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Descendants of John Whistler




Generation No. 1


1. JOHN1 WHISTLER was born Abt. 1758 in Ulster, Ireland?1,1, and died September 03, 1829 in Fort Bellefontaine (Near St. Louis) Missouri2,3,3,4. He married (1) ANN BISHOP5. She died April 25, 1814 in Near Newport, Campbell Co., Kentucky6,6. He married (2) ELIZABETH HOWARD Bet. 1816 - 1817, daughter of JOSEPH HOWARD and RACHEL RIDGELY. She was born WFT Est. 1754-1773, and died April 1826 in Fort Bellefontaine (Near St. Louis), Missouri7.

Notes for J
OHN WHISTLER:
The names of John Whistler's parents and place of birth are unknown at this time. He is said to be related to the English Whistlers who lived primarily in Oxford shire around Whitchurch and Goreing. This family has been documented in Rose Fuller Whistler's work, "Annals of an English Family (1887)," and an earlier genealogy, "A Genealogical Account of the Family of Druce of Goreing" by George Druce (1735). More work is needed to establish a link to these Whistler families, however.

It is known that John Whistler came to America as a British soldier in General John Burgoyne's army around 1776. Several regiments of Burgoyne's army were raised in Ireland. They sailed for Canada and then proceeded down the Lake Champlain route to Albany, New York. However Burgoyne was forced to surrender his entire army after the Battle of Saratoga on 17 October 1777. John Whistler became a prisoner of war for the next several years. (Ironically, he would find himself in the same position thirty-five years later in the War of 1812, except that then he was an American soldier captured by the British!)

Burgoyne's defeated army became known as the "Convention Army." The Americans were fearful that they would escape and rejoin the British army so the Convention Army was shuttled from town to town in Massachusetts, Virginia and Maryland for nearly five years. By the time they were finally allowed to return to England in 1782, the army was a mere fraction of the original size. Many men escaped to British bases or simply deserted and blended into the local population.

While family tradition, as chronicled in a biography of John's grandson, George Washington Whistler ("A Sketch of the Life of George W. Whistler, Civil Engineer" by George L. Vose, 1887), states that John Whistler returned to England after Saratoga and eloped with Anna Bishop, a daughter of Sir Edward Bishop and came back to America. This tradition is simply untrue - John Whistler never returned to England, but settled in the area of Hagerstown, Maryland where he married his first wife, said to be Ann Bishop (parents unknown). They lived in Hagerstown, Maryland from about 1777 to 1791. John
Whistler may have supported his growing family (he would eventually have fifteen children) as a shoemaker in the town shoe factory.

In 1791, John Whistler joined the American Army as an ensign in Captain Stevenson's company. The army was raised in the Levies of 1791 to fight the Indians in the Ohio River Valley under the command of Arthur St. Clair. John Whistler served as adjutant in Major Henry Gaither's battalion in Lt. Col. William Darke's regiment. When the army arrived in the Ohio frontier, it built a chain of forts from the Miami River to the Maumee River. On 3 November 1791 the army was attacked while in camp on the upper Wabash River. Out of 1,400 troops, 623 soldiers were killed and many more wounded. John Whistler
was among the wounded in what is known as "St. Clair's Defeat." He recuperated at Fort Washington (near Cincinnati) where he was joined by his wife and family.

Anthony Wayne took command of the army in 1792. He built a series of strongholds in Ohio: Fort Greenville, Fort Recovery, Fort Adams and Fort Defiance. Whistler probably helped build these stockades gaining experience that would help him when he was in charge of building Fort Dearborn (site of Chicago) a decade later. In 1794, Wayne's army met the Indians led by Blue Jacket at a site known as Fallen Timbers. This time the American army was victorious and the Ohio Indians were forced to sign the Treaty of Greenville in 1795.

Whistler was stationed at several of these frontier forts: Fort Washington (near present day Cincinnati) in 1795 where his daughter Ann was born, Fort Lorimie (Darke County, Ohio) in 1796, and Fort Wayne (now Fort Wayne, Indiana) in 1800 where his son George Washington Whistler was born. He was promoted to Captain in 1797 and stationed in Detroit in the early years of 1800.

In 1803, John Whistler was chosen to lead an expedition across lower Michigan to establish a fort at the mouth of the Chicago River. Fort Dearborn, as it was called, became the site of the City of Chicago. In 1810, Whistler became embroiled in a feud with a local trader, John Kinzie and the Government Factor, Matthew Irwin. Each side bitterly accused the other of various wrong-doings. The War Department disposed of the problem by simply dispersing the army officers involved in the quarrel. John Whistler and his family returned to Detroit where he was placed in charge until General William Hull arrived to
take command. It was fortunate for the family that they were recalled, as two years later many of the inhabitants of Fort Dearborn were killed in the Fort Dearborn massacre.

Just after the War of 1812 broke out, John Whistler was granted the brevet rank of major. General William Hull was in charge of the Army in the northwest and his objective was to prepare for an invasion of Canada. Although his forces greatly outnumbered the British, when the British attacked Fort Detroit Hull surrendered his entire army. The Whistler family passed down the legend that Whistler was so angered by the surrender that he broke his sword rather than turn it over to the enemy. He later testified against General Hull when Hull was tried for treason.

In 1814 John Whistler was ordered to regarrison Fort Wayne. While en route from Newport Barracks, Kentucky to Fort Wayne, John's first wife died on April 25, 1814 and was buried in Newport, Kentucky. After arriving in Fort Wayne, John Whistler had his troops rebuild the fort which he found in decay. During his years at Fort Wayne, Whistler became involved in another dispute with the civilians in the area. This time the feud was with Indian Agent, Bejamin F. Stickney who came to Fort Wayne in 1815. Whistler accused Stickney of misusing government provisions to the Indians; Stickney felt that Whistler
had no authority in interfere in his affairs. The dispute was investigated by the attorney general of the Michigan Territory, Charles Larned, who found in Stickney's favor.

In about 1816 or 1817, John Whistler married his second wife, Elizabeth (Howard) Ijams. She was the daughter of Joseph and Rachel (Ridgely) Howard of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Elizabeth married first, William Iiams (Ijams) of Frederick County, Maryland and had ten children. Sometime before 1806, the family moved to Fairfield County, Ohio near the present-day town of West Rushville. William Ijams died probably in late 1815.

When the army was reduced in size in 1815, John Whistler was honorably discharged, but he was kept on as military storekeeper at Fort Bellefontaine, near St. Louis, Missouri. Elizabeth Whistler died at Fort Bellefontaine in 1826. Her death notice appeared in the April 28, 1826 issue of the "National Banner" (Nashville, Tenn). Major John Whistler died on 3 September 1829 at Fort Bellefontaine. His death notice appeared in the Kentucky newspaper, "The Banner" and "The Missouri Republican"He was said to be 71, one of the oldest officers in the service.

Sources:
Vose, George L. "A Sketch of the Life and Works of Geroge W. Whistler, Civil Engineer" p. 10-11
Death Notice of John Whistler, The Reporter, 14 October 1829
"Howard/Ijams" information sent to author by Elmer Gossman of Janesville, MN in 1991;
Death notice of Elizabeth Whistler, National Banner, Nashville TN, 28 April 1826;
Appleton's Cyclopaedia, p. 463;
Obituary of Sarah Abbott, Detroit Free Press, 6 October 1874, p. 1, col. 4
Marriage Record of Rebecca Whistler and Aaron M. Wright, in "Quarterly Magazine of Wisconsin Genealogical Society,
vol. 1, p. 166.
Fleming, Thomas, "Gentleman's Johnny's Wandering Army," American Heritage, vol. 35 (1972), p. 10-15, 89-93.
Griswold, B.J., "The Pictorial History of Fort Wayne (Chicago: Robert O. Law, 1917) p. 175.
Williams, T.J.C. "Maryland Historical Magazine," vol. 2, p. 350.
Irwin, Matthew to the Editor, Scioto Gazette, Vol. 10, no. 489, p. 3, dated 31 March 1810, Chicago.
Williams, T.J.C. "History of Frederick County, Maryland (Frederick: L.R. Titsworth, 1910) p. 138-139.
Heitman, Francis B. "Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army" (Washington: GPO, 1903, vol 1, p.
1026, vol. II p. 41.
Brill, Wallace A. "History of Fort Wayne", p. 138-139.
Wood, James Whistler, "Whistler Family Genealogy," 1903; manuscript in the collection of the Chicago Historical Society.
Quaife, Milo M. "Checagou, From Indian Wigwam to Modern City, 1673-1835, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
1933) p. 69.
Kingsbury Letter Books, in the collection of the Burton Historical Collection (Detroit Public Library) and the Newberry
Library, Chicago. Correspondence from Whistler to Lt. Col. Jacob Kingsbury dated: 26 July 1804, 12 July 1805, 1 October
1809, 3 September 1809, 27 May 1810, 1 November 1814.
Wilson, James Grant. "Chicago from 1803 to 1812: Mainly Drawn from Verbal Account of Dr. John Cooper, Surgeon of
Fort Dearborn," 1907, Chicago Historical Society Collection, Fort Dearborn file.
Whistler, Captain John to the editor, Scioto Gazette, 28 February 1810.
Forbes, Lt. Col. James Grant, "Trial of General William Hull," p. 151-153.
Woehrmann, Paul. "At the Headwaters of the Maumee: A History of the Forts of Fort Wayne" (Indianapolis: Indiana
Historical Society, 1971) p. 270-272.

[whistler2.FBK]

The names of John Whistler's parents and place of birth are unknown at this time. He is said to be related to the English Whistlers who lived primarily in Oxfordshire around Whitchurch and Goreing. This family has been documented in Rose Fuller Whistler's work, "Annals of an English Family (1887)," and an earlier genealogy, "A Genealogical Account of the Family of Druce of Goreing" by George Druce (1735). More work is needed to establish a link to these Whistler families, however.

It is known that John Whistler came to America as a British soldier in General John Burgoyne's army around 1776. Several regiments of Burgoyne's army were raised in Ireland. They sailed for Canada and then proceeded down the Lake Champlain route to Albany, New York. However Burgoyne was forced to surrender his entire army after the Battle of Saratoga on 17 October 1777. John Whistler became a prisoner of war for the next several years. (Ironically, he would find himself in the same position thirty-five years later in the War of 1812, except that then he was an American soldier captured by the British!)

Burgoyne's defeated army became known as the "Convention Army." The Americans were fearful that they would escape and rejoin the British army so the Convention Army was shuttled from town to town in Massachusetts, Virginia and Maryland for nearly five years. By the time they were finally allowed to return to England in 1782, the army was a mere fraction of the original size. Many men escaped to British bases or simply deserted and blended into the local population.

While family tradition, as chronicled in a biography of John's grandson, George Washington Whistler ("A Sketch of the Life of George W. Whistler, Civil Engineer" by George L. Vose, 1887), states that John Whistler returned to England after Saratoga and eloped with Anna Bishop, a daughter of Sir Edward Bishop and came back to America. This tradition is simply untrue - John Whistler never returned to England, but settled in the area of Hagerstown, Maryland where he married his first wife, said to be Ann Bishop (parents unknown). They lived in Hagerstown, Maryland from about 1777 to 1791. John
Whistler may have supported his growing family (he would eventually have fifteen children) as a shoemaker in the town shoe factory.

In 1791, John Whistler joined the American Army as an ensign in Captain Stevenson's company. The army was raised in the Levies of 1791 to fight the Indians in the Ohio River Valley under the command of Arthur St. Clair. John Whistler served as adjutant in Major Henry Gaither's battalion in Lt. Col. William Darke's regiment. When the army arrived in the Ohio frontier, it built a chain of forts from the Miami River to the Maumee River. On 3 November 1791 the army was attacked while in camp on the upper Wabash River. Out of 1,400 troops, 623 soldiers were killed and many more wounded. John Whistler
was among the wounded in what is known as "St. Clair's Defeat." He recuperated at Fort Washington (near Cincinnati) where he was joined by his wife and family.

Anthony Wayne took command of the army in 1792. He built a series of strongholds in Ohio: Fort Greenville, Fort Recovery, Fort Adams and Fort Defiance. Whistler probably helped build these stockades gaining experience that would help him when he was in charge of building Fort Dearborn (site of Chicago) a decade later. In 1794, Wayne's army met the Indians led by Blue Jacket at a site known as Fallen Timbers. This time the American army was victorious and the Ohio Indians were forced to sign the Treaty of Greenville in 1795.

Whistler was stationed at several of these frontier forts: Fort Washington (near present day Cincinnati) in 1795 where his daughter Ann was born, Fort Lorimie (Darke County, Ohio) in 1796, and Fort Wayne (now Fort Wayne, Indiana) in 1800 where his son George Washington Whistler was born. He was promoted to Captain in 1797 and stationed in Detroit in the early years of 1800.

In 1803, John Whistler was chosen to lead an expedition across lower Michigan to establish a fort at the mouth of the Chicago River. Fort Dearborn, as it was called, became the site of the City of Chicago. In 1810, Whistler became embroiled in a feud with a local trader, John Kinzie and the Government Factor, Matthew Irwin. Each side bitterly accused the other of various wrong-doings. The War Department disposed of the problem by simply dispersing the army officers involved in the quarrel. John Whistler and his family returned to Detroit where he was placed in charge until General William Hull arrived to
take command. It was fortunate for the family that they were recalled, as two years later many of the inhabitants of Fort Dearborn were killed in the Fort Dearborn massacre.

Just after the War of 1812 broke out, John Whistler was granted the brevet rank of major. General William Hull was in charge of the Army in the northwest and his objective was to prepare for an invasion of Canada. Although his forces greatly outnumbered the British, when the British attacked Fort Detroit Hull surrendered his entire army. The Whistler family passed down the legend that Whistler was so angered by the surrender that he broke his sword rather than turn it over to the enemy. He later testified against General Hull when Hull was tried for treason.

In 1814 John Whistler was ordered to regarrison Fort Wayne. While en route from Newport Barracks, Kentucky to Fort Wayne, John's first wife died on April 25, 1814 and was buried in Newport, Kentucky. After arriving in Fort Wayne, John Whistler had his troops rebuild the fort which he found in decay. During his years at Fort Wayne, Whistler became involved in another dispute with the civilians in the area. This time the feud was with Indian Agent, Bejamin F. Stickney who came to Fort Wayne in 1815. Whistler accused Stickney of misusing government provisions to the Indians; Stickney felt that Whistler
had no authority in interfere in his affairs. The dispute was investigated by the attorney general of the Michigan Territory, Charles Larned, who found in Stickney's favor.

In about 1816 or 1817, John Whistler married his second wife, Elizabeth (Howard) Ijams. She was the daughter of Joseph and Rachel (Ridgely) Howard of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Elizabeth married first, William Iiams (Ijams) of Frederick County, Maryland and had ten children. Sometime before 1806, the family moved to Fairfield County, Ohio near the present-day town of West Rushville. William Ijams died probably in late 1815.

When the army was reduced in size in 1815, John Whistler was honorably discharged, but he was kept on as military storekeeper at Fort Bellefontaine, near St. Louis, Missouri. Elizabeth Whistler died at Fort Bellefontaine in 1826. Her death notice appeared in the April 28, 1826 issue of the "National Banner" (Nashville, Tenn). Major John Whistler died on 3 September 1829 at Fort Bellefontaine. His death notice appeared in the Kentucky newspaper, "The Banner" and "The Missouri Republican"He was said to be 71, one of the oldest officers in the service.

Sources:
Vose, George L. "A Sketch of the Life and Works of Geroge W. Whistler, Civil Engineer" p. 10-11
Death Notice of John Whistler, The Reporter, 14 October 1829
"Howard/Ijams" information sent to author by Elmer Gossman of Janesville, MN in 1991;
Death notice of Elizabeth Whistler, National Banner, Nashville TN, 28 April 1826;
Appleton's Cyclopaedia, p. 463;
Obituary of Sarah Abbott, Detroit Free Press, 6 October 1874, p. 1, col. 4
Marriage Record of Rebecca Whistler and Aaron M. Wright, in "Quarterly Magazine of Wisconsin Genealogical Society,
vol. 1, p. 166.
Fleming, Thomas, "Gentleman's Johnny's Wandering Army," American Heritage, vol. 35 (1972), p. 10-15, 89-93.
Griswold, B.J., "The Pictorial History of Fort Wayne (Chicago: Robert O. Law, 1917) p. 175.
Williams, T.J.C. "Maryland Historical Magazine," vol. 2, p. 350.
Irwin, Matthew to the Editor, Scioto Gazette, Vol. 10, no. 489, p. 3, dated 31 March 1810, Chicago.
Williams, T.J.C. "History of Frederick County, Maryland (Frederick: L.R. Titsworth, 1910) p. 138-139.
Heitman, Francis B. "Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army" (Washington: GPO, 1903, vol 1, p.
1026, vol. II p. 41.
Brill, Wallace A. "History of Fort Wayne", p. 138-139.
Wood, James Whistler, "Whistler Family Genealogy," 1903; manuscript in the collection of the Chicago Historical Society.
Quaife, Milo M. "Checagou, From Indian Wigwam to Modern City, 1673-1835, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
1933) p. 69.
Kingsbury Letter Books, in the collection of the Burton Historical Collection (Detroit Public Library) and the Newberry
Library, Chicago. Correspondence from Whistler to Lt. Col. Jacob Kingsbury dated: 26 July 1804, 12 July 1805, 1 October
1809, 3 September 1809, 27 May 1810, 1 November 1814.
Wilson, James Grant. "Chicago from 1803 to 1812: Mainly Drawn from Verbal Account of Dr. John Cooper, Surgeon of
Fort Dearborn," 1907, Chicago Historical Society Collection, Fort Dearborn file.
Whistler, Captain John to the editor, Scioto Gazette, 28 February 1810.
Forbes, Lt. Col. James Grant, "Trial of General William Hull," p. 151-153.
Woehrmann, Paul. "At the Headwaters of the Maumee: A History of the Forts of Fort Wayne" (Indianapolis: Indiana
Historical Society, 1971) p. 270-272.


     
Children of J
OHN WHISTLER and ANN BISHOP are:
  i.   SAMUEL2 WHISTLER8, d. WFT Est. 1789-1878.
  Notes for SAMUEL WHISTLER:
The twin sons of John and Ann Whistler were born ca. 1788-1791. Samuel's twin died at birth, and Samuel died as a young child, date unknown.
[whistler2.FBK]

The twin sons of John and Ann Whistler were born ca. 1788-1791. Samuel's twin died at birth, and Samuel died as a young child, date unknown.


  ii.   SAMUEL'S TWIN WHISTLER9.
2. iii.   EDWARD WHISTLER, b. Abt. 1780; d. 1834, Ohio.
3. iv.   WILLIAM WHISTLER, b. 1784, Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland; d. December 04, 1863, Newport, Campbell County, Kentucky.
4. v.   SARAH WHISTLER, b. September 26, 1786, Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland; d. November 04, 1874, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.
  vi.   JOHN WHISTLER, JR.9, b. Abt. 1787; d. December 1813.
  Notes for JOHN WHISTLER, JR.:
John Whistler, Jr., son of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler, was born ca. 1787-1790, probably in Hagerstown, Maryland. John Jr. joined the United States Army on 12 March 1812 and was assigned as ensign in the 19th Infantry just a month before the War of 1812 began.
      In August of 1812, John Jr. was part of a detachment of infantry whose assignment was to escort a badly-needed wagon train of supplies from the Raisin River to Detroit. The route, which followed the Detroit River, was heavily infested with British regulars, Canadian volunteers and their Tecumseh's warriors. The Americans, led by Lieutenant Colonel James Miller, got as far as the deserted village of Maguago, three miles north of Brownstown, Michigan, when they were ambushed. On August 9, 1812, General Hull sent 600 more men to escort the supply wagons, and these too were ambushed. Hull lost twenty men but considered the battle a victory; John Whistler, Jr. was among the 50 wounded.
      John survived his wounds but presumably remained in poor health. He was promoted to Second Lieutenant on 30 March 1812 and to First Lieutenant on 20 November 1813. He was among those taken prisoner at Hull's surrender of Fort Detroit on 16 August 1813. John Whistler, Jr. died, of disease, in December of 1813. He had no known issue.
[whistler2.FBK]

John Whistler, Jr., son of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler, was born ca. 1787-1790, probably in Hagerstown, Maryland. John Jr. joined the United States Army on 12 March 1812 and was assigned as ensign in the 19th Infantry just a month before the War of 1812 began.
      In August of 1812, John Jr. was part of a detachment of infantry whose assignment was to escort a badly-needed wagon train of supplies from the Raisin River to Detroit. The route, which followed the Detroit River, was heavily infested with British regulars, Canadian volunteers and their Tecumseh's warriors. The Americans, led by Lieutenant Colonel James Miller, got as far as the deserted village of Maguago, three miles north of Brownstown, Michigan, when they were ambushed. On August 9, 1812, General Hull sent 600 more men to escort the supply wagons, and these too were ambushed. Hull lost twenty men but considered the battle a victory; John Whistler, Jr. was among the 50 wounded.
      John survived his wounds but presumably remained in poor health. He was promoted to Second Lieutenant on 30 March 1812 and to First Lieutenant on 20 November 1813. He was among those taken prisoner at Hull's surrender of Fort Detroit on 16 August 1813. John Whistler, Jr. died, of disease, in December of 1813. He had no known issue.


5. vii.   CATHERINE WHISTLER, b. 1788; d. 1874, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan.
  viii.   REBECCA WHISTLER9, b. Bet. 1789 - 1790; m. AARON M. WRIGHT, June 15, 1823, Green Bay, Wisconsin10; b. WFT Est. 1773-1803, New Hampshire; d. March 31, 1826.
  Notes for REBECCA WHISTLER:
Rebecca Whistler, daughter of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler, was born ca. 1790- 1793. In the early 1820's, she was living in Green Bay (Wisconsin) where her elder brother, William Whistler was in charge of Fort Howard. Rebecca Whistler married a young lieutenant from New Hampshire, Aaron M. Wright. Their marriage at Green Bay, on 15 June 1823, was the first recorded marriage in Wisconsin territory. Lieutenant Wright attained the rank of brevet 2nd Lieutenant of the Third Infantry on 1 July 1822; he died on 31 March 1826. It is not known where or when Rebecca (Whistler) Wright died. They are said to have had no children.
[whistler2.FBK]

Rebecca Whistler, daughter of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler, was born ca. 1790- 1793. In the early 1820's, she was living in Green Bay (Wisconsin) where her elder brother, William Whistler was in charge of Fort Howard. Rebecca Whistler married a young lieutenant from New Hampshire, Aaron M. Wright. Their marriage at Green Bay, on 15 June 1823, was the first recorded marriage in Wisconsin territory. Lieutenant Wright attained the rank of brevet 2nd Lieutenant of the Third Infantry on 1 July 1822; he died on 31 March 1826. It is not known where or when Rebecca (Whistler) Wright died. They are said to have had no children.


  Notes for AARON M. WRIGHT:
From New Hampshire. Cadet September 1819; Brevet 2nd Lieutentant, 3rd Infantry 1 July 1822, Assistant Commissary Subsistence, October 1823. Dismissed 31 March 1826 (died).

Married 15 June 1823 at Green Bay, Wisconsin by Robert Irwin, Jr., Justice of the Peace.

Source: Gardner, " A Dictionary of all Officers of the Army of the United States," [whistler2.FBK]

From New Hampshire. Cadet September 1819; Brevet 2nd Lieutentant, 3rd Infantry 1 July 1822, Assistant Commissary Subsistence, October 1823. Dismissed 31 March 1826 (died).

Married 15 June 1823 at Green Bay, Wisconsin by Robert Irwin, Jr., Justice of the Peace.

Source: Gardner, " A Dictionary of all Officers of the Army of the United States,"

6. ix.   ELIZA WHISTLER, b. Abt. 1791; d. June 04, 1823, Green Bay, Wisconsin.
7. x.   ANN WHISTLER, b. September 01, 1794, Fort Washington (Cincinatti, Ohio); d. March 29, 1829, Litchfield, Connecticut.
  xi.   CHARLES WHISTLER11, b. Abt. 1796; d. WFT Est. 1797-1886.
  Notes for CHARLES WHISTLER:
Charles Whistler, son of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler was born ca. 1796, place unknown. He is said to have died young.
[whistler2.FBK]

Charles Whistler, son of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler was born ca. 1796, place unknown. He is said to have died young.


  xii.   HARRIET WHISTLER12, b. 1797; d. 1872, Detroit, Michigan13; m. ??? PHELAN.
  Notes for HARRIET WHISTLER:
Harriet Whistler, daughter of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler, was born 1797. Sometime after 1816, she is said to have married an Army captain named Phelan, who was killed in Detroit. No record of a Captain Phelan has been found in the Army registers.
      Harriet Phelan never remarried and died childless in the Chicago home of her nephew, James Whistler Wood, in 1872. She was seventy-five years old at the time of her death.[whistler2.FBK]

Harriet Whistler, daughter of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler, was born 1797. Sometime after 1816, she is said to have married an Army captain named Phelan, who was killed in Detroit. No record of a Captain Phelan has been found in the Army registers.
      Harriet Phelan never remarried and died childless in the Chicago home of her nephew, James Whistler Wood, in 1872. She was seventy-five years old at the time of her death.

  Notes for ??? PHELAN:
Captain in U.S. Army, was killed at Detroit.
Wood, p. 20.

Note: A Captain Patrick Phelon was killed in St. Clair's Defeat in 1791- father of the Captain Phelan who married Harriet?[whistler2.FBK]

Captain in U.S. Army, was killed at Detroit.
Wood, p. 20.

Note: A Captain Patrick Phelon was killed in St. Clair's Defeat in 1791- father of the Captain Phelan who married Harriet?

8. xiii.   GEORGE WASHINGTON WHISTLER, b. May 19, 1800, Fort Wayne, Indiana; d. April 07, 1849, St. Petersburg, Russia.
9. xiv.   CAROLINE FRANCES WHISTLER, b. December 25, 1802, Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan; d. December 31, 1842, Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan.
  xv.   JAMES WHISTLER14, b. July 14, 1808.
  Notes for JAMES WHISTLER:
James Whistler, son of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler, was born 14 July 1808 and baptized 5 December 1810 in the Church of England, Sandwich, Ontario, Canada. Sponsors were "Jno. Whisler and Ann Whisler and Ann Hands." This birth date does not correspond with Wood's "Whistler Family Genealogy" which states James was born between siblings Harriet and George Washington Whistler, and the statement Wood makes that his mother, Caroline Frances, was the youngest child in the family (born 1802). James Whistler is said to have died with no issue.

Sources: Wood, p. 8, Church of England Records, Sandwich, Ontario Canada.[whistler2.FBK]

James Whistler, son of John and Ann (Bishop) Whistler, was born 14 July 1808 and baptized 5 December 1810 in the Church of England, Sandwich, Ontario, Canada. Sponsors were "Jno. Whisler and Ann Whisler and Ann Hands." This birth date does not correspond with Wood's "Whistler Family Genealogy" which states James was born between siblings Harriet and George Washington Whistler, and the statement Wood makes that his mother, Caroline Frances, was the youngest child in the family (born 1802). James Whistler is said to have died with no issue.

Sources: Wood, p. 8, Church of England Records, Sandwich, Ontario Canada.





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