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View Tree for Robert BakerRobert Baker (b. Abt. 1665, d. Bef. Sep 30, 1728)

Robert Baker (son of John Baker) was born Abt. 1665 in England, and died Bef. Sep 30, 1728.

 Includes NotesNotes for Robert Baker:
The first of this family in America appears to have been Robert Baker who settled in Conestaga Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania.

The first record we find of Robert Baker, is the administration of his
estate dated Sept 13, 1728. Robert Baker died without a will and his son
Caleb Baker was appointed administrator of his estate; along with these
original papers at the Register's Office at the Court House in Lancaster
County is the Administrators Bond; and inventory and the administrator's
accounts; the bond was signed by the administrator; Joseph Higginbotham
and Tobias Hendricks, sureties; and witnessed by Douglas Baker and Josh
Lowe. The inventory enumerates chattels, harvest crops, live stock, and
450 acres of land, this was signed by Tobias Hendricks, David Jones and
Joseph Higginbotham, appraisers. Amount the creditors were the names of
Caleb Baker, Robert Baker, Jr, and Douglas Baker."

This Township became Lancaster County in 1729, as this family does not appear on the tax lists of any of the other Townships, it is possible that the settlement in Conestaga was the original home of the family from their arrival in America.
The circumstances appears to indicate that the name was originally the German name Becher, which is the same as the Latin word, Bacar, and the English word, Beaker, and signifies a vessel for drinking wine.
The ancestors of Caleb Baker were probably cup-bearers at some Court of high or low degree, and took their name from the function which they there fulfilled.
The well known family name of Blankenbaker, seems also to refer to the same origin; these who bore it feeling a special pride in maintaining their beaker in a condition of immaculate whiteness.
But many a Blankenbaker has found by experience that people in general have small appreciation of the nicer points in philology.
The descendants of Caleb Baker made a like discovery, and were compelled to submit when the name should be pronounced, and written Baker, instead of Beaker. They might have saved themselves in a measure if they had Anglicized the name in the form of Beecher, but few of those who employed it in that form would be enabled to make out its original meaning. It would be well, however, if all who bear the name of Caleb Baker, could be informed of these simple facts in connection with it.
History is worth preserving for its own sake, and the truth of it should be duly honored." (The American Historical Mag. Vol. 9 pages 384-390).
William H. Whitsett, named one of his sons William Baker Whitsett, born May 27, 1883 for Caleb Baker.
*************
{A number of Baker researchers have noted that Robert Baker and his sons were gunsmiths in Pennsylvania. I found the following info. in: Whisker, James B. Arms Makers of Pennsylvania. Selinsgrove: Susquehanna University Press, 1990. See pages 37-38. ________.
Gunsmiths of Lancaster and York Counties, Pennsylvania. Lampeter; Edwin Mellen Press, Ltd., 1990. See pages 6-8. Grove, Charles. "List of Gunsmiths of Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania, Period 1728-1863."
Journal of the Lancaster Historical Society. Vol. 72, no. 1, 1968, pages 50-60. (Ran Raider)}
Ran Raider: rraider@discover.wright.edu
Baker, Caleb, 1719-41, Gunsmith, worked with his father, Robert Baker, on the confluence of Pequa [Pequea] Creek and the Susquehanna River, Lancaster Co.
Baker, Robert (d. 1728), 1717-28, gunsmith at the confluence of Pequa Creek and the Susquehanna River, Lancaster Co.
Baker, Samuel. 1717-19, worked with his brother, Robert Baker, Lancaster Co. In 1719 Robert bought out Samuel's interests.
Individual:

Notes for Robert (James)T Baker:
A number of Baker researchers have noted that Robert Baker and his sons
were gunsmiths in Pennsylvania. I found the following information in:
Whisker, James B. Arms Makers of Pennsylvania. Selinsgrove: Susquehanna
University Press, 1990. See pages 37-38. ________.
Gunsmiths of Lancaster and York Counties, Pennsylvania. Lampeter; Edwin
Mellen Press, Ltd., 1990. See pages 6-8. Grove, Charles. "List of
Gunsmiths of Lancaster County Pennsylvania, Period 1728-1863."
Journal of the Lancaster Historical Society. Vol. 72, no. 1, 1968, pages

Ran Raider: rraider@discover.wright.edu

Baker, Caleb, 1719-41, Gunsmith, worked with his father, Robert Bake
the confluence of Pequa [Pequea] Creek and the Susquehanna River,
Lancaster Co.

Baker, Robert (d. 1728), 1717-28, gunsmith at the confluence of Pequa
Creek and the Susquehanna River, Lancaster Co.

Baker, Samuel. 1717-19, worked with his brother, Robert Baker, Lancaster
Co. In 1719 Robert bought out Samuel's interests.

Excerpts from GUNSMITHS OF LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA by James B.
Whisker: "Nearly all studies of the Pennsylvania-Kentucky long rifle
assume this distinctively American rifle was invented in Lancaster Coun
sometime in the second quarter of the eighteenth century. We find a
number of pre-Revolutionary War gunsmiths who may have made
Pennsylvania-Kentucky long rifles. We have no idea what the early Baker
files may have looked like, c. 1720. Lancaster County was formed out of
Chester Co, an original county of the Province of Pennsylvania, on 10 M
1729. Several of the Baker gunsmiths in the Pequea Valley, had worked
and died before the formation of the county."

"ROBERT BAKER ( -1728)., gunsmith. Robert Baker was a gunsmith
between 1717 and 1728 at the confluence of Pequea Creek and the
Susquehanna River in Chester (now Lancaster) County. In 1719 Robert
Baker took over the shop operated by his brother, Samuel Baker. Robert
died intestate 19 September 1728, the Orphan's Court ordered an invento
of Robert's estate. It showed tools of the gunsmith and blacksmith. The
total value of the tools in his gun barrel boring and gun shop was 295
pounds/10/7."

Editors Note: Based on all information found, I believe Samuel Baker &
his brother Robert Baker were probably the first gun makers in America.
National Geographic Magazine stated that the Baker's invented the
Pennsylvania-Kentucky Long Rifle. Unable to find the date of that
article.
*************
: BAKER RIFLES
Date: 9/17/00 10:24:34 AM Pacific Daylight Time
From: jvore@iti2.net (Jean Vore)
To: BBrown7152@aol.com (BBrown7152@aol.com)

I have heard that a Baker rifle was found at the Alamo. I
have never seen it, but the story goes; when the historians
at the Alamo were going through excess items, on of those
was a Baker Rifle that went down with the Tennesseans. Also
Ruth Burket's e-mail is rburket@hotmail.com. She has the
unlucky family of both Bakers and Bollings. She is from
John Rentas family. Jean
**************
COLONIAL FAMILIES OF PHILADELPHIA
"In April or early in May, 1722, Philip Syng had surveyed by his
order and to his use two Hundreds acres of land upon the west bank of
the Susquehanna River, at a place known as "The Mine". This
tract was within the bounds of Pa., but it was claimed by Philip
Syng and Co., under a Maryland title. A complaint having been
made by Robert Baker and James McClean before Francis Worley,
Esq., a Justice of the Peace for Chester County. Syng was committed
into the custody of the Sheriff of Philadelphia by the warrant of Sir
William Keith, Baronet, the Governor who had met Syng at Patterison's
on April 4 and threatened to have him punished if he presumed to make
any survey of the land in question.
Editors Note: It is believed that this "Mine" is where the ore came from
to make Baker guns.
Editors Note: Robert (James) Baker, the gunsmith, must have more than o
wife.
I have changed birth dates of all children according to dates found in
Patti Greer's file.

Editors note: Some researchers report that Robert Baker was order
to England to make guns for either King William or Queen Anne according
to time frame. In America these two Wars with France were know as King
Williams War & Queen Anne's War. They covered the period from late
1680s-1714.

He returned to America with a grant to make guns for the Colonies. This
is why some other researchers think Robert Baker was the first of this
line to come to America, which was actually the time of his returning to
his native soil. Some say he came from Liverpool, England. He may ha
his return from making guns & probably teaching cutting of rifling in
barrels to others while there.

Robert Baker settled in Conestoga Township, Chester County, PA (later
Lancaster County, PA). He bought 500 acres of land on the Susquehanna
River from Col. John French in 1717. (This seems to be time frame of his
return to America, so we might assume that he was ordered to England by
Queen Anne whose War dates were 1702-1713.) This land was located on mi
from the junction of Pequea Creek and the Susquehanna River. Robert's s
Caleb paid taxes on this land from 1719 until 1727. Robert and his sons
were gunsmiths and were commissioned by the King of England to make fire
arms for the Colonies. Later the Bakers would join the Colonies against
England in the Revolutionary War.

August 15, 1719, Robert Baker had Jacob Taylor, Surveyor, with permissi
from William Penn, lay out a site for erection of a gun mill. See Taylor
Papers #2921. From Pattie Greer file. In February 1721 iron ore was fou
near the site of the Baker tract. From Pattie Greer file.

Robert Baker left no will and his son Caleb was appointed administrator
of his estate, dated September 13, 1728. Caleb Baker being part owner of
the business and oldest son, took over and operated it until 1741, when
he sold out to Jacob Godin.

The list of children is on file in the Historical Society at Frankford,
Ky, and in History Mag. Vol. XLIX No.4.
*******
Date: 3/5/01 5:38:21 PM Eastern Standard Time
From: ndkelly@sahuaro.net (Nora N. Kelly)
To: BBrown7152@aol.com
The picture of the Baker gun is in the book The Great Guns by Harold L.
Peterson & Robert Elman copyright 1971 . I have attached a scan of it.

The picture said Very early American Rifle c. 1750

The very first American rifle are thought to have been made in Lancaster
County, Pennsylvania.



********
Note: GOOD BAKERS ~ BAD BAKERS - BY CLYDE N. BUNCH; Kd4vqd@juno.com
NOTE: Found in BAKER FAMILY NEWSLETTER (INTERNATIONAL) VOLUME #10 1997. A Genealogical publication ISSN: 0893-5831 Editor/Publisher, Crystal Jensen, 326 Panhorst, Staunton, IL 62088. http://members.tripod.com/Crystal_J/Baker.html
My Aunt, Lillie Baker Allen, was b. on Sacker Creek in Clay Co., Kentucky in 1891. She d. in Lexington, Kentucky in 1987, at the age of 96. Her father, George W. Baker was b. in Owsley Co., in 1871 and d. at burning Springs in Clay Co., in 1912. The family, shortly after his death, moved from there. Lillie was just a young woman at the time; the love for the mountains and its people remained with her until the day she d.. This lady and her remarkable memory started me out "Baker hunting".
Often when I talked to Aunt Lillie about her family, she would refer to them as Good Bakers, Bad Bakers. It wasn't until after her death that I began to understand what she was trying to tell me. She told me that her gdm., Ibby Baker, was a Baker before she m.. She said the Ibby was a schoolteacher, and that she went to Buffalo Creek in Owsley Co., to teach. Here she met and m. Jackson Baker. Jackson d. in 1878, leaving Ibby and their small son George. After the death of her husband, Ibby returned to Clay Co., and lived with her brother. She d. a year later. Her son George W. Baker was adopted and raised by her brother, William Baker and wife Elizabeth Parker.
Aunt Lillie wrote me a letter one time about the Bakers on Buffalo Creek in Owsley Co.,. These were the one's she called "Bad Bakers". She said her father received word from his aunt, Martha Gabbard, to come up to Owsley Co., that the family had sold some land, part of which belonged to his father. His aunt went on to tell him that she was holding his part of the money from the sale for him. Aunt Lillie said; "We didn't want him to go. We thought it was a Catch! We thought they were trying to get him up there to kill him." To the relief of Aunt Lillie and the family, her father George made the trip to Bull Skin and returned home safely.
I once asked Aunt Lillie where the Bakers came from? She said; "They came from Liverpool England, they were gunsmiths and that they came to this country to make guns for the colonies." At the time Aunt Lillie told me this, I paid little attention. Of all the great things Aunt Lillie told me, this statement would prove the most important. She d. without me having the opportunity of telling her what I learned about this unique family. So I would like at this time to share my story with you:
We begin our story with Abner Baker, first Co., Clerk of Clay Co.,. Abner was b. in Prince Edward Co., Virginia, September 18, 1775. He came to Kentucky in 1795 and first settled in Garrard Co., where he m. Elizabeth Buford. He was appointed Clerk of Garrard Co., in 1803 and held this office until he moved to Clay Co., in 1807. Abner Baker kept a recd. keeping book throughout his life he called his "Life Book". In this small notebook he kept recd. about his family. You can imagine my surprise when I read the following statement taken from this book. Abner Baker stated that there were three brothers Samuel, Andrew and Caleb, who first came to America. They were gunsmiths with a grant from the King of England to manufacture guns for the colonies. He goes on to say that his grandfather, Caleb Baker, and his family removed from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, bought land and settled in what was then called "The Backwoods" in Amelia Co., Virginia on Buffalo Creek.
Was this just a coincident, or were Aunt Lillie and Abner Baker talking about the same Baker family? A Mr. Samuel E. Dyke, a researcher in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania, finally convinced me I was on the right tract when I came across some writings. This was a report given to the Kentucky Rifle's Association in 1972. It seems that the Association had employed Mr. Dyke to do some research for them. They wanted him to see if he could find out the person or persons responsible for making the first Pennsylvania Rifles or what was sometimes call the "KENTUCKY LONG RIFLE". Mr Dyke in his report states; "We feel as though these early gunsmiths came into Chester, Pennsylvania, or New Castle, Delaware, from abroad and migrated up the Susquehanna River to where the Pequea flows into it and set up shop making guns." He goes on to say that Robert Baker came into Lancaster Co., Court on August 15, 1719 and asked permission to erect a gun boring mill at the mouth of Pequea Creek on his land. Permission was granted. Robert Baker and his son Caleb set up their gun shop and operated it until 1728. It was at this time Robert Baker d.. His son, Caleb Baker, continued to operate this gun shop until the family moved to Amelia Co., Virginia.
The above Caleb Baker was the grandfather of Abner Baker, first Clerk of Clay Co.,. Although Abner Baker is the one of the most interesting of people, he is not the subject of our story. I only used his statements and those of Mr Dyke to establish the fact that some of the Bakers now living in Clay and Owsley Counties can trace their ancestor's back to these early Pennsylvania Bakers.
Abner Baker, in his "Life Book", stated that his grandfather Caleb, had two brothers, Andrew and Samuel Baker. These two brothers would prove the most adventurous of this Baker Family. In the early 1750s Andrew Baker, John Cox, Enoch Osborn and several other neighboring families in Pennsylvania set out on a westward journey. This journey eventually led them into the Yadkin River Valley, in present day Wilkes Co., North Carolina. This small group of Pennsylvanians would be among the first to settle in the area.
Some of these people settled along the Yadkin River, others of the more adventurous nature, crossed the Blue ridge Mountains and settled along New River in what is now Ash and Allegheny Counties, North Carolina. No white man had attempted settlement here before. New River was known at the time only by it's Indian name "Saxphaw". It was here, along the south branch, Andrew Baker made his first home.
Andrew Baker remained in the area of New River until about 1753, He then decided to push even deeper into Indian country. He moved down New River into what is now Grayson Co., Virginia, very near the North Carolina line. Here Andrew staked out a large track of land he called his "Peach Tree Bottom" track. But the next summer, he and his family were run out by the Indians. He returned to his prior settlement on New River, where he would remain for the next ten years or so. He did, however, make one other attempt to settle his "Peach Tree Bottom" track. This was in 1767 or 1768. This time he encountered another problem. In Andrew's long absence, Dr. Thomas Walker, a surveyor for the Loyal Land Company, had staked and claimed the "Peach Tree Bottom" track, for his employers. He had to now purchase a 1000 acres of his orig. claim before he could resettle on it again. It seems that it just wasn't meant to be. The following year, he was once again forced out by the Indians and back to his old settlement. One might wonder why Andrew was so determined to settle this particular track of land. The answer lay in what was on and in this land, more so, than the land itself. For you see, one of the largest iron ore deposits in this area was discovered on the land. I think Andrew Baker, and at least one of his sons, were involved in the Iron business. His son James Baker and he built several large iron furnaces along Cranberry Creek, a tributary of the south branch of New River. The remains of some of these Iron Furnaces can be seen even today. They were at their peek production during the Revolutionary War.
Robert Baker, Sr. lived in Lancaster Co., PA, on Piquea Creek. He and his sons were gunsmiths in Lancaster Co., PA, in VA and in NC. They invented/developed the "Kentucky" Rifle and developed hand operated machines to cut the rifling in the barrel. From Bonnie Jean Miller Website.
Editors Note: It is interesting that a Thomas Anderson, Sr, from Kentucky, was with General Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans and stood next to another Kentucky sharpshooter, who shot General Puckingham from his white charger. The general thought he well out of range but underestimated the accuracy and range of the "Kentucky Long Rifle"! After the battle, Thomas Anderson walked back to KY only to find that his family had moved to Dubois Co., Indiana. So he just walked on over to Indiana. Two of his sons, John and Thomas, Jr, m. two of my GG-aunts, Daus. of David G. & Nancy Brittain Brown, in DuBois Co., Indiana. Byron Brown January 16, 2000.
Wins Battle of New Orleans: Jackson was then ordered to defend New Orleans. Finding the city foolishly ignoring its danger, he quickly put it under martial law and rallied the citizens to prepare for attack. To build up his small regular army, he recruited frontier riflemen from Tennessee and Kentucky and organized a force of raw volunteers--free blacks, planters, and pirates headed by the freebooter, Jean Lafitte (see Lafitte). This was the awkward force of some 5,500 that Jackson fused together.
Beyond the crude American ramparts of cotton bales lay 10,000 British regulars. These were veteran troops who had fought in Europe's Napoleonic Wars. Beginning late in December 1814 they bombarded the American defenses, setting the cotton bale ramparts afire. betw. skirmishes and shellings, Jackson's men doggedly threw up earthen breastworks.
On Jan. 8, 1815, with only contempt for Jackson's amateur army, the British troops charged. It was a slaughter. Wave after wave of the charging redcoats fell before the grapeshot and rifle bullets of the grim American defenders. Shattered, the British withdrew, having suffered 2,237 casualties, including three generals. Jackson's casualties that day were only 71. (See also War of 1812.)
The tragic mistake of the battle was that it was fought after the peace had been signed days earlier, Dec. 24, 1814, ending the war. In that era of slow communication, news of the peace did not reach Jackson in time to prevent the conflict.
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From Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia Deluxe 1999 The Learning Company, Inc.

Rifles. Rifle shooting was a way of life on the American frontier, and in farming settlements on the Atlantic seaboard rifles were used for recreation as well as for protection and hunting. The flintlock Kentucky rifle, produced from about 1750 by American gunsmiths from England, Germany and Switzerland, provided fair accuracy up to 200 yards--then considered a long range.
---------------------------------------------------------
From Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia Deluxe 1999 The Learning Company, Inc.
***Milly McGrane FireDot7@ihug.co.nz
*******************
Robert Baker settled in Conestoga Township, Chester County, PA (later Lancaster County, PA). He bought 500 acres of land on the Susquehanna River from Col. John French. Robert and his sons were gunsmiths and were commissioned by the King of England to make fire arms for the Colonies. Later the Bakers would join the Colonies against England in the Revolutionary War.
******************
Name: Robert BAKER , Sr. 1 2 3 4
Sex: M
Birth: ABT. 1670 in N. Ireland 5 6 4
Death: 1728 in Lancaster Co, PA 7 8 9 4
Note: [baker22.FTW]
!RECORDS:
1718 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. No Baker listed.
1719 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. Robert Baker and two sons 15/4 (land)
1720 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. Robert Baker and sons 12/6
1721 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. Robert Baker and son.
1722 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. Robert Baker and son in western part.
1723 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. Robert Baker and son in western part.
1725 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. Robert Baker and son in western part.
1726 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. Robert Baker and son in western part.
1727 Conestoga section, PA Assessment list. Robert Baker and son in western part.
(Eggleston 1941c, Rineer 1984a)
!DEATH DATE: Died 1728 intestate in Lancaster Co, PA. Estate was cleared through Orphan's Court with son Caleb made administrator on 13 Sep 1728. Bond witnessed by Douglas Baker. (Eggleston 1941c, Ray 1946, pg 443)
!REFERENCES:
Eggleston, Joseph D. 1941b. The Buffaloe Settlement and Its Makers. With an Account of some of their Descendants. Virginia Mag. Hist. Biog. XLIX:234-243.
Eggleston, Joseph D. 1941c. The Buffaloe Settlement and Its Makers. The Baker Family. Virginia Mag. Hist. Biog. XLIX:311-325.
Herndon, John Goodwin, 1943. Some of the Descendants of the Reverend John Thomson (c. 1690-1753). Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, XLIXII:454-464.
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Deed Abstracts & Revolutionary War Oaths of Allegiance. Deed Bks A through M-1729 through ca 1770.
Ray, Worth S. 1946. The Mecklenburg Signers and Their Neighbors. Reprinted: 1982. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc. pgs 313-558.
Rineer, A. Hunter. 1984a. Appendix III. Conestoga - Donegal - Tulpehocken - Pequea Tax Lists: 1725. Lancaster County Heritage 1:12-15.
Marriage 1 Wife Birth surname? [BAKER] b: ABT. 1677 in N. Ireland or Scotland
Married: ABT. 1695 in N. Ireland or Scotland 10 4
Children
Caleb BAKER b: ABT. 1696 in N. Ireland
Samuel BAKER b: ABT. 1698 in N. Ireland
Douglas BAKER b: ABT. 1700 in , N. Ireland
Mary BAKER b: ABT. 1705 in N. Ireland
Robert BAKER , Jr. b: ABT. 1707 in , N. Ireland
Sources:
Title: The Buffaloe Settlement and Its Makers. The Baker Family
Author: Eggleston, Joseph D., 1941c
Publication: Virginia Magazine of History and Biography XLIX:311-325
Note: Photocopy in Jerrold Haldiman files
Call Number: Bluebonnet
Media: Magazine
Title: The Mecklenburg Signers and Their Neighbors
Author: Ray, Worth S. 1946
Publication: Reprinted: 1982. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc.
Note: Photocopy of selected pages in Jerrold Haldiman files
Call Number: 975.676, R263m Bluebonnet
Media: Book
Page: pg 443
Title: The Buffaloe Settlement and Its Makers. With an account of some of their Descendants
Author: Eggleston, Joseph D., 1941b
Publication: Virginia Magazine of History and Biography XLIX:234-243
Note: Photocopy in Jerrold Haldiman files
Media: Magazine
Title: baker22.FTW:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Sep 17, 2000
Title: Estimate, Jerrold Haldiman
Media: Other
Page: Year based on probable birth of first son.
Title: Baker1.txt
Author: O'Connor, William
Publication: Received from Dave E. Williams 07 Mar 1997
Note: Printed copy in Jerrold Haldiman files
Media: Other
Page: also uses 1670
Title: The Buffaloe Settlement and Its Makers. The Baker Family
Author: Eggleston, Joseph D., 1941c
Publication: Virginia Magazine of History and Biography XLIX:311-325
Note: Photocopy in Jerrold Haldiman files
Call Number: Bluebonnet
Media: Magazine
Page: pg 312 1728
Title: The Mecklenburg Signers and Their Neighbors
Author: Ray, Worth S. 1946
Publication: Reprinted: 1982. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co, In
Note: Photocopy of selected pages in Jerrold Haldiman files
Call Number: 975.676, R263m Bluebonnet
Media: Book
Page: pg 443 1728
Title: Baker1.txt
Author: O'Connor, William
Publication: Received from Dave E. Williams 07 Mar 1997
Note: Printed copy in Jerrold Haldiman files
Media: Other
Page: has 1738
Title: Estimate, Jerrold Haldiman
Media: Other
Page: year & location

More About Robert Baker:
Record Change: Jun 28, 2005

More About Robert Baker and <Unnamed>:
Marriage: Abt. 1682, Lancaster, England.

Children of Robert Baker are:
  1. Robert Baker, b. Dec 11, 1686, d. date unknown.
  2. +Caleb Baker Sr., b. Abt. 1690, England, d. Mar 1754, Prince Edward, Virginia, USA.
Created with Family Tree Maker


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