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View Tree for Christian StaufferChristian Stauffer (b. 1580, d. Aft. 06 Apr 1672)

Christian Stauffer (son of Niclaus Stauffer and Catherina Lehmann) was born 1580 in Luchsmatt Farm, Eggiwill, Bern, Switzerland, and died Aft. 06 Apr 1672 in Ibersheim, Near Worms, Germany. He married Adelheid Opliger on 18 Jun 1610 in Rothenbach, Bern, Switzerland, daughter of Peter Opliger and Adelheid Blonier.

 Includes NotesNotes for Christian Stauffer:
Stauffer Family
mennosearch.com
Richard W. Davis
-------------------------------------
Christian Stauffer, b. c1580, Luchsmatt, Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland. d. after 6 Apr 1672, Dirmstein, Bayern, Germany.

He married first Adelheid Oppliger, daughter of Peter Opliger and Adelheid Blonier on 18 Jun 1610 at Röthenbach.

He married secondly Asenath Friedrich.

Adelheid his first wife died in May 1656 and in July 1656, Christian lived together with Asenath Friedrich either at Glashütte or at Hinten in Eggiwil.3

Christian and Asenath were not married at the state church, which would probably indicate an Anabaptist marriage.

On 6 Nov 1611, Christian was called son of Claus of Luchsmatt farm when he baptized his daughter Madlena at Röthenbach. In 1618 he appears on the Eggiwil tax rolls as living at Gläshutte farm in Eggiwil for the first time. On 28 Apr 1622 he was called a "public Taüffer" when his brother Uli Stauffer brought Christen's son Peter from Eggiwil to be baptized at Röthenbach. Eggiwil is situated in the Emmenthal Valley in Bern.

The Emmenthal Valley was a hotbed of Anabaptist activity and their numbers were growing, which greatly alarmed the authorities in Bern. By 1671, Eggiwil had a large group of Anabaptists, numbering about 40 adults, which when you add in their children probably totaled over 100 people. On May, 3 1671, the magistrate of Signau received orders from Bern to seize the Anabaptists of Eggiwil and bring them to the prison in Bern, where they would then be led out of Switzerland. The village community of Eggiwil refused to permit this, probably because so many of them had relatives who were Anabaptists and also because many themselves had leanings toward the Anabaptist faith. Shortly thereafter twelve of the wealthiest residents of Eggiwil were sent to the city of Bern as hostages until the Anabaptists agreed to be delivered to the Bern prison or to leave the land. They agreed to the latter. On October 16, 1671, the Reformed pastor of Eggiwil was able to report that the Anabaptist had left of their own accord4. They were not allowed to take much and probably had some of their possessions and lands confiscated as an emigration tax, as well
as having their citizenship taken away. They would become refugees without a country.

According to Valentine Hütwohl, a Mennonite Minister in the Pfalz, on December 14, 1671, 450 Anabaptists from Bern had recently arrived in the Pfalz. "These are scattered among the fellow believers throughout the region over a twelve-mile territory. Among these you will find those who need canes, being 70, 80 and 90 years old. On the whole they need clothing sorely; they didn't take more along than what they had on their backs. With little bedding, we don't know how to keep them warm. Some amongst us have seven, eight or nine living with them.

When you speak of their property, they sigh, wishing that they had their houses and farm land here as before. There are men who left their wives and children, and women, older as well as younger, who have left husbands and children; others who brought along some, leaving the rest with the husbands, also expectant mothers; also children who left father, mother, brothers and sisters behind"5.

Included in the Hütwohl letter was a list of the Swiss refugees. On 1 Jan 1672 Christian Stauffer was listed as a Swiss Anabaptist refugee, age over 90 years old living at Ibersheim, Germany with his second wife, age 70 years. It states that he was he was the father, grandfather and great grandfather of 94, of whom 16 were dead and 78 living.

On 6 Apr 1672 he was living at Dirmstein, Bayern, Germany, age 90, with his wife Asenath Frederick, age 70. Also living in his household were Daniel Stauffer, Ulli Stauffer, Christian Stauffer, age 65 (sic 56) and their wives, Babbi Galli, age 43, Babbi Stauffer, age 41 and Margriet Antony, age 50 years. It stated
that "they live together and have altogether 21 children, of whom many were left in Switzerland. They said they have debts to repay, and cows and tools to buy and would manage with 100 Reich Dollars". They were given 250 florins.4 Christian also had grandchildren named Schenk and Neukommet who were also exiled and living in the Pfalz at that time.

Christian Stauffer - Adelheid Opplinger
by Carole Henson
---------------------------------------
Christian Stauffer was born about 1579 in Rothenbach, Bern, Switzerland to Catherina (Trini) Lehmann and Niclaus Staffer. Christian married Adelheid Opplinger, who was born November 21, 1588 to Adelheid Blonier and Peter Opplinger in Rothenbach, Bern, Switzerland. The couple was married June 18, 1610 in Rothenbach, Bern, Switzerland. They had eleven children from 1611 through 1629 or 1632.

Christian Stauffer lived at Luchsmatt farm in his early married life and then probably at Glashutte, both in Eggiwil and located west of the Eggiwil village proper on the road to Rothenbach. His children were christened at Rothenbach, but were probably all born at Luchsmatt farm in Eggiwil that lies near the border of Eggiwil and Rothenbach parishes.

Adelheid and Christian had eleven children between 1611 and 1632: Madlena, Hans, Christian, Anna, Elsbeth, Peter, an infant son, Margret, Barbara, Ulrich and Daniel. Madlena was born in Rothenbach. Elsbeth, an infant son, Margret, Barbara, Ulrich and Daniel were born in Eggiwil.

Adelheid must have died around 1632.

Christian married Madlena Asmath Fredrich about 1633. Son Daniel is referenced as a son of Adelheid and in other references as a son of Madlena, so its not quite clear the timing of events between 1629 and 1633.

Christian, a fugitive Anabaptist preacher, may have been part of a great "Taufer hunt" along with Uli Zaugg and Uli Neuhaus in 1644. They were all captured and placed in jail in Thun, where the authorities there were warned to keep these obstinate preachers out of the Emmenthal Valley.

The Emmenthal Valley was a hotbed of Anabaptist activity and their numbers were growing, which greatly alarmed the authorities in Bern. By 1671, Eggiwil had a large group of Anabaptists, numbering about 40 adults, which when you add in their children probably totaled over 100 people. On May 3, 1671, the magistrate of Signau received orders from Bern to seize the Anabaptists of Eggiwil and bring them to the prison in Bern, where they would then be led out of Switzerland. The village -community of Eggiwil
refused to permit this, probably because so many of them had relatives who were Anabaptists and also because many themselves had leanings toward the Mennonite faith.

Shortly thereafter twelve of the wealthiest residents of Eggiwil were sent to the city of Bern as hostages until the Anabaptists agreed to be delivered to the Bern prison or to leave the land. They agreed to the latter. On October 16, 1671, the Reformed pastor of Eggiwil was able to report that the Anabaptists had left of their own accord. They were not allowed to take much and probably had some of their possessions and lands
confiscated as an emigration tax, as well as having their citizenship taken away. They would become refugees without a county.

Christian was exiled with his second wife from Glashutte farm in Eggiwil in the fall of 1671. According to Valentine Hutwohl, a Mennonite Minister in the Pfalz, on December 14, 1671, 450 Anabaptists from Bern had recently arrived in the Pfalz. "These are scattered among the fellow believers throughout the region over a twelve-mile territory.

Among these you will find those who need canes, being 70, 80, and 90 years old. On the whole the need clothing sorely; they didn't take more along than what they had on their backs. with little bedding, we don't know how to keep them warm. Some amongst us have seven, eight or nine living with them. When you speak of their property, they sigh, wishing that they had their houses and farm land here as before. There are men who left their wives and children, and women, older and well as younger, who have left husbands
and children; others who brought along some, leaving the rest with the husbands, also expectant mothers; also children who left father, mother, brothers and sisters behind." Included in the Hutwohl letter was a list of the Swiss refugees. Many were members of Christian Stauffer's family. All lived together, having 21 children. They had left large possessions in Switzerland. They had a large debt with a merchant. They brought along 100 Reichsthalers and were given 250 to pay the debt. They were living at Dirmstein.

Christian was living in Dirmstein, Germany, in December of 1671 and by January 1, 1672 in Ibersheim, Germany, where he probably died.

From Christian there are two lines of descendancy:
- through Hans Stauffer to Anna, who marries into the Schenk \ Bar branches of the Snell side of the family.
- through Daniel Stauffer to Susanna, who marries Henry Strickler on the Stitzel side of the family.

Christian Stauffer
------------------
Christian, a fugitive Anabaptist preacher, may have been part of a great "Taufer hunt" along with Uli Zaugg and Uli Neuhaus in 1644. They were all captured and placed in jail in Thun, where the authorities there were warned to keep these obstinate preachers out of the Emmenthal Valley. Imprisoned at Thun in 1644 and exiled Oct 1671 from Switzerland.

Christian Stauffer lived at Luchsmatt farm in his early married life and then probably at Glashutte, both in Eggiwil and located west of the Eggiwil village proper on the road to Rothenbach. He was exiled with his second wife from Glashutte farm in Eggiwil in the fall of 1671.

He was living in Dirmstein, Germany, in December of 1671 and by January 1, 1672 in Ibersheim, Germany, where he probably died.

His children were christened at Röthenbach, but were probably all born at Luchsmatt farm in Eggiwil which lies near the border of Eggiwil and Röthenbach parishes.

The Emmenthal Valley was a hotbed of Anabaptist activity and their numbers were growing, which greatly alarmed the authorities in Bern. By 1671, Eggiwil had a large group of Anabaptists, numbering about 40 adults, which when you add in their children probably totaled over 100 people. On May 3, 1671, the magistrate of Signau received orders from Bern to seize the Anabaptists of Eggiwil and bring them to the prison in Bern, where they would then be led out of Switzerland. The village community of Eggiwil refused to permit this, probably because so many of them had relatives who were Anabaptists and also because many themselves had leanings toward the Mennonite faith. Shortly thereafter twelve of the wealthiest residents of Eggiwil were sent to the city of Bern as hostages until the Anabaptists agreed to be delivered to the Bern prison or to leave the land. They agreed to the latter.

On October 16, 1671, the Reformed pastor of Eggiwil was able to report that the Anabaptists had left of their own accord. They were not allowed to take much and probably had some of their possessions and lands confiscated as an emigration tax, as well as having their citizenship taken away. They would become refugees without a county.

According to Valentine Hutwohl, a Mennonite Minister in the Pfalz, on December 14, 1671, 450 Anabaptists from Bern had recently arrived in the Pfalz. "These are scattered among the fellow believers throughout the region over a twelve-mile territory. Among these you will find those who need canes, being 70, 80, and 90 years old. On the whole they need clothing sorely; they didn't take more along than what they had on their backs. With little bedding, we don't know how to keep them warm. Some amongst us have seven, eight or nine living with them. When you speak of their property, they sigh, wishing that they had their houses and farm land here as before. There are men who left their wives and children, and women, older as well as younger, who have left husbands and children; others who brought along some, leaving the rest with the husbands, also expectant mothers; also children who left father, mother, brothers and sisters behind". Included in the Hutwohl letter was a list of the Swiss refugees. Many were members of Christian Stauffer's family. All lived together, having 21 children. They had left large possessions in Switzerland. They had a large debt with a merchant. They brought along 100 Reichsthalers and were given 250 to pay the debt. They were living at Dirmstein.

Children
Madlena STAUFFER b: 6 Oct 1611 in Rothenbach, Bern, Switzerland
Hans STAUFFER b: 18 Apr 1613 in Luchsmatt, Eggiwil, Switzerland
Christian STAUFFER b: 19 Mar 1614/15 in Rothenbach, Bern, Switzerland
Anna STAUFFER
Elsbeth STAUFFER b: 1620 in Eggiwil, Signau, Canton Bern, Switzerland
Peter STAUFFER b: 28 Apr 1622
STAUFFER b: 1624
Margaret STAUFFER b: Abt 1624 in Eggiwil, Signau, Canton Bern, Switzerland
Barbara STAUFFER b: 1626 in Eggiwil, Signau, Canton Bern, Switzerland
Ulrich STAUFFER b: 1629 in Eggiwil, Signau, Canton Bern, Switzerland

1671 Mennonite Refugees
mennosearch.com
------------------------------
1671 MENNONITE REFUGEES
With the expulsion of many of the Mennonites from Zurich and Schaffhausen, the Emmenthal Valley in Bern had become a hotbed of Anabaptist activity and their numbers were growing rapidly, which greatly alarmed the authorities. On 3 May 1671, the magistrate of Signau received orders from Bern to seize the Anabaptists of Eggiwil and bring them to prison in Bern, where they would be led out of Switzerland. The village community of Eggiwil refused to permit this, probably because so many of them had relatives who were Anabaptists and
also because many themselves had leanings toward the Mennonite faith.

Shortly thereafter, twelve of the wealthiest residents of Eggiwil were sent to the city of Bern as hostages until the Anabaptists agreed to be delivered to the Bern prison or to leave the land. They apparently agreed to the latter as the Reformed pastor of Eggiwil was able to report on 16 October 1671 that the Anabaptists had left of their own accord1.

This same scenario was unfolding in other villages in the Emmenthal Valley as well and between 16 October and 14 December of 1671, there were 643 Mennonite refugees who had arrived in the Pfalz, mostly from the Emmenthal Valley. One of those was Ully Seyler who was a minister with twelve children. There were
100 refugees who had recently arrived in Alsace and who would be coming to the Pfalz in the spring as well. Making a total of 743 people, probably the largest group of Mennonite refugees to be driven from Switzerland at one time.

On 2 November 1671, Jacob Everling of Obersulzen reported that "the long expected Swiss Brethren emigration has started on ships and also in wagons overland, all together totaling about 200 people, both young and old. Six brethren came to tell me that 70 would be here within two days and that when they went to reserve rooms in the inn, 60 more came. Among them were old and young children, crippled and lame. They had stuff on their backs and children in their arms and some were cheerful and others were weeping, especially the
old ones. They lodged them with their friends and when they returned home two brethren said that about 50 had arrived at Mannheim. They rented some farms for them, but don't seem to possess as much as a bed to sleep upon. Some women had to leave husbands and children in Switzerland and likewise some men left their wives and children, not knowing if they will follow them. P.S. This morning there were another 68 and expect 40 who are coming overland, all together now 300 people. Trouble was experienced in lodging them all"2.
By December 1671, it was reported that on the east side of the Rhine River in the Hilsbach district, and around Heidelberg there was a total of 284 refugees; 250 in families, 19 widows and unmarried adults and four women who had left their husbands and children because they were devoted to the Reformed Religion. Also 11 people at Mannheim. On the west side of the Rhine were a total of 359 refugees. In the Alzey district, 215 and in the Dirmstein district there were 144. The refugees were not allowed to bring their belongings and were stripped of their Swiss citizenship. They arrived in the Pfalz poor and sick. It was reported that there was only enough money amongst them to buy each person a pair of shoes. In a letter to the Dutch Mennonites, Valentine Hutwole, a Mennonite minister who was living at Kriegsheim at the time reported that
"these refugees cannot rent, for they have not the wherewithal to pay and they have no furniture, no equipment to farm, no horse, no wagon, no plow and all that belongs thereto, no shed, and they must needs wait one and a half years before they get the fruit of their sowing. Until that time we will need to
provide maintenance. You can imagine what the situation must mean, and whereas the Mennonites in the Pfalz are not very well to do and they probably have enough trouble themselves, there is an added burden by the great number of these persecuted peoples"3.

The Dutch Mennonites wished to send money and support to the Swiss refugees and asked the Mennonite leaders in the Pfalz to make lists of all the refugees, so they would know how many there were, and how much assistance they should send to their brethren in need.

Eventually, there were three lists made. The first on December 17, 1671 was a list of the refugees who lived in the Darmstein (Dirmstein) district. I count approximately 156 refugees on list 1.

List 1
List of Anabaptists exiled from Switzerland and living in the Dirmstein district in the Pfalz, April 6, 1672. Taken by Valentine Hutwole, Minister.

Christen Stauffer, Dirmstein, age 90, wife Asenath Fredericks, age 70, Daniel, Uli, Christen Stauffer, age 65; Babbi Galli, age 43, wife, Babbi Stauffer, age 41, Margaret Anthony, age 50. All these living together,
having 21 children. Have left large possessions in Switzerland. They have a large debt with a merchant. Group brought along 100 Reichtalers and were given 250 to pay the debt. (They came from Eggiwil)

1. Mennonite Encyclopedia, 1956 edition, "Emmenthal" & "Eggiwil". It was reported that there were 40 adult
Anabaptists at Eggiwil.
2. Manuscript #1405, Mennonite Archives, United Mennonite Church, Amsterdam, Holland.
3. Manuscript #1406, Mennonite Archives, United Mennonite Church, Amsterdam, Holland.

List 2
Refugee list of the Alzey district, January 1, 1672. Taken by Valentine Hutwole and Georg Lichti, Ministers4. Some of the people on this list were also listed on List 1. A large group of the refugees moved from the Dirmstein district to the Alzey district between December 17, 1671 and January 1, 1672.
Most of those who moved where members of the Christian Stauffer family (#40 on list 2) of Eggiwil and included the Stauffers, Neukommets, Schenks and Neuenschwanders5.

Those staying at Ibersheim
Christian Stauffert (Stauffer), over age 90. He has his second wife with him, age 70. He is the father, grandfather and great-grandfather of over 94 souls, among them 16 are dead and 78 living. He has brought
nothing with him. (See #11 on list 1)

THE STAUFFER FAMILIES OF SWITZERLAND, GERMANY, AND AMERICA
Publication: Provo, Utah: Richard Warren Davis, 1992
Page: Pg 23-25, 1A
-----------------------------------------------------------
Christian Stauffer, b. abt 1579, Rothenbach; last known to be living at Ibersheim Germany where he probably died. Married 1st 18 Jun 1610, at Rothenbach, Adelheid Oppliger, Chr 21 Nov 1588 Rothenbach, dau of Peter and Adelheid (Blonier) Oppliger. She died after 1632. Christian married 2nd Asmath (Madelina) Fredrich. She was born 1601. The only Fredrich girl I could find being christened about the year was a Madelina Fredrich, christened 19 Apr 1601 at Signau dau of Hans Fredrich and Barbara Brenneman of Eggiwil. This is probably the Asmath written of in the refugee list of 1671. Asmath is not a Swiss name and it was probably hard to decipher the old written German, which could have resulted in mistranslation of her first name.

Christian Stauffer
------------------
b. abt 1579, Canton Berne, Switzerland, m. (1) Asmath (Madlena) Fredrich, b. 1601, d. aft 1672, m. (2) Adelheid Oppliger, (daughter of Peter Oppliger and Adelheid Blonier) d. aft 1632. Christian died aft 1672.

Children by Adelheid Oppliger:
1. Madlena m. Hans Neukommet
2. Hans m. Madlena Neuenschwander
3. Christian b. abt 1637 m. Margret Anthoni
4. Anna m. Michel Neuenschwander
5. Elsbeth b. abt 1620 m. Wolfgang Neukommet
6. Peter m. Christina Stauffer
7. Son b. abt 1624
8. Margret
9. Barbara b. abt 1626
10. Ulrich b. 1629 m. Barbara Stauffer
11. Daniel b. 1632 m. Barbara Galli
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~anglemyer/data/Hub/stauffer.html

Christian STAUFFER
------------------
Birth: abt 1579 in Rottenbach, Bern, Switzerland
Birth: 1579 in Berne, Switzerland
Death: in Ibersheim, Germany
Death: 1671 in Ibersheim, Rineland-Pfalz, Germany

Father: Nicklaus STAUFFER b: abt 1555 in Rothenbach, Canton Bern, Switzerland
Mother: Cathrinia LEHMANN

BIRTH: Also 1575

Marriage 1 Adelheid OPPLINGER
Married: 18 Jun 1610 in Rottenbach, Bern, Switzerland

Children
Madlena STAUFFER b: 6 Oct 1611 in Rothenbach, Canton Bern, Switzerland
Hans (Johannes) STAUFFER b: 18 Apr 1613 in Rothenbach, Canton Bern, Switzerland
Christian STAUFFER b: 19 Mar 1614/15 in Rothenbach, Canton Bern, Switzerland
Anna STAUFFER b: 13 Apr 1617 in Rothenbach, Bern, Switzerland
Elsbeth STAUFFER b: 1620 in Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland
Peter STAUFFER b: 28 Apr 1622 in Rothenbach, Canton Bern, Switzerland
Barbara STAUFFER b: 1625 in Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland
Margaret STAUFFER b: 1627 in Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland
Ulrich STAUFFER b: 1629 in Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland
Daniel STAUFFER b: 1632 in Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland

Marriage 2 Asmath FREDRICH b: 1601 in Ibersheim?, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
Married: 1632

======================================================
Reference is likely a grandson Christian Stauffer
======================================================
Report #6 Ibersheim Records I
MennoSearch.com by Richard W. Davis
The following information is found in File E14 A 296/6
at the Darmstadt State Archives in Germany.
-------------------------------------------------------
Also found in the same files was a document dated 21 Sep 1782 but refers back to the year 1711;
This document refers to the so-called rose garden which obviously is a certain piece of land at Ibersheimerhof. It is claimed, that on 11 Apr 1711 the so-called Rosengarten including all belongings was given to the leaseholders Christian Stauffer, Johannes Hackmann and Johann Jacob Fohrer, as they made the best offer in the auction. On 20 Aug 1711 these three received the hereditary lease contract.

I believe that Christian Stauffer and Johannes Hackmann were probably recently married young men while Johann Jacob Fohrer was probably the same one who was a leaseholder at Ibersheim in 1683. It is not clear what the Rosengarten exactly refers to but in a future report I will list other Ibersheim records which will show that the Rosengarten had 32 shares while there were actually 24 shares of the Ibersheim farm. Also the cost of the one share of the Rosengarten was about 1/10 the cost of one share of the farm at Ibersheim. Perhaps the Rosengarten was a patch of land used for gardens, with not only the hereditary leaseholders having a share but also the others who lived there temporarily, or perhaps some leaseholders had more than one share.

More About Christian Stauffer and Adelheid Opliger:
Marriage: 18 Jun 1610, Rothenbach, Bern, Switzerland.

Children of Christian Stauffer and Adelheid Opliger are:
  1. +Hans Stauffer, b. 18 Apr 1613, Luchsmatt, Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland, d. Aft. 1695, Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland.
  2. +Daniel Stauffer, b. 1632, Glashütte, Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland, d. Aft. 1685, Germany?.
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