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View Tree for Cynthia Talbot RossCynthia Talbot Ross (b. Abt. 1801, d. Abt. December 08, 1831)

Cynthia Talbot Ross (daughter of Unknown Talbot) was born Abt. 1801, and died Abt. December 08, 1831 in Jackson Co, Tx.. She married (1) James Jefferies Ross on June 1816 in TN. She married (2) William B. Bridgers(r)(es) on Abt. 1824 in Mississippi, son of Joseph Bridger and Unknown Unknown.

 Includes NotesNotes for Cynthia Talbot Ross:
WILLIAM B. BRIDGERS
A TEXIAN
AND MEMBER OF AUSTIN'S "OLD THREE HUNDRED"
1795 - 1853
By Carrie Townley Porter, M. A.
August, 2000

(This NARRATIVE is con't from William B. Bridgers note pages)

Bridgers and Eliza had six children: Amanda, born in 1837, married Henry Boatright on January 27, 1852. The second daughter, Harriet E., born in 1840, married E. Sandill. The third child, William B. Jr., was born in 1843, in Fayette County. On September 30, 1863, in Fayette County, he married Mary E. Ross, a daughter of James Talbot Ross. Sophronia was born in 1847, probably in Fayette County, John was the fourth child. and Carrie was the fifth child.

It is uncertain just when the Bridgers family moved from Jackson County to Fayette County. On April 24, 1837, Bridgers and his wife, Eliza, joined her parents, James and Martha Lyons in Fayette County in posting a $20,000 bond in the sale of part of a league granted to Lyons. The league was located below the crossing by San Felipe de Austin and Gonzales Road, with Cox Point and Bastrop Road running through it, and consisted of one-half league. The buyer was Walter Hinckley. The bond was given with the stipulation that Lyons would transfer title to Hinckley within three months after the opening of the land office. Had Lyons not done this the Lyons and the Bridgers would have lost their bond money to Hinckley. By this time, Texas was a republic with many counties which had been organized in 1836, after defeating Santa Anna and his army. The land office had not yet been set up, however. On this deed, the Bridgers are listed as being "of Jackson County." This indicates they were still living on part of the original land grant, which by this time was a part of Jackson County, Texas. Thus, they moved to Fayette County after this time, and by 1840, when Bridgers was listed in the 1840 Census of the Republic of Texas as living in Fayette County. He owned no land in Fayette at that timeas he did not show up on the 1840 Jackson County tax roll.

Early on the morning of October 15, 1837, Comanches attacked the farm of James and Martha Lyons, killing James and taking captive his youngest son, Warren French Lyons, age twelve. Warren lived with the tribe for several years, but eventually returned to his family. Martha and her other children were in the house, but were not molested.


This tragedy and the death of his wife's father, must have been difficult for Bridgers and his family. James Lyons was buried on his land. He was the third member of the Lyons family to be buried in what was becoming the Lyons family cemetery. His daughter, Clarissa Lyons, died on November 7, 1834, and his son, John L. Lyons, died on June 5, 1837. They were both buried there. Seymour C. Lyons, son-in-law of William B. Bridgers, and the son of James and Martha Lyons, who died on February 13, 1848, was buried there as well. The plot is adjacent to the Schulenburg City Cemetery. James Lyons' grave was incorrectly marked in later years with the

name of Warren, his young son who was captured by the Comanches. A Texas State Historical Marker has corrected that error.

It is here, near these Lyons burials, that the descendants of William B. Bridgers, with this application request a marker honoring him be placed. Although some historians and descendants of Bridgers believe that he died at Black Jack Springs and was buried at the Black Jack Springs-Pin Oak Cemetery, his descendants who are applying for this marker, do not agree. There is no record of his owning land near Black Jack Springs. The land records indicate that Bridgers and Eliza bought land near that of the Lyons family land. On July 19, 1848, the Bridgers purchased 238 acres from Kisiah Crier Taylor and her husband, George Taylor. The original grant was made April 25, 1831, to Kisiah Crier. The town of Schulenburg is located on this grant. The Bridgers land was south or southwest of the present day, City of Schulenburg, and on the waters of the Navidad River

The Lyons family cemetery was so close. Buried there were Eliza Bridgers' sister, brother and father, as well as another brother, Seymour C. Lyons, the son-in-law of William B. Bridgers. It seems logical that Bridgers would have been buried there also, not at Pin Oak/Black Jack Springs Cemetery (now Pin Oak Cemetery.)

Although they did not live on the land, the Bridgers owned land in Gonzales County and Lavaca County. Bridgers had received a league of land for his service in the Texas Army, during the Siege of Bexar and his second period of service in 1836. The land was located in what later became Gonzales County. In addition, he bought and sold several tracts of land in Lavaca County from the late 1830's and into the 1850's. This land was originally the headright of Seymour C. Lyons.

Eliza Bridgers owned land in her own right. On April 2, 1838, she appeared before the Board of Land Commissioners of Gonzales County. She received a land grant of one league and one labor (177 acres) after proving she had arrived in Gonzales County in February of 1836, as the widow of William R. Tribble, which entitled her to the land grant. Bridgers acted as her agent in this matter. A certificate for one unlocated balance of one labor was issued and forwarded to William B. Bridgers by mail on September 7, 1849, and he paid a fee of $67.80 to agent James Kerr. It was not until after Bridgers' death that Eliza handled any of her land, a situation common at the time. # 60; Deed Records, Lavaca County, Texas, Deed Books F, p. 356-357.

This land later ended up in Lavaca County, after it was established. It was in the sale of some of this land that Bridgers, on June 30, 1848, signed a deed of gift to Eliza giving her his one slave, Reuben. This gift was for his having sold 800 acres of her widow's headright. No bill of sale for the slave has been located, so it is possible that Reuben was one of the Bridger slaves on the Joseph Bridger Plantation in Mississippi and that Bridger brought him to Texas when he returned from settling the estate in 1836. It is doubtful that Bridgers would have brought him to Texas in 1824, as slaves were not allowed by the Mexican government during that time.

The first record of the Bridgers buying land in Fayette County was the land Kesiah Crier Taylor and her husband, George Taylor, sold them. Before this time, it is probable that the Bridgers were living with either Martha Lyons, Eliza's mother, or one of Eliza's brothers. They later purchased fifty acres of the S. A. Anderson league as well as another 200 acres. Just two months before he died, Bridgers and Eliza sold the land they had purchased from the Taylors to Bridgers' oldest daughter, Mary Bridgers Ranne.

Bridgers began his public career in Fayette County when he was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace for Beat No. 6, in the vicinity of Lyons. He began his term of office on August 7, 1848, and was elected for two more terms on August 5, 1850 and August 17, 1852 . These are the terms found in the Fayette County records, although at least two printed, secondary sources list earlier years. Worth S. Ray, in Austin Colony Pioneers, notes Bridgers, in his duties as a Justice of the Peace, officiated at the marriage of Christopher Fitzgerld to Mary Burke in Fayette County on October 15, 1843. Joe E. Erickson in his book, Judges of the Republic of Texas - 1836-1846 lists Bridgers as being elected to the position of Justice of the Peace in Fayette County in 1840 and 1845. Perhaps more research needs to be done in this area.

During this time, he performed the marriage ceremony numerous times. On September 22, 1848, he officiated at the marriage of his brother-in-law, Warren F. Lyons and Lucy Boatright. Although Warren returned to live with the Comanches several times, he came back to stay when he married Lucy.

During Bridgers' time in office, things did not always run smoothly . He was involved with several law suits. In 1847, he was charged by the State of Texas with a misdemeanor in office, however he won the law suit and the State paid the costs. In 1848, the State found him guilty of holding an unlawful election. Later, Bridgers' attorney asked that the charges be dropped and for what ever the reason, the indictment was quashed .

Bridgers was granted a license from Fayette County on November 6, 1846, to sell liquor by the quart. For this license he paid $7.18 & 3/4 to the State of Texas and $5.59 to Fayette County. He perhaps was still in the hat making business as in the 1850 census, he had living in his household William Williams who listed his occupation as hat maker. Bridgers listed his occupation as a farmer.

Bridgers owned at least one slave. The Census of 1840 of the Republic of Texas listed one slave and the Slave Census of Fayette County in 1850 listed his having one black male slave, age fifty-four.

In addition to serving as Justice of Peace for the Lyons area, Bridgers was appointed the Postmaster of Lyons. His brother-in-law, DeWitt C. Lyons, had served from May 22, 1846, through August 3, 1847, when he was replaced by William B. Anderson, who was also a Justice of the Peace. Anderson served from January 5, 1848 until May 5, 1849. Bridgers served as Postmaster from September 19, 1849 until his death, according to the Fayette County records. Jim Wheat, in his book, Postmasters and Post Offices of Texas 1846-1930, however, lists his term as beginning on May 19, 1849. Although there is no exact record of Bridgers's death, his successor as Postmaster officially took over April 23, 1853, and Eliza filed for probate of his estate on April 10, 1853. Thus, it is obvious he died while still serving as Postmaster and no doubt as Justice of the Peace as well.

The Probate Court approved Eliza's petition and she was appointed Administratrix on April 25, 1853. Her bond of $1,500 was approved on May 30, 1853. Jacob Castleman and her brother, DeWitt Lyons, signed on the bond as sureties. During the August term, the Probate Court set apart $100 for the support of Eliza for one year as Bridgers' widow to be paid out of the first funds available. On September 29, the court set aside eight acres at $1.50 per acre as part of the $100 due her for serving as Administratrix. This was part of the 200 acres which were set aside to her as property exempt from execution. The court authorized her to sell enough of the estate to generate $88.00, the remainder of her year's support. To satisfy a court order, Eliza advertised in the newspaper that she would sell to the highest bidder certain items belonging to the late William B. Bridgers. The auction was held at his residence from 10 a.m. to 4. p.m. All items were purchased by family members.

W. A. Ranne purchased a rifle for $3.00; L. Boatright bought a shotgun for $100.00; DeWitt Lyons bought a saddletree for $3.00. Twenty-nine bushels of corn at 22 cents each for a total of $6.28. were purchased by Warren Lyons as well as a blind mule for $1.00, three steers for $30.00, and four cows and calves at $4.50 each, for a total of $36.00. Three sales were made on six month's credit. W. A. Ranne purchased six heifers for $31.50 and DeWitt Lyons purchased some household " improvements" for $43.50. The laws of the time were unfair for the family of a man who died intestate. This is demonstrated, sadly, by the purchase of a heifer for $2.00 by Bridgers and Eliza's thirteen year old daughter, Harriet. The animal most likely was a pet of hers as it is unusual that a girl would purchase a farm animal. She had six months to pay for it. The total money raised from the estate sale was $132.88. This amount was her widow's allotment for about one year and four months. p. 394. Eliza made her final report and settled the estate on January 18, 1853. Eliza Bridgers, with other members of her family, eventually left Fayette County to relocate in Limestone County, Texas. She died there in 1883.

This project began in 1965 when my cousin Vada Sutton, now Bell County Clerk, and I were beginning to work on our genealogy. We were inspecting tombstones in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Nolanville, Bell County, Texas, when we discovered the tombstone of Mary Bridgers Ranne. It was her tombstone which opened the door to my family's connection with Steven F. Austin's "Old Three Hundred." My brother, Ed Miller, and I traveled the research road alone for many years. Now we have an army of cousins to help with the task. The research continues!

William B. Bridgers, patriot of the Texas Republic, has no marker to show where he is buried. It seems fitting that the State of Texas now erect an historic marker in memory of the contributions this man made to Austin's Colony, the Republic of Texas and to the Lone Star State.

FOOTNOTES TO THE ABOVE NARRATIVE:

1.] State of Texas, General Land Office, Austin Texas, Spanish Archives, Land Grant Book 1, July 17, 1824, pp. 371-373; Original Land Grant No. 107, Recorded in Spanish; English Translation, Volume 1, p. 194, translated June 10, 1842, by the Works Progress Administration; Deed Records, Jackson County, Texas, Book B, September 30, 1834, pp. 339-341; Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Nolanville, Bell County, Texas, tombstone of Mary Bridgers Ranne.
2.] Deed Records, Claiborne County, Mississippi, Book P, August 11, 1836, pp. 510- 511.
3.] Marriage License of Mary E. Ross to William Bridges, son of Eliza and William Bridgers, Marriage Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book B, September 8, 1863.
4.] William B. Bridgers to Sylvanus Hatch, December 29, 1851, Sylvanus Hatch Papers, Daughters of the Republic of Texas Archives, San Antonio, Texas; William B. Bridgers to Gail Borden, January 9, 1835, Austin Papers, Eugene C. Barker History Center, University of Texas, Austin.
5.] State of Texas, General Land Office, Austin Texas, Spanish Archives, Spanish Archives, Land Grant Book 1, July 17, 1824, pp. 371-373; Original Land Grant No. 107, Recorded in Spanish; English Translation, Volume 1, p. 194, translated June 10, 1842, by the Works Progress Administration.
6.] The General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin and The Texas State Historical Association, "Jackson County", The Handbook of Texas Online , February 13, 1999, [http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/JJ/hcjw.hmtl].
7.] The General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin and The Texas State Historical Association, "Jackson County", The Handbook of Texas Online , February 13, 1999, [http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/KK/fje33.hmtl].
8.] Matagorda County, plat map of Matagorda County, Texas, 1839, from Map by James H. Selkirk, County Surveyor.
9.] State of Texas, General Land Office, Austin Texas, Spanish Archives, Spanish Archives, Land Grant Book 1, July 17, 1824, pp. 371-373; Original Land Grant No. 107, Recorded in Spanish; English Translation, Volume 1.
10.] State of Texas, General Land Office, Austin Texas, Survey Book B, p. 109.
11.] Mexican Citizen, March 24, 1831.
12.] Deed Records , Anson County, North Carolina, Deed Records, Claiborne County, Mississippi, Book P, August 23, 1825, pp. 168-171, August 11, 1836, pp.510- 511.
13.] Circuit Court Minutes, Lavaca County, Texas, Book L, April 22, 1898; pp. 18-20, P. B. Lyons, et al. vs William S. Lyons, et al., Court Case No. 3165, including the deposition filed by W. A. Ranne, given and sworn to in Bell County, Texas on April 12, 1898.
14.] Miscellaneous Court Records, Clark County, Arkansas, Book B, p. 6, July Term 1820; Book B, pp. 29-30; Book B, pp. 40-41. March Term, 1820; Book B, pp. 68-69.
15.] Miscellaneous Court Records, Clark County, Arkansas . Book B, p. 81, July term, 1822.
16.] Spanish Archives, General Land Office of the State of Texas, Land Grant Book, Book 1, pp. 283-285.
17.] Census Report for the District of " Collorado " (sic), December 31, 1825, in Barker, Austin Papers, vol. 1, pt. 2, p. 1244.
18] Mullins, Marion Day , The First Census of Texas, 1829 - 1836: To which are Added Texas Citizenship Lists, 1821-1845 and Other Early Records of The Republic of Texas, Washington, D. C., 195, p. 50.
19.] Ibid., p. 50.
20.] Deed Records, Jackson County, Texas, Book E, p. 22, September 15, 1853.
21.] Circuit Court Minutes, Lavaca County, Texas, Book L, pp. 18-20, April 22, 1898; P. B. Lyons, et al. vs William S. Lyons, et al., Court Case No. 3165, including the deposition filed by W. A. Ranne, given and sworn to in Bell County, Texas on April 12, 1898.
22.] Ibid.
23.] Marriage Records, Fayette County, Book A, p.42, November 18, 1841.
24.] Webb, B. E., "The Lyons' in Texas (Martha & James)", unpublished manuscript, pp. 32-41, Fayette County Archives, LaGrange Texas.
25.] Circuit Court Minutes, Lavaca County, Texas, Book L, pp. 18-20, April 22, 1898; P. B. Lyons, et al. vs William S. Lyons, et al., Court Case No. 3165, including the deposition filed by W. A. Ranne, given and sworn to in Bell County, Texas, on April 12, 1898.; Tombstones of William A. and Mary Bridgers, Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Nolanville, Bell County, Texas.
26.] Marriage Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book A, December 14, 1848, p. 199.
27.] Circuit Court Minutes, Lavaca County, Texas, Book L, pp. 18-20, April 22, 1898; P. B. Lyons, et al. vs William S. Lyons, et al., Court Case No. 3165, including the deposition filed by W. A. Ranne, given and sworn to in Bell County, Texas, on April 12, 1898.; U. S. Bureau of the Census, Seventh Census of the United States: Population, Texas).
28.] Tombstones of Mary Ann Ranne and William A. Ranne, Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Nolanville, Bell County, Texas.
29] Circuit Court Minutes, Lavaca County, Texas, Book L, pp. 18-20, April 22, 1898; P. B. Lyons, et al. vs William S. Lyons, et al., Court Case No. 3165, including the deposition filed by W. A. Ranne, given and sworn to in Bell County, Texas, on April 12, 1898.
30.] Marriage Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book A, p. 174.
31.] Webb, B. E., "The Lyons' in Texas (Martha & James)", unpublished manuscript, pp.32 - 41, Fayette County Archives, LaGrange, Texas.
32.] Circuit Court Minutes, Lavaca County, Texas, Book L, pp. 18-20, April 22, 1898; P. B. Lyons, et al. vs William S. Lyons, et al., Court Case No. 3165, including the deposition filed by W. A. Ranne, given and sworn to in Bell County, Texas, on April 12, 1898.
33.] Bridgers to Austin, January 9, 1830, List of notes, WPA Papers, File 98, Eugene C. Barker Texas History Center, Austin.
34.] Province of Coahuila and Texas, Docket Of Alcalde Court, Book A-B, pp. 46-47, WPA Papers, Eugene C. Barker Center, Austin.
35.] Circuit Court Minutes, Lavaca County, Texas, Book L, pp. 18-20, April 22, 1898; .P. B. Lyons, et al. vs William S. Lyons, et al., Court Case No. 3165, including the deposition filed by W. A. Ranne, given and sworn to in Bell County, Texas, on April 12, 1898.
36.] Marriage Records, Gonzales County, Mexico, Book 1, November 11, 1832, p. 8.
37.] Daughters of the American Revolution, Alamo Chapter, O'Shavano Chapter and San Antonio Chapter, The Alamo Heroes and Their Revolutionary Ancestor, p. 33.
38.] Robert E. Davis, ed., The Diary of William Barrett Travis, p. 105; Turner, Martha Anne, William Barret Travis: His Sword and His Pen, p. 250.
39.] Bridgers to Gail Borden, January 9, 1835, Austin Papers, Eugene C. Barker History Center.
40.] Ibid.
41.] Ibid.
42.] Hardin, Texian Iliad , pp. 12-13.
43.] The Texas Republican, Brazoria, November, 10, 1835.
44.] Official Republic of Texas military file of William B, Bridgers, Manuscript Number 7473, Texas State Archives, Austin, Texas.
45.] Texas Republican, October 10, 1835.
46.] Ibid.
47.] Texas Land Office, File 87, #9085.
48.] Ibid.
49.] Deed Records, Jackson County, Texas, Book B, September 30, 1834, pp. 339-341.
50.] Ibid., p. 361.
51.] Ibid., p. 266.
52.] Deed Records, Jackson County, Texas, Book B, p. 76.
53.] Ibid.
54.] Webb, B. E., "The Lyons' in Texas", pp. 4-5.
55.] Marriage Records, Lavaca County, Texas, Book B, January 17, 1852, p. 60.
56.] Marriage Records, FAYETTE County, Texas, Book B. September 30, 1863, p. 60.
57.] Deed Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book B, April 24, 1837, p. 408; White, ed., 1840 Census of the Republic of Texas, p. 35; Jackson County, Texas web site, [ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/tx/jackson/taxroll/taxroll1840.txt].
58.] Freytag, Chronicles of Fayette; , p. 41; Webb, The Lyons in Texas, p. 7; Donna Wallace, "The Tonkawas - A Forgotten People, in Mrs. Marjorie L. Williams, ed., Fayette County: Past and Present, p. 9; Jane Knapik, Schulenburg: 100 Years On The Road, 1873-1973, p. 3.
59.] Tombstones in the Old City Cemetery, Section E, Schulenburg, Texas.
60.] Knapik, Schulenburg, p. 3.
61.] Deed Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book E, July 19, 1848, pp. 160-161.
62.] State of Texas, General Land Office, plat map of Fayette County, copyright by W. C. Walsh, Commissioner, 1879.
63.] Deed Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book E, July 19, 1848, pp. 160-161.
64.] Deed Records, Gonazles County, Texas, Deed Books A, B, and C.
65.] Deed Records, Lavaca County, Texas, Deed Books A, p. 304, p.358-360.
66.] State of Texas, General Land Office, Austin, Texas. Gonzales County, File 114, certificate

67.] Deed Records. Fayette County, Texas, Book E, June 30, 1848, p. 118.
68.] Deed Records. Fayette County, Texas, Book E, July 19, 1848, pp. 160-161.
69.] Ibid.
70.] Deed Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book F, October 15, 1843, p. 48; p. 108; p. 148. Just why these were recorded in a deed book is a mystery.
71.] Webb, The Lyons of Texas, p.20; Ray, Worth S., Austin Colony Pioneers, p. 281, p. 283.
72.] Marriage Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book A, September 22, 1848, p. 192.
73.] District Court Records, Fayette County, Texas, Minutes Book D, p. 50, p. 128.
74.] District Court Records, Fayette County, Texas, Minutes Book A, p.141.
75.] Licenses, Fayette County, Texas, November 16, 1846.
76.] U. S. Bureau of the Census, Seventh Census of the United States: Population, Texas.
77.] White, ed., The Republic of Texas 1840.; U. S. Bureau of the Census, Seventh Census of the United States, Fayette County Slave Census; Deed Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book E, June 30, 1848, p. 118.
78.] Wheat, Jim, comp. Postmasters and Post Offices of Texas 1846-1930; Plat Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book 1, pp. 41- 42.
79.] Wheat, Jim, comp, Postmasters and Post Offices of Texas 1846-1930; Plat Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book 1, pp. 41-2; Texas 1846-1930. Probate Records, Fayette County, Texas, Probate Case 289, April 10, 1953.
80.] Probate Records, Fayette County, Texas, probate case 289, April 10, 1853.
81.] Probate Records, Fayette County, Texas, Book C, May 30, 1853.
82.] Probate Records, Fayette County, Texas Book C, May 30-September 29, 1853.
83.] Probate Records, Fayette County, Texas, probate case 289; Book C, January 18, 1854,

84.] Ibid., p. 394.
______________________________________________________________________________
B I B L I O G R A P H Y



PRIMARY SOURCES

Anson County, North Carolina. Deed Records, County Courthouse, Wadesboro.
Austin, Stephen F. Papers. Eugene C. Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin.
Claiborne County, Mississippi. Deed Records, County Courthouse, Port Gibson.
Clark County, Arkansas. Miscellaneous Court Records, County Courthouse, Arkadelpha.
Fayette County, Texas. Deed Records, County Courthouse, LaGrange.
______________. District Court Records, County Courthouse, LaGrange.
______________. Licenses, County Courthouse, LaGrange.
______________. Marriage Records, County Courthouse, LaGrange.
______________. Plat Records, County Courthouse, LaGrange.
______________. Probate Records, County Courthouse, LaGrange.
Gonzales County, Texas. Marriage Records, County Courthouse, Gonzales.
Hatch, Sylvanus. Papers. Daughters of the Republic of Texas, San Antonio.
Jackson County, Texas. Deed Records, County Courthouse, Edna.
Lavaca County, Texas. Circuit Court Records, County Courthouse, Hallettsville.
______________. Marriage Records, County Courthouse, Hallettsville.
Official Republic of Texas Military Records.Texas State Archives, Austin.
Province of Coahuila y Texas, Mexico. Alcalde Court Records, Eugene C. Barker History Center, University of Texas at Austin.
Spanish Archives. State of Texas. General Land Office. Austin.
State of Texas. Deed Records, General Land Office, Austin.
State of Texas. Survey Records, General Land Office, Austin.
Tombstones. Pleasant Hill Cemetery. Nolanville, Texas.
Tombstones. Old City Cemetery. Schulenburg, Texas.

MAPS

Selkirk, James H. A Plat Map of Matagorda County. 1839. Matagorda County, Texas, Bay City.
Walsh, W. C. Plat Map of Fayette County. 1979. State of Texas General Land Office, Austin.

NEWSPAPERS

Mexican Citizen.
The Texas Republican. (Brazoria).


PUBLICATIONS

Barker Eugene C., ed. The Austin Papers. Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the year 1919. 2 vols.. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1924.
Mullins, Marion Day, The First Census of Texas, 1829-1836: To which are Added Texas Citizenship Lists, 1821-1845 and Other Early Records of the Republic of Texas. Washington D. C., 1959.
United States Bureau of the Census. Seventh Census of the United States: Population, Texas. 1850.
United States Bureau of the Census. Seventh Census of the United States: Slave Population, Texas. 1850.

SECONDARY SOURCES

Freytag, Walter, ed. Chronicles of Fayette County. La Grange, 1976.
Hardin, Texas Iliad. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1994.
Knapik, Ruth. Schulenburg: 100 Years on the Road.
Turner, Martha Anne, William Barret Travis: His Sword and His Pen. Waco: Texian Press, 1972.
Wallace, Donna. "The Tonkawas - A Forgotten People. Fayette County: Past and Present.
LaGrange: Privately printed, 1976.
Webb, B. E. "The Lyons in Texas (James and Martha)." Manuscript. Fayette County Archives, LaGrange, Texas.
Wheat, Jim, comp. Postmasters and Post Offices of Texas 1846-1930.
White, Gifford, ed. The Republic of Texas 1840.

WEB SITES

The General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin and The Texas State Historical Association, The Handbook of Texas Online.



























More About Cynthia Talbot Ross:
Property: 1825, Wm. B. & Cynthia granted land in Jackson Co., TX. as a couple..

More About Cynthia Talbot Ross and James Jefferies Ross:
Divorce: June 07, 1822, Petition for devorce filed in Clark Co., Arkansas.
Divorce Filed: June 07, 1822, Petition for devorce filed in Clark Co., Arkansas.
Marriage: June 1816, TN.

 Includes NotesMarriage Notes for Cynthia Talbot Ross and James Jefferies Ross:
>The following was in a letter from Carrie Porter.( L. Keith Porter ) May find out more from her later:
There was a great story about James Ross being charged for bigamy in very early Arkansas in 1822. He was acquitted and then Cynthia filed for divorce.
Carrie also said "We have erected a historic marker to him in Fayette Co." She didn't say which cemetery. CHECK AT ARCHIVES FOR THIS MAN-CEMETERY AND ANY THING ELSE. [RanneupdateFromPatFrey.FTW]

>The following was in a letter from Carrie Porter.( L. Keith Porter
) May find out more from her later:
There was a great story abo ut James Ross being charged for bigamy in very
early Arkansas in 1822. He wa s acquitted and then Cynthia filed for
divorce.
Carrie also said "We have er ected a historic marker to him in Fayette
Co." She didn't say which cemetery . CHECK AT ARCHIVES FOR THIS
MAN-CEMETERY AND ANY THING ELSE.

More About Cynthia Talbot Ross and William B. Bridgers(r)(es):
Death of one spouse: December 1831, Soon after birth of 3rd child, Martha in Jackon Co., TX.
Marriage: Abt. 1824, Mississippi.

Children of Cynthia Talbot Ross and James Jefferies Ross are:
  1. James T. Ross, b. December 14, 1820, d. date unknown.

Children of Cynthia Talbot Ross and William B. Bridgers(r)(es) are:
  1. +Mary Ann Bridgers(r)(es), b. December 18, 1825, Jackson Co., TX, d. December 01, 1895, Nolanville, Texas, Bell County.
  2. +Elizabeth Bridgers(r)(es), b. July 14, 1828, Jackson Co, Tx., near Edna, d. date unknown.
  3. +Martha Bridgers(r)(es), b. December 07, 1831, Jackson Co., Tx., d. date unknown.
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