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Descendants of Mcginnnis


Generation No. 2


2. THOMAS2 MCGINNIS (MCGINNNIS1) was born 1695 in county down ireland. He married (1) POLLY.

Notes for T
HOMAS MCGINNIS:
Thomas MCGINNIS OF KENTUCKY MERCCER COUNTY . he came to America 1710 or before .
to the family of Thomas Magennis <in & around>
,,,,,,county down Ireland ,,,,
Am looking for the parents of this man,
this is my line from across the sea we came

ON THE MCGINNIS SIDE OF MY FAMILY.
WILLIAM THOMAS MCGINNIS
OUR father,,
SALLY DAE NELL WRIGHT MCGINNIS

OUR MOTHER
AND WE ARE SALLY "S GIRLS
AND SON

ELISHA JACK WRIGHT
is my forefather on the wright side of my family



IS IA WILLIAM MI CHALES
is my forefather on the Michaels side of my family



roomer has it Thomas came from Kinsolving port of entry from county down IRLAND
fallowed the path to the wilds of Kentucky to raise his four sons
1 john (my line)
2 William
3thomas
4 Neal
roomer of 5 more sons after reaching Kentucky ( Am still researching this )
NAME THOMAS MCGINNIS
SERVICE UNIT 20 TH KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS
COMPANY B
ENLISTMENT 01/12/1862
MUSTER OUT 01/17/1865
DISCHARGED HONORABLY


Thomas McGINNIS it is believed that he came to America 1710 or before . to the family of Thomas Magennis in around county down Ireland Am looking for the parents of this man,
IF YOU HAVE ONE MEMBER IN MY LINE .
IN YOURS
******* ('' WE COULD BE KIN)**********
xxxxxoooooxxxxxxxooooooxxxxxxxoooooooo
XXXXOOOOOXXXXXXOOOOOXXXXXXOOOOOO
COUSINE
AUNT,UNCLE,GRANDFATHER,GRANDMOTHER ,
who were the women of yore past ????
the woman behind the man,,
i hour you for your hard work raising these fine men

...... my start on this path ....... THOMAS MCGINNIS ......
COUNTY DOWN IRLAND AROUND 1710

PLEASE TO THE FAMILY OF THOMAS, HELP FILL IN THE GAPS.
IN OUR VERY INTERESTING FAMILY HISTORIES
THE VOICE OFF OUR PAST REACHING OUT TO BE HEARD
this is my line
------------------------< descent ants of THOMAS MCGINNIS>---------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------
1.thomas McGINNIS 4 sons

1john 1740-1814 <my line >
2 Thomas B 1743-1832
3 William 1750- 1786
4 Neal 1755 -1820

john McGINNIS 1 1740
7 sons 3 Daughters
1 Thomas 1761-1825
2 john 1765-1818
3 William 1770-1810
4 Jessy 1772-1843 < my line >
5 Hezekiah 1774-1814
6 nancy 1776
7green berry 1778-1844
8 Polly 1780-1837
9 Elizabeth??????
10 Samuel 1768-1835

Jessy born 1772 1843
4 children

1 john Kopel <my line>
2
3
4 Mary Jane

john B born 1825
8 children
1 William Henery < town Marshell 1904 of Powhattan Kansas>
2 Robert Josha
3 Jesse Frankland
4 john Allem
5 James Thomas <my line >
6 Lewis Wilkason
7 Mary Ella
8 Arther < died at one month old the harsh winter of 1-6-1871>

James Thomas
had 5 children
1hugh Thomas <my line >
2alva guy
3bessie
4 Eva
5 coral

Hugh Thomas
2 children
1 Cleta
2 William Thomas <my line>
william thomas mcginnis married sally darnell wright
there are seven of us ,children all living
iam the eldest della joann mcginnis johnson
scoreshell@yahoo.com
____________________________________________________________________________________
know you have made it down the line to my
parents,------Am the eldest of seven --------
my mother was a great lady to her whole family ,
she was kind ,sweet Lovering
but she was also a Ladie you dint want to cross,
mom was a Rash Indain with a temper to match.
JACK WRIGHT -- DELLA B -CUMMINGS --
have five children
mom is the eldest girl
WE ARE SALLS GIRLS PROUD OF OUR HERITAGE



William Thomas
and sally Darnell wright have 7 children
1 Della JoAnn 1962
2 Fay 1966
3 Becky 1968
4 jimmy 1969
5 Chris 1970
6 patty 1971
7 Tammy 1972
this is my line ,
looking for info in Irland
thank you
--------Mail----------- score shell@yahoo----------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



MC GUINNESS SURNAME HISTORY
by Willie O' Kane


This name originated in Ulster, and goes back to Saran, a fifth century Cruthnic chief. By the twelfth century, MacGuinnesses were Lords of Iveagh, controlling most of Down from their base at Rathfriland. Their power remained fairly intact over the following four centuries, many of them becoming Protestants before the Plantation. There were MacGuinness bishops of Down and Dromore in the Elizabethan period.

However, in 1598, the son of the then MacGuinness chief joined O'Neill's campaign against the British, and for the most of the next century the family generally was regarded as rebellious by the government, and was dispossessed of most of its lands. Many of the leading lights emigrated to Europe and became prominent in the Wild Geese, fighting against Britain for France, Spain and Austria.

This Surname History is reproduced with the kind permission of Irish Roots Magazine in which it was first published as part of the feature article, Surnames of County Down, in Issue 1, 1996

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SURNAMES OF COUNTY DOWN
by Willie O'Kane


County Down occupies the south-eastern corner of Ulster, being bounded to the east and south by the Irish Sea, to the north by County Antrim, and to the west by County Armagh. The county is just over 955 square miles in area, with the northern part having the best agricultural land, and the south being dominated by the Mourne mountains.

Strangford Lough, an inlet of the Irish Sea, creates the Ards Peninsula, an area of rolling dairy farms and sandy beaches, threaded by small country roads and neatly painted houses. Drowned drumlins form small islands along the lough shore, and its sheltered location makes the lough a haven of bird life.

In the extreme south, another deep inlet of the sea, Carlingford Lough, separates Down from County Louth, and between the Mournes and the sea lies a flat coastal plain known as the Kingdom of Mourne. There are geographical links between the tall granite upthrusts of the Mourne range and the older, lower mountains of the Cooley peninsula in Louth, and between them these ranges encompass some of the most beautiful hiking country in Ireland.

The Mournes, perhaps best known for 'sweeping down to the sea', in the words of Percy French, are unique in providing within such a compact area a variety of scenery and mountain features unmatched elsewhere in the country. Slieve Donard, the highest peak in the province of Ulster, rises to 2,796 feet, and within a radius of a few miles are a dozen handsome summits above 2,000 feet.

Tourism naturally forms an important component of Down's economy, and the resort of Newcastle, at the foot of Slieve Donard, is one of the countys most thriving centres, while in the north are Bangor a popular seaside destination for nearby Belfast, and quieter coastal villages like Donaghadee and Strangford. Other notable towns in the county are Newtownards, Downpatrick, Banbridge, Comber, Ballynahinch, Hillsborough, Castlewellan, Rathfriland, Dromore and Newrv.

Down has a long history of settlement, and the county exhibits in microcosm the many strains of peoples and identities that comprise Ireland's character. In ancient times, Down formed part of the kingdom of the Ulaid, from which the name Ulster is derived. In this part of north-east Ireland, in early Christian times, the tortuous battle for supremacy between competing tribes and overlords resulted in the emergence of the Uí Neill dynasty as the dominant grouping in Ulster.

From this, over the following centuries, came the various branches that resulted in modern family names. The descendants of these are still to be found widely in the county, McGuinesses, O'Neills and McCartans. As was the case with County Antrim, Down's proximity to the Scottish and English coasts resulted in commercial and social intercourse long before the seventeenth century. Names like Savage and White are quite widespread in Down, and their origins go back to the Anglo-Norman invasions of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. But it was the influx of Scottish and English settlers in the early seventeenth century that left the deepest imprint on the county. Thompson and Smith are among the commonest names in Down today, as are Campbell and Patterson. This strong Scottish complexion is reflected in the rest of the county's roll call of names - Martin, Wilson, Graham, Johnston, Robinson, Hamilton, Bell and Boyd.

The older Irish names are mostly confined to the mountainous and inaccessible portion of the county, whence they were driven as a result of the systematic settlement schemes of the early seventeenth century. (During the Ulster Plantation, Antrim and Down were not 'planted' in the sense that Derry, Tyrone, Donegal and Cavan were; the eastern counties proved attractive to incoming settlers and there was little in the way of organised resistance. Since central and west Ulster had no significant pockets of English or Scots settlement, it was necessary to undertake plantations.)

In terms of architecture, agriculture, politics and industry, the county reflects its multi-faceted settlement history. The north's well tended farms and seaside villages are unmistakably British, while in the south and the kingdom of Mourne, is a stronger echo of Gaelic ways. However, even in the Ards peninsula are isolated pockets of Gaelic cultural identity, exemplified by ' thriving GAA clubs, while in the Mournes there has long been a fusion o Scots and lrish traditions in farming, building and dialect. The geographer and sociologist, E. Estyn Evans, noted for his insight into aspects of northern Irish history and folk culture, saw Down as epitomising all of Ulster, and spent much time working in the county.

Any brief survey of the most widespread names in County Down would include the following.

McGuinness

This name originated in Ulster, and goes back to Saran, a fifth century Cruthnic chief. By the twelfth century, MacGuinnesses were Lords of Iveagh, controlling most of Down from their base at Rathfriland. Their power remained fairly intact over the following four centuries, many of them becoming Protestants before the Plantation. There were MacGuinness bishops of Down and Dromore in the Elizabethan period. However, in 1598, the son of the then MacGuinness chief joined O'Neill's campaign against the British, and for the most of the next century the family generally was regarded as rebellious by the government, and was dispossessed of most of its lands. Many of the leading lights emigrated to Europe and became prominent in the Wild Geese, fighting against Britain for France, Spain and Austria.

MacCartan

This again is an exclusively Ulster name, and is strongest in its homeland around the Down-Armagh borders. The name derives from Artan, a great-grandson of Mongan MacGuinness of Iveagh. They established their stronghold in central Down where they were chiefs of Kinelarty. Although in general subordinate to the MacGuinnesses, MacCartans were powerful in their own right, and in the mid-fourteenth century managed temporarily to make themselves lords of Iveagh. In more modern times, the name MacCartney gradually came to be used interchangeably with MacCartan.

Savage

In Down, most bearing this name derive from the old French sauvage meaning just that - savage or wild. Thomas le Sauvage settled in England with the Normans, and in 1177 a descendant, William le Sauvage, took part in John de Courcy's invasion of Ulster. He was granted lands in the upper Ards and built a fortified house at Ardkeen. Over time the Savages gradually became hibernicised, some taking part in the campaign against further British influence. However, they managed to retain most of their lands, and today some of the original grant of eight hundred years ago is still held by Savages.

White

This name derives from the Old English hwit for white, and in some accounts, from wiht, denoting a dweller by the bend. It entered Ireland during the Norman invasion, and a Kildare branch of the name established themselves in the Ards area in the mid-fourteenth century, where they became Lords of Dufferin after dispossessing the de Mandevilles. White was gaelicised as deFaoite, giving rise to MacFaoitigh and by a process of later re-anglicisation, becoming MacWhite, MacWhitty and MacQuitty.

Johnston

One of the commonest names in Scotland, it came to Ireland with the seventeenth century plantation. In Ireland, it is confined almost to Ulster, particularly Antrim and Down, and is rarely encountered in the other provinces. A variant spelling is Johnstone, although neither should be confused with Johnson, which is one of the commonest surnames of England and occurs fairly frequently over most of the north of Ireland as a legacy of the plantation.

Thompson

This is among the top five names in Scotland, and in Down the main areas associated with the name are around Ballynahinch and Loughinisland. Most will derive from Scots sources, of which there is a bewildering array, further complicated in cases where variants like MacCombe and Holmes came into use. In some cases, the name derives from an incorrect anglicisation of the rare Irish name MacThomais (Son of Thomas), where certain descendants assumed Thom(p)son as an acceptable version.

Boyd

This is among the 15 commonest names in Antrim and Down, and occurs widely in Derry. In Down it is commonest in the Ards Peninsula where a branch of the family, related to the Montgomerys settled in the early eighteenth century. The name probably derives from the Gaelic 'buidhe' for yellow, (although it may be directly connected to the Isle of Bute) and is linked to the beginnings of the Stewart dynasty through Robert 'Buidhe'. The seat of the clan was in Ayrshire, where they were well established by the early fourteenth century.

Crawford

The original family territory was the Crawford barony in Lanarkshire, and the name derives from the Lallans word 'craw' meaning crow. There were Crawfords in Fermanagh in the 1630s, but Antrim (where Crawfordsland bears the name) and Down (with Crawfordsburn the chief centre) are the counties most associated with the name. William Sharman Crawford (1781-1861) MP was born at Crawfordsburn and was founder of the Tenant League of Ireland. During the Famine period he was prominent in advocating better conditions for tenant farmers, especially in Ulster. He also called for the Royal Navy to be used for importing food into Ireland to relieve destitution.

Wilson

Wilson is the third most common name in Ulster, and indeed one of the most widespread in the English speaking world. Like Williams and Williamson, it derives from William and is almost always of English or Scots origin. More than three quarters of Ulster Wilsons are descended from Lowland Scots settlers. Woodrow Wilson, 28th US president, had ancestral links with north Tyrone, and a small cottage near Strabane today commemorates this connection.

Bell

Bell may derive from the Old French bel, meaning handsome, or Old English belle, denoting someone employed as a bell ringer for a church or small town. The name is in Ireland from Norman times and is believed to have originated with Gilbert le fizBel. However those of the name in Down are most likely descended from the Bells who were among the famous riding clans of the Scottish borderers 'pacified' by James I in the first decade of the seventeenth century. The subsequent clearances of their lands coincided with large scale settlement in Ireland, so many ended up in Ulster. Many Bells in Down are found in the south of the county, around Hilltown and Magheralin, and almost certainly stem from the Gaelic Mac Ghille Mhauil, which was anglicised as MacGilveil and Macmillan, as well as Bell.

Patterson

Among the five commonest names in Down, Patterson appears also as Paterson and Pattison, and translates as son of Patrick. In this form it is from the Scottish lowlands, although some Highland names like MacPhadrick, MacFeat and MacPhater were anglicised as Patterson -and in some cases as Kilpatrick. The Galloway name MacFetridge (MacPhetruis, son of Peter) also became Patterson.

Martin

In the middle of the last cenury, Martin was the second most numerous name in Down, and is still among the top ten. The main concentrations are around Lecale and Ards, and also the Dromore Area. The name derives from a number of Scottish sources, and those of the name in Down probably descend from the MacMartin branch of the Clan Cameron of Inverness-shire, or from the Martins, a sept of Clan Donald from Skye. Henry Nexvell Martin (1848-96), born in Newry, achieved fame as a biologist in America, while 'Honest John Martin' (1812-75), also Newry born, was a brother-in-law of fellow Young Irelander John Mitchell, and like Mitchell was transported, edited a newspaper and was elected an MP.

Acknowledgements to The Book of Ulster Surnames (1988) by Robert Bell.

This article is reproduced with the kind permission of Irish Roots Magazine in which it was first published in Issue 1, 1996.


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More About T
HOMAS MCGINNIS:
Burial: kentuchy
CILVAL WAR: 1810, kentucKY
     
Children of T
HOMAS MCGINNIS and POLLY are:
3. i.   JOHN B3 MCGINNIS, b. 1740.
  ii.   THOMAS T MCGINNIS, b. 1743.
4. iii.   WILLIAM MCGINNIS, b. 1750; d. March 12, 1852.
  iv.   NEAL MCGINNIS, b. 1755.


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