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Ancestors of Dean Andrew Enderlin


      30. Geo Emil Gonsales Christiansen ("Emil") Stengel, born 12 September 1823 in Tønset (Tynset), Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway316,317; died 07 June 1915 in Sem farm, Øvre Eiker, Buskerud fylke, Norway318. He was the son of 60. Otto Christian Stengel and 61. ? Myre. He married 31. Oline Christophersdatter 14 December 1847 in Vang, Hedemarkem amt (Hedmark), Norway319.

      31. Oline Christophersdatter319, born 03 November 1828 in Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway320,321; died 27 July 1881 in Sem farm, Øvre Eiker, Buskerud fylke, Norway322,323. She was the daughter of 62. Christofer Helgesen Diesen and 63. Karen Amundsdatter Ovren.

Notes for Geo Emil Gonsales Christiansen ("Emil") Stengel:
      "Emil Stengel" was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Hamar, Norway. He was listed as head of household, "Arbeidsmand" (laborer), age 40, born in Røraas. Emil and his wife Oline were listed with five children, namely, Karl Albert, Christian Ditløv, Martine Lovise, Emile Olivie, and Anna Hilda Sofie, ages 17, 13, 14, 9 and 5, respectively. All the children were listed as having been born in "Wang" (Vang in Hedmark) with the exception of Anna who was born in Hamar. There were no other members of the household besides Emil, Oline and the children. The household also listed 1 horse and 1 pig. The family was one of several on the parcel of land (which was located in the 38th quarter of Hamar). The total number of people living on the parcel was 50.
      "Emil Kristian Stengel" was also enumerated in the 1900 folketelling for Øvre Ekers, Norway, as head of household for Sem farm, with his wife Danelen. Emil was listed as "Pensjoneret jernbaneformand, grindvogter" (railroad foreman on pension, gatekeeper), born at Tønset in Hedmark in 1823. Emil and his wife were listed with two children, Vilhelm Emil Stengel and Tora Stengel, born in 1890 and 1891, respectively. The census noted that the farm had corn or potatoes, farm animals (no poultry), a vegetable garden, and a fruit orchard.

      According to Dagny Louise Jacobsen (as told to her by her mother), Emil Stengel was the son of Dr. Stengel and his housekeeper. Parish records for Tønset, where Emil was born, reveal that the mother's name was Madame Myre. Emil's mother left him with his father and vanished. He was later adopted by Madame Leigh, the wealthy widow of Morten Leigh, who brought Emil up in luxury.
      Emil grew up to be a handsome man, but with little regard for money. His adopted mother had wealth, and as the only heir, he assumed he would always live well. Madame Leigh sent Emil to Agricultural College in Trondheim.
      While Emil was in college, a heavily veiled woman came to his room one night and wanted to talk with him. She said that she was his mother, and left a remembrance of some sort for him to keep. It was said by Marthine Bergersen, that Emil was not sentimental toward her during the visit, and he never saw her again. There were some who suspected that Madame Leigh was Emil's mother, but that because she was a widow she wouldn't admit to it. This, we now know, is incorrect. According to his baptism record in the Tønset Kirkebok, Emil's mother was Madame Myre.
      After he finished polytechnic school in Trondheim, Emil came to Sahli farm (also called Sæhli or Sæli, located in Vang, Hedmark) for a while. That was where he met Oline, who lived on nearby Olsrud farm. They often rode together on horseback. When they married, Madame Leigh bestowed Ry farm (in Vang, Hedmark) on him, complete with equipment, stock and help. Emil did not give the farm the attention it deserved, however, due to his uncontrolled drinking. It was said that he knew how to do better, but didn't. After the children were born, Emil was abusive. He beat the boys most of all, especially Albert, who was the most outgoing.
      In the course of years, the farm was either sold or lost due to neglect. In the meanwhile, Madame Leigh died [1859], but her estate was seized by a partner, Engzelius, who claimed it over Emil. This was a terrible blow to Emil.
      The family moved to Stafford farm, and while there, Oline's sister Helene stayed with them. In 1858, Emil, who was more or less perpetually intoxicated, sexually assaulted Helene. She became pregnant after the incident, and was so depressed she attempted suicide by trying to jump into a well. The child, who was born in July, 1859, was named Julius. He was given the surname, Christophersen (or Christiansen), because of his scandalous parentage.
      Emil left home after the scandal became known (circa 1861). It is said that during his absence, he worked on the railroad where drinking was not allowed. This caused him to sober up and become a better man. Emil returned home after eight years, and was forgiven by Oline, contrary to the advice of others in the family. They moved to Øvre Eiker in Buskerud fylke (on the Drammen River, about 30 miles southwest of Oslo), and lived the remainder of their lives on Sem farm in the parish of Haug (Hokksund). Emil continued to work for the railroad, and their living accommodations at Sem were probably provided by the railroad. In 1885, he was described as district foreman for the railroad (source: marriage record for his daughter, Mille). He also served as a gatekeeper for the railroad.
      In November of 1888, Emil married Danelen Villumsdatter in Haug. She was a native of Holum in Vest-Agder fylke, and was the daughter of Villum Thoresen Lie. Danelen was over 30 years younger than Emil. They had four children, two of whom died young (one stillborn). The children who reached adulthood were Vilhelm Emil and Thora (Tora) Julie. Both children emigrated to America, but eventually returned to Norway. Vilhelm took over the house in Øvre Eiker after his mother died in 1923.
      Emil's granddaughter, Dagny Bergersen, referred to him as "Emil Gonsales Stengel." In life, he used the name "Emil Christian Stengel." He was baptized "Geo Emil Gonsales Christiansen." Witnesses to his baptism were: "Hr. Prof. Hagrup" from Trondhjem, "Lieut. Ramm" (probably Lieutenant Nikolay Hersleb Ramm of Tønset, the forest inspector -- "skog-inspektør"), Lo__se (sp?) of Tangen, "Mdm. Østgård", and "___ Brokorp."

      Emil is buried in Haug cemetery in Øvre Eiker, Buskerud fylke, along with his wife, Danelen, and son Vilhelm (Wilhelm) Emil Stengel. Acording to the transcription on the DIS-Norge website, they are buried in Block (Felt) 00D, Row (Rad) 04, Grave number (Gravnr.) 8.

More about Madame Leigh...
      Madame Leigh (1776 - 1859), was a prominent member of the Røros community. She was the widow of the merchant, Morten Leigh (1779 - 1816). She adopted Emil Stengel at an early age. Her husband, who had died 16 April 1816 (seven years before Emil was born), left Madame Leigh with considerable wealth. The most important of the assets was Leighgården in Røros.
      Madame Leigh's birth name was Bereth Martha Beenberg. She was born in Trondhjem (Trondheim) in 1776, and was the daughter of Johan P. Beenberg and Ingeborg Olsen Ellberg (source: IGI). She married merchant Morten Leigh, the son of Hieronymous Leigh and Anne Sophie Steen, in Røros around 12 March 1802. Hieronymous Leigh (1747 - 1807) was a church pastor, living in the nearby village of Tønset (Tynset). It is interesting that, prior to the marriage, Bereth Martha was living with the Leigh family in Tønset. She was listed in the 1801 census as "Berte Marte Benborg", age 25, unmarried, lodging free ("gratist") in the household. Hieronymous Leigh was listed in the census as "Pastor emeritus - har 200 rd aarl. af kaldet - grd bruger".
      Morten Leigh was born 28 October 1779 at Lom in what is now Oppland fylke. He originally settled in Tynset with his parents, and established his first business in Røros in 1800 on Bergmannsgata. He was enumerated at this business in Røros in the 1801 census, described as "handelsmand logerende" (merchant - lodger), age 22, with no family (ikke beslægtet). The business grew quickly, and he soon needed larger quarters. In 1806, he purchased a property across the street, at what would later be known as "Leighgården." The property had previously been owned by Peter Schnitler Krag. Leigh purchased it for 1,500 riksdaler. The mercantile that was developed on this property became known as "M. Leigh & Co." According to Andreas Lund, Morten had a large liquor distillery in Sweden, and the store in Røros sold this liquor with all sorts of other commodities to the copper miners. Morten Leigh died 16 April 1816, and was buried in the cemetery of the Røros Church (by the famous "Bergstadens Ziir"). It is said that his grave marker was one of the first to be erected in the cemetery, alongside that of his father. A cast iron marker, honoring his memory and that of Madame Leigh, still stands in the Engzelius plot in the Røros churchyard. Morten Leigh is also depicted in Johan Falkberget's novel, "Den fjerde nattevakt" (The Fourth Night Watch, published 1923), in which he appears as the landlord Morten Leich.
      Morten and Bereth Martha were parents to one child -- a little girl named Ingebor Sophia. She was born 13 December 1802, and baptized 23 January 1803 in Røros. She was buried on 2 August 1809, after a sudden death, leaving the Leigh family with no children to be their heirs.
      Madame Leigh, as she was known in Røros, continued to manage the business after Morten's untimely death in 1816. In May 1819, she and two other merchants were granted privileges to conduct business in Røros (which was essentially a company-run town). She was considered to be a clever businesswoman, and the license to operate the mercantile gave her considerable power in the community.
      Madame Leigh conducted the business with the assistance of her Swedish store clerk, Magnus Engzelius (1791 - 1868). Engzelius became a partner in the business in 1820, when he invested 5,000 silver speciedaler into it. When Madame Leigh died in 1859, Engzelius asserted his claim to full possession of the business, and ultimately prevailed over Emil Stengel's claim as an heir to her portion. After Engzelius acquired the store, it was renamed "M. Engzelius & Sønne." The store is still owned by the seventh generation of the Engzelius family (2006), however, it is still affectionately known as "Leigh-bua," in honor of Morten and his wife.
      According to the parish record for her death, "Madame Berthe Martha Leigh" died in Røros on 18 February 1859 at the age of 82. She was buried on 28 February in the Røros churchyard.

More About Geo Emil Gonsales Christiansen ("Emil") Stengel:
Baptism: 24 September 1823, Tønset (Tynset), Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway324
Burial: 14 June 1915, Haug, Øvre Eiker, Buskerud fylke, Norway325,326
Cause of Death: "hjertelammelse" (heart failure)

  Notes for Oline Christophersdatter:
      "Oline Christofersd." was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Hamar, Norway, under the household of "Emil Stengel". She was listed as Emil's wife, age 35, born in "Wang" (Vang in Hedmark).

      Oline was confirmed in Vang (Wang) in 1842, at the age of 14. She was living on Olsrud farm at the time of her confirmation.

      According to the notes of Dagny Bergersen (The Second Record), Oline "was regarded to be one of Vang's most beautiful young girls. Her Uncle Ole Anton Overn often escorted her to balls around town. When she was with her Grandfather and mother on Olsrud farm she had plenty of horses there to ride. When Emil Stengel was at Sahli farm for a while, nearby, after having finished college (polytechnic) in Trondheim, he became acquainted with her there and they rode around together and were later married when Madam Leigh bestowed on him Ry farm -- a large one -- completely equipped inside and out with the best of everything needed to run it -- including equipment, stock and help."

      According to Dagny Jacobsen in her notes in the "Second Record," Emil Stengel left Oline for a period of eight years after his assault on her sister. His departure was probably in 1861. This left Oline in a financial dilemma. Her brother, Anders Christophersen, came to her rescue with money to set up a millinary shop in Hamar. The shop was run in partnership with "Tante Elise Tostie." Tante Elise was probably not a true aunt to Oline, but the relationship was close. According to the Hamar Borgerbok, Elise's business appears for the first time in 1856, where she is described as "Elise Clara Margrethe Tøstie, handelsberettiget 21/10." She appears again in 1874 as "Elise Clara Margrethe Tøstie, handelsberettiget 22/4."


More About Oline Christophersdatter:
Baptism: 14 December 1828, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway327
Burial: 03 August 1881, Haug, Øvre Eiker, Buskerud fylke, Norway328
Cause of Death: "limvenoderkræft" (lymphatic cancer)
Confirmation: 02 October 1842, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway329
     
Children of Geo Stengel and Oline Christophersdatter are:
  i.   Bertrand Martin Leigh Stengel330,331, born 21 February 1848 in Disen østre farm, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway332,333,334; died 15 January 1929335; married Marie Wilhelmine Fahlstrøm 12 September 1875 in Røros, Søndre Trondhjems amt (Sør-Trøndelag), Norway336; born 11 December 1849 in Røros, Søndre Trondhjems amt (Sør-Trøndelag), Norway337,338; died 06 March 1916339.
  Notes for Bertrand Martin Leigh Stengel:
      "Bertrand M. L. Stengel" was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Røraas Bergstad, Norway, on the east side of the town proper under the household/store of Magnus and Johan Magnus Engzelius. He was listed as a "Handelsbetjent" (merchant's clerk), age 18, single, born at Vang in Hedmark. He and several other clerks (including his uncle, Anders Christophersen) appear in the same enumeration.
      Bertrand was not enumerated in the 1875 census for Røros. He had probably moved to Tolga by then. The Tolga census is not available online.
      Bertrand appears in the Gårdsmatrikkelen (land tax) of Norway for 1886 with three entries (University of Tromsø on-line information). In Tolgen, he was taxed 1/6 Skilling as owner of Rosinggaarden subfarm under Tolgensgaard farm, and 7 skilling as owner of Lilletrøen subfarm under Tolgensbakken søndre farm. In Røros, where he was listed as "handelsmand" (merchant), he was taxed 4 skilling for his paddock (græshage) in the Stormohagerne (gnr. 133, bruksnr. 39, the paddocks at Stormo, west of Røros).
      "B. Stengel" was enumerated in the 1900 folketelling (census) for Tolgen, Hedmark, Norway, as head of household with his wife, Marie, for Skrivergaard farm. He was described as "Landhandler m. m." (land merchant m. m.), born at Vang in Hedmark in 1848. His household included his wife, Marie, and a son, Einar Stengel. Also in the household were three servants. The latter included Oline Brandhaug, a female "husgjerning" (houseworker), born in nordre Froen in 1847; Liva Bjørnstad, a female houseworker, born in Tolgen in 1882; and G. Graven, a male "handelsbetjant" (trade officer), born in Tyldalen in 1882.

      According to the notes of Dagny Bergersen (The Second Record), Bertrand "came to M. Engzelius & Son's as a young man in Røros. Later he started his own store in Tolga and was postmaster there many years." M. (Magnus) Engzelius and Sons was a store in Røros, Norway, catering to the miners in that copper mining community.
      "He married Maria Tahlstrom [Fahlstrøm] and they had three children: Axel, Odovar (twins that drowned) [Incorrect: Paul Odvard was the only child who drowned, and he was not a twin to Axel] and Einer who journeyed to America."
      Bertrand's store was located near the Glåma river, on the west side of the Tolga bridge. His house ("Skrivargård", named after the hytteskrivar who once owned the place, was located about 200 meters northeast of the store on a street known simply as "gata." Both original buildings are now gone (as of 2006). Bertrand's grandson, Ola, lived in the house for a time.
      Bertrand traded frequently with local Sami people. Among the family heirlooms is a Sami beadwork pouch bearing Bertrand's intials "B M." It was a gift from his Sami trading partners. The pouch is now in the possession of Dag Axel Stengel and his family.

      Bertrand's two middle names were no doubt given to him in honor of the late Morten Leigh of Røros. In the parish record for his baptism, "Morten" is spelled "Martin." This may have been an error on the part of the pastor when making the entry.

  More About Bertrand Martin Leigh Stengel:
Baptism: 11 April 1848, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway340
Burial: Tolga kirkegård, Tolga, Hedmark fylke, Norway341

  Notes for Marie Wilhelmine Fahlstrøm:
      "Marie Wilhelmine Fahlstrøm" was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Røraas Bergstad, on the east side of the town proper, under the household of her widowed father, "Axel M. Fahlstrøm." She was listed as single, age 17, born in Røraas Bergstad, supported by her father. The household included four other siblings: "Anthon Julius" (age 26), "Catharine Christine" (age 30), "Sara Amalie" (age 28), and "Anna Petronelle" (age 19), all born in Røros. The father was born in Sweden.
      "Marie Stengel" was enumerated in the 1900 folketelling for Tolgen, Hedmark, Norway, under the household of "B. Stengel". She was described as "Landhandlerkone" (wife of land merchant), born in Røraas in 1849.

      Birthday notes in the possession of Cathy Carpenter-Bartley, indicate that the birthday of Marie Stengel was December 11. This is consistent with her recorded date of birth: 11 December 1849.

  More About Marie Wilhelmine Fahlstrøm:
Baptism: 24 March 1850, Røros Bergstad, Søndre Trondhjems amt (Sør-Trøndelag), Norway342
Burial: Tolga kirkegård, Tolga, Hedmark fylke, Norway343

  ii.   Karl Albert ("Albert") Stengel/Stingle344, born 25 May 1849 in Rye farm, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway344,345,346; died 1936347; married Maren ("Mary") Christianson 31 October 1874 in Eau Claire County, Wisconsin, USA348; born August 1852 in Norway349; died Bet. 1920 - 1930350.
  Notes for Karl Albert ("Albert") Stengel/Stingle:
      "Karl Albert Stengel" was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Hamar, Norway, under the household of "Emil Stengel". He was listed as Emil's son, unmarried, age 17, born in "Wang" (Vang in Hedmark).
      "Albert Stingle" and his family were enumerated in the 1880 U.S. census for Butternut, Ashland County, Wisconsin, as head of household. Albert was listed as age 31, born in Norway. His household included his wife "Mary," and children "Emma" (age 8), "Augusta" (age 5), and "Charles" (age 3).
      "Albert C. Stingle" was enumerated in the 1900 U.S. census for San Ysidro Precinct, Gilroy Township, Santa Clara County, California. He was listed as head of household on a rented farm, age 51, married (26 years), born May 1849 in Norway, occupation farmer. His household included his wife "Mary," and children "Augusta M." (age 23), "Caroline" (age 19), "Annie M. B." (age 17), "Emma E." (age 15), "Mary M." (age 13), and "Edward O." (age 7). Also included in the household were three servants: "Charles Tatimo" (single male, age 22), "J. Kakemoto" (single male, age 18), and "E. Takahachi" (single male, age 22), all natives of Japan. Albert's year of immigration was 1869, and he was listed as naturalized. He could read, write and speak English.
      "Albert Stengle" was enumerated in the 1910 U.S. census for Wapato Town, Yakima County, Washington (ED293, page 18B). He was listed as head of household in a rented house. He was listed as married (35 years), age 60, born in Norway (as were his parents), year of immigration 1880, working for wages in the farm real estate business. He was never unemployed in 1909. His household included his wife "Mary" (age 58) and son "Ed" (age 19).
      "Albert Stengle" was enumerated in the 1920 U.S. census for South Grandview, Yakima County, Washington (ED184, page 11A), as head of household on a farm. The farm was owned free of mortgage, and was located on Chestnut Ridge. Albert was listed as married, age 71, born in Norway (as were his parents). His year of immigration was listed as 1871. He was naturalized in 1882. His occupation was farmer, working on a fruit farm on his own account. His household included his wife "Mary" (age 67).
      "Albert Stengle" was enumerated in the 1930 U.S. census for South Grandview Precinct, Yakima County, Washington (ED39-83, page 6B). He owned his home, and was the only one listed in the household. He was listed as a widower, age 81, born in Norway (as were his parents), native tongue Norwegian. His year of immigration was listed as 1872, and he indicated that he was naturalized. His occupation was farmer on a "General Farm," working on his own account. He indicated that he had worked in the past year. He was not a veteran. The household was noted as containing a radio set.

      According to the notes of Dagny Bergersen (The Second Record), Albert "came to America in his early years to work in a lumber camp in Butternut, Wisconsin. He married Marn ? -- they had six children: Agusta, Carrie, Annie, Emma, Mary and Eddy."
      Albert, like his siblings, was subjected to abusive discipline by his father, Emil Stengel. According to Dagny Bergersen, "Uncle Albert was big and strong, also outgoing, so he got his share of beatings and perhaps he returned some blows himself after he got older."

      A "Carl Albert Stengel" appears on the passenger list for the bark, Hebe, which departed Christiania (Oslo) on 27 June 1866. The Hebe arrived at Quebec on 26 September 1866. He was listed as an adult male, residence "Hammer" (Hamar). The Hebe was captained by N. J. Martinsen, and had a crew of 11. There were 162 passengers in steerage, and 1 cabin passenger. Information courtesy "100 Years of Emigrant Ships from Norway." According to the Wisconsin Genweb website, an important route for Norwegian immigrants to Wisconsin was via Quebec. From Quebec, immigrants would journey up the St. Lawrence, throught the Great Lakes, to the port of Milwaukee. It is quite possible that this is the route Albert Stengel took to ultimately arrive in the United States. He may have sojourned in Canada for three or four years, as his year of immigration to the U.S. was 1871-72 (according to most sources).
      There is an inconsistency between church records and the passenger list, regarding the year Albert departed from Hamar. An entry in the Hamar church book of emigrants (utflyttede), dated 11 February 1867, indicates that "Carl Albert Stengel" emigrated to Drammen. This could have something to do with his parents' move to Øvre Eiker, which lies on the river Drammen.

      In America, Albert and his family changed the spelling of their surname to Stingle (sometimes spelled Stengle), for unknown reasons. It is possible they chose this spelling variant while living in Butternut, Wisconsin. The population there was dominated by Germans, and Albert may have wanted to distinguish his Norwegian family from German Stengels in the area.

      Albert's marriage is recorded in the records for Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. He was listed as "Carl Stengel." His wife was listed as "Maren Christianson." The marriage date was 31 October 1874, recorded in volume 3, page 89 of the marrriage records.

      A biography of Albert Stengel appears in the book, History of the Yakima Valley, Washington, Volume II, by W. D. Lyman (Chicago, 1919: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.), page 760. The biography includes a full-page lithograph of Albert on page 761. An original print of this lithograph is in the personal collection of Cathy Carpenter Bartley. Please note that this biography contains a number of factual errors, which I have identified in brackets. Albert's surname is here spelled "Stengle," which is one of the two spelling variants he used in America. The biography follows:
                        ALBERT STENGLE.
      Albert Stengle is the manager of a ranch covering one hundred and thirty acres for the Netherlands American Mortgage Bank, of which eighty-five acres is planted to orchards. He has lived in the Yakima valley since 1902 and in the United States since 1871. He was born in Norway, May 25, 1849, a son of Emil and Paulina [sic - Oline] Stengle, both of whom have passed away. His youthful days were spent in the land of the midnight sun and when he had reached the age of twenty-two he determined to try his fortune in the new world. Accordingly he crossed the Atlantic in 1871 [He probably resided in Canada from 1866 to 1871 -- DAE] and took up his abode in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, where he followed farming until 1892. The succeeding six years were spent in Oregon and then he went to California, where he resided until 1902, when he removed to the Yakima valley. The following year he entered the employ of the Buchell Land Company as manager, thus representing them for a few years, after which he became manager for the Netherlands American Mortgage Bank in charge of their orchards. He is now controlling a ranch of one hundred and thirty acres, of which eighty-five acres is planted to fruit and fifty-five acres to alfalfa. Thereon he is engaged in raising apples, pears and peaches and his orchards are in excellent bearing condition, so that he annually harvests large crops. He has also had large farming interests on the Yakima Indian reservation and he likewise developed a twenty-acres orchard on his own near Grandview which he has now sold. In 1917 he bought another ten acres near Grandview and took up his abode thereon in 1919.
      In October, 1875, Mr. Stengle was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Nelson, a native of Norway and a daughter of Nels and Mary Nelson [Wisconsin records list the marriage year as 1874]. She crossed the Atlantic to the United States when a young woman of twenty years and became the wife of Mr. Stengle in Wisconsin. Ten children have been born to them but only two survive, namely: Edward, who is married and is the owner of a garage at Wapato, Washington; and Carrie, the wife of E. E. Norling [sic - Nordling], who is engaged in ranching near Grandview and by whom she has one child.
      In his political views Mr. Stengle is a republican and while at Butternut, Wisconsin, he served for two terms as assessor. While in Oregon he was a school clerk. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church and he is a member of the Fraternal Brotherhood. His success in life is the direct result of his perseverance and energy. Actuated by a laudable ambition, he came to the new world to try his fortune and has made good use of his time, talents and opportunities as the years have gone on. He is now most comfortably situated in life and has never had occasion to regret the step that brought him from his native country to the United States.




  More About Karl Albert ("Albert") Stengel/Stingle:
Baptism: 25 September 1849, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway351

  Notes for Maren ("Mary") Christianson:
      "Mary Stingle" was enumerated in the 1880 U.S. Census for Butternut, Ashland County, Wisconsin, under the household of her husband, "Albert Stingle." She was listed as white, married female, age 28, born in Norway. Her occupation was "keeping house." Her parents were also listed as born in Norway.
      "Mary Stingle" was enumerated in the 1900 U.S. Census for Gilroy Township, Monterey County, California, under the household of her husband, "Albert C. Stingle." She was listed as white female, married (26 years), age 47, born August 1852 in Norway. She had no occupation. She could read, write and speak English. She immigrated in 1870, and her parents were both listed as being born in Norway. Her total number of children born was 10, of which, 6 were living at the time of the enumeration.
      "Mary Stengle" was enumerated in the 1910 U.S. Census for Wapato Town, Yakima County, Washington (ED293, page 18B), under the household of her husband, "Albert Stengle." She was listed as married (first marriage, 36 years), age 58, born in Norway (as were her parents), mother of 8 children (2 still living). Her occupation was "none."
      "Mary Stengle" was enumerated in the 1920 U.S. Census for South Grandview, Yakima County, Washington (ED184, page 11A), under the household of her husband "Albert Stengle." She was listed as married, age 67, born in Norway (as were her parents), immigrated 1873, naturalized 1886. Her occupation was "none."

      Wisconsin marriage records indicate that Mary's maiden name was Christianson, but several other records indicate her name was Nelson. In her husband's biography (dated 1919), her parents were noted as Nels and Mary Nelson. Her daughter, Carrie, also indicated that her mother's name was "Mary Nelson," when she was married in 1907.

  15 iii.   Marthine ("Martina") Lovise Stengel, born 05 February 1852 in Rye farm, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway; died 23 May 1931 in Pacific Grove, Monterey County, California, USA; married Gunnar Bergersen 16 July 1879 in Ottestad, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway.
  iv.   Christian Ditløv Stengel352, born 03 December 1853 in Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway352,353; died 28 December 1873 in Øvre Eiker, Buskerud fylke, Norway354
  Notes for Christian Ditløv Stengel:
      According to the notes of Dagny Bergersen (The Second Record), Christian "died at Eker as a young man."
      "Christian was the sweet, gentle, nervous one who was scared to death of his father. The schools those days, on account of the severe winters, were open only half a year and the children had to know the alphabet and numbers thoroughly before starting school. When his father was teaching Christian he was so scared of him he couldn't remember well and for that reason came the blows from his fiercely impatient father."
      Also according to Dagny Bergersen, "At one time when kerosene lamps became the new lighting system, my grandfather purchased one and brought it home, complete with a beautiful globe to replace candlelight. The children stood in awe of it and were forbidden to touch it. One day when their parents left to be away for a few days, grandfather warned them not to touch the lamp. But childlike, they had a chance to inspect it more closely in hopes of not being detected, when somehow the globe slipped down and broke. Three of the children were home at the time. Christian was one of them. He became hysterical, screaming and crying to come down to the lake to drown themselves rather than face their irate father. The neighbors hearing the screaming came over to see what had happened and when they found out they bought a new globe to replace the broken one."

      "Christian Ditløv Stengel" was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Hamar, Norway, under the household of "Emil Stengel". He was listed as Emil's son, unmarried, age 13, born in "Wang" (Vang in Hedmark).

      According to a letter written by Emil Stengel to his daughter Martine, dated 28 December 1873, Christian died at 1:45 p.m on Sunday, 28 December 1873. The letter notes that he was to be buried the following Sunday. The letter is very sad in tone, and notes that Christian's life was a difficult one up to the final hour.

  More About Christian Ditløv Stengel:
Baptism: 11 January 1854, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway355
Burial: 04 January 1874, Øvre Eiker, Buskerud fylke, Norway356

  v.   Olivie Emile ("Milla") Stengel357, born 30 July 1857 in Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway358,359,360; died 14 March 1906 in Hamar, Hedmark fylke, Norway361,362; married Andreas Olsen Lund 10 November 1885 in Hamar, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway362; born 20 August 1849 in Næs (Nes), Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway363; died 1949364.
  Notes for Olivie Emile ("Milla") Stengel:
      "Emile Olivie Stengel" was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Hamar, Norway, under the household of "Emil Stengel". She was listed as Emil's daughter, unmarried, age 9, born in "Wang" (Vang in Hedmark).
      "Emilie Lund" was enumerated in the 1885 folketelling for Hamar, Norway, under the household of "And. Lund". Her year of birth was stated as 1857, place of birth Vang, Hedmark. This census would have been taken only a few years after her marriage to Andreas.
      "Emilie Olivia Lund født Stengel" was also enumerated in the 1900 folketelling for Hamar Norway, under the household of "Andreas Olsen Lund". She was listed as born at Vang, Hedmark, in 1857.

      According to the notes of Dagny Bergersen (The Second Record), Milla "married Uncle Lund, then a widower with two children: Christopher and Trina. They had five children: Olga, Betsy, Anders, Einer and Signe.

  More About Olivie Emile ("Milla") Stengel:
Baptism: 15 November 1857, Vang, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway365,366
Burial: 20 March 1906, Hamar kirkegård, Hamar, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway367,368
Cause of Death: Breast cancer

  Notes for Andreas Olsen Lund:
      An "Andreas Ols." was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Hamar, Norway. He is possibly Andreas Olsen Lund. He was enumerated under the household of the painter, "Johan Nicolais." in the 43rd quarter of Hamar. He was working as a "læredreng" (apprentice helper), single, age 16, born at Næs.
      "And. Lund" was enumerated in the 1885 folketelling for Hamar, Norway, along with his new wife, Emilie and two children by his first marriage, "Christopher Lund" and "Thrine Lund." Andreas was listed as born in 1849 at Nes, Hedmark. His profession was "Vognfabrikk" (wagon builder).
      "Andreas Olsen Lund" was enumerated in the 1900 folketelling for Hamar, Norway as a head of household. He was listed as born at Næs, Hedmark in 1849, married to Emilie Olivia Lund (born Stengel). His occupation was listed as "Vognfabrik & Kalkfabrikker" (wagon-builder & mortar-maker or plasterer). Included in his household were his wife, Emilie Olivia, and five children, Olga Karoline, Betze Elida, Anders Gustav, Einar Arthur and Signe Augusta. Andreas' father, Ole Christophersen Lund, born 1816, also resided in the same household.

      An Andreas Olsen Lund appears in the Hamar Borgerbok in business listings for the year 1872 as follows: "Andreas Olsen Lund, maler, frimester 8/2. He appears again in 1873 as "Anders Olsen Lund, 24 år, malermester 22/10."

      According to the notes of Dagny Bergersen (The Second Record), Andreas Lund was "born on Nes, Hedmark 1849 - confirmed 1854. When he was 16 years old he came to Wagonmanufacturer G. Norseng in Hamar to learn the trade and was there for 16 years until he started his own firm in Hamar in 1881. He was very successful and became a wealthy man."
      The gravesite of G. Norseng "Vognfabrikant" lies near the Lund plot in Hamar churchyard. The grave marker indicates that G. Norseng was born in 1832, and died in 1883.

      According to a letter, written by his granddaughter Else to Dagny Jacobsen, "...grandfather doesn't live any more though, he passed away in the spring 1948, which saved him having to go through the war and occupation. He was at very good health until the last 3-4 months, and didn't suffer much fortunately. He was such a a grand old man, and we missed him tremendously, and still do."

  vi.   Anna Hilda Sofie Stengel369, born 06 December 1860 in Hamar, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway369,370; married (1) Ed Johnson Abt. 1883371; died 24 May 1894 in Oneida County, Wisconsin, USA372; married (2) Hans Anderson Abt. 1896373; born October 1863 in Norway373; died Bet. 1910 - 1920.
  Notes for Anna Hilda Sofie Stengel:
      "Anna Hilda Sofie Stengel" was enumerated in the 1865 folketelling (census) for Hamar, Norway, under the household of "Emil Stengel". She was listed as Emil's daughter, unmarried, age 5, born in Hamar.
      "Anna Anderson" was enumerated in the 1900 U.S. census for the Town of Pelican, City of Rhinelander, Oneida County, Wisconsin (ED194, page 11A), under the household of her husband, "Hans Anderson." She was listed as married (4 years), age 39, born December 1860 in Norway, parents both born in Norway, immigrated 1881, in the U.S. for 19 years, naturalization and occupation not given, mother of 8 children, all living.
      "Anna Anderson" was enumerated in the 1910 U.S. census for Rhinelander, Oneida County, Wisconsin (ED134, page 14B), under the household of her husband, "Hans Anderson," located at 1 South Brown Street in Rhinelander. She was listed as married (2nd marriage, for 14 years), age 49, born in Norway (as were her parents), immigrated 1884, occupation "none." She was listed as the mother of 6 children, 3 still living. Note: Three of her children were still living at home. Anna may have misunderstood the question.
      "Anna Anderson" was enumerated in the 1920 U.S. census for Ellensburg City, Kittitas County, Washington (ED1, page 2A). She was head of household in a rented house, located at 110 East Ninth Street. She was listed as widowed, age 59, born in Norway (as were her parents), immigrated 1881, naturalized, occupation "none." Her household included her daughter "Mabel T." (age 22), and two lodgers: "Floy Rossman" (age 10, born in Minnesota) and "Pearl Dixon" (age 23, born in Washington).
      "Anna Anderson" was enumerated in the 1930 U.S. census for Ellensburg City, Kittitas County, Washington (ED19-7, page 3A). She was head of household in her own home (valued at $4,000), located at 211 8th Street in Ellensburg. She was listed as widowed, age 69, first married when she was 23, born in Norway (as were her parents), immigrated 1881, naturalized, occupation "none." Her household included her daughter "Mabel T." (age 33), and a female lodger named "Jenne Johanson" (age 30, born in Washington). The household did not own a radio.

      According to the notes of Dagny Bergersen (The Second Record), Anna "came as a young girl to her brother Albert in Wisconsin where she married a man named Johnson. They had five daughters: Olga, Jennie, Ella, Hattie and Edna. After her husband's death she married a storekeeper and widower with two children: Morris and Ogette. They had one daughter - Mabel."

      Harbor records for Kristiania (Oslo), courtesy Digitalarkivet, show that Ana Stengel departed for America aboard the SS Rollo of the "Chr. Sotaaen" line on 2 September 1881. She was listed as age 20, occupation "Pige", residence Vestfossen, destination Butternut (Wisconsin).

      The Washington State Death index lists an "Anna M. Anderson," who died at the age of 89 in Ellensburg on 11 October 1950. This may be our Anna. Further research is needed to confirm this.

  More About Anna Hilda Sofie Stengel:
Baptism: 26 May 1861, Hamar, Hedemarken amt (Hedmark), Norway374

  vii.   Axel O. Stengel375, born 1872 in Norway; died Aft. 1930; married Minnie Abt. 1904376; born 1882 in USA377; died 28 May 1969 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, USA378.
  Notes for Axel O. Stengel:
      "Axel Stengel" was enumerated in the 1910 U.S. census for Wapato Precinct, Yakima County, Washington (ED293, page 22A). He was head of household on a farm which he owned free of mortgage. He was listed as age 38, born in Norway (as were his parents), married (first time) for 5 years, working as a farmer on a "Hay & Fruit" farm. He was classified as an employer ("emp"). His year of immigration was listed as 1882, and he could read, write and speak English. His household included his wife "Minni" (age 28).
      "A. O. Stengel" was enumerated in the 1920 U.S. census for Yakima City, Yakima County, Washington (ED215, page 19A). He was listed as head of household in a home that he owned free of mortgage on E __ street. He was listed as married, age 47, born in Norway (as were his parents), year of immigration 1878, naturalized 1883, working as a salesman for wages at a "___ Co." His household included his wife "Minnie" (age 37). [Note: This 1920 entry shows a number of discrepancies with regard to Axel and his wife. It is remotely possible that this is a different Axel Stengel. In this census, the ages of both Axel and his wife are exact matches to those indicated in other records, but Axel's immigration date doesn't match, nor does the information on Minnie's birthplace.]
      "Axel O. Stengel" was enumerated in the 1930 U.S. census for North Harrah Precinct, Yakima Indian Reservation, Yakima County, Washington (ED39-124, page 2A). He was head of household on his own farm. He owned a radio. He was listed as married (at age 33), age 58, born in Norway (as were his parents), immigrated 1881, naturalized, working on his own account as a farmer on a "general farm." He was not a veteran. His household included his wife "Minnie" (age 48).

      According to harbor records for Oslo (Digitalarkivet on-line data), "Axel Stengel" departed from Oslo aboard the ship "Angelo" on 9 June 1882, bound for Ogema (Wisconsin). He was listed as age 11, resident of Hamar. No occupation. He was accompanied by his brother-in-law "Gunar Bergers.," sister-in-law "Helene Bergers.," brother-in-law "Severin Bergers.," and a 36 year old laborer from Wermeland, named "Gustaf Anders." His family position was coded as "B" for child with permission to travel (reiseløyve) granted by T. Gløersen.

      According to the notes of Dagny Bergersen (The Second Record), Axel's "father sent him to his brother (Uncle) Albert in Wisconsin when he was twelve years old. He went to Alaska in the Goldrush years, made his stake, and bought a ranch in Wapato, [Yakima County] Washington where he settled down. He married Minnie (born 1882) at the World's Fair in New Orleans in early 1904's. They had no children." The 1904 World's Fair was held in St. Louis, Missouri, so there is some confusion regarding the above marriage location.

      According to "The Only Yukon-Alaska Directory for 1901," compiled by Mrs. M.L. Ferguson of Los Angeles in 1899, and originally published by Barnes & Baber (reprinted in the September/October 1996 issue of Family Chronicle), an Alex Stingle was listed as a miner at Dawson City in the Yukon Territory. This individual is probably Axel, since the surname was often spelled "Stingle" in America.

      Axel's birth record could not be found in the parish records for Hamar. He may have been baptized in another parish, possibly Øvre Eiker in Buskerud fylke.

  Notes for Minnie:
      "Minni Stengel" was enumerated in the 1910 U.S. census for Wapato Precinct, Yakima County, Washington (ED293, page 22A), under the household of her husband, "Axel Stengel." She was listed as age 28, born in Missouri (as were her parents), married (first time) for 5 years, no children. Her occupation was "none."
      "Minnie Stengel" was enumerated in the 1920 U.S. census for Yakima City, Yakima County, Washington (ED215, page 19A), under the household of her husband "Axel F. Stengel." She was listed as married, age 37, born in Wisconsin, father born in [unintelligible, but apparently in the U.S.A.], mother born in Germany, occupation "none."
      "Minnie Stengel" was enumerated in the 1930 U.S. census for North Harrah Precinct, Yakima Indian Reservation, Yakima County, Washington (ED39-124, page 2A), under the household of her husband, "Axel O. Stengel." She was listed as married (at the age of 23) age 48, born in Missouri, parents both born in Germany, occupation "none."

      She was listed as "Minnie Stingel" in the Washington death index.




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