENS (b. ca 1560) married Kathrine BROKE (b. 1562), daughter of Richard BROKE (b. ca 1530). They were parents of Thomas STEVENS.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note for: Airard Fitz-Stephens, ABT. 1036 - Index
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Airard Fitz- Stephen, a nobleman of Normandy in France, immigrated to England with William the Conqueror in 1066.
When William the Norman invaded England, Queen Matilda presented him with a magnificent ship called the "Mora" commanded by Airard Fitz Stephen, a nobleman of Normandy. A son Thomas commanded the "White Ship." Thomas Fitz Stephen had two sons: 1st was Ralph his heir, founder of the English line; 2nd Stephen, founder of the Welsh and Irish lines.

The Battle of Hastings in 1066
Duke William of Normandy left St.Valery in Normandy with about 600 ships and 10 to 12,000 men Sept 27th in 1066. William and his barons had been recruiting and preparing the invasion of England since early spring of that year. He was a seasoned general and master tactician, using cavalry, archers and infantry and had fought many notable battles. Off Beachy Head, his ship, the "Mora", arrived ahead of the fleet.. William waited and ate a hearty breakfast. As his fleet straggled into place behind him they moved eastward to the first sheltered bay to provide protection for his armada. Pevensey and Bulverhythe were the villages on each promontory. Pevensey, to the west, was protected by an old Roman Fort and behind the fort there was much flat acreage to house his large Army. To suggest this landing was not pre-planned, is not in keeping with the preparatory time taken by William, or his track record. There had been much intelligence gathering in the past few months.
The bay, wide enough for maneuverability of this large fleet, was flat shored. William is said to have fallen on the beach, grasped the sand, and declared "This is my country" or words to that effect. Next, the ships were disembarked without resistance. They included 2,500 horses, prefabricated forts, and the materiel and equipment was prepared for any contingency.
The ships shuttled in and out of the bay with the precision of a D Day landing. A Fort was built inside Pevensey Roman Fort as an H.Q, while the army camped behind it. William and FitzOsborn scouted the land He was unhappy with the terrain but it had proved to be a satisfactory landing beach. Taking his army around Pevensey Bay he camped 8 miles to the east, north of what is now known as Hastings all of which was most likely pre-planned. He camped to the east outside the friendly territory of the Norman Monks of Fecamp who may have been alerted and were waiting for his probable arrival. William waited. Perhaps he was waiting to know of the outcome of the battle to the north. In those two weeks William could have marched on London and taken it. He was obviously waiting for something?
Harold, far to the north in York at Stamford Bridge, was engaged in a life and death struggle against his brother who had teamed up with the Viking King Hadrada to invade England. Whether this was a planned Norman tactic, part of a pincer movement north and south, is not known, but students of Norman and Viking history might find it very feasible. The timing of each invasion was impeccable, and probably less than coincidental. Harold managed to resist the invasion to the north and killed both commanders. He was advised of the landing to the south by William.
Bringing the remnants of his Army south, Harold camped outside London at Waltham. For two weeks he gathered reinforcements, and exchanged taunts, threats and counterclaims to the Crown of England with William. Finally he moved his army south to a position about six miles north of where William waited.
Perhaps one of the most devastating events preceeding the battle was Harold's sudden awareness that he had been excommunicated by the Pope, and that William was wearing the papal ring. It is most likely this had been arranged by fellow Norman Robert Guiscard who had conquered most of southern Italy and was patron of the Pope who was indebted to him for saving the Vatican. Harold's spirit flagged. William was leading what might perhaps by called the first Crusade. The whole world was against Harold. William moved up to Harold's position and set up in what was then the conventional European style. Archers, infantry and cavalry in the rear. A set piece, each assigned to their own duties. . Harold waited. He and his brother Gyrth arranged a mass of men along a high ground ridge 8 deep, 800 yards long . A fixed corridor of tightly wedged humanity. Strategically, given the relative equipment of each side, it was hopeless from the start. To William it was almost a formality. Harold's men were hemmed in by their own elbows. William, with total mobility, held his Breton, Maine and Anjou contingents to the left of the line, the Normans the main thrust, the Flemish and French to his right. The flanking movements paid off. How long the battle took has varying estimates. Some say as little as two hours. Some as long as six hours. The latter seems more reasonable simply because of the numbers involved. .

This battle would later be called Senlac, a river of blood. It demolished most of the remnants of the Saxon fighting men of the Island at very little cost to William.
Thus began a three century Norman occupation of England, Wales and Scotland, and later Ireland.

"Stevens - Stephens Genealogy and Family History"
Author: Clarence Perry Stevens
Call Number: CS71.S844 This book contains the history and genealogy of the Stevens-Stephens family of North Carolina.Bibliographic Information: Stevens, Clarence Perry. Stevens-Stephens Genealogy and Family History. Privately Published. 1968.

PREFACE
This, we believe, is the first family history to link some of the large branches of the Stevens-Stephens
family, Henry of Stonington, Conn., Thomas of the North Carolina Colony, their father, Nicholas, an officer under Oliver Cromwell in England, Richard of Taunton, Mass., Cyprian of Lancaster, Mass. and Thomas of Stow and Plainfield, Conn.; being descendants of Thomas Stephens of London, England, living in 1634 and his father Anthony Stephens of Wiltshire in the 16th century. Their descendants, known and unknown, number many thousands of people.
In the first edition, published in 1950, the North Carolina line is correct as far back as Thomas Stevens, d. 1751 in Craven Co., N. C. But it appears now this Thomas was the younger son of Capt. Nicholas instead of the son of his nephew Richard of Taunton, Mass. Both men had the same name, were about the same age, had wives with exactly the same name "Mary Caswell" and the records show the brother of Mary came to North Carolina and settled in South Carolina. But, nevertheless, from later research by M. J. Gavin, we conclude this was not the same Thomas, and so change the genealogy accordingly. Except for two generations the ancestor is the same anyway. I indicated in the first edition there was some doubt about this lin
In addition to those noted in the first edition, we wish to thank those who have sent in genealogical records and data, especially Mrs. Ruhlin Overlease (deceased) and family, Rushville, Ind.; Mr. Charles Holloman of Raleigh, N. C.; Brig. Gen. M. J. Gavin (deceased) et ux.; Mrs. Veraldine Benton, 201 Fulwood Blvd., Tifton, Georgia; Lane Stephens Wilcox of San Jose, California; Mrs. Stephen A. Breed, Cambridge 38, Mass.; Mrs. Vivian Swent, San Francisco, California; Ethel Stephens of Indianapolis, Indiana; Brig. Gen, Jesse F. Stevens of Boston, Mass., John J. Stephens of Brooklyn, N. Y. (not related); and Miss Alice E. Johnson of Ann Arbor, Mich. Clarence Perry Stevens, 2038 Edmart St., Escalon, California, Veraldine Sharp Benton,
201 Fulwood Blvd.,
Tifton, Ga. 31794. _P_CCINFO 1-49535
_P_CCINFO 1-49563
_P_CCINFO 1-49356
_P_CCINFO 1-43032
_P_CCINFO 1-27786
_P_CCINFO 1-13307
_P_CCINFO 1-13272
A NOBLEMAN OF NORMANDY Indiana FRANCE, IMMIGRATED TO ENGLAND WITH WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR Indiana 1066. WHEN WILLIAM THE NORMAN INVADED ENGLAND, QUEEN MATILDA PRESENTED HIM WITH A MAGNIFICENT SHIP CALLED THE "MORA" COMMANDED BY AIRARD FITZ-STEPHEN A NOBLEMAN OF NORMANDY. A SON THOMAS COMMANDED THE "WHITE SHIP." THOMAS FITZ-STEPHEN HAD TWO SONS: 1ST SON RALPH / HIS HEIR, FOUNDER OF THE ENGLISH LINE; 2ND STEPHEN, FOUNDER OF THE WELSH AND IRISH LINES.

******************Stevens Ancestry in England*************************
For the following STEVENS ancestry to the early 11th century, together with additional details on each generation, refer to the compilation of Don W. Stephens. As with many lineages in England prior to 1600, differences appear in the published compilations of this family. See the above cited compilation shows Thomas STEVENS, husband of Mary WALLE, as the son of Anthony STEVENS and Katherine BROKE, while elsewhere he is shown as son of Thomas STEVENS and Elizabeth STONE, daughter of John STONE (b. ca 1535) - in either case Thomas STEVENS, husband of Mary WALLE, is shown as grandson of Edward STEVENS and Jane FOWLER. This compiler will leave to others more qualified the presentation of the pre-America lineage, and the following is presented only as a suggestion, with no claim of accuracy. The principal information source from the pre-America lineage is Stevens-Stephens Genealogy and Family History, compiled by Clarence Perry Stevens, et al. (1968).

Airard FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1036)
Thomas FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1058, d. 1120)
Ralph FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1090)
Ralph FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1122, d. 1190)
Fitz Ralph FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1154)
John FITZ-STEPHEN (b. 1186)
Henry FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1218)
Henry FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1250)
John FITZ-STEPHEN (b. ca 1282)
John STEPHENS (b. ca 1314)
Richard STEPHENS (b. ca 1346, d. 1390)
John STEPHENS (b. ca 1378) married Margaret DEDBROKE (b. ca 1381)
John STEPHENS (b. ca 1400, d. post 1442) married Alice
Thomas STEPHENS (b. ca 1420)
John STEPHENS (b. 1459)
Henry STEPHENS (b. ca 1497, d. Jan. 9, 1551/2) married Ms. LUGG
Edward STEVENS (b. 1523, d. Oct. 22, 1587), Lord of Eastington Manor, married Joan FOWLER (b. 1529, d. Aug. 5, 1587), daughter of Richard FOWLER and Margery BENNETT.
Anthony STEVENS (b. ca 1560) married Kathrine BROKE (b. 1562), daughter of Richard BROKE (b. ca 1530). They were parents of Thomas STEVENS.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note for: Airard Fitz-Stephens, ABT. 1036 - Index
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Airard Fitz- Stephen, a nobleman of Normandy in France, immigrated to England with William the Conqueror in 1066.
When William the Norman invaded England, Queen Matilda presented him with a magnificent ship called the "Mora" commanded by Airard Fitz Stephen, a nobleman of Normandy. A son Thomas commanded the "White Ship." Thomas Fitz Stephen had two sons: 1st was Ralph his heir, founder of the English line; 2nd Stephen, founder of the Welsh and Irish lines.

The Battle of Hastings in 1066
Duke William of Normandy left St.Valery in Normandy with about 600 ships and 10 to 12,000 men Sept 27th in 1066. William and his barons had been recruiting and preparing the invasion of England since early spring of that year. He was a seasoned general and master tactician, using cavalry, archers and infantry and had fought many notable battles. Off Beachy Head, his ship, the "Mora", arrived ahead of the fleet.. William waited and ate a hearty breakfast. As his fleet straggled into place behind him they moved eastward to the first sheltered bay to provide protection for his armada. Pevensey and Bulverhythe were the villages on each promontory. Pevensey, to the west, was protected by an old Roman Fort and behind the fort there was much flat acreage to house his large Army. To suggest this landing was not pre-planned, is not in keeping with the preparatory time taken by William, or his track record. There had been much intelligence gathering in the past few months.
The bay, wide enough for maneuverability of this large fleet, was flat shored. William is said to have fallen on the beach, grasped the sand, and declared "This is my country" or words to that effect. Next, the ships were disembarked without resistance. They included 2,500 horses, prefabricated forts, and the materiel and equipment was prepared for any contingency.
The ships shuttled in and out of the bay with the precision of a D Day landing. A Fort was built inside Pevensey Roman Fort as an H.Q, while the army camped behind it. William and FitzOsborn scouted the land He was unhappy with the terrain but it had proved to be a satisfactory landing beach. Taking his army around Pevensey Bay he camped 8 miles to the east, north of what is now known as Hastings all of which was most likely pre-planned. He camped to the east outside the friendly territory of the Norman Monks of Fecamp who may have been alerted and were waiting for his probable arrival. William waited. Perhaps he was waiting to know of the outcome of the battle to the north. In those two weeks William could have marched on London and taken it. He was obviously waiting for something?
Harold, far to the north in York at Stamford Bridge, was engaged in a life and death struggle against his brother who had teamed up with the Viking King Hadrada to invade England. Whether this was a planned Norman tactic, part of a pincer movement north and south, is not known, but students of Norman and Viking history might find it very feasible. The timing of each invasion was impeccable, and probably less than coincidental. Harold managed to resist the invasion to the north and killed both commanders. He was advised of the landing to the south by William.
Bringing the remnants of his Army south, Harold camped outside London at Waltham. For two weeks he gathered reinforcements, and exchanged taunts, threats and counterclaims to the Crown of England with William. Finally he moved his army south to a position about six miles north of where William waited.
Perhaps one of the most devastating events preceeding the battle was Harold's sudden awareness that he had been excommunicated by the Pope, and that William was wearing the papal ring. It is most likely this had been arranged by fellow Norman Robert Guiscard who had conquered most of southern Italy and was patron of the Pope who was indebted to him for saving the Vatican. Harold's spirit flagged. William was leading what might perhaps by called the first Crusade. The whole world was against Harold. William moved up to Harold's position and set up in what was then the conventional European style. Archers, infantry and cavalry in the rear. A set piece, each assigned to their own duties. . Harold waited. He and his brother Gyrth arranged a mass of men along a high ground ridge 8 deep, 800 yards long . A fixed corridor of tightly wedged humanity. Strategically, given the relative equipment of each side, it was hopeless from the start. To William it was almost a formality. Harold's men were hemmed in by their own elbows. William, with total mobility, held his Breton, Maine and Anjou contingents to the left of the line, the Normans the main thrust, the Flemish and French to his right. The flanking movements paid off. How long the battle took has varying estimates. Some say as little as two hours. Some as long as six hours. The latter seems more reasonable simply because of the numbers involved. .

This battle would later be called Senlac, a river of blood. It demolished most of the remnants of the Saxon fighting men of the Island at very little cost to William.
Thus began a three century Norman occupation of England, Wales and Scotland, and later Ireland.

"Stevens - Stephens Genealogy and Family History"
Author: Clarence Perry Stevens
Call Number: CS71.S844 This book contains the history and genealogy of the Stevens-Stephens family of North Carolina.Bibliographic Information: Stevens, Clarence Perry. Stevens-Stephens Genealogy and Family History. Privately Published. 1968.

PREFACE
This, we believe, is the first family history to link some of the large branches of the Stevens-Stephens
family, Henry of Stonington, Conn., Thomas of the North Carolina Colony, their father, Nicholas, an officer under Oliver Cromwell in England, Richard of Taunton, Mass., Cyprian of Lancaster, Mass. and Thomas of Stow and Plainfield, Conn.; being descendants of Thomas Stephens of London, England, living in 1634 and his father Anthony Stephens of Wiltshire in the 16th century. Their descendants, known and unknown, number many thousands of people.
In the first edition, published in 1950, the North Carolina line is correct as far back as Thomas Stevens, d. 1751 in Craven Co., N. C. But it appears now this Thomas was the younger son of Capt. Nicholas instead of the son of his nephew Richard of Taunton, Mass. Both men had the same name, were about the same age, had wives with exactly the same name "Mary Caswell" and the records show the brother of Mary came to North Carolina and settled in South Carolina. But, nevertheless, from later research by M. J. Gavin, we conclude this was not the same Thomas, and so change the genealogy accordingly. Except for two generations the ancestor is the same anyway. I indicated in the first edition there was some doubt about this lin
In addition to those noted in the first edition, we wish to thank those who have sent in genealogical records and data, especially Mrs. Ruhlin Overlease (deceased) and family, Rushville, Ind.; Mr. Charles Holloman of Raleigh, N. C.; Brig. Gen. M. J. Gavin (deceased) et ux.; Mrs. Veraldine Benton, 201 Fulwood Blvd., Tifton, Georgia; Lane Stephens Wilcox of San Jose, California; Mrs. Stephen A. Breed, Cambridge 38, Mass.; Mrs. Vivian Swent, San Francisco, California; Ethel Stephens of Indianapolis, Indiana; Brig. Gen, Jesse F. Stevens of Boston, Mass., John J. Stephens of Brooklyn, N. Y. (not related); and Miss Alice E. Johnson of Ann Arbor, Mich. Clarence Perry Stevens, 2038 Edmart St., Escalon, California, Veraldine Sharp Benton,
201 Fulwood Blvd.,
Tifton, Ga. 31794.

  Notes for Uknown:
_P_CCINFO 1-49535
_P_CCINFO 1-49563
_P_CCINFO 1-49356
_P_CCINFO 1-43032
_P_CCINFO 1-27786
_P_CCINFO 1-13307
_P_CCINFO 1-13272
     
Child of Airard Fitz-Stephen and Uknown is:
  704643072 i.   Thomas Fitz-Stephen, born Abt. 1058 in Normandy, France; died 1120 in England; married (1) Uknown; married (2) Uknown.


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