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View Tree for Mary SAMMISMary SAMMIS (b. 1710, d. Aft. 1773)

Mary SAMMIS326 was born 1710 in Long Island, NY, and died Aft. 1773. She married John WOOLSEY on December 15, 1730 in Huntington, Long Island, New York, son of John WOOLSEY and Abigail STEVENSON.

 Includes NotesNotes for Mary SAMMIS:
Mary SAMMIS
She was married to John WOOLSEY II . From Fourth Edition of the Handy Book for Genealogists, p. 157:
Some early settlers came into the northeast corner of Tennessee from the Uplands of North Carolina and banded together as the Watauga Association and spread over the eastern part of the section. North Carolina shortly accepted the district as Washington County, which eventually embraced all of the present Tennessee. Washington County (1772), North Carolina, was then divided into several counties, which included Greene (1783) County,
Tennessee.

From Mattie T. Logsdon, "Climbing the Cherry tree", Ada, Okla. 1977. p. 246ff.
"In searching records in Greene County, Tennessee, one needs to know that Greene County was established by an Act of the north Carolina General Assembly on 18 Apr 1783, the third established in the territory now the state of Tennessee. The Act provided that Washington County be divided into two counties. Greene County was named in honor of Gen. Nathaniel Greene, Rev. War hero. On the third Tuesday in August, 1783, Greene County was organized into four districts .... the third district included "all residue of said County the North side of Nolachucky River and French Broad River." ... Fourth district - all south of Nolachucky...."

"We don't know if John and his brother Zephania came to Greene Coun,ty together, or not. We do know from Court records, etc., that Zephaniah Woolsey settled south of the Nolachucky river - some of his descendants are still living in the same area. . . . . John Woolsey settled on the North side of Nolachucky river, where many of his descendants still live. It is interesting to learn that those descendants don't seem to know (or recognize) the fact that their ancestors of Greene County were brothers. John Woolsey was in Greene County by 1784 (jury duty, grand jury etc) and in 1787 John Woolsey purchased a Land Grant #1952 for 100 acres adj Nathaniel Davis' Line, which was on Lick Creek (third district) (Greene County)."
The Nolachucky river runs through the lower 1/3 of Greene County, so John Woolsey (whose 1st wife was Priscilla Woolsey, and 2nd wife was Sarah Oliphant) and his descendants settled north of the Nolachucky and John's brother Zephaniah Woolsey and descendants settled south of the Nolachucky, both in Greene County. John and Zephaniah Woolsey were sons of John Woolsey and Mary Sammis, and many of John's and Zephaniah's descendants went into Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas.
So....... I think it would be safe to say that these descendants were born in Greene County, Tennessee.
Wilford W. Whitaker
Children were: John WOOLSEY III, Zephaniah WOOLSEY.

More About Mary SAMMIS:
Identifier Number: 16195.
Record Change: May 6, 2004

More About Mary SAMMIS and John WOOLSEY:
Marriage: December 15, 1730, Huntington, Long Island, New York.

 Includes NotesMarriage Notes for Mary SAMMIS and John WOOLSEY:
[Archfam[2].FTW]

From Fourth Edition of the Handy Book for Genealogists, p. 157:
Some early settlers came into the northeast corner of Tennessee from the Uplands of North Carolina and banded together as the Watauga Association and spread over the eastern part of the section. North Carolina shortly accepted the district as Washington County, which eventually embraced all of the present Tennessee. Washington County (1772), North Carolina, was then divided into several counties, which included Greene (1783) County,
Tennessee.

From Mattie T. Logsdon, "Climbing the Cherry tree", Ada, Okla. 1977. p. 246ff.
"In searching records in Greene County, Tennessee, one needs to know that Greene County was established by an Act of the north Carolina General Assembly on 18 Apr 1783, the third established in the territory now the state of Tennessee. The Act provided that Washington County be divided into two counties. Greene County was named in honor of Gen. Nathaniel Greene, Rev. War hero. On the third Tuesday in August, 1783, Greene County was organized into four districts .... the third district included "all residue of said County the North side of Nolachucky River and French Broad River." ... Fourth district - all south of Nolachucky...."

"We don't know if John and his brother Zephania came to Greene Coun,ty together, or not. We do know from Court records, etc., that Zephaniah Woolsey settled south of the Nolachucky river - some of his descendants are still living in the same area. . . . . John Woolsey settled on the North side of Nolachucky river, where many of his descendants still live. It is interesting to learn that those descendants don't seem to know (or recognize) the fact that their ancestors of Greene County were brothers. John Woolsey was in Greene County by 1784 (jury duty, grand jury etc) and in 1787 John Woolsey purchased a Land Grant #1952 for 100 acres adj Nathaniel Davis' Line, which was on Lick Creek (third district) (Greene County)."
The Nolachucky river runs through the lower 1/3 of Greene County, so John Woolsey (whose 1st wife was Priscilla Woolsey, and 2nd wife was Sarah Oliphant) and his descendants settled north of the Nolachucky and John's brother Zephaniah Woolsey and descendants settled south of the Nolachucky, both in Greene County. John and Zephaniah Woolsey were sons of John Woolsey and Mary Sammis, and many of John's and Zephaniah's descendants went into Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas.
So....... I think it would be safe to say that these descendants were born in Greene County, Tennessee.
Wilford W. Whitaker

Children of Mary SAMMIS and John WOOLSEY are:
  1. +John WOOLSEY, b. October 15, 1737, Huntingdon, Long Island, New York327, 328, 329, d. January 14, 1819, Lick Creek, Greene County, Tennessee330, 331, 332, 333.
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