Starting Sept. 5, 2014, Genealogy.com will be making a big change. GenForum message boards, Family Tree Maker homepages, and the most popular articles will be preserved in a read-only format, while several other features will no longer be available, including member subscriptions and the Shop.
 
Learn more


[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]

Descendants of John HAMPTON




Generation No. 1


1. JOHN2 HAMPTON (ANDRE1)1,2,3,4 was born October 01, 1643 in Elphingston, East Lothian County, Scotland5, and died January 1701/02 in Freehold, New Jersey6,7,8. He married (1) UNKNOWN9,10 Bef. 1668 in Scotland11. He married (2) KATHERINE CLOUDSLEY12,13 December 07, 1675 in Dunbar, East Lothian Scotland14,15,16,17. She died Abt. 1686 in New Jersey18. He married (3) MARTHA BROWN19,20,21,22 March 03, 1686/87 in Middletown, New Jersey23,24,25, daughter of ABRAHAM BROWN and MARY POTTER. She was born Bet. 1665 - 1667 in Mansfield, Burlington, New Jersey26, and died Abt. 1697 in Freehold, New Jersey27,28. He married (4) JANE (JEAN) CURTIS29,30,31 1698 in Freehold, Monmouth Co, NJ32, daughter of THOMAS CURTIS and JANE. She was born February 11, 1660/61 in Bugbrooke, North Hamptonshire, England33,34, and died June 08, 1729 in Bucks, PA35,36,37.

Notes for J
OHN HAMPTON:
The earliest ancestor thus far "conclusively" located for our family is John Hampton. There is, however, a good possibility for tracing the family back one more generation to an Andre or Andro Hampton. The correct name was probably Andrew. We have also been made aware that the very old "e" looked like an "o" open at the top with a loop on its left [special thanks to Sanna Gaffney for helping with the translation and clarification].

It appears that John's first Scottish Hampton ancestors (Andro or Andrew and others) may have been among the English artisans and trades people encouraged to settle in Scotland's royal boroughs, beginning in the early 12th century. Hampton is an English name and can be found in England dating back to 1273, but by John's era, there were Hamptones, Hamptons, Hamptens or Hamtons in several Scottish locales, the largest concentration being in Angus and Kincardine, South and West of Aberdeen. The Hampton name is suprisingly common in Scotland, especially in the Northern part. There is a town of Hampton in Scotland between Oban and Brora and there can be found the seat of the Earl of Hampton.

A "Jhone Hamptone" was christened 1 October 1643, in the parish of Kineff south of Aberdeen. Kinneff is about ½ mile West of the coast of the North Sea and is currently called "Roadside of Kinneff." Jhone was the son of " Andre (or Andro) Hamptone " and "Ketterine Scherreff." While we do not have conclusive proof that this was the immigrant John Hampton, in addition to an appropriate birth date, other facts make it a good possibility:

Kineff and Catterline are close to some of the Clan Kieth lands. George Keith, a fellow Quaker and Surveyor General of East Jersey, was immigrant John Hampton's friend in America.

Most of the few Quakers in Scotland were converted to that belief by a scattering of Quakers among Oliver Cromwell's soldiers. A large contingent of Cromwell's troops was in Kineff and Catterline for eight months in 1651 and 1652, besieging Donnatter Castle.

One Caleb Sherife owned property adjacent to John Hampton's land in Freehold, NJ - thus offering the possibility of a family connection between John Hampton's family and the Scherreff (Sheriffe) family of Scotland. Also, the Quaker settlement in East Jersey, to which John immigrated, was known as "New Aberdeen." SOURCE: JW Foster

It is well documented that John Hampton came to East New Jersey with five children and his wife, Katherine Cloudsley, in December 1683. Another record, for David Barclay who also sailed on the same ship, shows the departure date as Aug 6, 1683. John Hampton would have been about 40 years old in 1683. They traveled aboard the ship EXCHANGE of Stockton, from Elphingstone (Elphinstone - one will find a variety of spellings, many records at the time depended on the phonetic spelling of the individual recording them), East Lothian County, Scotland. East Lothian is southeast of Edinburgh and had the ancient name of Haddingtonshire. East Lothian, is called the "Lowlands" of Scotland, along with Mid-Lothian and other counties in the region nearest the English border.

John Hampton was a "Gardner." This term had a very different meaning in 1683. It would be similar in meaning to horticulture, horticulturist or agronomy, agronomist. It was a very respected profession, as was evidenced by the fact that John Hampton and John Reid, also a "Gardner," were appointed overseers of the New Jersey Settlement by the Scottish Propieters.

John Hampton is shown by a deed for a 10 acre lot on Amboy Point given him by the Proprietors of East Jersey, dated Nov. 23, 1682, in which deed he is styled "gardner."
Olde East New Jersey part 3, Patents for Lands in Perth-Amboy
Grantee             Date
John Falconar       10 Acres       Nov. 23, 1682
Bartholomew       10       ditto
David Barclay       10       ditto
John Hampton       10       ditto

John Reid's account of the voyage on the EXCHANGE is as follows, [The ship was from Stockton and James Peacock was the Master for the 1683 voyage] "We went to Leith for our voyage to America the 2d of August, 1683. Came aboard the ship the 10th day and next day at Aberdeen, where we stayed to the 28th. Made sight of Long Island the 30th 9 br, but off again and discovered Cape May 13th Xbr. Came within Sandy Hook the 16th and ashore on Staten Island the 19th. To Elizbethtown the 23rd and to Woodbridge the 10th January, 1683/84." The exact number of passengers on the Exchange for this voyage is not known.

The Staten Island John Hampton landed on was far different from today. It was little developed and very primitive. A trip across to NJ was necessary and NJ at the time was also very undelevleoped, described as follows: "an ardous journey overland through Jersey lowlands and wilderness." I believe there is still Hampton History, as yet undiscovered, in Staten Island. George Commin (relative to the Hamptons was from Staten Island and constable there, and Jonathan Hampton - son of John Hampton, born in NJ is found in Staten Island in 1739 before moving back to where he died in 1744/45.

John Reid immigrated with John Hampton to America in 1683. He was born 2-13-1655, Mildrew Castle, Kirkliston. He was a Gardner and author of "The Scotch Gardner." He married Margaret Miller. He was joint overseer of the East Jersey settlement with John Hampton. He died 11-16-1723 in Monmouth Co, NJ. His son James, later surveyor general of NJ, sailed with him. Source: David Dobson - Original Scotch Colonists.

Recorded in Trenton, NJ are the "Redemptioners" as they were registered in the public records of Trenton. The list reads: "The names of such persons as were imported (came to America) into this Province (New Jersey area) and brought to be registered in the Secretary's Book of Records are as follows: Upon the accomp of such proprietors of this province as belongs to Scotland (came to America from Scotland): Janet HAMPTON (Indentured for 4 years), John HAMPTON and John REID, Overseers (Indentured for 4 years).

John Hampton shows in the Scottish Quaker 'Record Book of Friends Att Urie', at page 93 as having affiliated with the Quaker movement in Scotland in January 1669. The same page shows that Robert Barclay was married, in the home of his wife's father. Barclay was the first governor of East Jersey in 1682, in absentia.

In Scotland - Quaker Records, show John Hampton's marriage - 7 December 1675 in the home of Alexander Hamilton of Drumbouy to Katherine Cloudsley. The same records shows daughter Elizabeth born Oct 11, 1676; Lydia b. May 14, 1678; son John b. Sept 6, 1681. NJ Records show that John Hampton arrived in NJ with children Janet, Elizabeth, Lydia, John and David. David was probably born circa 1683, just prior to departure or en-route to America, on the 3 1/2 month crossing.

Janet Hampton (daughter of John Hampton) died in NJ in 1761 at age 93, which would give her a birth year of about 1668, earlier than the 1675 marriage date shown above for her father to Katherine Cloudsley, suggesting that John Hampton was married before Katherine Cloudsley.

It should be noted that in 1680, upon the death of George Carteret, his province of New Jersey was sold to William Penn and 11 other quackers for L3400. Penn and his partners sought to establish East NJ as a refuge for Scotish Covenanters who were much persecuted by King Charles II. Penn and his partners were called the "Proprietors."

On 23 November, 1682, before his departure from Scotland, John Hampton of Elphingstoun, East Lothian, Scotland received a 10 acre lot on Amboy Point in NJ. Agreement was stated for the Overseers of the Quaker Movement, John Reid and John Hampton, "to have 25 lbs English Yearlie, and for the first year each a share of ten acres in Amboy Point which being accoumpted at 5 lb a piece with 10 lbs of money they received in Scotland before they went away, completing their first years payment." John Hampton shows in NJ Colonial Records with first land deeded by the Proprietors on 23 November 1682.

John Hampton paid quit-rents for his estate soon after his arrival to the "proprietors" of East Jersey. Records of Gawen Lawrie, Stillwell's Historical Miscellany, Quit Rents dated Oct. 15, 1686.

John Hampton's signature is on the Quaker marriage record of Andrew Hampton, a tailor, and Margaret Cumming in Edinburgh, "the seventh day of the fourth month" 1683. Also immigrating to America at this time (on the Ship EXCHANGE) was one Andrew Hampton. Andrew is believed by most researchers to be the brother of John Hampton. The relationship between John and Andrew has not been conclusively proven. Some cite evidence that suggests that they may have been cousins, rather than brothers. An Andrew Hampton that was the son of a James Hampton has been suggested by some, as the immigrant Andrew Hampton ......... A record exists of the christening of an Andrew Hampton in Arbuthnot, Scotland, 23 July 1659. In this record, this Andrew's father is shown as James. No mother's name is on the record. Arbuthnot is a few miles west of Kineff and Catterline. [As noted above, John was recorded the son of "Andre (or Andro) Hamptone." This younger Andrew's father is shown as James, a name perpetuated among Andrew Hampton and wife Margaret's descendants. While not conclusively proven either way, most researchers believe that John and Andrew were brothers.

An accounting done for the absentee proprietors a few months after the arrival in 1683 showed John Hampton with 9 cows, 6 oxen, 2 horses and 1 mare, 2 breeding sows, 144.6.11 pounds in provisions, utensils, and necessaries. John Marsh had in hand 35.10.9 pounds for building John Hampton's house. John Reid had a similar distribution of stock and considerations.

John first settled in Perth Amboy, NJ in America.

By 8 January 1685/6, John Hampton shows with patent for 164 acres from William Haige, Surveyor General. The land was on Navesink River, Cheesquakes - today the site of a state park. Haig had been registered in East Jersey as a new immigrant at the same time as was John Hampton.

In July 1686, John Hampton petitioned for his 175 acres of headlands, for himself, **wife and five children.

John Reid did petition in December 1686 on behalf of the Scottish Proprietors, to the Perth Amboy Board of Proprietors, for the headlands in East Jersey for 47 servants imported in December 1683. The local board, "by warrant granted the same to be surveyed where desired."

*In 1687 John Hampton married Martha Brown at Shrewsbury, New Jersey, "at the publicke meeting house of Friends." Sons Andrew, Johathan and Noah were born to this union with Martha Brown. One witness to the 1687 wedding at Shrewsbury was George Keith (1638-1716), who had studied to be a Presbyterian minister in Aberdeen, Scotland, but became a Quaker in 1662. (Source: Notes of Robert B. Cox).

1686/7, 3rd of 1st month, John Hampton of Middleton, md. to Martha Brown, of Shres., 'at the publicke meeting of house of friends," the first day of the week - No Hamptons as witnesses. Witnesses: Abraham Brown, John Hamton, Peter Tilton, Martha Hamton, George Keith, Remembrance Lippincott, Jedidah Allen, Nathaniel Cammact, John Toocker, John Harvey, Samuell Spicer, Cattron Brown, John Hance, Sarah Shreeve (Sherife?), John Chambers, Audrey West, Judah Allen, Abigael Lippincott, Ephraim Allen, Jane Borden, Caleb Shreeve (Sherife?), Jerusha Eaton, Henry Chamberlin, Elizabeth Hance, John Cheshire, Hester Vicars, Thomas Vickers, Mary Thorpp, John Lippincott, Thomas Eaton.

The Abraham Brown shown as a witness to the 1686-87 marriage of John Hampton to Martha Brown of Shrewsbury, was probably her father. Brown land adjoined Hampton Land in Monmouth County, New Jersey. The Brown family lists the marriage as follows: BROWN, Martha and John Hamton, 3 January 1687, Middletown, N.J. **This provokes the conclusion that Catherine Cloudsley (John's second wife) died before 1686/87, although I have not yet found a record of her death date.

Alexander ANDERSON died in 1687 at Chingeroras (in or near present Raritan TOWNSHIP). He was one of the Scotch settlers, and had been in the province not over two years. He left no will and on October 28, 1687, administration was granted to John HAMTON. In 1714, John BARCLAY was made administrator.
Name: Alexander Andersone - Date: 28 Oct 1687 - Location: the Chingaroras
Bond of John Hamton, of Chingaroras, planter, as administrator of the estate of; John Reid, of Amboy Perth, Deputy Surveyor, fellow bondsman.

29 Jun 1714 Anderson, Alexander. Administration on the estate of, who died intestate in 1687; not administered on by John Hamton, since deceased, granted to John Barclay, of Middlesex.

9 Dec 1687, John Hampton purchased 100 acres from Thomas Huet.

As mentioned earlier, George Keith was a Scot (originally Presbyterian) that joined the Quaker movement in Scotland and came to East Jersey as a Quaker activist, then returned to London and joined the Church of England. He came back to Pennsylvania and New Jersey and converted Quakers to the English Church, including in November 1703 in Essex County, New Jersey, Andrew Hampton and wife Margaret and eight children." Rector in Sussex, Keith's records for 4 November 1702-3 in New Jersey show, "I baptized the children of Andrew Hampton, eight in number; he and his wife are come over from Quakerism to the Church."

The following, while abbreviated may help explain the lapse in record keeping at this point in time, Rahway & Plainfield Monthly Meeting Religious Society of Friends - Preface and research done by: Charles Carroll Gardner - "......This meeting was first set up in Perth Amboy in 1686, and three years later it met at Woodbridge. From 1689 until 1704 no meeting was held, by reason of George Keith's Separation. ............ In 1704 it was re-established at Woodbridge as a preparative meeting, and in 1706 as a monthly meeting, which continued ...........................

George Keiths departure is an important event in early Quaker History and is refered to as the Keithian Schism. Prior to 1691, Keith began to question some of the Quaker doctrines. In this monumental controversy, which shook the "Society of Friends" in NJ, John Hampton was one of Keith's supporters. Keith was denied Quakerism in 1691 [kicked out of the church]. At the 1692 Annual Meeting, a gathering of church elders and ministers heard his case and declared in his favor in a signed document, John Hampton was one of the elders signing the document.

A brother of the John Hampton, Andrew Hampton, got his headland for himself and wife, in 1688, 'adjoining to the Scotch Proprietor's servants head land," at Blew Hills. This Andrew Hampton left a will in 1738 in Elizabeth Town, County of Essex, Province of East New Jersey.

1689 Jan 9 - "9th of 11th month" in margin 10th of 2d mo. 1690 - Robert Ray married Jenett Hamton, both of Shrews at home of John Hamton." Witness, include John Hamton & Martha Hamton, Jacob Lippincott, at the house of John Hamton.

1692, John Hampton was a witness at the marriage of William Ashin of Shrewsbury and Jenett Mill, "on the fifth day of the week, at a publicke meeting house of friends." Also in 1692, 29th of 7th month, John was a witness at the marriage of Abraham Brown and Leah Clayton, the former of Shrewsbury and she of Middletown, marriage at the home of John Clayton. William Penn attended the annual meeting of Friendsat Burlington and John Hampton is listed as one of the elders present at the meeting. IFOJH

On 25 October 1693 John Hampton buys 500 acres in Monmouth Co, NJ from George Keith of Philadelphia, land on the Burlington Path and adjoining land of Robert Barclay, Proprietor. During these uncertain years John Hampton continued to trade in land and apparently stay "on the right side of things."

Property records (Warrants for Surveys, Monmouth, Co, NJ) show that John and family moved to Freehold, NJ, about 1695, for he was paying quit rents on Dec. 2, 1695 on 544 acres.

3 Jul 1696, John Hampton bought 60 acres in Monmouth Co, NJ from John Reid.

In 1696 John Hampton sold the 500 acres purchased 3 years earlier from George Keith, to one Benjamin Borden of Freehold, Monmouth County. 7 Oct 1696 John Hampton of Freehold, NJ, gave deed to Benjamin Borden for "that tract of Burlington Path and that meadow, called South Meadow, purchased of George Keith and all that tract adjoining to ye sd meadow purchased of John Reid '500 ac between Jedidah Allen and Robert Barclay on Manalapay Creek and 60 acres of meadow on Manasquam River." The Hampton and Borden names will again be linked in 1734 in Virginia.

Martha Brown (wife of John Hampton), born about 1665 in Mansfield, Burlington, New Jersey; died about 1697 in New Jersey (she was the daughter of Abraham Brown and Mary Potter) - three sons, Andrew, Jonathan and Noah Hampton were born of this union.

In the period prior to 1698, John Hampton married a fourth time, this time to a widow, Jean Curtis Ogborne. She was born in England in 1661. One son, Joseph Hampton, was born (about 1702) to this union. Jean Curtis Ogborne, was the widow of Samuel Ogborne of NJ.

1698, May 12 - John Hampton, of Freehold, and wife Jane Curtis (Ogbourn - Ogbourne), sold a house, in Burlington, late in the tenure of Samuel Ogborne - former husband of Jane Hampton, to John Borradaill, of Burlington.

John Hampton died in Freehold, County Monmouth, NJ in January 1701/02. John Hampton left a will in Freehold, NJ, in which names his wife Jean (4th wife) and nine children, which was filed on January 23, 1702, indicating death before that date. The 1702/3 will for John Hampton mentioned the wife Jean; and children Jannet Ray, Elizabeth, Lydia, John, David, Andrew, Jonathan, Noah) and Joseph. John Hampton's Will was probated 2-26-1702/3.

WILL OF John HAMPTON [Transcription]
"In the name of God Amen the twentieth and third day of January one thousand seven hundred and two years According to the computation of the church of England, I John Hampton of Freehold in the County of Monmouth and province of East New Jersey planter being of perfect memorie and Remembrance praised be God do make and ordaine this my last will and testament in Manner and form following Viz Imp. I bequeath my soul into the hands of almighty God my maker hoping that through the meritorious death and passion of Jesus Christ my only Saviour and redeemer to receive free pardon and forgiveness of all my sins and as for my body to be buried in Christian burial at the discretion of my Executor hereafter nominated.

Item I give unto my son John Hampton the north east Lot of my land lying next to the dutch mans brook being part of that land which was formerly James Miller's. Item I give unto my son David Hampton the mid Lot of the said land joyning to that I have given John my son. Item I give unto my son Joseph the south west lot of the said land lying next to James Reid's Land as also I give unto them my ditched meadow adjoyning to James Reid's Land after my widow Jean Hampton her marriage or decease and I likewise will that if one or more of my said sons shall die without heirs Lawfully begotten of their bodies yet then their Estate of Inheritance shall fall to their Surviving Brethren or their lawful heirs and likewise if any of them be minded to sell their above said Inheritance they prefer it first to their brethren or Lawful heirs.

Item I give unto my son Andrew Hampton one hundred acres of Land I purchased from John Butler when he comes to be twenty one years of age. Item I give unto my son Jonathan Hampton one hundred Acres of Land upon which my house stands after my widow's marriage or death when he is of age twenty one years. Item I give unto my son Noah Hampton the middle hundred acres lying twixt that I have given to my sons Andrew and Johathan Hampton after my widow marriage or decease when he comes to the age of twenty one years and I will that my sons David, Jonathan and Noah Hampton live upon my said plantation and be assisting to my said widow till they come of age (if she see cause to keep them.)

Item I give unto my wife Jean and her son Joseph Hampton four cows, two big steers, a year old bull, two year old heifers, and a year old steer of her choosing. Item in token of my love to Sarah and Mary Ogburns I give each of them a year old heifer. Item I give unto my daughters Elizabeth and Lydia each of them a cow. Item I give unto my sons John, David, Jonathan, Andrew and Noah Hampton all the rest of my estate to be Equally divided among them by my Executor. Item I give unto my wife Jean and her son Joseph Hampton my horses called Buck Jack and the young horse that runs in the woods. Item to my sons John and David Hampton my two old mares that run in the woods and the horse called Cupid and will that they give to my sons Jonathan and Noah two mare Colts when the mares breed them. Item I give my son Andrew Hampton my young mare in the woods. Item to Jean my wife and my son Joseph twelve of my sheep of her choosing. Item to Sarah and Mary Ogburns two Ewes. Item to Jannet Rayes and her children three Ewes. Item to my four Grand Children four Ewes and all the rest of my sheep to my sons John, David, Andrew, Jonathan, and Noah Hampton. Item I give my daughters Elizabeth and Lydia two bedds and Bolsters which were their mothers with what other cloths my Executor finds can be sparred. Item to Jean my wife my great bible and after her decease to my son Joseph. Item to Jannet Ray my little bible. Item to my wife Jean and her Children all that belongs to her and her Children before our marriage and the Equal half of all my pewter and other half to my daughters Elizabeth and Lydia. Item to my sons John and David Hampton I give each of them an Iron pot. Item to Jean my wife and my son Joseph a case with knives and a case with bottles with all my provisions of meat and drink for the use of my house and I desire my Executor may make use of my wheat in the house and in the barn for paying all my debts and what is over paying my debts I give to my wife Jean and my son Joseph. Item to Jean my wife and my son Joseph the half of my crop of wheat on the ground and the other half thereof to my sons John and David Hampton on the condition that they cut down the same and take it up again carry it to my barn and then secure it thresh clean and transport it to the market. Item I give to Jean my wife and son Joseph my Cart & Cows, harrows, ax, aze, howes, siths and other tools and utensils upon my plantation with all the remaining vessels, tables, chairs, beds, bedsteads, chests and trunks together with two sows and their pigs and three hives of bees. Item all the rest of my Goods, Money, debts I give unto my wife Jean and my son Joseph Hampton upon Condition they pay all my debts and Legats and make Robert Ray of Freehold and Jean my wife Executors of this my last will and testament revoking all other wills and testament In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal day and year above written in presence of:

Andrew Burnet, John Trot, William Laing - John Hampton (seal). William Laing and Andrew Burnet two of the hereunto Subscribing witnesses came before me and underwritten Commission for taking the probate of all last wills and Testaments within the province of East New Jersey and did solemnly depose that they saw the above named John Hampton sign seal publish and declare the above written Instrument to be his last will and testament and yet at the same time he was of sound mind and perfect memorie to the best of their understanding - Jurat vicesimo Sexto Die Feb Anno Domi 1702 Coram me.

12 Feb 1702-3 Inventory of the personal estate, £202.19.10 1/2, included a large and a small Bible £2; made by Walter Ker, Andrew Burnett and Wm. Laing.

NOTE:
In accordance with Quaker practice, the months are designated by numbers, rather than names - e.g., March, and it is most important to remember that until to September 2, 1752, the calendar year began on March 25, so that "1st month" was March, 2nd month was April, etc.; 10 th month was December; 11th month, the following January; and 12th month, the next February.

NOTE:
One will find the family name during this period spelled Hamton, Hamptone and Hampton. Most spelling at the time was done phonetically and if it sounded correct that was how it was written. It was recorded various ways on documents of the members of the family during this period.

I offer special acknowledgement and appreciation to Roberta Rose and James W. Foster - for their research, assistance and significant contributions. Both have done significant research into this family and have very graciously assisted me. I acknowledge the significant contributions made by others, but must take full responsibility for any conclusions in this compilation in order not to attribute incorrectly to any one else.

More About J
OHN HAMPTON and UNKNOWN:
Marriage: Bef. 1668, Scotland38

More About J
OHN HAMPTON and KATHERINE CLOUDSLEY:
Marriage: December 07, 1675, Dunbar, East Lothian Scotland39,40,41,42

Notes for M
ARTHA BROWN:
Child of Abraham Brown and Mary Potter is: Martha Brown, born Abt. 1665 in Mansfield, Burlington, New Jersey; died Abt. 1697 in New Jersey; married John Hampton March 3, 1687 in Shrewsbury, New Jersey.


More About J
OHN HAMPTON and MARTHA BROWN:
Marriage: March 03, 1686/87, Middletown, New Jersey43,44,45

Notes for J
ANE (JEAN) CURTIS:
Jane, daughter of Thomas and Jane Curtis and Jane's Quaker origins are well documented. Image of Quaker birth register (extract) 1661 -1663. This original Quaker record of Bugbrooke, Northamptonshire shows her birth on 11 February 1661, and the two sisters who accompanied her to New Jersey. The Northamptonshire area was the cradle of Quakerism in England from its origins in the 1640s.

Samuel Ogborne, married Jane Curtis, an English Quaker emigrant, in 1684. SAMUEL OGBORNE was a resident of Burlington NJ and contemporary with John Ogborne and no doubt of kin.

1685, 3 mo, 29. Jane Ogbourne was present at the birth of Ann, the daughter of Thomas and Hester Butcher.

1686, 3, 9. Samuel and Jane Ogborne, Sarah Harvie, and others, were witnesses to the marriage of William Atkinson and Elizabeth Curtis.

Jane (Jean) Curtis came with her parents to Springfield Township. Burlington County, N.J. by 1685. The Minutes of Burlington Monthly Meeting state that, "Jane Ogborne" the daughter of Thomas Curtis hath gone contrary to truth and hath brought dishonor to God and grieved his people. Friends have visited her; she was very tender and doth condemn it. Read in the Meeting the 7th of the 12th month [Feb.] 1686/7."

The Will of Samuel Ogborne, of Burlington County, N.J., dated 4 November 1694 and proved 8 December following, names his wife Jane executrix; mentions his children, not by names; and appoints his brother-in-law Peter Harvey trustee. 1694, Nov. 7 - Will of Samuel Ogborne, of Burlington, sick, etc.; proved Dec. 8, 1694, mentioned: "dearly beloved wife, Jane." He gave £5 to each of his children, at the discretion of his executrix, if so much remains when they are brought up. Executor: wife, Jane. His brother-in-law, Peter Harvey, trustee and assistant. The will was written and signed by the testator, and was a fine specimen of caligraphy. Daniel Leeds, of Burlington, Gent., and William Atkinson, of Burlington, yeoman, went on her bond. She made her mark. Will of - Executor: ".......my said wife to be my whole and sole Executrix." Overseers: "my well Esteemed freinds, John Laing and John Rinsey, and my son Samuell Fitz- Randolph and by Councell help Execute this my last will " Witnesses: John Laing, William Laing, Edward Fitz-Randolph and John Kinsey. The testator made his mark to the will.

1694, 21, 9. The inventory of his personal estate, of this date, amounted to £127-1 1-7

The widow Jane Ogborne married second John Hampton of Freehold, Monmouth County, NJ, and she married third, on 12 June 1706, under Shrewsbury Monthly Meeting, Nathaniel FitzRandolph of Woodbrldgc, Middlesex County, NJ. who died testate in 1714; and she married fourth, on 20 December 1719, under Haddonfield Monthly Meeting, Glouccester County, NJ - John Sharp, of Evesham Township - Burlington County, NJ, who died testate in 1727.

1695, Mch. 26. John Harwood, of Springfield, Burlington County, yeoman, sold to Jane Ogborne, widow, of the town of Burlington, for £80, a house and ninety acres, which was previously sold by her husband, Samuel Ogborne, to said Harwood, lying near Matoropan Bridge, South of Maple Creek, and North of the Great Swamp.

1695, June 8. Jane, the widow of the aforesaid Samuel Ogbourne, sold, as executrix, the preceding purchase of 1693, fronting on High Street, with forty-six feet front and one hundred and twenty-one feet, ten inches in depth, with stone, wood, timber and other materials, which Samuel Oghorne had gotten together, intending to build on the said site, for £52, to Lyonell Britton, of Philadelphia. She made her mark to the deed.

She bought property in Burlington, NJ, Mar. 26, 1695. Amnesty was given to Jane in Pennsylvania, June 8, 1695.

1697 May 27. Jane Ogborne, of Springfield, Burlington County, widow, sold lands to Richard Ridgway, of the same place.

1698, May 12. John Hampton, of Freehold, and wife Jane, sold a house, in Burlington, late in the tenure of Samuel Ogborne, former husband of Jane Hampton, to John Borradaill, of Burlington.

Jane Hampton of Freehold, NJ married Nathamiel Fitz-Randolph, of Woodbridge, NJ - April 12, 1706. This was Jane's third marriage - first to Ogbourne and second to John Hampton. Fitz-Randolph was of Woodbridge, New Jersey. They had one son, Benjamin Fitz Randolph, born at Woodbridge, 10-23-1707. The will of Natharliel Fitz Randolph was proved May 12-1714. Jane was the second wife of Nathaniel Fitz Randolph. His first wife was Mary Holly of Sandwich, Massachusetts. She was daughter of Joseph and Rose Holly of the same place. Nathaniel Fitz Randolph died November 21-1713 at Woodbridge. He was one of the most prominent men of Woodbridge. He was a member of the New Jersey Assembly of 1693-4. He was High Sheriff of Middlesex County, New Jersey, in 1699. He was an elder of the Church at Burlington and attend some of the same meetings as John Hampton. John and Nathaniel most probably knew each other. Attending the wedding were John Hampton (noted as Jr., although is often later noted as Sr.), David Hampton, Izibell Hampton, Robert Ray (Rhea-Rhe), John Laing and many others.

Sarah Ogborne; permission granted Edmond Kinsey and Sarah Ogborne to marry, 21, 8, 1708.

It may be worthy of note that Jane had a sister Sarah Curtis Farr, her daughter - also named Sarah Farr was a witness to the Will of David Hampton, deceasde 1710. Sarah Curtis Farr deceased in 1698 and mentioned sister Jane in her Will - South Jersey, Burlington Co.

1714, May 12. Declaration of "Jean, the widdow & Executrix of Nathaniel Fitzrandolph," before Thomas Gordon, Surrogate..

1715, 2mo., 15 At a monthly meeting, at Woodbridge, of this date, Jane Fitzrandolph requested a certificate of removal for herself, her son-in-law, Edmond Kinsey, and his wife, to Falls Monthly Meeting. Minutes of Woodbridge Monthly Meeting.

Jane was listed as a member of Friends Church Falls Meeting, Bucks Co., PA, Aug. 5, 1715. She had relocated to PA, of this date, Edmond Kinsey, wife, and mother-in-law, produced a certificate of removal from Woodbridge Monthly Meeting. Minutes of Falls Monthly Meeting, Bucks County, Pa.

Thus we have Jane Fitz Randolph, her son, Benjamin Fitz-Randolph, and son, Joseph Hampton, accompanied by Edmund and Sarah (Ogborn) Kinsey removed to Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It appears she remained there for about 3 years.

At the age of 58, she married a fourth time, to John Sharp. The marriage is recorded at Haddonfield Friends' Meeting in Gloucester County, New Jersey, 10-24-1719, as follows--Jane Fitz Randle (wid) and John Sharpe, both of Evesham, Burlington County, New Jersey. Jane Fitz Randolph was granted certificate of removal from Falls Meeting on 8-7-1719. There were no children by this marriage. John Sharp's will was probated March 29-1727.

1719, 8mo., 7. At a monthly meeting, at Falls, of this date, Jane Fitzrandolph was granted, a certificate of removal. Minutes of Falls Monthly Meeting.

John Sharp, of Evesham, Burlington County, and Jane Fitzrandolph, widow, were married 10 mo., 20, 1719.

1725, 3mo., 17. Will of John Sharp, of Evesham, Burlington County; proved Mch. 29, 1727 mentioned Wife, Jane - Sons: William, John, Thomas, Samuel, - former wife, Elizabeth Green, [i. e, his second wife.] Daughters, Elizabeth Sharp, Sarah Sharp, Hannah Adams.

Jane after her husbands demise, moved back to Bucks Co, PA.

1729," 8th day of ye +'6-'th month called August." Will of Jane Sharp, of Buckingham, in County of Bucks and province of Pensilvania - widow; proved,, Dec.13, 1731, mentioned: To my son Samuel Ogburne the sum of 8 pounds proclamation money." "to my son Joseph Hampton 12 pound." "to my son in law Edmond Kinsey 5 pounds." "to my son in law Jonas Ketle 5 pound." "to my son Benjamin Fitzrandle twenty pound and also one bed and 2 pair of sheets 2 pillows and 2 pairs pillow cases I diper table cloth 3 blankets one bird eyed coverlidd one silver spoon one great Bible one great looking glass one pair iron doggs." "to my Grand daughter Jane engle a great pewter dish." "to my daughter Mary Ketle 25 pound." "to my daughter Sarah Kinsey 25 pound." "after my legacies is payd if any money remains let it be given to my two daughters and Jo Hampton." "to my daughter Mary's three daughters and to my daughter's Sarah's three daughters and to my son Joseph Hampton's one daughter (who are all now living) 7 pound in Silver and Gold, twenty shillings apeace each." "to Mary Kinsey and Elizabeth Kinsey each of them one trunk." "all my horse and mares be sold or valued and the value of them to pay all charges to my executors that may accrue to them by funeral expenses or any otherwise whatsoever upon my account and after legacys and other charges are all payd if any thing remains of value I hereby give it to Edmond Kinsey, but if it should so happen that my estate shall fall short of paying my legacyes and all charges then ..... all Legtees shall abate their proportion according to their shares."
"I give my executors forty shillings apiece."
Executors: "my son in law Edmond Kinsey and Joseph Fell."
Witnesses: John Hill and Elizabeth Fell. The testator made her mark to the will.

Jane Sharp of Buckingham, widow, will was made 6th Month, 8th day, 1729 , and probated Nov. 13 - 1731.

Jane died 1729 in Buckingham, Bucks Co., PA. Her body was interred Nov. 1729 in Buckingham, Bucks Co., PA, Friends Cemetery.

1731, 28th of Xber. The inventory of her personal estate was exhibited, which was made 18-th day of the Ninth Month, 1731, by John Hill and John Walton, and amounted to £118-10-9.


More About J
ANE (JEAN) CURTIS:
Burial: 1729, Buckingham, Bucks Co., PA, Friends Cemetery46

More About J
OHN HAMPTON and JANE CURTIS:
Marriage: 1698, Freehold, Monmouth Co, NJ46
     
Child of J
OHN HAMPTON and UNKNOWN is:
  i.   JANET3 HAMPTON47, b. Abt. 1668, Elphingston, East Lothian County, Scotland48; d. January 15, 1761, Monmouth Co, New Jersey49,50; m. ROBERT RHEA51,52,53, November 09, 1689, Shrewsbury, New Jersey54,55,56; b. , Scotland57; d. January 18, 1719/20, Freehold, Monmouth Co, East Jersey58,59.
  Notes for JANET HAMPTON:
"Hampton Janet, born 1668, daughter of John Hampton, an indentured servant imported into East New Jersey 1684; married Robert Rhea in Shrewsbury, East New Jersey, 10.2.1690 (MNJ)"

Robert Ray and Jannett Hampton, both belonging to the town of Shrewsbury, were married at the house of John Hampton in an appointed meeting this ninth day of the eleventh month; 1689," .... 1689, Jan. 9. Jacob Lippincott was a witness at the marriage of Robert Ray to Jenett Hamton, at the house of John Hamton.

WILL OF ROBERT RHE
In the name of God Amen, the tenth day of Aprile one thousand seaven Hundred & Eighteen, I Robert Rhe of Freehold yeoman being of perfect memory & Remembrance praised be God, Do make & ordain this my Last Will & Testament in manner & forme following (viz)

Imprimis I bequeath my soule into ye hands of Almightie God my maker, hoping that through ye meritorious Death & passion of Jesus Christ my only Saviour & Redeemer, to receive free pardon & forgiveness of All my sins and as for my Body to be Buryed In Christian buryal at ye discretion of my Executrix hereafter Nominated,

Item I Give to my son David Rhe All my Lands & tenements, and All my Carpenters & Coopers Tools upon condition that he shall pay All my debts & Legacies, and that my Executrix shall have her Priviledge of any one Room In ye house during her Life,
Item I give to my Daughter Elizabeth Rhe ye sum of twenty pounds,
Item I give to my daughter Catherine Rhe ye sum of twenty pounds,
Item I Give to my daughter Margarett Rhe ye sum of twenty pounds,
Item I give to my daughter Isabell Rhe ye sum of twenty pounds,
Item I give to my daughter Mary Rhe ye sum of twenty pounds to be paid In manner followeing, that is to say Elizabeth within two years after my decease, Catherine one year after Elisabeth, Margarett two
years after Catherine, Isabell two years after Mary, Mary two years After Margarett or when she comes to ye Age of twenty years,

Item I Give to Jannet my wife the sum of thirtie pounds to be paid In six months After my decease, and all my moveables Imediately and make her sole Executrix of this my last will & testament, Revoking all other wills & Testaments, further I will & ordain that In case of Non payment of ye Aforesd Debts & Legacies, that then so much of my Land bequeathed shall be sold by ye greeved to pay all Debts & Legacies In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seale the day above written

Signed sealed, pronounced &       his mark
declared In ye presence       Robt: f Rhe (Seal)
of Richard Clerk,
George Walker
John Campbell

Memorandum on ye 27th of May 1719 Richard Clerk & John Campbell two of ye subscribing witnesses to ye above Instrument came before me John Barclay Surrogate, who upon their solemn oath deposed that they saw ye above Robert Rhe, Sign, Seale, Deliver, pronounce & declare ye same to be his Last Will & Testament, and that at ye same time he was of sound mind & Judgment to the best of their understanding, Sworn before me ye day & year above written - John Barclay Surgt.

Letter of Administration was Accordingly Granted by His Excellency Brigadeere Hunter Governour of New Jersey &c. to Jannet Rhe widow ye Executrix In ye sd Last will & Testament named Dated ye 20th day of June 1719 - Barclay Dpt Sety.

WILL OF JANNET RHE
In the name of God Amen the first day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fifty two I Jannet Rhe widow of the deceas'd Robert Rhe of Freehold in the county of Monmouth and province of East New Jersey being weak and sickly in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be given to God therefore calling unto mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all once to dye do make and ordain this to be my last will and testament Viz: principally and first of all I recommend my soul unto the hands of God that gave it and for my body I recommend it to the earth to be buried in a christian like and decent manner at the discretion of my executors herein after mentioned nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with in this life I hereby give devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form Viz:

Imprimis it is my will and I do order that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid and discharged by my executors hereinafter named out of my personal estate.
Item I give and bequeath unto my well beloved friend William Tenant the sum of five pounds: Item I give and bequeath towards the finishing of the presbyterian mitting house the sum of five pounds. Item I give and bequeath to my well beloved son David Rhe one great bible and one chest and one pair of money weights. Item I give and bequeath to my well beloved granddaughter Jannet Rhe one silk gown and pettecoat and one trunk and one table and one looking glass and one pair of hand irons and one pair of tongs and fire shovel. Item I give and bequeath to my well beloved granddaughter Margret Gordon wife of John Yeetman one cobbert and one bed filled with flowrs and one old bolster one coverlid, two blankets one sheet. Item I give and bequeath to my well beloved grand daughter Anne VanShyack my feather bed one boulder two pillows two sheets two blankets one coverlid and writings.
Item I give and bequeath to my great grand daughter Isable VanShyack daughter of John one old crape gound and pettecoat. Item I give and bequeath to my well beloved son in law James English all my sheep. Item I give and bequeath to my well beloved gran daughter Elizabeth English one Iron pott and pott hooks. Item it is my will and I do order that all other parts of my estate that will remain after paying the above debt charges and legacies be left to the discretion of my executors hereafter mentioned and lastly I do nominate constitute and appoint my well beloved son David Rhe and my well beloved son in law James English and no other to be executors of this my last will and testament and do hereby utterly disallow revoke and disannull all manner and other wills testaments legacies and executors by me heretofore made and given ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.
In witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seal the day and year first above written, 1752.

mark - - - Jannet Rhe (L. S.)

Signed Sealed published pronounced
and declared by the said
Jannet Rhe to be her last will and
testament in the presence of us
Robert English blacksmith
James Cole
James English Junr.
David English

Be it remembered that on the fourteenth day of August one thousand seven hundred and sixty one Robert English (blacksmith) and David English two of the subscribeing wittnesses to the within will personally appeared before me the subscriber who am duly authorized to prove wills and qualify executors who being solemnly sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God did depose and declare that they were present and saw Jannet Rhe the testatrix within named sign and seal the within written instrument and heard her published pronounce and declare the same to be her last will and testament, and that at the time of the doing thereof she was of sound mind and understanding to the best of their judgments and as they believed and that the said deponants together with James Cole and James English Junr. the other two subscribing wittnesses to the within will severally signed their names thereto as wittnesses thereof in presence of the said testatrix and of each other Also at the same time James English the surviving executor (David Rhe being lately dead) in the within will named was solemnly sworn to the true execution thereof before me. - Jacob Dennis Surrogt.

Probate granted by Govr. Boone &c. (in the usual form &c) dated the same fourteenth day of August 1761. Janett Hampton Rhea's will was probated 04 Sept. 1761.

Janet Rhe, w. Robert, d. Jan. 15, 1761 aged 93 years.

The Battle of Monmouth in the Revolutionary War, June 28, 1778, took place largely on the Rhea farm, and "Lieut. Col. David Rhea, son of David, ruling elder in Old Tennent, fought in the battle almost over the very spot where the graves of his family's dead were made."

GEORGE WASHINGTON AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION-1975 by Burke Davis. Published by Randon House - p 290. "The General recovered swiftly. With the aid of Lt. Col David Rhea of the 4th N.J. who knew the terrain. Washington began moving men into position behind the hedgerow, facing the enemy. He ordered an issue of rum in the hopes of steadying the troops."

The above extract relates to the Battle of Monmouth, NJ, 28 June 1778, and the retreat of General Charles Lee. Washington, in anger, relieved Lee and assumed command himself. One accouont described General Washington's "tongue lashing" of General Lee as one of the fiercest ever. Lee had been reluctant to move on the British at Monmouth. General Washington was a stranger to the land and consulted Lt. Col. Robert Ray, whose family owned the land. The grandmother of Lt. Col. David Rhea was Janet Hampton Rhea, b. Scotland c. 1668, came to East Jersey 1683 with her father, the "immigrant" John Hampton., who in his will of 1702 mentions Janett and her children.

State Park Service Region II Office
275 Freehold-Englishtown Road Englishtown, NJ 07726 23 May 1994
Col. Robert B. Cox
W----r C----e Drive
N------ N---, Virginia -----
Dear Colonel Cox:
Yes, the former Hampton land was part of the fields of battle at Monmouth Courthouse. Two-thirds of Charles Lee's vanguard retreated across it with most of the lst Division of the Crown Army in hot pursuit. Enclosed is a reference to George Hampton's sale of the property in 1731. I have marked this area on one of my maps reconstructing the battle.

Mark Lender, a professor at Kean College, Elizabeth, New Jersey, will be publishing a book on the battle within a few years. The illustrations for the book will show the area of the Hampton lands. (The marked enclosure is a draft for one of the illustrations.)

The State is hoping to acquire more of the Rhea Farm with the assistance of the Friends of Monmouth Battlefield and the SAR. This would not include any of the Hampton land, but it would include the site of Janet Hampton Rhea's home (referred to as the "Carr" house in the Lee court martial. The tenant in 1778 appears to have been William Kerr. ) I look forward to receiving a copy of the Hampton will. Sincerely yours,

Gary Wheeler Stone
Principal Historic Preservation Specialist
Source: Roberta Rose - RB Cox

  Notes for ROBERT RHEA:
ROBERT RHE, as the name was first spelled, was the first of the name in Monmouth Co., N. J., where he bought headland in 1688, and in 1691 he had land from the proprietors, and also bought land in the same year of which the proprietors confirmed the title in 1693. He married Jan. 9, 1689-90, or as the date is given on the margin of the record in Shrewsbury Meeting, Apr. 10, 1690,54 Jannet Hamton, who was born about 1668, died Jan. 15, 1761, aged about 93 years, daughter of John and (Janet?) Hamton. Robert Rhe died Jan. 18, 1719. Robert and Jannet (Hamton) Rhe had 6 children. Robert Rhe made his will Apr. 10, 1718, and it was proved May 27, 1719; his widow making her will Apr. 1, 1752, which was proved Aug. 14, 1761.

Robert RHEA - Quaker, carpenter, emigrated from Scotland to America during 1685. Settled in Monmouth Co, NJ in 1688. Father of David, Elizabeth, Catharine, Margaret, Isabel and Mary. Died 18 January 1720.

  More About ROBERT RHEA and JANET HAMPTON:
Marriage: November 09, 1689, Shrewsbury, New Jersey60,61,62

     
Children of JOHN HAMPTON and KATHERINE CLOUDSLEY are:
  ii.   ELIZABETH3 HAMPTON63, b. October 11, 1676, Elphingston, East Lothian County, Scotland64,65; m. THOMAS COMBS66, NJ.
  Notes for ELIZABETH HAMPTON:
9 Sept 1715, Noah sold land inherited from his father - 100 acres of land in NJ to Thomas Combs. This Thomas Combs was the husband of Elizabeth Hampton.

SOURCE: Unrecorded Wills and Inventories Monmouth County, New Jersey
WILL of THOMAS COMBS, offfice hold, Carpenter, "being now Sick in body." Dated Oct. 12,1723. Proved by dep. Of John Cambell and John Fenton, two of ye evidences, who were present when the other evidence signed; before Michael Kearny, Surrogate, Freehold, Mon. Co., May 27, 1724.
Gives: "unto Robert Combs my Son twelve acres of Land Joyning to Land formerly Benjamine Cooks Land where "the afor sd Roberts shop standeth to him. his heirs. ..." ; "unto Rachel Combs my Daughter, twenty "five aceres of Land to her heirs. ..."; "unto Thomas Combs my son twenty five aceres of Land to him his "heirs. ..."; "unto Jofeph Combs my son twenty- five acres of Land to him his heirs. ..."; "unto "Jonathan Combs my son twenty-five acres of Land to him his heirs. ..."; "unto John Combs my son the "Remaining part of the sd Land all which I now possess. ...and that the fd John Combes his share. ..."shall be and take in ye house and orchard that I now live in " ; "unto Elizabeth Combs my Daughter thirty " pounds moneys at eight shilling pr ounce which is to [be] paid to ye sd Elizabeth her heirs by my aforefd Sons "viz, Thomas Combs, Jsfeph Combs, Jonathan Combs and John Combs, each of them their equal proportion of sd thirty "pounds when any and every of them shall arrive . ...at the age of twenty two years that is first Thomas Combs, "and so on successfully as they shall be at that age. ...And upon. ...neglect by any of. ..."Legatees that then his or their part shall be sold to pay the same by my now wife Elizabeth "Combs and that her Deed shall be as good. ...as if I were alike; "unto Elizabeth "Combs my beloved wife all my movable Eftat to be by her. ...Enjoyed with my ffarm During "her lifetime or to be Divided at her Descretion the paying all my Debts. ...whom I Constitute together with " Jonathan Hampton of Freehold Cordweinr my Executrix and Excr "
Wits. : THOMAS COMBS George Walker, John Fenton, John Campbell

Oath of Executors, Elizabeth Combs and Jonathan Hampton; before Michl Kearny, Surrogate, Freehold, NJ - May 27, 1724.

1715 (Freehold, Monmouth Co NJ Deeds E:1753 [175]) Deed. Thomas COMBS of the Township of Freehold in the County of Monmouth in the Eastern Division of the Province of New Jersey "by and with the consent Approbation & good liking of Elizabeth his wife" to Ambrose STEELE dated 1715. (Abstracted by Combs Researcher Kate C. DiBlassio)

27 May 1719. Inventory of estate of Robert RHE (or RAY) of Freehold [Monmouth Co, NJ], was apprized [appraised?] by Thomas COMBS et als. (GDAC, 1925, Ref: NJ Wills, Vol. 1)

  More About THOMAS COMBS and ELIZABETH HAMPTON:
Marriage: NJ

  iii.   LYDIA HAMPTON67, b. May 14, 1678, Elphingston, East Lothian County, Scotland68,69; d. 171770; m. CHARLES GORDON71,72, March 03, 1684/85, Shrewsbury, New Jersey73; b. 1669, Pitlurg, Aberdieenshire, Scotland74; d. 173875.
  Notes for LYDIA HAMPTON:
Charles Gordon d. 1740 was on Grand Jury Feb. 22, 1703 Court held at Shrewsbury: ruling elder in old Tennent 1731: md. Lydia Hampton dau. John Hampton, will dated Mch. 1739 probated Apr. 1740 mentions chldr:
PETER b. 1703 d. 1770.
JOHN, of Perth Amboy (1771) md. Elizabeth _____ had chld. Lydia b. 1740.
CHARLES, of Monmouth, md. 1st Dec, 4,1739 Mary Newell had child.
ROBERT b. 1742 md. 2nd 1747 Gertrude wid.Geo. Walker had chld. Mary b. 1748.
DAVID
LYDIA md. 1740 Timothy Lloyd Jr.
ELIZABETH.
CATHERINE b. June 14, 1705 d. Oct. 26, 1757 md
Horner also mentions a son Robert.

CHARLES GORDON (CHARLES, ROBERT) was born Abt. 1669 in Pitlurg, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and died March 1739/40 in Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ. He married LYDIA HAMPTON March 03, 1685/86 in Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co., NJ, daughter of JOHN HAMPTON and KATHERINE CLUDSLEY.
Children of CHARLES GORDON and LYDIA HAMPTON are:
ELIZABETH GORDON, b. April 12, 1699, Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ.
PETER GORDON, b. May 07, 1703, Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ; d. April 25, 1770; m. (1) MARY CRAIG; m. (2) MARGARET MELVIN, Abt. 1728.
KATHERINE GORDON, b. June 14, 1705, Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ; d. October 26, 1757; m. JOHN BARCLAY, June 11, 1725.
JOHN GORDON, b. September 03, 1707, Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ; m. ELIZABETH MAIN, August 11, 1742.
ROBERT GORDON, b. Abt. 1709, Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ; m. GERTRUDE ??, Abt. 1747.
CHARLES GORDON, b. October 03, 1710, Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ; m. MARY NEWELL.
LYDIA GORDON, b. February 17, 1712/13, Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ; m.
Source: Descendants of ROBERT GORDON
@ http://www.angelfire.com/wa2/Conkey/Gordon.html
DAVID GORDON, b. March 31, 1717, Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ; d. October 06, 1783.

  More About CHARLES GORDON and LYDIA HAMPTON:
Marriage: March 03, 1684/85, Shrewsbury, New Jersey76

  iv.   JOHN HAMPTON, SR77, b. September 06, 1681, Elphingston, East Lothian County, Scotland78,79; d. Aft. 1747, Frederick Co, VA80; m. (1) CHRISTIAN CUMINE81; m. (2) ISABEL REDFORD82,83,84, Bef. 170685; b. 86; d. Bef. 172087,88.
  Notes for JOHN HAMPTON, SR:
John Hampton (2) distributed his father's land to his brothers in 1705. The significance of that year is uncertain. It was the year David, the next oldest brother turned 21. John's (1) widow, Jane Hampton of Freehold, NJ married Benjamin Fitz-Randolph, of Woodbridge, NJ - April 12, 1706. She was left possession of John's (1) land until her death or remarriage and she didn't remarry until 1706. The Friends Record of Shrewsbury NJ show for 1706-7, the marriage of the 1702 widow of the immigrant John Hampton [this would be the marriage of Jean Curtis Ogbourne Hampton to one Mr. Fitz-Randolph], of Freehold NJ, with John (2) & Isabell Hampton as witness, along with Charles Gordon and wife Lydia (Hampton), Robert and Jennet (Hampton) Ray, David Hampton. Source: RB Cox notes from Roberta Rose.

David Hampton, brother John Hampton (2), left his will in 1710, in Freehold, Monmouth County, New Jersey naming wife Mary, son George under 15; and subsequent records suggest a child David was born after his death. Wife Mary and brother John Hampton (2) and George Commen (Cummin) were Executors. John Hampton took "oath as Executor," suggesting he had left the Quakers. The 1711-12 will of one George Cummin mentions his children David, Margaret, Mary & Christian and son-in-law John Hampton as one of the Executors. Best available evidence indicates that John Hampton was married to Christian Cummin.

August 17, 1711, John sells land to Thomas Combs.

1712 Will, probably Margaret Comin/Cummin/Cumming (Hampton)'s brother, mentions George and Isabel, children of John Hampton. John was executor of the will. ..... GEORGE COMIN, (sic.) rem. to P. A., soon, and 1711-2, Mar. 22, made his will, prov. April 2, 1712, (ARCH., Vol. XXIII, pp. 103-4); hence, he then was d. It names no wife, nor his son, GEORGE, Jr., (infra). But, names chil., David, Margaret, (then, Frazer, wife of John), Mary, (then, Barnet), dau. d., wife of "son-in-law," JOHN HAMPTON, and Christian, who may have been that dau. "Home farm of 300 acres on the South side of the Raritan River." He had a son, WILLIAM CUMMINS, (infra).

George Comin (Commen) [Cummin], Will of. Children -- David, Margaret, Mary and Christian. Home farm of 300 acres on the South side of Raritan River, bought of Andrew Galloway ~ personal property. Executors, son-in-law John Hamton and John Ireland. Witnesses -- John Hutton, Thomas Coomes, John Fraizer. Proved 02 Apr 1712. Lib. 1, p. 361, Database: Full Context of Calendar of New Jersey Wills, 1670-1760 Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Vol. 11670-1730. Part I Calendar of New Jersey Wills .

GEORGE CUMMINS OF S. I. - In 1678, he was constable of S. I., (vide, ante, PART TWO, p. 155). And, had land there (idem, same p.). In 1680, he was listed, (vide, ante, PART ONE, p. 125); however, his origin was at Jamaica, L. L., where in 1660-62, he was a settler, (vide, ante, PART ONE, p. 108), and his association with CALEB CARMAN seemed to be ever present, as well as the MATTHEWS family. 1695, he, GEORGE CUMMINS, was at W. (ARCH., Vol. XXI, p. 241.) By 1711, GEORGE CUMMINS, was of PISC., for he signed the Petition of that year, (vide, ante, PART THREE, p. 379).

Peter Perrine, of Staten Island, bought land, 1713, of John Hampton of Monmouth.

August 17, 1711 ....... (22 of April, 1714 - 13 May 1720 - Freehold, Monmouth Co NJ Deeds, Book E., page 361) - Deed between Thomas COMBES of Freehold Township in the County of Monmouth, New Jersey and John REID, land granted to Thomas by John HAMPTON and his wife Christian in a deed dated August 17, 1711. At the end it states "and Elizabeth the wife of the said Thomas doth fully and freely give and yield up unto the said John REID all her right and title of Dower and Intrest. A memorandum to this deed dated the 13th of May 1720 states that "Thomas COMBS above named--- Acknowledged this instrument to be his act & deed before me, John REID." (Abstracted by Combs Researcher Kate C. DiBlassio)

The 1715-16 New Jersey will of one David Commin (Cumine), mentions David Hampton son of David Hampton deceased; and Isabell & George, children of John Hampton (2). John Hampton (2) was one Executor of this will of David Commin.

DAVID CUMMINGS of PISCATAWAY - - - He was the son of the foregoing GEORGE CUMMINS. He d. in 1716, a will, dated 1715-16, Feb. 7, called "Commin, David, Piscataway, N. J., cord wainer." (ARCH., Vol. XXIII, p. 104). His sister, Margaret, was a witness to the will of JOHN BOWNE, 1714, Sep. 14, Mattewan, Mon. Co., merchant, (q. v., idem, p. 50). First Settlers of Ye Plantations of Piscataway and Woodsridge Olde East New Jersey part 5

David Commin Date: 07 Feb 1715-6 Location: Piscataway, N.J. - cordwainer ~ will of. Divides personal estate, incl. a Bible and books, between Margaret Frazer, David Hampton, son of David Hamton dec'd, Isabell and George, children of John Hamton, Mary Barnet, Hugh Frazer, John Hamton, making the last two executors. Witnesses--Edmuns Dunham, Robert Webster, Sam'l Walker. "Proved before me Jas. Smith."

INVENTORY of JOHN BOWNE, Mercht, deceased, at Matawan, Momouth Co., Dated Apr. 9, 1716. Proved by Executors, Obadiah Bowne and Richard Saltar, Apr. 11, 1716, before Ro. Hunter. NOTES: NOTE THAT MANY OF THESE DEBTS WERE "ON THE BOOK" OR LISTED "BY THE BOOK". EVIDENTLY, A PERSON (THERE ARE A VERY FEW WOMEN) BORROWED THE MONEY BY SIGNING THE BOOK SO THEY WERE INDEBTED TO JOHN BOWNE "BY THE BOOK"!
INDEX
Hampton John
Debts Due upon Mortgages ... £ s d By John Hampton 23--12--00--3
It is not known which John Hampton was indebted to the estate of Bowne.

In Virginia, after Governor Spotswood in 1716 rode out from Williamsburg to the Shenandoah Valley with his Knights of the Golden Horseshoe, the area was promoted for settlement, word was circulated to all parts of the bountiful lands, with the apparent hope that the publicity would encourage movement west. Little came of it at the time.

Earlier in Elizabethtown, New Jersey in 1717, the children of one George Ross elected James Hampton as their guardian. This James Hampton was probably the son of the 1683 immigrant to East Jersey, the Andrew Hampton with will of 1738.

The John Hampton born Scotland 1681, is by good evidence the same as found in the Shenandoah Valley land records as John Hampton Sr., with sons George, Thomas, and daughter Isabel Hampton Johnson Jump. SOURCE: R.B. COX NOTES - PROVIDED BY ROBERTA ROSE. It should be noted that there is no mention of a son Andrew.

Noah Hampton, John, Jr. & Sr. and Andrew Hampton - all first settled along the Opequon between what is now Middleway and Leetown in Berkeley County WV. Source: JW Foster.

John bought brother Jonathan's NJ land in 1713 (originally inherited from their father in 1702), then sold the last of his Freehold, NJ land in 1714. Almost no mention of John is found in the records of the next sixteen years, until he shows up as one of the first settlers in what later became Frederick County, VA, (circa 1730). John was getting on in years by then, approximately 50, his brother Noah, sons George & Thomas, John, Jr. and an Andrew Hampton were leaders in the settlement of the northern Shenandoah Valley. The deed of John Hampton, selling his NJ land was signed by a wife Christian, the daughter of Geoge Cumming. Source: JW Foster.

A local historian in NJ, by name of Hornor, in his ~ This Old Monmouth or Ours at page 301, cites the son John Hampton (2) as first married to Isabel Redford, daughter of the Quaker William Redford, who came from Scotland in 1683 at the same time as the immigrant John Hampton (1) and whose 1720 Freehold NJ will names children of my daughter Isabel Hamton - deceased. This Isabell deceased by 1720, would have been the mother of the Isabell Hampton Johnson Jump, early in the Valley. Source: RB Cox notes from Roberta Rose.

The 1720 will in Freehold, NJ - by William Redford shows his daughter Isabell Redford Hampton as deceased, leaving her children 10 lbs to be equally divided. Redford also left like amounts to other grandchildren, and five pounds to Shrewsbury Quaker Meeting.

Hornor makes a best guess that the son John Hampton b. 1681, as first married to Isabel Redford, and second to George Cummings daughter (Christian), with a son William Hampton by the first marriage and children George and Isabell by the second marriage. Source: RB Cox notes from Roberta Rose.

Our Hampton forefathers (from New Jersey) were not traders, adventures, hunters, etc. It would seem unlikely that they would have ventured beyond the 50-75 mile (from Philadelphia) frontier boundary of civilization when migrating from NJ circa 1715-20. Migration into VA didn't really gain any significant momentum until the 1730s. Most likely our Hamptons were in either PA, MD or NJ and possibly the so-called "disputed area."

August 12, 1727, the Will of Conelius Tomson of Freehold mentions farm with a meadow bought of John Hampton.

The early immigrant groups into the Valley were, not surprisingly, the same immigrant groups found in PA, MD and NJ - the Germans and the Scots-Irish, Welsh and Quakers. As early as 1726 or 1727, it has been recorded that a small group of German settlers were squatting onland int the Valley near Massanutten.

The main route of migration from the east for many began in Philadelphia. It was called "The Great Wagon Road" and began in Philadelphia as the Philadelphia Wagon Road, ran west through the middle of Pennsylvania. From Philadelphia (on today's maps), it crosses Delaware Co., then Chester Co., Lancaster Co., York Co., and exits PA at the southwestern corner of Adams Co. It continues into Washington Co., WV though Berkeley Co., through Frederick Co., Shenandorn Co., Rockingham Co., Stauton Co., Rockbridge Co., Botetourt Co., and the branches at Roanoke Co. on into the Carolinas. There is an excellent map of the trail in Everton's Handybook for Genealogists, 9th edition.

The Great Wagon Road brings visions to many of the large Conestoga Wagons (first built along that road in Conestoga, Pennsylvania) pulled by large teams of oxen or horses. This was not such a road in the early days; in fact, much of its length offered only passage for one or two horses at a time. It wasn't until later that this could really be called a wagon "road."

In 1730, Alexander Ross and Morgan Bryan (both with Quaker backgrounds and relations) appeared before the Governor and Council of Virginia and from them received a grant of 100,000 acres on the Opequon River in Frederick County, Virginia. This encouraged the move of many who followed them to the Virginia back country. Many of these people moved through the Monocacy area of Maryland.

Benjamin Borden (1692-1743), a Friend from Freehold, New Jersey, was an ambitious businessman. When King Carter died in 1732, Borden sailed to England and applied to Lord Fairfax to succeed Carter as Fairfax' land agent. When Borden did not get the job, he promptly returned to Freehold, moved his family to Virginia and in 1736, got a patent of 99,129 acres.

Many settlers from Pennsylvania, Maryland and New Jersey were the first contingents to arrive around the 1730's in "The Valley" of Virginia. Early Orange County records show the presence of John Hampton Sr. and Jr., Noah Hampton, Henry Hampton and others - all in the northern end of the Shenandoah Valley. Henry Hampton was a son in law of Peter Wolfe, an associate of Joist Hite, who came into the Valley from Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania in the fall of 1731. Hite had sold his mill in Pennsylvania and bought a small number of families with him to Virginia. Peter Wolfe was from New Jersey and obtained 600 acres of land about 1734.

Virginia's method for administering its real estate policy is interesting. Large grants were made to land speculators rather than creating a corps of civil servants to handle it. In 1732, Joist Hite acquired one such grant of 100,000 acres on Opequon Creek in the Shenandoah Valley.

When the first records of what later became Frederick County, VA, began, eldest son John was already living on the Opequon Creek. Within a short time, John Jr. and Andrew lived on adjacent property along the Opequon and eldest son John's brother Noah had what is believed to be the first mill in the Shenandoah Valley just north of the other three Hamptons. At that time Orange County encompassed areas later to be called Frederick and Augusta Counties. Source: JW Foster

Where did John spent the years 1714-1730? New Jersey Quakers moved across the Delaware into Bucks County, PA, or south to the border between Cecil County, MD, and Chester County, PA. The location of that border was in hot dispute between the two states and the record keeping was less than satisfactory. David Hampton's sons (David and Gorge Hampton) and Andrew Hampton (b. circa 1689, son of Immigrant John) are known to have moved into the border area.

John Smith and John Hampton Jr. covenanted to divide a patent, Hampton to get 150A, west end. Surveyed and patented by John Smith 21 Aug. 1734, 420A on Opeckon Creek at Turkey Spring. Hampton assigned his right to William Hiett and Simion Woodrow. 60A to Woodrow, 90A to Hiett. West side Shenando River and on Opeckon Creek at a place called Turkey Spring. Div. comes between Hiatt and Woodrow crossing Opeckon Creek to stone by a run coming from John Smith's mill. Wit: Samuel Brattan, Rees Smith, William Smith, John Smith ackn. 22 June 1738. Commission to Morgan Morgan, Benjamin Borden and William Russell to take acknow. of Jane, wife of John Smith, who is too sickly and impotant to travel to court. 5 Jan 1738/9 We certify that Jane Smith is dead. 22 Feb 1738/9 Returned signed by Benjamin Borden and Morgan Morgan. Jane Smith GCT from Chester MM, Pa. 26 of 5 Mo., 1736 to Hopewell. Quaker Yeoman, by James Bellarts, Vol 14, #3, Pct. 1987, pg. 3, Hiatt Notes: Contains several references to the Hiatt and Smith families; viz. John Hiett's brother in law, John Smith, had by 1711 married Jane Hinton, dau. of Rees Hinton. Records for John Smith were found in Lancaster Co., Penn. and Orange Co., Ca. John Smith sold a part of the land he had inherited from his father to Henry Hollingsworth, son of Valentine Hollingsworth. It is a matter of record that Stephen Hollingsworth, son of Henry, moved to Orange Co., Va, from Cecil Co., Maryland Abt. 1733. John Hiatt Jr. purchased land from Stephen Hollingsworth in 1737.

Sometime before 1735, Alexander Ross and Morgan Bryan applied for a patent on land in the northern Shenandoah Valley. The patent was awarded 12 November 1735. Indications are Ross, Bryan and about 70 other families were already living on the land. Including Ross and Bryan, most if not all were formerly New Jersey Quakers recently residing in Chester, PA and Cecil Co, MD.

Only 34 of the 70 families recorded their deeds. Other early pioneers in what became Frederick settled on land they had surveyed, marked boundaries and claimed through what they believed to be a legal process. After the formation of Frederick County a land office was opened to make land grants, and these later grants were made to newcomers for land on which the original settlers already lived. The results were enough lawsuits to keep the Virginia courts busy for many years. When he died in 1751, John Hampton, Jr., was living on disputed land. He willed the land, and the lawsuits it is presumed, to his sons. Source: JW Foster. **The "Junior," used in referencing John could also mean younger versus the elder John Hampton Sr., thus distinguishing between their ages rather than relationship as father and son.

John Hampton and Noah Hampton show on Orange County Court records for the period after 1736. John Sr. and Noah Hampton were by best evidence the brothers named in the 1702 Freehold will of the immigrant John Hampton. Source: RB Cox notes from Roberta Rose. Noah along with adjoining property of John Hampton Sr & Jr and an Andrew Hampton stretched for almost a mile along Opequon Creek, beginning about a mile North of the present border between VA & WV A. Source: JW Foster

1738 - Orange County Court Orders cite some sixty settlers in a suit brought by one William William, an early dissenting minister in the area. Williams appears to have come to the Valley from the disputed area between Pennsylvania and Maryland at the head of the Chesapeake Bay. Williams had charged the settlers with "signing scandalous papers reflecting on ye complainant." Orange County records show Williams lost this case as well as others in the county. Rev. William Williams, reportedly was a Welsh Presbyterian minister. Noah, Andrew and John Hampton, were among those Rev. Williams sued.

In Williamsburg, VA - 18 May 1742, the Governor and Council heard the petition of John Hampton and granted him 500 ac on the South Branch of the Potomack, beginning at the lower end of the Rough Mountain, and running down the south side of the river to the land of Patrick Cogan. This tract then shows in Orange Co. VA. By letter of 21 Aug 1975, the head of the Archives Branch, Virginia State Library, Richmond, advised that a land office document cannot be round to show that this authorized grant was ever carried through to completion or execution. Source: RB Cox notes from Roberta Rose.

In 1742 Thomas Turner filed suit against John Hampton and four others over what appears to be a dispute involving unrecorded deeds. In 1746 and 1747, John sold most of what he owned and deeded the rest to his sons George and Thomas (some believe, in order to protect those holdings against lawsuit). S:JW Foster.

Thomas Turner, deceased in Frederick County, Virginia on 10 February 1743/44 (will proved 8 June 1744) left sons Anthony, John, Robert and Roger; daughters Ann Sullen/Sutten and Sara Pickken (Pickren). His son John was deceased by 25 March 1742 when Thomas filed suit against John Hampton, Charles Phillips, Abraham Pennington, Zebulon Cantrell and James McKee in reference to the estate of John Turner. His son Roger and his wife Elizabeth were living on 125 acres of Morgan Bryon's 400-acre patent land by 1742.121 (Tract 81, Map 2). poofcv/44/kh [Was this John Jr or Sr? - kh]

Following info. from Karleen Phillips and book, "Pioneers of Old
Frederick County, Virginia...", pg. 44.
This is in regard to "Thomas Turner, deceased in Frederick Co., VA.,
on Feb. 10, 1743/1744 (will proved 8 June 1744) left sons Anthony, John,
Robert and Roger; daughters Ann Sullen/Sutten and Sara Pickken
(Pickren). His son John was deceased by 25 March 1742 when Thomas filed
suit against John Hampton, Charles Phillips, Abraham Pennington, ZEBULON
CANTRELL and James McKee in ref. to the estate of John Turner. His son,
Roger, and his wife, Elizabeth, were living on 125 acres of Morgan
Bryon's 400-acre patent land by 1742. (Tract 81, Map 2)

JW Foster reports that one of the first court orders in the new Frederick County (1743) appoints John Hampton as County Appraiser.

9 Feb 1746 - John Hampton ~Senor" - records in Frederick Co. VA - a deed of Bargain & Sale to Ralph Humphries, for the plantation and dwelling where he then lived. Later the name Ralph Humphries appears with the establishment of the new town of Frankford, today Franklin, SW of Petersburg W VA. Wed., 6 May, 1747 - John Hampton in open court acknowledged the Bargain & Sale, and on the motion of Ralph Humphries, the deed was admitted to record. Source: RB Cox notes from Roberta Rose.

28 August 1747 John Hampton, the elder (Sr) of Frederick Co, VA - by gift deed, "for love and affection he hath for two sons George Hampton and Thomas Hampton," gives in equal portions all of his estate real and personal, debts due by me contracted "within the Colony." Sons George and Thomas were also charged with supporting and defending against certain actions "prosecuted against me by the Administrators of Jonathan Jaycocks deceased." John Hampton Sr. appeared in court and acknowledged this gift deed to sons George and Thomas Hampton, 4 Nov, 1747. Witness: George Johnston, Bushrode Daggett, Margaret Johnston, Jean (X) Isaacs. Source: RB Cox notes from Roberta Rose.

Gift deeds often served as the last will and testament for these early settlers. The appearance of John Hampton Sr. in Frederick Court on 4 Nov, 1747, apears to be and may be his last record in the area. The John Hampton born in Scotland in 1681, would have been about 66 yrs of age in 1747, not an unusual age of death for these old pioneers on the frontier.

JW Foster attributes John Jr (d. 1751) and Andrew Hampton (b. 1710) as possibly the sons of this John Hampton Sr.

5 Dec 1998 Wilbourn Edward Wilbourn appears in court records in Pr. Wm. Co. from about 1754. After Fauquier was formed, he is shown in Fauquier Co. from 1759 until he moved to Granville Co., NC, Nap of Reed's District, ca. 1768/1769. He brought land in Granville Co., NC in Jan, 1769 from John Hampton,
who may have had Fauquier connections. Edward Wilbourn and wife second wife, Mary, daughter of Alexander St. Clair of Stafford and Pr. Wm., sold the last of the land she had inherited from her father in Fauquier Co. as late as the 1790s, I believe. Edward lived on land adjoining Francis Tennell whose wife Margaret was a sister to Mary St.Clair Wilbourn. Seek information on other Wilbourns in the area in the 1750's and before; we need Edward's parents and siblings. There is a Duke Wilburn mentioned in a Pr. Wm. court record in the 1750's. Does anyone know of him? Edward Wilbourn, as well as many others in Fauquier in the 1760s, seems to have often been sued for relatively small amounts of money. Was this tied to tobacco farming, or were these just hard times then? I would be interested in learning about the economy. Eager to hear from any others interested in the Wilbourn (all types of spelling and St. Clair (often spelled Sinclair) families. Thank you! Pansylea Willburn willburn@earthlink.net

  Notes for CHRISTIAN CUMINE:
GEORGE CUMMINS OF S. I. [Staten Island] - In 1678, he was constable of S. I., (vide, ante, PART TWO, p. 155). And, had land there (idem, same p.). In 1680, he was listed, (vide, ante, PART ONE, p. 125); however, his origin was at Jamaica, L. L., where in 1660-62, he was a settler, (vide, ante, PART ONE, p. 108), and his association with CALEB CARMAN seemed to be ever present, as well as the MATTHEWS family. 1695, he, GEORGE CUMMINS, was at W. (ARCH., Vol. XXI, p. 241.) By 1711, GEORGE CUMMINS, was of PISC., for he signed the Petition of that year, (vide, ante, PART THREE, p. 379).

GEORGE COMIN, (sic.) rem. to P. A., soon, and 1711-2, Mar. 22, made his will, prov. April 2, 1712, (ARCH., Vol. XXIII, pp. 103-4); hence, he then was d. It names no wife, nor his son, GEORGE, Jr., (infra). But, names chil., David, Margaret, (then, Frazer, wife of John), Mary, (then, Barnet), dau. d., wife of "son-in-law," JOHN HAMPTON, and Christian, who may have been that dau. "Home farm of 300 acres on the South side of the Raritan River." He had a son, WILLIAM CUMMINS, (infra).

DAVID CUMMINGS of PISCATAWAY - He was the son of the foregoing GEORGE CUMMINS. He d. in 1716, a will, dated 1815-16, Feb. 7, called "Commin, David, Piscataway, N. J., cord wainer." (ARCH., Vol. XXIII, p. 104). His sister, Margaret, was a witness to the will of JOHN BOWNE, 1714, Sep. 14, Mattewan, Mon. Co., merchant, (q. v., idem, p. 50).

George Comin (Commen) [Cummin], Will of. Children -- David, Margaret, Mary and Christian. Home farm of 300 acres on the South side of Raritan River, bought of Andrew Galloway ~ personal property. Executors--son-in-law John Hamton and John Ireland. Witnesses--John Hutton, Thomas Coomes, John Fraizer. Proved 02 Apr 1712.

David Commin Date: 07 Feb 1715-6 Location: Piscataway, N.J. - cordwainer ~ will of. Divides personal estate, incl. a Bible and books, between Margaret Frazer, David Hampton, son of David Hamton dec'd, Isabell and George, children of John Hamton, Mary Barnet, Hugh Frazer, John Hamton, making the last two executors. Witnesses--Edmuns Dunham, Robert Webster, Sam'l Walker. "Proved before me Jas. Smith."

  Notes for ISABEL REDFORD:
The 1720 will in Freehold by William Redford shows his dau Isabell Redford Hampton as deceased, leaving her children 10 lbs to be equally divided. Redford also left like amounts to other grandchildren, and five pounds to Shrewsbury Quaker Meeting.

William Redford, yeoman; will of Wife Margrit. Children--Sarah (who has children--Andrew, Mary and Elizabeth), Sommewell dec'd, (who has left children), Isobell Hampton dec'd; grandchildren--John Redford, Margrit Redford, son and dau. of son Andrew; legacies to Monthly Meeting of "Quakers" at Shrewsbury, and to the Overseers of the Poor at Freehold. Real and personal estate. Executors-- the wife, Gidion Craford and James Lowrey, sons-in-Iaw. Witnesses--John Hepburn, Anna Hebron, Edward Hardman. Proved April 1, 1726.

1721 April 12. Margrat Redford, the widow, refuses to act as executrix, "being infirm and made incapable by age to travel to Amboy to qualify myself."


  More About JOHN HAMPTON and ISABEL REDFORD:
Marriage: Bef. 170689

  v.   DAVID HAMPTON90, b. Abt. 1682, enroute from Scotland to USA91; d. Abt. 1710, Freehold, Monmouth Co, NJ92,93; m. MARY COMMIN94.
  Notes for DAVID HAMPTON:
David left his will in 1710, in Freehold, Monmouth County, New Jersey naming wife Mary, son George under 15; and subsequent records suggest a child David was born after his death. Wife Mary and brother John Hampton (2), b. 1681 and George Commen (Cummin) were Executors. John (2) took 'oath as Executor, suggesting he had left the Quakers. The 1711-12 will of one George Cummin mentions his children David, Margaret, Mary & Christian and son-in-law John Hampton (2) as one of the Executors.

Transcription of his will dated 1710:
IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN, I David Hamton of Freehold in the County of Monmouth & Province of New Jersey, being ______ of of my mortality not knowing how soon it may please God to take me out of this life by death, being now weake in body but in perfect health & strength of memory, do for ye better ordering & settling of my affairs after my decease, make this my last will and testament as followeth:

And first I do give and bequeath my soul to God who gave it and my body to ye ground to be decently buried, - Item I give to my well beloved wife Mary Hamton all ye rents and profits of plantation in Freehold for ye space of fifteen years after my decease, and as long after ye sd time as she continues my widow, &: no longer, - Item I give to my son George Hampton all my plantation with all ye buildings and improvements as is or shall be made upon it before he is of age, or at end of ye fifteen years his mother to have it , and to his heirs & assigns forever, Item I give to my wife all my personal estate after my debts & funirall charges are paid, - Item I do appoint George Commens and John Hamton with my wife Mary Hamton, Executors of this my will and testament, - And I do declare this to be my last will & testament and in witness thereof I have put my hand & seale this sixteenth day of September Anno Dom 1710.
Signed & sealed in the presence of
(s) James Bollen (s) John Okeson (s) John Lawrence (s) Sarah Parg Or Farr ??

It may be worthy of note that Jane Curtis (wife of John Hampton) had a sister Sarah Curtis Farr, her daughter - also named Sarah Farr was a witness to the Will of David Hampton, deceased 1710. Sarah Curtis Farr deceased in 1698, mentioned sister Jane in her Will - South Jersey, Burlington Co.

February 27th Anno Dom: 1710 Then appeared before me Thomas Gordon Surrogate appointed to take ye probate of wills, etc. , James Bollen & John Okeson*, two of the witnesses to ye within written will who being duly sworn upon ye Holy Evangelist of Almighty God, did declare that they were present & saw the within named David Hamton sign seal publish & declare sd within writing to be his last will and testament, and at the same time he was of sound mind & perfect memory to the best of their knowledge and belief.
Anno et die superceding-Cor m me. /S/ Thomas Gordon

February 27th Anno Dom 1710 Then appeared before me Thomas Gordon, Mary Hamton & John Hamton Exors of ye within written will and took their oaths as Executors for ye sd performance of the same, and returning an inventory. Jurat /s/Thomas Gordon

David Hampton inventory presented by Richard Clark & John Okeson* included 38 line items, valued L 89-3-1, two of the line items were Wheat valued @ L 39. Copied from Archives photo of the basic records. 14 Aug 76 by RB Cox -- Source Roberta Rose.

*Witness was one John Okeson, shown later as owning adjacent land to land
formerly owned by Noah Hampton in NJ, another brother of David. Source: Kathryn Weiss

15 May 1731- George Hampton of CECIL CO, Md. sells land bequeathed to him by David Hampton to DAVID RHE and WILLIAM COVENHOVEN 50 acres each. SHOWS survey.

David Hampton, born Abt. 1682 in en-route from Scotland to New Jersey? (Source: Notes of Robert B. Cox, Newport News, Virginia, 23602, submitted to the Garland Family Research Association, written March 2, 1982, commenting on the parties to the 1702 will of John Hampton); died 1710 in Freehold, Monmouth County, East Jersey (Source: Notes of Robert B. Cox, Newport News, Virginia, 23602, submitted to the Garland Family Research Association, written March 2, 1982, commenting on the parties to the 1702 will of John Hampton); married Mary.

     
Children of JOHN HAMPTON and MARTHA BROWN are:
  vi.   ANDREW3 HAMPTON95, b. Abt. 168895; d. 1725, Cecil County Maryland95; m. SUSANNAH95.
  Notes for ANDREW HAMPTON:
Dr. Robert W. Ramsay, a professional historian, in an article found in the Fall 1967 issue of the North Carolina Genealogist Magazine, discusses Andrew Hampton and others. It is Dr. Ramsay's expressed opinion in this article, that Colonel Andrew Hampton came from the line of Hamptons found in Cecil County, Maryland. Cecil Co, Maryland records show for May 4, 1725, one Andrew Hampton, was deceased and his widow Susannah renounced her rights to administer the estate of her deceased husband. In the absence of a will and with no record of the estate settlement in 1725, names of children are unknown. Colonel Andrew Hampton did mention an eldest daughter in his 1805 Will, with the name Susannah.

1712 Andrew Hampton member of Baptist Church Middletown NJ - No Hampton woman. Source: Sanna Gaffney. The Baptist Church Records of Middletowne, Monmouth Co, NJ show that on May 24, 1712 an Andrew Hampton was recorded as one of twenty six persons accepting the new Baptist Doctorine, with some specific reservations. [I have not documented this record and we must also remember there was at least one other Andrew Hampton in the area.]

1712 Andrew Hampton, son of John Hampton is cited in the Will of Peter Watson, Freehold merchant and also in 1716 cited in the Will of Edward Highbee of Middletown, Monmouth Count, being indebted to both decedents. "An Andrew Hampton, Jr." of Elizbethtown, as early as 1698, and later dates was not of this family, but hailed from a New England family of that name which had moved to Long Island and thence to Elizbethtown, NJ. "Source: In The Footsteps Of Joseph Hampton." I am not at all sure that the Andrew in Watson's Will was this Andrew. The only link is that both were of Freehold, NJ. The other Andrew Jr in the 1716 Highbee Will was very possibly Andrew, son of Andrew Hampton and Margaret Cummin.

This is however, the second time I have seen reference to this mysterious "New England" Hampton family. I have found no other documentation and wonder if it is correct, at the moment I suspect it is not.. Any information concerning such a family would be most welcome.

Andrew & wife Susannah sold his inherited land in NJ in 1715 according to JW Foster notes. Andrew Hampton and wife Susanna, release land recieved in 1702 will of John Hampton - March 31, 1716. Source: Roberta Rose - RB Cox

The following proceedings were then exhibited from Cecil Co. by Stephen Knight, Gent. " Deputy Commissary thereof (viz) - - - "Andrew HAMPTOH his Admton Bond in common form by Gideon Pearce his Admin with Henry Hendrickson & Richard Whitton his sureties in one hundred pounds sterling dated 4 May 1725" and his widow's renunciation as follows - Cecil County ~ I Susanah Hampton widow and relict of Andrew Hampton late of Cecil county deceased do by these presents renounce & refuse the administration of my said dec'd husbands estate and pray that letters of administration on the same may be granted unto Mr. Gideon Pearce. As wittness my hand the 30th day of April Anno Dom 1725. - - - Susannah (X - mark) Hampton Test: Wm Ramsey. 1726, July Court, pg 321 - Gideon Pearce Adm. of Andrew Hampton to inventory. 1725 - Cecil Co., Md. Source: Roberta Rose - RB Cox

GIDEON PEARCE, son of William and Isabella Pearce, m. Beatrice Codd, dau. of Col. St. Ledger and Mary Hanson Codd, and d. in August 1751. In 1721 Gideon Pearce was Sheriff of Kent. 1722, Sept. ye 15th. Then was ordered that Gideon Pearce (High Sheriff) should pay unto William Thornton thirty shillings ......

William Pearce 1 came to America in 1660 from England - he was the High Sheriff of Cecil County in 1687. William II Pearce born circa 1646 - died March 1720 - married Isabella Hopkins (died Feb. 1728).

William was the son of the High Sheriff of Cecil county, MD (William 1). He represented Cecil in the Legislature of Maryland in the sessions of 1694, 1706, and 1707. In 1714 and 1715 he was the Presiding Judge of Kent County court.

  Notes for SUSANNAH:
The following proceedings were then exhibited from Cecil Co. by Stephen Knight, Gent. " Deputy Commissary thereof (viz) - - - "Andrew HAMPTOH his Admton Bond in common form by Gideon Pearce his Admin with Henry Hendrickson & Richard Whitton his sureties in one hundred pounds sterling dated 4 May 1725" and his widow's renunciation as follows - Cecil County ~ I Susanah Hampton widow and relict of Andrew Hampton late of Cecil county deceased do by these presents renounce & refuse the administration of my said dec'd husbands estate and pray that letters of administration on the same may be granted unto Mr. Gideon Pearce. As wittness my hand the 30th day of April Anno Dom 1725. - - - Susannah (X - mark) Hampton Test: Wm Ramsey. 1726, July Court, pg 321 - Gideon Pearce Adm. of Andrew Hampton to inventory. 1725 - Cecil Co., Md. Source: Roberta Rose - RB Cox

  vii.   JONATHAN HAMPTON96, b. Abt. 1690, Freehold, Monmouth Co, East Jersey97; d. March 12, 1744/45, New Jersey97,98; m. (1) UNKNOWN; m. (2) ELIZABETH BIRD, February 21, 1739/40, Elizabeth Town in the County of Essex, NJ99.
  Notes for JONATHAN HAMPTON:
Jonathan Hampton, Born Abt: 1690 In Monmouth County, East Jersey (Source: Notes of Robert B. Cox, Newport News, Virginia, 23602, submitted to the Garland Family Research Association, written March 2, 1982, commenting on the parties to the 1702 will of John Hampton) died 1744 in New Jersey.

My research has led me to the following conclusions:

(1) Much of what had previously been attributed to Jonathan Hampton (son of Andrew Hampton from Scotland) was in fact Jonathan Hampton (1712-1777) son of Jonathan Hampton (abt. 1690-1744) that was the son of John Hampton (1643-1702) from Scotland.

(2) These Jonathans Hampton have probably been reported as a Composite Jonathan Hampton for many years - when in fact there were 3 Jonathans Hampton, not 1 or 2 as often reported. My speculation is that Jonathan Hampton (often chronicled) is a composite because he is reported as a Surveyor, High Sheriff, Judge, prosperous Coach Maker, Land Speculator, developer, Public Servant & Office Holder, etc., and that is a lot for one man. This may have started happening circa the 1730's.

(3) There is a possibility (and only a possibility) that Jonathan Hampton - son of James Hampton the son of Andrew and Margaret Hampton, may have been deceased by 1746.

(4) R.B. Cox was correct, based upon the best available evidence, Jonathan, the son of John Hampton died in New Jersey in 1744 and more specifically - 12 March, 1744/45.

(5) The children of this Jonathan Hampton (son of John Hampton and Matha Brown) were - Abraham, of Staten Island, Jonathan, Margaret Stites, Mary Oliver, Sarah, Johanna and Hannah Hampton.

(6) There is still much research to be done on these 3 Jonathans.

In summary, I believe you find the following in my compilation: There is a Jonathan Hampton, fairly well documented and chronicled, born 1712 and deceased 1777. I believe one will clearly see that the 1712-1777 Jonathan Hampton had a sister named Margaret and another named Sarah, had a son-in-law name Joseph Jelf married to a daughter Marian, a daughter named Mary married to Cavalier Jouet, a wife named Anne Frances and only one Jonathan Hampton fits that profile - the son of Jonathan Hampton deceased 1744/45 that was the son of John Hampton and Martha Brown.

One will also find that there appears to be only one known Jonathan Hampton in this NJ area in 1712 that could have been the Jonathan Hampton [Sr.], father of Jonathan Hampton [Jr.] born in 1712. That Jonathan Hampton, born about 1690 and proven to be in this part of NJ through 1724, was the son of John Hampton (1643-1702) and Martha Brown.

I wish to acknowledge the significant contributions of Roberta Rose and James W. Foster, however I take full responsibility for this compilation and the conclusions herein. I welcome any additions, corrections or suggestions, khampton@mediaone.net is my email address.

1702 Jan. 23 - John Hampton died in Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ. On 1702 Feb. 26 - John Hampton's Will is proved in Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ .....son Jonathan Hampton is one of the children named in the Will …. "Item I give unto my son Jonathan Hampton one hundred Acres of Land upon which my house stands after my widow's marriage or death when he is of age twenty one years."

1712 - Jonathan Hampton (1712-1777) "Jonathan Hampton was born 1712, died 1777, married Ann Frances. Unfortunately the life of this Revolutionary worthy ended when, at the age of sixty-five, he died while rejoicing over the surrender of Burgoyne in 1777." Source: Roberta Rose, "As We Were, The Story of Old Elizabethtown."

This Jonathan will later be shown to be the son of Jonathan Hampton (1690-1744), who, based upon best available evidence, is the son of John Hampton of Scotland (1643-1702).

1713 - Jonathan Hampton (1690-1744) conveyed his inherited land to his brother John Hampton in 1713 as was required under his father's will when he inherited it. From the will of John Hampton, …. "and likewise if any of them be minded to sell their above said Inheritance they prefer it first to their brethren or Lawful heirs." Jonathan would have been about 23 years of age when he sold his land to brother John Hampton.

1714/5 Feb 18 - Margaret Hampton (Stites) - "Margaret Hampton, daughter of Jonathan Hampton [1690-1744] was born Feb 18, 1714/5, Scudders Mill, Rahway River, NJ" - Location: ………."William Scudder who owned the Mill at Scudder's Mills on the Millstone, Middlesex Co, NJ, ….…"

Jonathan would be about 24 years old - this certainly can't be Jonathan son of James who was born about this time and certainly can't be Jonathan son of this Jonathan who was born about 1712.

1719 Mar 5 - Jonathan Hamton - - - - Estate of Richard Ellison of Freehold, Monmouth Co., yeoman; will of. wife, Ellse. Children -Daniel, Richard, Samuel, Ruth, Mary, Susanna and Sarah. To daughter, Sarah, "one hollowe which lyeth about half a mile from Afrems Wollintins southward." Executor - son, Daniel. Witnesses - Mary Pelton, Mary Wood and Ithamor Pelton. Proved at Crosswicks, in Upper Freehold, December 23, 1732, by Ithamar and Mary Pelton. Lib. B. p. 257. 1719, April 2. Inventory, £14.7.6; made by Thomas Sutton and Jonathan Hamton.

Jonathan Hampton (son of John) was the only known Jonathan Hampton in the area at the time. This would tend to indicate Jonathan was still reasonably close to Freehold in order to make the inventory, even though he had sold his inherited land in Freehold in 1713.

It should be noted that these towns were very young at this time and very sparsely populated by today's standards. For example, Elizabethtown had only about 150 families, Shrewsberry 80 families, Woodbridge 120 families, Newark 100 families - Source: First Settlers of Ye Plantations of Piscataway and Woodbridge Olde East New Jersey 1664-1714. I have seen the names of many of these families. It is possible, to reasonably say - " he was the only known Jonathan Hampton in the area." One has to grant the possibility of someone not being enumerated, etc., so one can proceed only upon the best available evidence, absent an individualized census, which is not available.

1724 May 27 - Jonathan Hampton ………….. Executor of will - - - Will of Thomas Combs … "Jonathan Hampton, cordwainer of Freehold, executor. Elizabeth (Hampton) Combs." Elizabeth Hampton, wife of the deceased is believed to be the sister of Jonathan. Herein he is described as a cordwainer [leather, shoes, etc. and of Freehold, NJ. - showing that he was still in the area in 1724.

Elizabeth Combs is Jonathan's sister Elizabeth Hampton:
WILL of THOMAS COMBS, officehold, Carpenter, "being now Sick in body." Dated Oct. 12,1723. Proved by dep. Of John Cambell and John Fenton, two of ye evidences, who were present when the other evidence signed; before Michael Kearny, Surrogate, Freehold, Mon. Co., May 27, 1724. Gives: "unto Robert Combs my Son twelve aceres of Land Joyning to Land formerly Benjamine Cooks Land where "the aforfd Roberts shop standeth to him ….. his heirs. ..." ; "unto Rachel Combs my Daughter, twenty "five aceres of Land to her heirs. ..."; "unto Thomas Combs my son twenty five aceres of Land to him his "heirs. ..."; "unto Jofeph Combs my son twenty- five aceres of Land to him his heirs. ..."; "unto "Jonathan Combs my son twenty-five aceres of Land to him his heirs. ..."; "unto John Combs my son the "Remaining part of the sd Land all which I now poffeff. ...and that the fd John Combes his share. ..."shall be and take in ye houfe and oarchard that I now live in " ; "unto Elizabeth Combs my Daughter therty " pounds moneys at eight shill pr ounce which is to [be] paid to ye sd Elizabeth her heirs by my aforesd Sons "viz, Thomas Combs, Joseph Combs Jonathan Combs and John Combs, each of them their equal proportion of sd thirty "pounds when any and every of them shall arrive . ...at the age of twenty two years that is first Thomas Combs, "and so on successivley as they shall be at that age. ...And upon. ...neglect by any of. ..."Legatees that then his or their part shall be sold to pay the same by my now wife Elizabeth "Combs and that her Deed shall be as good. ...as if I were alike [alive?] "; "unto Elizabeth "Combs my beloved wife all my movable Estate to be by her. ...Enjoyed with my farm During "her lifetime or to be Divided at her disretion the paying all my Debts. ...whom I Constitute together with " Jonathan Hampton of Freehold Cordweinr my Executrix and Excr "
Wits. : THOMAS COMBS George Walker John Fenton John Campbell
Oath of Executors, Elizabeth Combs and Jonathan Hampton; before Michl Kearny, Surrogate, Freehold, May 27, 1724.

1734/5 Feb 12 - Thomas Hampton & Jonathan Hampton, Inventory of personal estate of John Morris of Elizabeth Town, Essex Co, NJ includes bonds due from Jonathan Hampton and others, including Thomas Hampton. Executors are John and Joseph Shotwell.

1734/35 Jan 18 - Thomas and Jonathan Hampton - - - - - John Morris of Elizabeth Town, Essex Co., yeoman; will of. Children - John, Deborah and Justus, all under age. Land joining lands of John Shotwell, Erasmus Anton and Job Pack. Wife, Eliphol. Executors - friends John Shotwell, Joseph Shotwell, and son Justus. Witnesses - Jeffry Jones, Mary Shotwell, Deborah Lane. Proved Feb. 8, 1734 Lib. C, p. 8. 1734/5 Feb. 12. Inventory of personal estate (£1165.13.04) inc1. bonds due from Job Pack, John Lambert, William Robison, Isaac Lawrence, Thomas Hampton, Jonathan Winans, Lues Winans . . . . . . Jonathan Hampton . . . . [the full list reads almost like a census of Elizabeth, NJ including most who shortly become the borough's first leadership, i.e. - - - Joline, Shotwell, Ogden, Lambert, Woodruff, Frasee, Bonnel, etc.

It should be noted that a Capt. Isaac Lawrence (at a later date) marries the daughter of Jonathan Hampton (1712-1777) - son of Jonathan (1690-1744), son of John Hampton.

This Thomas Hampton, based on best available evidence would appear to be the son of Andrew and Margaret Hampton, that is virtually disinherited by Andrew Hampton, his father, in 1738 for forging a deed to Andrew's home property.

1736 - Margaret Hampton married John Stites (5 May 1706 STRAFIELD, FAIRFIELD, CONNECTICUT - 1 Apr 1782, SPRINGFIELD, ESSEX, NJ) about 1736. John was the son of William Stites (3 Apr 1676 Hempstead, Long Island, NY - 13 May 1727 Springfield, Essex Co, NJ) and Mary Hall (June 7 1681 Fairfield, CT - Auf 21, 1728 Springfield, Essex Co, NJ), William and Mary were married about 1705 in Springfield, Essex Co, NJ. John & Margaret had children: Margaret (b. 1740 Elizabeth Town NJ), Sarah (b. 1737 Elizabeth, NJ), John (b. 1743 Elizabeth, NJ), Abigal (b. 1745), Richard (b. 1747 Elizabeth, NJ), Chole (b. 1748).

Margaret Hampton is later shown to be the daughter of Jonathan Hampton (1690-1744) son of John Hampton.

1737 Oct 17 - "Mary Ann Hampton was born, daughter of Jonathan Hampton" [1712-1777]. Source: Edwin F. Hatfield, 1868, NY Historical Society, NYC.

That would mean this Jonathan born by at least 1719, could be much earlier, i.e., 1711/12. Calculation thereof: 1737 - 18 years = 1719. This Jonathan (1712-1777), later proven to be the son of Jonathan, deceased 1744 of Rahway, NJ. He would have been 25 years old in 1737 when daughter Mary Ann was born.

1739 May - Jonathan Hamton of Elizabeth in a book by Rev. Hatfield called "A History of Elizabeth, NJ." In May of 1739, Jonathan was called a "leading man of the town." He served on various governmental committees and was also a magistrate. He served as chairman of the Town Comm. before 1776. Then it says that after 1776 "he walked no longer with the patriots."

Other Jonathan (deceased 1744 of Rahway) is noted and documented in Staten Island in 1739, see below. This quote would suggest this was a younger man and if accurate the one that becomes a Judge - wouldn't be the one deceased 1744, has to be one of the younger Jonathans. The notation of after 1776 "he walked no longer with the patriots" would lead one to believe this is Jonathan deceased 1777.

It appears that the two younger Jonathans have possibly been rolled into one. There appears to be a Composite Jonathan, when in fact there are 2 or 3 Jonathans, any one of whom could have been the subject of a given attribution or account. My speculation is that Jonathan Hampton is a composite because he is later chronicled as a Surveyor, High Sheriff, Judge, prosperous Coach Maker, Land Speculator, Public Service Office Holder, etc., and that is a lot for one man.

1739 July 14 - Jonathan Hampton ...... executor, Will of John Dennis of Elizabeth Town Point, Essex County, Inn Holder…. Wife Mary… executors wife Mary and friends Jonathan Hampton of Staten Island, New York, yeoman and Thomas Jackman of Elizabeth Town… witnesses Thomas Hall, Caleb Woodruff, Anne Cana. Proved Aug 22, 1939. Jonathan Hampton and Thomas Jackman renounce executor ship.

1740 Feb 21 - "Jonathan HAMPTON of the County of Richmond [New York], Esq'r, and Ephraim FERRILL [?Terrill?]* of the County of Essex, blacksmith... [bound to]... Lewis MORRIS, Governour... 500 pounds... 21 Feb 1740. ...Jonathan HAMPTON... obtained license of marriage for himself and for Elizabeth BIRD of Elizabeth Town in the County of Essex, widow... [w] Nich's BIRD, Jno BARTOW."

1744/5 Mar 5 - "Jonathan Hampton of Rahway, Essex Co.; will of. Eldest son, Abraham, of Staten Island, land joining lands of Peter Tremleys and Garret Post. Son, Jonathan, negro man and clock, after the death of his mother-in-law [can be read, stepmother, in this case would be Elizabeth Bird]. Daughters: Margaret Stites, Mary Oliver, Sarah, Johanna and Hannah Hampton. Son- in-law [could be read, stepson], John Bird. Land joining lands of John Marsh and Daniel Lane. Executors-wife, Elizabeth: and son Abraham. Witnesses - John Badgley, Euphema Badgley, Edward Vaughn. Proved April 13, 1745."

Jonathan Hampton tombstone inscription, Rahway Public Cemetery d. 12 Mar 1745.

A John Bird, Joseph Bird and Rueben Bird lived in Elizabeth Town along with Jonathan, Abraham and Jacob Hampton, circa 1755.

Margaret Hampton (Stites) - "Margaret Hampton was born Feb 18, 1714/5, Scudders Mill, Rahway River, NJ - …William Scudder who owned the Mill at Scudder's Mills on the Millstone, Middlesex Co, NJ, who married Eleanor Craig"…. Margaret Hampton married John Stites (5 May 1706 STRAFIELD, FAIRFIELD, CONNECTICUT - 1 Apr 1782, SPRINGFIELD, ESSEX, NJ) about 1736. John was the son of William Stites (3 Apr 1676 Hempstead, Long Island, NY - 13 May 1727 Springfield, Essex Co, NJ) and Mary Hall (June 7 1681 Fairfield, CT - Auf 21, 1728 Springfield, Essex Co, NJ), William and Mary were married about 1705 in Springfield, Essex Co, NJ.
     
John & Margaret had children: Margaret (b. 1740 Elizabeth Town NJ), Sarah (b. 1737 Elizabeth, NJ), John (b. 1743 Elizabeth, NJ), Abigal (b. 1745), Richard (b. 1747 Elizabeth, NJ), Chole (b. 1748).
     
Stites Family File, which is in print as the Stites Family Book. From the file, page 66: "The Hampton Family - The Hampton Family was of Staten Island, Richmond County, New York and Rahway, Essex County, New Jersey" " Elizabeth Bird subsequently married Jonathan Hampton of Richmond County, NY, by license dated February 21, 1740-1."

This daughter [Margaret Stites cited in 1744 Will of Jonathan and above] along with later data conclusively links this Jonathan (1690-1744 to his son Jonathan 1712-1777).

RB Cox is a very noted and respected Hampton Family researcher. I have not been able to find the source or basis for his statement/conclusion - "Jonathan died 1744 in NJ," but do now concur with him, based upon my research.

George Cumming, possibly Margaret's brother, another of the early immigrant group and a cordwainer in Piscataway. Note - was also a cordwainer (works with leather, shoes, etc.).

RAHWAY PUBLIC CEMETERY, UNION, NEW JERSEY
Tombstone Inscriptions
Rahway Public Cemetery
Rahway, Union County, New Jersey
Copied by
Ruth Carter Hillier
Typed by Delene H. Keddington
HAMPTON, Jonathan, d. 12 Mar. 1745.

  More About JONATHAN HAMPTON:
Burial: Rahway Public Cemetery - Rahway, Union County, New Jersey

  More About JONATHAN HAMPTON and ELIZABETH BIRD:
Marriage: February 21, 1739/40, Elizabeth Town in the County of Essex, NJ99

  viii.   NOAH HAMPTON100,101, b. Abt. 1693, Freehold, Monmouth Co, East Jersey102; d. 1775, Hampshire Co, Virginia103; m. (1) SARAH104,105, Bef. 1717, Monomouth Co, NJ106; d. Aft. 1717107; m. (2) ALSE (ALYS)108, Aft. 1718.
  Notes for NOAH HAMPTON:
Noah Hampton is the same person shown as a son in the 1702 Will of one John Hampton in Freehold, New Jersey.

Noah Hampton is the son of John Hampton and Martha Brown. We find the following in Quaker records - 1686/87, 3rd of 1st month, John Hampton of Middleton NJ, md. to Martha Brown, of Shrews., 'at the publicke meeting of house of friends,".....

1714, Sept. 14 The Will of John Bowne of Mattawan, Middletown, Monmouth, NJ - merchant, Bowne's estate includes mortgages, bonds and book debts. - Noah Hampton owes L08-09-07-2 "owing on the books" (signature loan). Also showing as a debtor to the estate was Crine Jansen & John Van Metre 81--16--05--3 (the Van Meter name will again link with the Hamptons in VA circa 1730).

9 Sept 1715, Noah sold his inherited 100 acres of land in NJ to Thomas Combs.

Noah virtually disappears between 1717 and 1734 when he shows up in VA.

One of the first known grants was 1020 acres to Jost Hite - Aug. 5, 1734. On Oct. 3, 1734 there were 34 other grants made totaling 19,033 acres - including one for 1142 acres to Benjamin Borden, David Griffith and Andrew Hampton.

Noah Hampton occupied land and was on Opequon Creek by 1734/35. Noah reportedly operated his first mill on the Opequon Creek in VA. Noah along with the adjoining property of John Hampton Sr & Jr and an Andrew Hampton stretched for almost a mile along Opequon Creek, beginning about a mile North of the present border between VA & WV. Source: JW Foster

Noah's Opequon property (which he had apparently sold by 1743) is noted in reference to a Jonas and Jonathan Seamon.

Jonathan Seamon [b.c.1703] was living on Thomas Anderson's north half of the 542 acre patent land (Tract 144B, Map 4) by December 1737. [Orange County, VA Deed Book 2, pp.55,56]. Jonathan was deceased by 11 November 1743 when his wife Elizabeth was appointed Administratrix of his estate,

At the request by Jonas Seamon, [son of Jonathan Seaman], a warrant was issued by the Clerk of the Proprietors Office on 2 August 1750 for a survey of 205-plus acres "where he lives within a survey made for Noah Hampton

The first documentation of Noah in the valley shows up in 1735/36 - Noah Hampton appears on a list of petitioners in Orange County, opposing the routing of a wagon road from the Forks of the Shenandoah River over the "Blue Mountains." Source: Kathry Weiss citing notes of RB Cox

In 1737/8, Orange County Court Records - Noah Hampton was named, along with other settlers, in suits of complaint brought by William Williams.

Sometime before 1743/44 Noah had removed to the South Branch of the Potomac near Old Fields (which was Frederick County at the time) where we also find members of the Vanmeter and Hite families as neighbors.

A History of Hardy County, WV, says Noah's 1743 mill (known as the Old Stackhouse Mill, on the Great Capon River) was probably the first in what later became Hardy County. [I haven't yet found documentation of this - in fact would appear to be on the South Branch by initial research - kh]

FC, 1:15, 13 January 1743 - On the petition of Noah Hampton and others for a road from Noah Hampton's mill into a road on Great Cape Capon [Great Cacapon] near James Coddy's [Caudy's].

This "Wagon Road" became the major route of transportation for the South Branch residents and connected them to Frederick VA and the eastern markets for import/export of goods.

At the "Old Virginia Court," held " Friday the 9th day of December MD, CCXLIII," we find this entry: "On petition of Noah Hampton and others, for a road from Noah Hampton's mill, into a road on the Great Cacapon, near James Coddy's Fort, ordered that Jonathan Coburn, Isaac Thomas, Peter Kuykendall and James Delheryea, or any two of them, mark off the road petitioned for by the said Hampton, . . . and make returns to this court, etc."

There is a "Fee Book" [tax book] in the Handley Library, Archives Division, in Winchester, VA for Frederick County 1744.

Reportedly, in 1744, Noah Hampton is sworn as a constable in the precinct of Solomon Hedges.

On May 11, 1744 "Old" Noah Hampton was reportedly in court in Frederick charged by one of his customers with taking more toll in grain for grinding the grain, than the one-sixth allowed by law. Source: Ancestors of Vance Peterson

14 July 1744 - Jonathan Cobourn and Peter Kuykendall having made their return of an order of this court for viewing, marking, and laying off a road from Noah Hampton's mill into the road on Great Cape Capon near James Cody's.

11 September 1744 - Henry Vanmetre is hereby appointed overseer of the road from Noah Hampton's mill to the road on Great Cape Capon near James Cody's in the room of Matthias Yoakham and it is ordered that he causes the same to be cleared, and when cleared, that he keep the same in good repair according to law.

In 1744 Joseph Hampton and two sons came from the eastern shore of Maryland and located on Buck Marsh, near Berryville and dwelt the greater part of the year in a hollow tree. Finally, enclosing a piece of land, they made a crop preparatory to the removal of their families.

March 31, 1747 James Genn, surveyed South Branch Manor.

April 8, 1747 Genn then surveyed Patterson Creek Manor about 12 miles north of South Branch Manor.

1748 - More surveying was done by Genn and this time he was accompanied by another surveyor, 16-year-old George Washington, a friend of the Fairfax family, who wrote: "March 26, 1748.

16 November 1749 - Jonathan Cobourn and William Miller having returned, that they had laid out the road petitioned for by Henry Vanmetre from Hampton's down the South Branch according to an order of the court, and beginning below where the said road Vanmetre did leave from thence to where he now lives, and so down by his mill from thence straight to Hampton's mill.

James Coburn was living near the present town of Petersburg when George Washington and his associates came to the South Branch Valley to do some surveying. "It was on March 21, 1743, when they reached the South Branch near Colonel Cresap's home and soon crossed Peterson's Creek to Abraham Johnson's place, then traveled to Solomon Hedge's home and later reached the home of Henry Van Meter. They next went up the South Branch through Frosty Hollow and over Scott's Ridge to Looney's (Lunice) Creek and the present town of Petersburg, .... continued up the North Fork to Meadows and the home of James Rutledge; and then to the James Coburn place near Petersburg; and then continued their journey...... and to Great Cacapon and Winchester."

In 1751-53 a Frederick County Court Order shows Noah Hampton was granted a judgement against Robert Lowther for a debt.

6 March 1753 - John Kuykendall is appointed overseer of the road from the North River near Thomas Parker's to Peter Tostees Plantation

Henry Vanmeter is appointed overseer of the road from Peter Tostees Plantation to Hampton's Mill and it is ordered that all the tithables on Patterson's Creek above Frees Mill and all the above the Trough to the county line on the Branch [South Branch] work on the same under him as their overseer and that he clear and keep it in repair according to law.

.both Cassey and Vanmeter lived at Old Fields, West Virginia. Noah Hampton's mill, the starting point of a road authorized by the Frederick County Court, was located either on Turnmill Run about three miles north of Old Fields on U.S. Highway 220 where he had 312 acres surveyed on 2 December 1750** or about 1 1/2 miles west of Old Fields where a branch of Anderson Run was called Hampton's Mill Run in 1747 and later on several Fairfax surveys. Hampton's Mill Run was the middle branch of Anderson Run north of Walnut Bottom Run. Adjacent land owners of Hampton on Turnmill Run were Soloman Hedges (who assigned his tract to George Strickler - 10 Aug. 1764 and Abraham Hite who owned 360 acres at Reynolds Gap on U.S. Highway 220 on (Henry) Vanmeter's Run (Mudlick).

John McCulloch - Thomas Neale of Hampshire Co. 312 A. in said Co. Surv'd 2 Dec. 1750 by David Vance for Noah Hampton who sold to John McCulloch who gave Bond to John Hayton & William Carlyle to make them a Title. John Hayton by his last Will ordered same to be sold. William Carlyle agreed to sale. Joseph Watson acting Executor of said John Hayton sold to Thomas Neale who forfeited by advertisement and recorded in Book N. Deed to Thomas Neale. Adj. Abraham Hite, the Manor Line. [From 1774 record]

George Stickler - Hampshire Co. Deed book #4 p. 70 - Jan 16 1775 George Stickler of Fred. Co. to Garrett Van Meter 195 acres for 60 Lb. on Twin Mill Run adj. to Noah Hampton. Lease and release.

Isaac Van Meter, will dated 15 Feb 1754, shown as resident of South Branch of the Potowmack (Potomac) River, in Frederick Co., Va. Will proved 14 Dec. 1757 in Hampshire Co., VA, mentions land purchased of Michael Hyder in Hampshire; also land bought of James Cebrun (Coburn) mentioned as located by Abraham Hite & Jonathan Heath.

July 30, 1755 ......... we find this real estate transaction July 30: "Bill of Sale: Wm Tucker of Hampshire (Adj. a survey of Noah Hampton) sold to Robert Higginas. Witnesses: Moses Hampton and Edward Purcell..." In a listing just above this Bill of Sale is another transaction involving Robert Higginas and having a witness by the name of Adam Hampton.

The Valley was devastated during the late summer and early fall of 1755. "Deeds recorded the first eight years of Hampshire's existence, including sales, leases, mortgages, etc., are tabulated as below: 1754 - 2 1756 - 0 1758 - 2 1760 - 1 1755 - 3 1757 - 1 1759 - 1 1761 - 36"

Noah Hampton was a qualified Elector in Frederick County, he voted for George Washington, a candidate for the Virginia House of Burgesses and his second ballot was for Colonel Martin - records show.

A John Hampton, Charles Colson and John Colston along with Henry Vanmeter, Joseph Vanmeter, Remberance Williams, Josiah Combs and many others were paid for Military service [Militia]. Source: Virginia Colonial Records 1600-1700,

1758 - A Story of Two Tennessee Families, Edwards - Hyder, Ernestine Ratcliffe Edwards - In the Ross B. Johnson book of West Virginia Estate Settlements we find: p. 31 Inventory and appraisement for Michael Hider, Date of Probate 14 February, 1758. Witnesses: Henry Van Meter, Jonathan Corbin, Peter Casey

On February 1, 1759, Noah Hampton, Rawley Wood and John Andrews witnessed the will of Joseph Matthews, of Albemarle County, Virginia.

January 17, 1761 - Reportedly, Frederick Co. records show a clerk fee of 30 pounds of tobacco due by Noah Hampton to the County Clerk James Wood.

1762 - Benjamin Kuykendall of Hampshire Co. 400 A. adj. John Kuykendall on Mill Cr. of S. Br. of Potomac R. in said Co. Surv. Mr David Vance. 10, Sept. 1762. Also a 1770 survey for John Henry - 77 A. on break neck run of S. Br. of Potomac .. adj. John Kuykendall.

1762 - Col. George Mercer of Frederick Co. 100 A. in Black Walnut Bottom adj. John Ryan, Noah Hamptons Run in Hampshire Co. Surv. David Vance. 1 Jan. 1762 nnlg/p128/K-342:

Col. George Mercer of Frederick Co. 342 A. adj. the Manour line on N. Fork of Noah Hamtons Mill Run in Hampshire Co. Surv. David Vance. 4 Jan. 1762 - K-344:nnlg/p128

It is noted that a Martha Williams sold what would appear to be land on the Manor Line of the South Branch Manor (lot #4, 68 Acres, to Issac Van Meter circa 1800). Lot 4 West would appear to be in the same spot as Hampton's MIll Run & Anderson's Run. Andersons Run proceeds east - west through lots 3 West and 2 West of the South Branch Manor and just below "Old Fields." The east - west border between lot #1 and lot #2 is located at "Old Fields."

Both of Noah's locations near Moorefield and Old Fields are noted as "adjacent to the Manor Line." Neither is apparently in the South Branch Manor. One should also note that Washington surveyed all around Noah (including Solomon Hedges' land & Van Meter's land - Noah's neighbors) for Lord Fairfax, but did not survey Noah's Land? It would appear that the Van Meters, Abraham Hite and Solomon Hedges were Noah's closest neighbors in the Old Fields location. Was Noah's Land outside of the South Branch Manor?

1764 - Geroge Stickler of Town of Lancaster in Pennsylvania 195 A. in Hampshire Co. Surv. Mr. David Vance Adj. Noah Hampton. 10 Aug. 1764 nnvg/p158/M-289

1765 - Col. Abraham Hite of Hampshire Co. 360 A. adj. the Manor Line on Van Meters Run at Mudd Lick in said county Surv. Mr. David Vance Adj. Hites Corner, Noah Hampton. 1 Apr. 1765 nnlg/p160/M-334. A 1747 map shows Noah's property with the southwest corner on Mudlick Run and Turnmill Run running through the middle of the property. The location is basically about 1-2 miles north and west of where Moorefield WV is located. [This would be the same 312 acres described below. I do not know at this time what the title problems were.]

Thomas Neale of Hampshire Co. 312 A. in said Co. Surv'd 2 Dec. 1750 by David Vance for Noah Hampton who sold to John McCulloch

The 1772 will of Noah Hampton was found by a researcher named George Purcell in 1997.

1776 - HAMPTON NOAH S BR Manor County VA Rental Rolls Rent Role VA -

Colonial America, 1607-1789 VA Census Index - GenealogyLibrary.com
Williams, Martha       VA S BR MANOR 1776 RENT ROLL
Hampton, Mansah       VA S BR MANOR 1776 RENT ROLL [Who is this? kh]
Hampton, Noah       VA S BR MANOR 1776 RENT ROLL

"South Branch Manor Lands - Men and Manors"
17      Hampton Manor      96a (this is presumed to be Noah Hampton)
17      John Renick      122a (also owned lot #1)
19      Jonathon Heath      105a (friend & executor of Noah's Will - 1775)
33       Edward Williams & Issac Hornback 235a each
58      Adam Hyder      104a

Hampshire County, West Virginia Estate Settlements, Genealogical Records - Early West Virginia (CD520 FTM)
Hampton, Noah, Bond 5-9-1775
Hampton, Noah, Inv., 4-14-1778
Heath Jonathan, Bond 11-15-1775 & 11-11-1773 & 11-10-1772

In the eastern mountain dialect, "Alse" is Elsie and "Mathy" is Martha.

7-31-1779 - Martha Williams to Garret Vanmeter. Bill of Sale. Place on which she lived, for L500 pounds, one bushel salt, two bushels corn, one and one-half bushels wheat: rec. 8-10-1779. Wit: Jacob Vanmeter, Noah Williams.

1781 - I see that Peter Casey, Jr. conveyed to Jonathan Purcell 400 acres on Patterson Creek that was originally granted to Vincent Williams, my ancestor Sept 26 1781. This was owned by Vincent prior to 1756 and I do not know its exact location but Vincent is not listed as one of the Patterson Creek lot owners. Source: Wednesday, May 02, 2001 11:19 AM - George M.Williams <gmwill@hereintown.net>

1782 - "Edward Purcell and his brother William inherited their grandfather Noah Hampton's 95 acres, part of Lot 17, Fairfax Patterson Creek Manor. The 1782 census of Hampshire Co shows them together.

Reportedly, Wild Meadow Run was Hampton's Run; Mill Creek was Ed. Corns Run; Staggs Run was Parkers Mill Run. Source: Purcell Family Web Site

Several adult Andrew Hamptons are known to have been alive in 1772 when Noah named his son Andrew in his will.

There is ample record of brothers Purcell in 1800-1810 Indiana.

I am not sure, at this point, if we can say with any degree of certainty, who is Col. Andrew Hampton's father. The two best candidates are certainly Noah and brother Andrew, sons of John Hampton (NJ) the immigrant from Scotland.

Was Mary, wife of Peter Kuykendall the daughter of Noah Hampton? Family tradition on both sides says that she was, but nothing has been conclusively proven. A more detailed evaluation is included in Mary Hampton's family file (daughter of Noah).

Edward and Ann had three sons: Jonathan, 1754-1813; Edward, 1759-1851, and William, 1761-1842. .

The first Census of Hampshire Co, 1782. enumerated north to south, shows Edward and William living on Lot 17.

There is also the unaswered question of, "What happened to Mathy?" Purcell's suggestion that she married a "Williams" is the only clue I have found so far. There was at least one Martha Williams in Hampshire County.

7/31/1779 - Martha Williams to Garret Vanmeter. Bill of Sale. Place on which she lived, for L500 pounds, one bushel salt, two bushels corn, one and one-half bushels wheat: rec. 8-10-1779. Wit: Jacob Vanmeter, Noah Williams. A Noah Williams is later found in PA and noted in some military records. Any information on Martha or Noah is most welcome.

I surmise Jonathan was not named in Noah's Will because early on Noah gave Jonathan choice 45-acre Lot 37W, Fairfax's South Branch Manor, in now Hardy Co. This lot, 37W, shows as 45a and owner as Wm Ashby in "Men and Manors in the South Branch Valley."



  More About NOAH HAMPTON:
Probate: 1775, Hampshire County, VA

  More About NOAH HAMPTON and SARAH:
Marriage: Bef. 1717, Monomouth Co, NJ109

  More About NOAH HAMPTON and ALSE (ALYS):
Marriage: Aft. 1718

     
Child of JOHN HAMPTON and JANE CURTIS is:
  ix.   JOSEPH3 HAMPTON110,111,112, b. Abt. 1702113; d. October 02, 1767, Bucks Co, PA114,115; m. MARY CANBY116,117, August 09, 1722, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania118,119; b. December 14, 1697, Abington, Pennsylvania, USA; d. August 04, 1794, Wrightstown, PA.
  Notes for JOSEPH HAMPTON:
Joesph Hampton appears to have been very early in life a man of means. He built and operated the Anchor Tavern in Wrightstown, PA about 1724. It appears that operated it for over 10 years as a "public house." he was "compelled to entertain numerous travelers form New England, New York and the Jersey Province." It is rpeorted that among Quakers of early years, a tavern partook of the "general hospitality" of the community and they evidently realized the importance of such an establishment. Tavern owners were very prominent and substanital members of the community.

He married Mary Canaby, daughter of Thomas Canby, a very prominent figure in PA and holder of extensive land holdings. Thomas was noted as the first in the county to graft apple trees.

It is not clear if Joseph remained in PA when Jane returned to NJ to marry John Sharp or traveled with her to NJ. Some researchers believe he stayed in PA with sister Sarah and her husband Edmond Kinsey.

Joseph purchased 224 acres of land from Thomas and Jane Canby in 1724. He secured from Zebulon Heston the remaining portion of the Richardson tract, about 250 acres and also purchase other land.

This newspaper article was found in a file on the HAMPTON family at the Hunterdon County Historical Society, 114 Main St., Flemington, NJ 08822. Unfortunately, the name and date of the newspaper was not written or attached to the article. From evidence in the article itself, the date might have been around April 1939. Biography of Joseph HAMPTON of Bucks County, Pennsylvania - Posted by Mary Jo C. Martin on Thu, 27 Jan 2000

[Headline:] Honor Joseph Hampton, Whose Descendants Settled in Hunterdon

The name of Joseph Hampton, noted colonial pioneer of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, whose descendants settled in Hunterdon County, at Quakertown, will be honored on May 6, 1939, at the annual meeting of the Bucks County Historical Society, to be held in the Mercer Museum, Doylestown. On that occasion, Dr. Vernon Boyce Hampton, of 301 Hart Avenue, Staten Island, N. Y., will speak on the subject “In the Footsteps of Joseph Hampton and the Pennsylvania Quakers.”

Dr. Hampton recently recorded the name of Joseph Hampton of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and his father, John Hampton, who settled at Freehold, N. J., in 1683, in the office of the registrar of the noted Society of Colonial Wars, 122 East 58th Street, New York City. Membership in the society is based upon distinguished ancestry which participated in the early American colonial period.

The first Joseph Hampton in this distinguished colonial line, son of the above John Hampton, removed with his mother to Bucks County prior to 1722, in which year he married Mary Canby, daughter of another noted pioneer patriot, Thomas Canby. Joseph Hampton was a member of the colonial provincial assembly of Pennsylvania for 20 years, representing Bucks County. His father-in-law, Thomas Canby, was also a member of the Pennsylvania assembly. Both the Hampton and Canby families were knighted in England and entitled to arms. As the eldest sons only inherited the earldom, the younger sons left to try their fortunes in America, and they and their descendants have left their names in the history of religion, authorship, farming, statesmanship and the arts in America.

John Hampton, Joseph Hampton and three Benjamins in direct line and their families were prominent Quakers. John Hampton heard William Penn at the annual meeting in Burlington; Joseph was an elder of the Friends Meeting at Wrightstown, Bucks County, Pa., and a member of the colonial assembly with Benjamin Franklin. He was also clerk of the quarterly and annual meetings in New Jersey and at Philadelphia, and overseer and held other important posts. One of the largest land-holding Quakers, he introduced the first tree-grafting in his apple orchards in Bucks County. He built the Anchor Inn in 1724, which is today the oldest tavern still in continuous operation in Bucks County.

Ann Hampton was one of the most prominent of the early Quaker preachers. Preachers and teachers are numbered largely among the Hampton names in America. Some of the descendants of Joseph Hampton, thru Benjamin, moved westward into Ohio, Kentucky, Iowa and beyond the Rockies. Amos Hampton was a leader of the Quaker band which in 1856 settled West Branch, Iowa, being associated with Herbert Hoover’s grandfather in this settlement. An interesting coincidence of history made Rev. William Judson Hampton, D. D.--a Methodist minister born in Quakertown, N. J.--a biographer of Herbert Hoover during the latter’s presidency. Rev. Dr. William Hampton was the brother of the late Joseph Elrod Hampton of Baptistown, and the father of Dr. Vernon B. Hampton, who will speak next month in Doylestown.

Joseph Moved to Hunterdon

In 1804, Joseph Hampton, son of Benjamin, Jr., moved from Bucks County into Hunterdon County, and lived on a farm near Flemington. Later Benjamin the third, another son of Benjamin, Jr., also moved into Hunterdon County with his wife, Hannah Morris, daughter of Issacher Morris, of the Philadelphia Morrises. Accompanied by their children, they became leaders in the Kingwood Friends Meeting at Quakertown, N. J. Morris Hampton, William Wharton Hampton and John Hampton were three sons of Benjamin, III, who settled in Hunterdon. Dr. Morris Leaver is a descendant of Morris Hampton, still living in Quakertown. Joseph Elrod Hampton, for many years a prominent Republican in Hunterdon County, and an agricultural leader, was a son of William Wharton Hampton. His widow, Mary Hoff Hampton, resides on the original Hoff farm on which Abijah Hampton has his well-known Black Leghorn chicken farm.

Benjamin Bowles Hampton was the editor of Hampton’s Magazine, and prominent in the development of the motion picture industry in this country.

Honorable J. Hampton Moore is well-known as the statesman-Mayor of Philadelphia during some of the most brilliant days of that fair Quaker city.

Dr. Vernon B. Hampton, New York City educator, author of many historical works, has completed work on a Hampton genealogy, which includes other noted families of Hunterdon County. He has traced the Trimmer family to the original Trimmer immigrant, in unbroken line; the Baldwin family enters the Hampton family line, bringing direct descent from Sir John Baldwin, the first Chief Justice of England. William Wharton Hampton, Dr. Hampton’s grandfather, married Susannah Baldwin, of the above line, direct thru Triamor Baldwin. The Marshall family is another famous Hunterdon County family which Dr. Hampton has traced, since Furman Marshall’s marriage to Susannah Trimmer made possible the union of their daughter, Maria Marshall to Samuel Baldwin.

I have a John Hampton b. Jan. 12, 1724 of Joseph and Mary Canby Hampton who were married on Aug. 9, 1722. John married Ann Croasdale and they had 8 children. One of their sons named Joseph had a son named Noah but I have no record of Noah after that. Also I don't have any records of Andrew Hampton or Jean Jane] Curtis Osbourne. I hope this is of some help.\

Karl
Samuel B. Hampton was born in Frederick Co., Maryland on the 9th of the 4th
month, 1825. When he was 16 he moved, with his father's family, to Ohio, and
settled on a farm at Blue Rock, Muskington Co. In 1851 the family moved to
Viola, Linn Co. Iowa. This is from the book Hampton History by John Hampton
Doan that was published in 1911. I believe that is the same book that you
ordered. I was born in Keokuk Co... Iowa in 1930 and moved to Ca. in 1950 then to Nv.
in 2000.

  More About JOSEPH HAMPTON and MARY CANBY:
Marriage: August 09, 1722, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania120,121




[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]
Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com