Starting Sept. 5, 2014, Genealogy.com will be making a big change. GenForum message boards, Family Tree Maker homepages, and the most popular articles will be preserved in a read-only format, while several other features will no longer be available, including member subscriptions and the Shop.
 
Learn more


[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]

Descendants of Thomas Potts

Generation No. 4


6. JOHN4 POTTS (THOMAS3, JOHN2, THOMAS1) was born 1658.

Notes for J
OHN POTTS:
John POTTS was born about 1658 in Llangirrig, Montgomeryshire, Wales. Chapter XI - The Orphan Children of John Potts, of Wales. The Potts Family in Great Britain and America - 1901 - Thomas Maxwell Potts page 250
In the year 1896, several orphans, children of John Potts, deceased, and late of Wales, were sent over to the care of Friends in Pennsylvania. It seems very probable that they were passengers in the good ship " William Galley," (Note: See page 234, ente) which brought so many Friends from the Welsh Counties of Radnor and Montgomery, and in which Thomas pPotts, Junior, (Colebrookdatle), came a passenger to Pennsylvania. The JOHN POTTS, is believed to be identical with John Potts, the persecuted Quarker of Llangirrig, Montgomeryshire, in Wales, of whom some account is given on pages 67 and 68, in this work. He was a brother of Thomas Potts, (Miller), of Bristol Township, Philadelphia County.
Neither the names nor the number of all these children are given in any record so far discovered. It is, however, quite certain that John Potts and Mary Potts were two of these orphan children. The Friends of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting had the care of these children, and the Meeting minutes contain several references to them, of which the following are copies:
"5 mo. 26, 1699. Whereas John Austin proposed to this meeting that seveal Children of John Potts of Wales, came here last year, their passage being paid, this meeting desires Edward Shippen and Anthony Morris to Speak with the persons concerned, and see for convenient places in order that the Children be bound out apprentices by the next Orphans Court.
1 mo. 29, 1700. John Kinsey reports that there are two Orphans, Children of One John Potts to be put out, Thomas Potts also desiring (be their uncle) that this meeting would appoint some friends, to put them out to friends. John Kinsey & Anthony zmorris are desired to see it done.
2 mo. 26, 1700. John Kinsey & Anthony Morris are desired to continue their care in putting out Jn Potts's Children.
11 mo. 30, 1701. Isaac Shoemaker laying before this meeting,That a friend's Child named Mary Potts having been with him more than two years, the time agreed is near out, and she wants learning. In order therefore that she may have what learning is suitable, he desires to have her bound with him for some longer time. Whereupon Samuel Carpenter & John Kinsey are desired to take care therein, making report thereof to the next monthly meeting.
12 mo. 27, 1702. John Kinsey & John Parsons are desired to use their endeavour to get Thomas (John) Potts's (NOTE: Mr. William John Potts examined these records very carefully, and was fully convinced that the name "Thomas" was a clerical error, written in mistake by the Clerki or transcriber, Insteaed of "John.") Child from the place where it is, upon as easy Terms as they can, in order tohaveit placed with a friend.
1 mo. 27, 1702. John Kinsey & John Parsons are continued to take care concerning the Child of Thomas (John) Potts, (See Note above) decease, to place it out with some honest friend. It being thought that William Rutledge's may be a fit place for her.
2 mo. 24, 1702. John Parsons reporting that the persons with whom the Child of Thomas (John) Potts, (See Note Above) is not willing to part with it. He and John Kinsey are desired so trya little further what they can do therein.
1 mo. 26, 1703. John Austin lays before this Meeting that John Potts, who was bound aprentice to him to learn the Carpenter's Trade, doth not like it, but had rather have some other emplyment, Therefore Anthony Morris (who was concerned in the binding of him) and William Hudson are desired to do what is needful in the matter, and give an account therof to the next Monthly Meeting.
1 mo. 25, 1708. John Potts, who was an Orphan bound apprentice to John Autin by approbation of this Monthly Meeting, Complains that he hath Served out his apprenticeship, and his mistress, will not discharge him, and desires assistance. In order thereto this meeting appoints Edward Shippen, Nathan Stanbury & David Lloyd to enquire into the matter and if they find he hath severed out his time, that then they Endeavour to see him discharged, and Report their proceedings to the next Monthly Meeting.
2 mo. 29, 1708. Report they cannot understand that he hath served out his time, therefore could not discharge him.
These records make it quite certain that John Potts and Mary Potts were two of these orphan children. It is also evident that another orphan daughter was under the care of some family who were not members of the Friends meeting. In another Chapter, entitled "Kinship of the Potts' of Pennsylvania," it will be suggested who the other children are thought to be.
He was married. John POTTS had the following children:
+28 i. John POTTS.
+29 ii. Mary POTTS.
+30 iii. Margaret POTTS.
+31 iv. Eleanor POTTS.

     
Children of J
OHN POTTS are:
  i.   JOHN5 POTTS.
  ii.   MARY POTTS.
  iii.   MARGARET POTTS.
  iv.   ELEANOR POTTS.


7. THOMAS4 POTTS (THOMAS3, JOHN2, THOMAS1) was born 1660 in Llanidloes, Montgomershire, Wales, and died October 03, 1719 in Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He married JUDITH SMITH. She was born in Long Island, New York, and died June 1749 in Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

Notes for T
HOMAS POTTS:
Thomas POTTS was born about 1660 in Llangirrig or Llanidloes, Montgomeryshire, Wales. He died on Oct 3 1719 in Pennsylvania. He was a Miller. Thomas Potts, Sen., was a resident of Bristol Township, Philadelphia County. He seems to have come to Pennsylvania from Wales, it is supposed from Llangirrig or Llanidloes, Montgomeryshire. He was a miller by occupation, and was a partyto numerous land conveyances, owning lands and mills in Bristol Township, and in New Jersey. He was a member of the Society of Friends and attached to Abington Meeting. He was an acceptable Public Friend, as ministers of that Society are termed, and after 1700, traveled much in the service of Truth. In contempoary records he is variously styled "Thomas Potts, Sen.," "Thomas Potts, yeoman," and "Thomas Potts, miller," while recently he has often been referred to as "Thomas Potts, the Quaker Preacher," In this work he will be designated, when necessary, as "Thomas Potts, (Miller)."
He is first noticed in Pennsylvania, as a witness to the marriage certificate of John Austin and Jane Potts, on 9 mo. 11, 1686. At the marriage of Friends it was customary for those present to sign the marriage certificate as witnesses, the relatives of the contracting parties, signing first and following each other in the order of nearest connection. In this instance, Thomas Potts signs immediately after the mother of the bride, which is a strong evidence of near relationship.
His first purchase of land seems to have been, 150 acres on the west side of the Schuylkill River, bought 10 mo. 5, 1692, from John Blunston, attorney for William Shardlow of London, England. The deed recorded at Philadelphia in Deed Book E. 7, Vol. 9, page 53
On 2 mo. 2, 1695, "Thomas Potts, of Philadelphia, Yeoman, for ye consideration of 75 pounds current silver money of Pennsilvania, to him paid by David Hugh, of Merion in Welch tract, yeoman," conveyed "all that tract of land with buildings and improvements," scituated on the west side of Skoolkill," etc., containing 150 acres formerly purchased of John Blunston, the 5th day of the tenth month, 1692. The witnesses to this letter were Thomas Pritchard, David Potts, and ffrancis Cooke.
The earlier public records are frequently quite deficient, as in many instances the recording of deeds was long delayed or they were not recorded at all. The Deed-Books at Philadelphia, show at least some of the land transactions of Thomas Potts. He build two water corn mills or grist mills on a brach of Franklford Creek, not far from Germantown, that were long known as "Potts's Mills," or "Potts' Mills." Among land conveyances, aside from the foregoing, are the following.
On 4 mo. 28, 1699, Thomas Potts, yeoman, purchased 100 acres of land in Bristol Township, from Jacob Shoemaker(or Shoemaker), (NOTE: On June 17, 1699, Jacob Shoemaker made a deed to John Moore for land in Bristol Township, which ispartially described as "Bounded Easterly by former land of said John Moore, Southerly by the City Liberties, Westerly by the said Jacob's Land sold to his Brother-in-law Thomas Potts, and northerly by Land of Samuel Richardson, as the same is actually divided." As Thomas Potts was then unmarried, (we believe), to have been brothers-in-law, Jacob Shoemaker must have married Thomas Potts' sister. This view is supported by the fact that Jacob Shoemaker's children signed Potts marrige certificates among relatives, and were in other ways associated with the Potts family. Jacob Shoemaker's wife's name was Margaret. He came to Pennsylvania in 1685, a single man.) and on Sept. 6, 1705, he bought another tract in the same Township, from the said Shoemaker.
On "29, 9ber, 705," Heifert Papen of Germantown, conveyed two tracts of land in Germantown, one parcel of 21 1/4/ acres and another of 28 3/4 acres, containing together 50 acres, to Samuel Richardson,Richard Townsend, Thomas Potts, Sr., and Samuel Cart, all of the County of Philadelphia, yeomen. Thomas Potts, Sen., by a deed dated Oct. 2, 1707, sold and set over his interest in thiese two tracts to the other three partners. On October 8, 1711, Samuel Richardson. Richard Townsend and Samuel Cart, in considersation of L200, executed a deed, conveying this same 50 acres in German Township, to Thomas Potts,Sr., Thomas Canby, John Cadwakkaderm David Potts, Isaac Delaphine, Morris Morrs, Henry Cunnards, William Lukens, etc. These were Trustees of the Friends Meeting, who purchased it for a Meeting House lot. On 2 mo. 18, 1712, the signing of the deed was confirmed by Peter Shoemaker and Isaac Shoemaker. (See Deed-Book, E. 7, Vol 8, p. 175. Philadelphia.)
In 1706, Thomas Potts, of Bristol Township, yeoman, sold to Everard Bolton a one fourth interest in certain lands and two water corn mills or grist mills in Bristol Township, commonly known as 'Potts's Mills." In the same year Thomas Potts, Sen., of Bristol Township, miller, and George Gray, of the City of Philadelphia, merchant, were parties to several real estate conveyances of lands, etc., in Bristol Township.
On Dec. 26, 1717, Thomas Potts, Sen., of Bristol Township,yeoman, purchased two small tracts of land in said Township from Joshua Fincher and Elizabeth, his wife, On the same day Thomas Potts and Judith, his wife, made a deed to Joshua Fincher for a lot in the same Township.
Among public records are to be found a number of original signatures of Thomas Potts. They are marked by certain characteristics that make them readily recognized and easily distinguished from those of any of his contemporaries who bore the same name.
The papers relating to the decedant's estate are in the Register's Office at Philadelphia.
Thomas Potts and David Potts were witnesses to the will of William Howell, of Cheltenham Township, Philadelphia County, made 12 mo. 20, 1709.
Thomas Potts was an earnest and active mameber of the religious Society of Friends, being attached to the Germantown Prerparative Meeting, which was under the care of the Abington Monthly Meeting. From the minutes of Abington Monthly Meeting (NOTE: The early minutes of Abington Monthly Meeting are very meager and evidently imcomplete. It is possible that the original minutes were written upon separate slips of paper andsubsequently copied into a book, when some of the slips may have been lost.) and other sources, it appears, that from about 1705 to the end of his life, he devoted himself very largely to the duties of a public Friend or religious minister, traveling and visiting Friends in the service of Truth, in Maryland, Virginia, New England, the West Indes, England, Ireland, and other places.
in "Hazard's Register," it is stated that"About this time (1705) or the last year, Thomas Potts of Pennsylvania went to pay a visit to Friends in England and Ireland," and in 1705 William Penn, writing from England, mentions Thomas Potts as about to return to Pennsylvania. Two years laterhe again visited England and Ireland, having been granted a Certificate for that purpose by Abington Monthly Meeting on 3 mo. 26, 1707. In the same year Thomas Chalkley mentions Thomas Potts,in his journal, as a companion of himself and Anthony Morris, on a visit to Friends in the West Indes, from whence they sailed for England. Rutty's "History of the Rise and Progress of the People called Quakers in Ireland, etc., Dublin, 1751," has the following, " In 1707, James Farmer, from Essex, John Bradley, from Cheshire, Thomas Potts, from Pennsylvania, also divers other ministering Friends from this nation, were diligent in the exercise of their gifts, both in meetings held among Friends and strangers."
In 1711, he made a visit to Maryland, and on his return immediately prepared for a journey into New England, as it appears from the following entry in the Abington Monthly Meeting minutes of 4 mo. 25, 1711.
"Our friend Thomas Potts lately returned from Maryland upon ye Service of Truth, & recommended to good Service from Tredevan Creek & now the said Thomas having declared that he finds a concern on him to Visit friends at New England, requests a Certificate Inorder for ye Said Service, which allso was granted."
He was accompanied by Thomas Chalkley upon this visit, and it is probable that they visited Friends on Long Island and at other points on the route of travel. it may be that it was upon this, or a similar journey, Thomas Potts first met Judith Smith,of Flushing, whom he married in the next year. The minutes of Abington Monthly Meeting for 5 mo. 28, 1712, show that, " A Certificate was granted Thomas Potts in order to proceed on towards Marriage with Judith Smith of Long Island."
The marriage was accomplished not long afterwards, as shown by the following abstract from the Friends records of marriages at Long Island. (See New York Genealogical and Biographical Record,Vol. VI, page101.)
"The foreteenth day of the Sixth Month Ano One thousand seven hundred & twelve. At flushing - Thomas Potts of Bristol Township in ye county of Philadelphia in pennsilvania and Judith Smith of flushing, &c."
In a latter part of the year 1712, he again visited Friends in Maryland, and on 2 mo. 25, 1715.
"A Certificate was granted Thomas Potts, in order to go to visit Friends in Barbadoes, upon ye Service of Truth."
Sometime after his return he made arrangements to settle in Maryland, and on 11 mo. 30, 1715, "A Certificate was granted Thomas Potts in order to Settle in Maryland."
He removed to Talbot County, Maryland, where he continuued to live for some time. While a resident of Maryland, he issued a letter of attorney to Joseph Kirkbride ofr Bucks County, enpowering him to sell his land, house and mills in Somerset County, New Jersey. The original document remains on file in the office of the Department of State at Trenton.
No deeds of conveyance of this property have come to the notice of the compiler, and neither the date of purchase nor sale can be given. Stony Brook is a short distance south of the Town of Princeton, and within the limits of the present County of Mercer.
Thomas Potts returned to Pennsylvania from Maryland in about a year and a half, and on 6 mo. 25, 1717, the minutes of Abington Monthly Meeting contain this record, "Thomas Potts produced a Certificate from Treadevan in Maryland which was read and accepted."
He subsequently made one or two other visits to Friends to the southward. On 6 mo. 25, 1718, a Monthly Meeting minute shows that, "Thomas Potts acquainted friends that he is minded to travail Down Towards ye Capes of Delaware & Desires a Certificate: The Meeting Do appointed Dennis Cundras & John Lucan to make Enguiry how he leaves his Business."
He was frequently appointed to attend Quarterly Meetings, and on 12 mo. 23, 1718, he was appointed "to visit families."
On 1 mo. 30, 1719, this entry, which probably refers to an intended visit to the southward.
"At this Meeting things was found Clear Relating to Thomas Pots and a Certificate was granted him."
On his return this minute was entered on 5 mo. 27, 1719.
"At this Meeting Thomas Potts having lately Returned from: traveling in Meryland & Virginia Produced a Certificates from Treadaven Monthly Meeting.
Thomas Potts did not survive long after his return from this visit, as he died before October (8mo), 3, 1719, the date on which his will was probated. He was undoubtedly a man of rare worth and exemplary character. William Penn calls him "honest Thomas Potts," and an estimate of his character may be gathered from the Penn and Logan Correspondence.
The age of Thomas Potts has not been ascertained. As he signs as a witness to a marriage certificate in 1686, it is probable that he was then a well grown youth or a young man. Whenhe purchased land in 1692, he must have been above twenty one years of age. It seems reasonable to conclude that he was at least forty years old when he married Judith Smith in 1712, and fifty years or over when
Thomas Potts left a will, dated 3 mo. (May), 6, 1719. It was proven October 3, 1719, and is recorded in the Register's office at Philadelphia in Will-Book D, p. 133.
In 1724 Judith Potts, the widow married Thomas Sharp, as her second husband. The minutes of Abington Monthly Meeting of 2 mo. 27, 1724, has a record of their passing meeting, feginning thus, " Whereas Thomas Sharp of West Jersie & Judith Potts Weddow having Declared their Intenetions to Marriage with Each Other before two Monthly Meetings, etc."
The marriage very likely took place shortly afterwards.
Thomas Sharp was a widower with seveal grown-up children. He died within a few years after this second marriage. His will is recorded in Liber 3, folio 55, in the Department of State at Trenton. He is therein described as "Thomas Sharp, of Newtown, Gloucester County, West Jersey, yeomen." The will is dated 8 mo. 5, 1724. He mentions his wife; his sons Thomas, John, Samuel and Joseph; and daughters Elizabeth Hallowell, Mary Smith and Sarah Pearce. Executors, ffriends, John Estaugh, and Joseph Cooper, Jr. Witnesses, Benjamin Thackers, Joseph Thackera and Mary Thackera. Both persons named as executors, declined to serve, as also did Judith Sharp, the widow, Samuel Sharp, one of the sons was appointed administrator on the ____ day of ____, 1728.
There are on record at Philadelphia, several deeds for the conve4yance of lands in Bristol Township, formerly property of Thomas Potts, late deceaseed. On March 1, 1741, Judith Sharp, formerly Judith Potts, mother of the said Thomas, join in a mortgage covering one hundred acrs in said township, in favor of Mary Carter. In 1744 and 1748, Judith Sharp, Thomas Potts, Jr., and Susanna, his wife, heirs of Thomas Potts,Sr., join in deeds for the sale of Lands in Bristol Township to Robert Strettel.
James Logan, on April 4, 1718, purchased a one fourth interest in the "Potts Corn Mill," in Bristol Township,for L200. The property included fifteen acres of land. The "Pennsylvania Gasette" for April 2, 1744,contained an advertisement for the sale of Potts' Mill. Another advertisment appeared August 21, 1746.
Judith Sharp died about June, 1749. Her will is dated 2 mo. 6, 1748, and was proven July 8, 1749. It is recorded at Philadelphia, in Will Book ___, filio___.
The Potts Family in Great Britain and America, 1901 - Thomas Maxell Potts
The Potts Family in America, Thomas Maxwell Potts page 201
He was married to Judith SMITH on May 28 1712 in Abington MM, Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania. He was married to Judith SMITH 5 mo. 28, 1712 in Abington MM, Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania. Judith SMITH was born in Flushing, Nassau Co., New York. Thomas POTTS and Judith SMITH had the following children:
+32 i. Thomas POTTS Jr..

     
Child of T
HOMAS POTTS and JUDITH SMITH is:
  i.   THOMAS POTTS5 JR., b. Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.


8. DAVID4 POTTS (THOMAS3, JOHN2, THOMAS1)1 was born 1670 in Montgomeryshire, Wales1, and died 1730 in Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania1. He married ALICE CROASDALE1 January 22, 1691/921, daughter of THOMAS CROASDALE and AGNES HATHERNWAITE. She was born 1674.

Notes for D
AVID POTTS:
Forbear of President Theodore Roosevelt. See "The Potts Family" by Thomas Maxwell Potts.

David POTTS was born about 1670 in Montgomeryshire, Wales. He died on Nov 16 1730 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., Pennsylvania. He was buried in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Potts Family in Great Britain and America, 1901 Thomas Maxwell Potts
He was born about 1670, in Montgomeryshire, Wales, it is believed. He was a Friend, married Alice Croasdale in 1694, settled in Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, and died in 1730.
David has already been mentioned in this work on pages 192, 196, 203, 252, 278, and in Chapter XIX, page 282, et seq. The time of his coming to Pennsylvania, has not been discovered. He may have come with other members of the family when he was but a lad. The first memtion of him that has been noticed is on 7 mo. 24, 1692, when he became the bondsman for Elizabeth Bennet, (NOTE: see page 196, anti) as executrix of Edmund Bennett, her late husband. His signature attached to the bond, which remains on file in the Register's office at Philadelphia, is here fairly reproduced. seems to remain. The early records of the Meeting are quite inperfect., David Potts and Alice Croasdale, youngest daughter of Thomas and Agnes (Hathernthwaite) Croasdale, (The Croasdale Family. Thoms Croasdale and Alice Hatternthewaite were married 3 mo. 1, 1664, according to the records of Lancaster (England) Monthly Meeting of Friends. They resided in Yorkshire for sometime, but in 1682 came to Pennsylvania in the ship Welcome with Willia Penn. They setted on Neshaminy Creek in Bucks County, in the vicinity of the present village of Langhorne. Thomas Croasdale died 9 mo. 2, 1684, and Alice 8 mo. 20, 1686. They had the following children, all born in England.
1. William Croasdale, b. 12, 7, 1664; d. 1715; m. 1st Elizabeth Hayhurst, 2nd, Sarah Wilford
2. John Croasdale b. 5, 11, 1666; d. 10, 6, 1796; m. Marah Chapman
3. Elizabeth Croasdalen b. 11, 5, 1667; d. 6,4, 1682.
4. Mary Croasdale, b. 8, 30, 1669; d. 1716, m. William Smith
5. Bridget Croasdale, b. 6, 30, 1671; d. 2, 26, 1701; m. John Cowgill
6. Alice Croasdale, b. 8, 3, 1673; m. David Potts
For a fuller account of the Croasdale, see "Our Family Ancestors," by Thomas Maxell Potts)
declared their intentions of marriage with each other, before the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting, 10 mo. 29, 1693. (December 1693), passed the Meeting the second time 11 mo. 26, 1693-4 (January 1694), and were granted a certificate to marry under the care of Middletown Monthly Meeting in Bucks County. The following is a copy of an entry in the minutes of the latter Meeting.
"David Potts and Alice Croasdale have requested to solemnize their marriage within this meeting, because her relations mostly dwell here, and they belonging to Philadelphia have brought a Certificate from that Monthly Meeting, that testifies they have proceeded there orderly, and nothing is found against them, and also requested that they may accomplish their marriage here, which they have granted them; so this meeting is satisfied and grants their request."
The marriage certificate can be found on pages 442- 443
Thomas and Jonas Potts, who are thr first signerrs to this certificate, were brothers of David, as it is believed. (See Chapters VII, VIII, and XIX, Part II). William Croasdale was a brother of the bride, and Mary Smith, who was the wife of William Smith, was a sister. John Cowgill was a brother-in-law. Possibly some of the other witnesses were also related.
In 1695, David Potts purchased 150 acres of land in Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, in the vicinity of Germantown. He subsequently sold 50 acres, leaving him 100 acres upon which he seems to have settled and spent the remainder of his life. The following memoranda, relating to the purchase of the land, is from the minutes of teh Board of Property, as printed in Volume XIX, page 278 of the "Pennsylvania Archives" second series.
"The Commiss'rs, by Patent deatd 26th 9 mo. 1685, Granted 500 acres to Rob't Longshore, Puchaser in Bristol Township, in the County of Philad'a, joyning on Germantown, Irenia Land, and Will'm Watkins, of which by Deed dated 1st 4 mo. 1686, he sold to Samuel Bennett 200 acres, who by Deed dated 2, 4, 1695, sold 150 thereof to David Potts, who sold to Wm. Harman 50 acres now in the Possession of Peter Clever."
"The said David Potts Requests a Warr't of Resurvey on the said 150 acres according to the Ture bounds of the Tract and to Cutt off 50 a's to said Harman or Clever. Ordered that a Warr't be accordingly granted for the said 50 acres to the cutt off as by agreement made between them and a Patent on the Return if required, they paying for the Overplus, it any."
In 1716, he had a grant of 100 acres of land in the Manor of Springfield for which he wa to pay L80.
When a Friends Meeting was established at Germantown, David Potts seems to have been transferred to that Meeting. On October 11, 1711, Samuel Richardson, Richard Townsend and Samuel Cart, for the consideration of L200, conveyed 50 acres of land in German Township, to Thomas Potts, Sr., Thomas Canby, John Cadwallader, David Potts, Isaac Delaphine, Morris Morris, Henry Cunnards and William Lukens. These latter were Trustees of Germantown Meeting, and in 1712, David Potts was appointed one of the two overseers of the Meeting at Germantown, From this time forward, David Potts was frequently appointed to attend Quarterly Meeting, and entrusted with other matters of greater or less importance.
On June 15, 1728, David Potts petitioned the Orphans' Court of Bucks County, representing that William Croasdale, by his will about the year 1715, devised to his grandson William Hill, a plantation in Bristol Township and a lot in Bristol, and appointed his daughter Agnes, wife of Richard Hill, executrix. She died soon after her father so the said William Hill was left by his mother, the said Agnes, to the care of his, the said David's wife, until he should arrive or attain to man's estate; and also that the said David Potts has kept and maintained the said William Hill about twelve years, etc.
David Potts was a man of good standing in the community and had the confidence of his neighbors. He represented Philadelphia County in the Provinicial Assembly for the years, 1728, 1729, and 1730. He died November 16, 1730.."The Pennsylvania Gazette" of Nov. 19, 1730, contained a notice of his death inwhich it is stated that "Monday last died Mr. David Potts, one of the Members of Assembly for this County."


Alice, wife of David, was born 8 mo. 3, 1673. She has a rather interesting history. The Croasdales came passengers with William Penn in the ship Welcome. Robert Greenway, master, in 1682. During the passage, the small -pox made its appearance in great virulence and occasioned much distress, disease. It is related that Wiliam Penn cheered the dying and the survivors with his Godly conversation during the memorable voyage. One of the passengers writing of the voyage says. "The good conversation of William Penn was very advantageous to all the company. HIs sigular care was manifested in contributing to the necessities of many who were sick of the small-pos then on board, of hwihc about thirty died."
The date of her death has not been discovered. but she probably died brfore her husband, as he does not mention her is his will. David Potts' will made Nov. 13, 1730, and proven Nov. 26, 1730, is on file in the Register's Office at Philadelphia, and recorded in Will Book E, at page 142.
Transript of the Will can be found on pages 446-448.
The third item in the foregoing Inventory includes "a large bibel." This Bible passed to the possession of David's son Ezekiel, and is still preserved by his descendants at Norristown, Pennsylvania. The writer hereof made a careful examination of this old Bible some years ago. It is well preserved, but has been rebound. There is some writing on some of the margins, scattered through the book, but nothing of historical value. If any family records were ever entered, none now remain. The book was printed at London in 1613. It was probably brought over by the family at their coming to Pennsylvania.
He was married to Alice CROASDALE on Jan 22 1693 in Middletown, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Alice CROASDALE was born on Aug 3 1673 in Yorkshire, England. She died before 1729 in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was buried in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. David POTTS and Alice CROASDALE had the following children:
+44 i. Thomas POTTS.
+45 ii. John POTTS.
+46 iii. Daniel POTTS.
+47 iv. Elizabeth POTTS.
+48 v. Jonathan POTTS.
+49 vi. Mary POTTS.
+50 vii. Stephen POTTS.
51 viii. Rebecca POTTS was born on Nov 16 1705 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., Pennsylvania.
+52 ix. Ezekiel POTTS.
+53 x. Nathan POTTS.


Notes for A
LICE CROASDALE:
Forbear of President Theodore Roosevelt. See "The Potts Family" by Thomas Maxwell Potts.

Alice, wife of David, was born 8 mo. 3, 1673. She has a rather interesting history. The Croasdales came passengers with William Penn in the ship Welcome. Robert Greenway, master, in 1682. During the passage, the small -pox made its appearance in great virulence and occasioned much distress, disease. It is related that Wiliam Penn cheered the dying and the survivors with his Godly conversation during the memorable voyage. One of the passengers writing of the voyage says. "The good conversation of William Penn was very advantageous to all the company. HIs sigular care was manifested in contributing to the necessities of many who were sick of the small-pos then on board, of hwihc about thirty died."
The date of her death has not been discovered. but she probably died brfore her husband, as he does not mention her is his will.

Alice Croasdale, youngest daughter of Thomas and Agnes (Hathernthwaite) Croasdale, (The Croasdale Family. Thoms Croasdale and Alice Hatternthewaite were married 3 mo. 1, 1664, according to the records of Lancaster (England) Monthly Meeting of Friends. They resided in Yorkshire for sometime, but in 1682 came to Pennsylvania in the ship Welcome with Willia Penn. They setted on Neshaminy Creek in Bucks County, in the vicinity of the present village of Langhorne. Thomas Croasdale died 9 mo. 2, 1684, and Alice 8 mo. 20, 1686. They had the following children, all born in England.
1. William Croasdale, b. 12, 7, 1664; d. 1715; m. 1st Elizabeth Hayhurst, 2nd, Sarah Wilford
2. John Croasdale b. 5, 11, 1666; d. 10, 6, 1796; m. Marah Chapman
3. Elizabeth Croasdalen b. 11, 5, 1667; d. 6,4, 1682.
4. Mary Croasdale, b. 8, 30, 1669; d. 1716, m. William Smith
5. Bridget Croasdale, b. 6, 30, 1671; d. 2, 26, 1701; m. John Cowgill
6. Alice Croasdale, b. 8, 3, 1673; m. David Potts
For a fuller account of the Croasdale, see "Our Family Ancestors," by Thomas Maxell Potts)

     
Children of D
AVID POTTS and ALICE CROASDALE are:
  i.   THOMAS5 POTTS1, m. RACHEL JAMES1.
  ii.   NATHAN POTTS1, d. 17541.
  iii.   JOHN POTTS1, b. 16961; m. ELIZABETH MCVAUGH1.
  iv.   DANIEL POTTS1, b. 16981; m. SARAH SHOEMAKER1.
  v.   ELIZABETH POTTS1, b. 16991; m. PETER CLEAVER1.
  vi.   JONATHON POTTS1, b. 17011; m. SARAH WOOD1.
  vii.   MARY POTTS1, b. 17031; m. JEREMIAH MCVAUGH1.
  viii.   STEPHEN POTTS1, b. 17041; m. ANNE1.
  ix.   REBECCA POTTS1, b. November 16, 1705, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania1.
9. x.   EZEKIAL POTTS, b. January 30, 1707/08, Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsulvania.


[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]
Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com