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View Tree for Daniel BOKOVOYDaniel BOKOVOY (b. Dec 1820, d. 1906)

Daniel BOKOVOY35, 36 was born Dec 1820 in Harchenko, Ukraine, Russia37, 38, and died 1906 in Kief, McHenry County, North Dakota39, 40. He married (1) SOPHY. He married (2) Sophia VOLOCHENKO on Abt. 1839 in Ukraine, Russia41, 42, 43, 44.

 Includes NotesNotes for Daniel BOKOVOY:
[bokovoy.FTW]

About 1837 or 1838 Daniel Bokovoy married Sophia Volochenko. The census of 1900 for McHenry County, North Dakota, states that they had been married for 60 years. The family oral history mentions a rape of Sophie by oriental soldiers. Through the years there has been the suggestion that there was oriental blood in the Trofim line. He was born in June 1838. This is surely true if one compares the photos of the children and grandchildren of Trofim and now the information given on the only census taken, while they were still living. Maria or Mary Porfoun, who had small oriental type of eyes, and we have other photos of her brother Jacob who also had the small eyes. Jacob was Bill Buckaway's grandfather. Two of Jacob's children, George, (Bill's father) and his brother John also carried this same feature. Along with this, both men had quite short arms and could have passed for twins. Their natures and personalities were quite different. Two of John's children, his eldest son and youngest daughter both also inherited the same small eyes. The two children of that son, I am told, have also inherited the same gene. Neither of the sons of George nor any of the grandchildren or great grandchildren have this characteristic.

The suppostion of the 5 brothers is also probably correct. Recently we found the Semion or Sam Bokovoy/Buckway family. Again they told us of the 5 brothers theory that had been passed on from their father, Sam. Emily Cook credits her sister and her husband, the Dubovys for preserving much of the family history. The lists suggest, the father of Semion was Gregor or Gregory. By comparing the birth date of Sam or Semion we must conclude that Gregory was born in 1840 since his son Semion was born in 1858. There was a 10 year gap between Trofim and Cornelius and it is likely that not only was Gregory born during this period of time but also 2 sisters, Lipistina and Odarka. It is reasonable conjecture that they were married and their families were not willing to leave Russia or that as the census has suggested only 3 of Sophie's children were still living. These children would have been, Trofim, Cornelius, and Anton, however, they may have thought the census taker was referring only to those who were living in the USA.

Daniel and his family were serfs in Russia until the Freedon Period of time when the landowners were required to share their land with their most faithful and productive labors, even though most had to pay the landowner for this land. The full account will be written in the book by Douglas Bokovoy. Daniel was one of few to become a land owner. They must have been a very careful diligent family because they also were debt free. This was not the way it became for most of the peasant population but was a requirement in order to sell their land and leave the country. The large land owners saw to it that most of the peasants stayed in debt to them. Douglas writes in his account of the family story, that "the land (about 3 1/2 acres) owned by Nikita Bokovoy was sold by his widow for about $1,500.00(according to the Dixon family record) in order to provide the means for their immigration". It would seem that Daniel had already divided his land as required by the Russian law and custom according to Douglas. They obviously had accumulated a large enough amount of money through very hard work. Douglas has also speculated that the land holdings of Daniel may have been as much as 20 acres, since entire families as well as parts of others were able to immigrate. Only the 2 sisters and Gregory remained in Russia, and even one of Gregory's sons left to live in the USA and later in Canada. It has been stated that one son of Trofim, by the name of Evon also remained. At the time of immigration, Daniel would have been in the enviable position of the upper class peasant landowner.

The Bokovoy family endured a great amount of persecution because of their religious beliefs. Nikita had died of pneumonia but some reports within the family suggests he was also imprisoned previously. We can not be sure of the state of his health after the prison experience. Anton had been imprisoned for 8 months for their strong Baptist faith. It is little wonder, having heard from Jewish neighbors of the freedom of America, that they sold their land and left for America. While that sounds reasonable on this side of the time line, they did not speak the language, and did not understand what freedom was really all about. It is hard to understand the decision to leave the familiar and to embark on a journey of this magnitude at the age of 78 years old. The house, buildings, farm implements, horses and cattle were purchased by John Pritul. Daniel and Sophie traveled with Anton, his family and 6 other families from their region of the Valley of the Dnieper River. They travelled 40 miles by wagons, to Zvenegordka, after a short service was held in the front yard. They borded a train for Hamburg, Germany, where they would take a ship bound America. There is a story, that on board the ship, they met a German man, Peter Sayler. He had returned to Russia to accompany his widowed sister and her 3 sons to America. He spent many hours talking to them about America and told them of the free land being given away by the govenment in North Dakota. They were very surprised and somewhat suspicious, so 2 families decided to go by rail to Philadelphia to work in the factories until the others in the group could write and let them know if what this man said was true. The 4 families traveled with these German people across America to Trippe, South Dakota. They left Boyarka in October 1898 arriving in Trippe, on 16 November 1898. It was too late in the year for them to continue, so the German people took them in for that winter. Anton, his wife Christina and six children, plus Grandma and Grandpa. Peter Saylor told his German Baptist neighbors who had arrived at the train station to meet him, that these Russians were their brethern, and they should look after them. He knew his neighbors well. They found an empty building to store the baggage and all were taken into the homes of these German Baptists.

The following excerpt has been taken from the November 1925 issue of the Baptist Missions Magazine. The article was written by Coe Hayne in 3 parts.

"Anton Bokovoy and his family for four days were given lodging and food in the home of Fred Meyers, a grain buyer. When Bokovoy was upon the point of renting a vacant house in town, Mitchel Jasman, a blacksmith, advised him to save his money."
"Don't be in a hurry," cautioned Jasman. "I think we'll find you a place."

The blacksmith took occasion to speak to a customer, named Koening, in behalf of the four Russian families. Koening knew of a house and a barn on a piece of land recently purchased by his neighbor, John Brandt. He thought 2 families could live in the house and he was quite willing to take them out to his own place and care for them until arragements could be made with John Brandt for the use of his extra house. For 2 days Anton Bokovoy, his wife, and children, William, Mary, John, Michael, Annie and Mathilda (the latter an infant), and Peter Michlanko, his wife and eight children (the youngest born at sea during the recent voyage) , were guests at the Koening home. The two families then moved into John Brandt's empty farmhouse and occupied it until the spring of 1899. "

According to the account written by Andrew Dubovy in Pilgrims of the Prairies, it took three weeks for them to travel from Trippe, SD. to Harvey, ND. From Harvey they continued to the area of Kief, where they laid claim to their land. The story written by Dubovy is the only one we know of that has detailed their hardships. None of the immigrant children left a written account of their life's story and most of the the next generation have also passed away, leaving us today to piece together the giant puzzle that led to our Freedom.

At this time most of the family of Daniel Bokovoy that came to America has been accounted for.

There are some missing links in both the Cornelius and the Nikita lines which need to be found before we consider a more indepth research in the Ukraine.

According to 1900 Federal Census for McHenry County, North Dakota, it would appear that Daniel was born in 1820 and was married for 60 years at the time of the census. This would support the story that Trofim was the child of the rape, since he was born in 1838 and may have been a year and a half at the time of the marriage of Daniel and Sophie. Daniel would have been the only father he knew.

Daniel died in 1906 and is buried with his wife, in the Family Cemetery in Kief , North Dakota. Sophia Volochenko/Bokovoy, found peace in 1900, less than 2 years after leaving the turmoil of Russia. Since she is named on the Census which was taken the middle of June, we must accept that she died during the last 6 months of 1900. It was a terribly difficult year for the Bokovoy Family.
They laid the child, Michael, son of Anton & Christina, to rest in the spring, in the first grave of the original 7 families. The year produced no rain, and no crops grew at a time when these settlers were the least prepared. In the last 6 months of the drought, Daniel also laid his wife Sophia to rest beside Michael and Daniel, no doubt in his dispair, said to Anton "Why did you bring me to this place."

Throughout most of this family history, there will likely be notes on different individuals and one should read all of it to get a panoramic view of this family.

It has taken 100 years for this family to find out who they really are and where they have come from. Hopefully it will not be another 100 years before another generation starts looking for their roots.


[Buckaway.FTW]

About 1837 or 1838 Daniel Bokovoy married Sophia Volochenko. The census of 1900 for McHenry County, North Dakota, states that they had been married for 60 years. The family oral history mentions a rape of Sophie by oriental soldiers. Through the years there has been the suggestion that there was oriental blood in the Trofim line. He was born in June 1838. This is surely true if one compares the photos of the children and grandchildren of Trofim and now the information given on the only census taken, while they were still living. Maria or Mary Porfoun, who had small oriental type of eyes, and we have other photos of her brother Jacob who also had the small eyes. Jacob was Bill Buckaway's grandfather. Two of Jacob's children, George, (Bill's father) and his brother John also carried this same feature. Along with this, both men had quite short arms and could have passed for twins. Their natures and personalities were quite different. Two of John's children, his eldest son and youngest daughter both also inherited the same small eyes. The two children of that son, I am told, have also inherited the same gene. Neither of the sons of George nor any of the grandchildren or great grandchildren have this characteristic.

The suppostion of the 5 brothers is also probably correct. Recently we found the Semion or Sam Bokovoy/Buckway family. Again they told us of the 5 brothers theory that had been passed on from their father, Sam. Emily Cook credits her sister and her husband, the Dubovys for preserving much of the family history. The lists suggest, the father of Semion was Gregor or Gregory. By comparing the birth date of Sam or Semion we must conclude that Gregory was born in 1840 since his son Semion was born in 1858. There was a 10 year gap between Trofim and Cornelius and it is likely that not only was Gregory born during this period of time but also 2 sisters, Lipistina and Odarka. It is reasonable conjecture that they were married and their families were not willing to leave Russia or that as the census has suggested only 3 of Sophie's children were still living. These children would have been, Trofim, Cornelius, and Anton, however, they may have thought the census taker was referring only to those who were living in the USA.

Daniel and his family were serfs in Russia until the Freedon Period of time when the landowners were required to share their land with their most faithful and productive labors, even though most had to pay the landowner for this land. The full account will be written in the book by Douglas Bokovoy. Daniel was one of few to become a land owner. They must have been a very careful diligent family because they also were debt free. This was not the way it became for most of the peasant population but was a requirement in order to sell their land and leave the country. The large land owners saw to it that most of the peasants stayed in debt to them. Douglas writes in his account of the family story, that "the land (about 3 1/2 acres) owned by Nikita Bokovoy was sold by his widow for about $1,500.00(according to the Dixon family record) in order to provide the means for their immigration". It would seem that Daniel had already divided his land as required by the Russian law and custom according to Douglas. They obviously had accumulated a large enough amount of money through very hard work. Douglas has also speculated that the land holdings of Daniel may have been as much as 20 acres, since entire families as well as parts of others were able to immigrate. Only the 2 sisters and Gregory remained in Russia, and even one of Gregory's sons left to live in the USA and later in Canada. It has been stated that one son of Trofim, by the name of Evon also remained. At the time of immigration, Daniel would have been in the enviable position of the upper class peasant landowner.

The Bokovoy family endured a great amount of persecution because of their religious beliefs. Nikita had died of pneumonia but some reports within the family suggests he was also imprisoned previously. We can not be sure of the state of his health after the prison experience. Anton had been imprisoned for 8 months for their strong Baptist faith. It is little wonder, having heard from Jewish neighbors of the freedom of America, that they sold their land and left for America. While that sounds reasonable on this side of the time line, they did not speak the language, and did not understand what freedom was really all about. It is hard to understand the decision to leave the familiar and to embark on a journey of this magnitude at the age of 78 years old. The house, buildings, farm implements, horses and cattle were purchased by John Pritul. Daniel and Sophie traveled with Anton, his family and 6 other families from their region of the Valley of the Dnieper River. They travelled 40 miles by wagons, to Zvenegordka, after a short service was held in the front yard. They borded a train for Hamburg, Germany, where they would take a ship bound America. There is a story, that on board the ship, they met a German man, Peter Sayler. He had returned to Russia to accompany his widowed sister and her 3 sons to America. He spent many hours talking to them about America and told them of the free land being given away by the govenment in North Dakota. They were very surprised and somewhat suspicious, so 2 families decided to go by rail to Philadelphia to work in the factories until the others in the group could write and let them know if what this man said was true. The 4 families traveled with these German people across America to Trippe, South Dakota. They left Boyarka in October 1898 arriving in Trippe, on 16 November 1898. It was too late in the year for them to continue, so the German people took them in for that winter. Anton, his wife Christina and six children, plus Grandma and Grandpa. Peter Saylor told his German Baptist neighbors who had arrived at the train station to meet him, that these Russians were their brethern, and they should look after them. He knew his neighbors well. They found an empty building to store the baggage and all were taken into the homes of these German Baptists.

The following excerpt has been taken from the November 1925 issue of the Baptist Missions Magazine. The article was written by Coe Hayne in 3 parts.

"Anton Bokovoy and his family for four days were given lodging and food in the home of Fred Meyers, a grain buyer. When Bokovoy was upon the point of renting a vacant house in town, Mitchel Jasman, a blacksmith, advised him to save his money."
"Don't be in a hurry," cautioned Jasman. "I think we'll find you a place."

The blacksmith took occasion to speak to a customer, named Koening, in behalf of the four Russian families. Koening knew of a house and a barn on a piece of land recently purchased by his neighbor, John Brandt. He thought 2 families could live in the house and he was quite willing to take them out to his own place and care for them until arragements could be made with John Brandt for the use of his extra house. For 2 days Anton Bokovoy, his wife, and children, William, Mary, John, Michael, Annie and Mathilda (the latter an infant), and Peter Michlanko, his wife and eight children (the youngest born at sea during the recent voyage) , were guests at the Koening home. The two families then moved into John Brandt's empty farmhouse and occupied it until the spring of 1899. "

According to the account written by Andrew Dubovy in Pilgrims of the Prairies, it took three weeks for them to travel from Trippe, SD. to Harvey, ND. From Harvey they continued to the area of Kief, where they laid claim to their land. The story written by Dubovy is the only one we know of that has detailed their hardships. None of the immigrant children left a written account of their life's story and most of the the next generation have also passed away, leaving us today to piece together the giant puzzle that led to our Freedom.

At this time most of the family of Daniel Bokovoy that came to America has been accounted for.

There are some missing links in both the Cornelius and the Nikita lines which need to be found before we consider a more indepth research in the Ukraine.

According to 1900 Federal Census for McHenry County, North Dakota, it would appear that Daniel was born in 1820 and was married for 60 years at the time of the census. This would support the story that Trofim was the child of the rape, since he was born in 1838 and may have been a year and a half at the time of the marriage of Daniel and Sophie. Daniel would have been the only father he knew.

Daniel died in 1906 and is buried with his wife, in the Family Cemetery in Kief , North Dakota. Sophia Volochenko/Bokovoy, found peace in 1900, less than 2 years after leaving the turmoil of Russia. Since she is named on the Census which was taken the middle of June, we must accept that she died during the last 6 months of 1900. It was a terribly difficult year for the Bokovoy Family.
They laid the child, Michael, son of Anton & Christina, to rest in the spring, in the first grave of the original 7 families. The year produced no rain, and no crops grew at a time when these settlers were the least prepared. In the last 6 months of the drought, Daniel also laid his wife Sophia to rest beside Michael and Daniel, no doubt in his dispair, said to Anton "Why did you bring me to this place."

Throughout most of this family history, there will likely be notes on different individuals and one should read all of it to get a panoramic view of this family.

It has taken 100 years for this family to find out who they really are and where they have come from. Hopefully it will not be another 100 years before another generation starts looking for their roots.




More About Daniel BOKOVOY:
Date born 2: Dec 1820, Ukraine, Russia/Ukraine.
Burial: 1906, Family Cemetery, Kief, North Dakota.45, 46
Died 2: 1906, Kief, North Dakota, USA.
Ethnicity/Relig.: Ukrainian/Baptist.47, 48
Marr: Abt. 1839, Harchenko, Ukraine, Russia.49, 50, 51, 52
Occupation: Farmer..53, 54
Yr. Immigrated: 1898, Through port of New York.55, 56

More About Daniel BOKOVOY and Sophia VOLOCHENKO:
Marriage: Abt. 1839, Ukraine, Russia.57, 58, 59, 60

Children of Daniel BOKOVOY and SOPHY are:
  1. +Gregory BOKOVOY.
  2. Lipi(t)sina BOKOVOY.
  3. Odorka BOKOVOY.
  4. +Trifim Bokovoy BOKOVOY, b. Bet. 1837 - 1838.
  5. +Gorne BOKOVOY, b. Dec 1849.
  6. +Nikita BOKOVOY, b. 1855, d. Abt. 1895, Harchanko, Ukraine, Russia61, 62.
  7. +Anton BOKOVOY, b. Aug 1856, Ukraine, Russia/Ukraine, d. 1938, Kief, North Dakota, USA.

Children of Daniel BOKOVOY and Sophia VOLOCHENKO are:
  1. +Cornelius (Gorne/Cornea/Carlo) BOKOVOY, b. Aug 1848, Probably in Harchanko, Ukraine, Russia/Ukraine63, 64, d. 14 Sep 1906, On Farm near Kief, McHenry Co., North Dakota65, 66.
  2. +Nikita BOKOVOY, b. 1855, d. Abt. 1895, Harchanko, Ukraine, Russia67, 68.
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