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Ancestors of Stephen Cardwell Johnson


Generation No. 9


      274. James Finney, born Abt. 1680 in Northern Ireland; died 1742 in Orange County, Virginia. He married 275. Ann Arnold Unknown.

      275. Ann Arnold, born Unknown; died Unknown.

More About James Finney:
Fact 1: Will admin. in 1742. James Patton and Michael Finney appt'd administrators.
Fact 2: May have died with Capt. John McDowell in an Indian battle near Glasgow, Va.

      Children of James Finney and Ann Arnold are:
  137 i.   Jane Finney, born 1712 in Virginia; died Abt. 1805 in Franklin County, Kentucky; married Stephen Arnold Abt. 1745 in Virginia.
  ii.   Michael Finney, born 1725; died 1787; married Catherine Armstrong Unknown.
  More About Michael Finney:
Fact 1: Lieut. of Foot in 1747, Augusta Co., Va.
Fact 2: Virginia to S.C.
Fact 3: Appointed administrator of his father's will in 1742.

  iii.   Joseph Finney, born Unknown; died Unknown; married Ruth Lloyd Unknown.
  iv.   Christopher Finney, born Unknown.


      286. Michael Woods, born 1684 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath Co., Ireland; died 1761 in Albemarle County, Virginia. He was the son of 572. John Woods and 573. Elizabeth Worsop. He married 287. Mary Campbell 1704 in Scotland.

      287. Mary Campbell, born 1690 in Argylshire, Scotland; died 1742-1765 in Albemarle County, Virginia. She was the daughter of 574. James Campbell and 575. Susan Campbell.

Notes for Michael Woods:
1. Per Jim & Sue Woods Web Site, 4/16/1998: "Much controversy exists over these parents of Michael Woods and his four siblings. Documents exist showing an Elizabeth Worsop whose will shows her dying w/o issue (childless). One reference indicates this Elizabeth may be an Elizabeth Woods. This marriage is listed in several genealogical references, and although questionable, is the best data available at this time."

2. Per Jim & Sue Woods Web Site, 4/16/1998: "From Woods, Rev. Neander M.; The Woods-McAfee Memorial: 'In the year 1724 there came to Pa. from the North of Ireland one Michael Woods, his bro. William, & their widowed sister Elizabeth Wallace, and a number of their children. It has been a current belief in the Woods family that Michael, William & Elizabeth had two brothers, James & Andrew, who migrated with them to America. At the date of the migration, Michael Woods was 40 years old, and William was 29. Elizabeth was probably the eldest of the party, and about 42 yrs. old, and had with her at least 6 children by her husband, Peter Wallace, who was long since deceased.'
"Michael and his family removed to Va., where Michael was an original Proprietor in Albemarle Co., Va. and served as a Lt. Col. in the militia."

More About Michael Woods:
Fact 1: A portrait of one of his ancestors hangs in Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland.

      Children of Michael Woods and Mary Campbell are:
  i.   William Woods, born November 02, 1705 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath Co., Ireland; died April 12, 1783 in Greenbrier, West Virginia/Fincastle County, Virginia; married Susanna Wallace Abt. 1732 in Virginia.
  More About William Woods:
Fact 1: Possibly b. 2 Nov 1715 per married 1st cousin.

  ii.   Magdelen Woods, born Abt. 1706 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath County, Ireland; died 1810 in Virginia; married (1) John McDowell December 14, 1734; married (2) Benjamin Borden , Jr. Unknown; married (3) John Boyer Unknown.
  Notes for Magdelen Woods:
1. Per Dave Leebrick RTF file, "booklaps.rtf" sent by e-mail to Steve C. Johnson on 3/20/99: "Joseph LAPSLEY Sr. Capt. was born about 1721 in , , , North Ireland. He died in 1787 in Lexington, Rockbridge, Virginia. Will was made November 29, 1787. Joseph bought a farm of 338 acres from Benjamin Borden July 6, 1742, near where Lexington in Rockbridge county, Virginia now stands, which probably means he was at least 21 years old then. Borden had been granted the land by Gov. Gooch of Virginia. Borden gave Gooch a buffalo calf and in return he gave Burden enough land for a small principality. This was about six months prior to the Indian raid into the Valley which resulted in the cruel death of John McDowell, who was the husband of Magdalen Woods McDowell, his wife's own sister.

"Joseph may have come to Virginia by way of Pennsylvania, reaching Virginia about 1734. That is the year in which the Woods and Wallaces came to Virginia from Pennsylvania, and the Lapsleys may have been of the same party. Of his parents, we know nothing, except that it is said he was of Huguenot extraction.

"In 1752, ten years after his first purchase, Joseph Lapsley bought another tract of four hundred acres, this time from Sarah's nephew, James McDowell, her sister Magdalen's son. The Lapsleys were no doubt prominent people in Rockbridge from the earliest days - good, reliable, Scotch-Irish folk,who in any time or place make sturdy citizens and good neighbors. There is a little creek near Lexington now which, for generations, has been called "Sarah Lapsley's Run".

"Joseph Lapsley's home was visited in June, 1755, by the Rev. Hugh McAden, one of the pioneer Presbyterian missionaries of Virginia and North Carolina. From his diary we read "...preached on the second Sabbath of July to a considerable large congregation. Rode home with Joseph Lapsley, two miles from meeting, where I tarried till Wednesday morning (16th). Here it was I received the most melancholy news of the entire defeat of our army by the French at Ohio, the general killed, numbers of inferior officers, and the whole artillery taken. This, together with the frequent accounts of fresh murders being daily committed upon the frontiers, struck terror to every heart. A cold shuddering possessed every breast, and paleness covered almost every face. In short, the whole inhabitants were put into an universal confusion. Scarecely any man durst sleep in his own house, but all met in companies with their wives and children, and set about building little fortifications to defend themselves from such barbarians and inhuman enemies,whom they concluded would be let loose upon them at pleasure". This, of course, was Braddock's defeat, which occurred July 9th, and the news of which spread all over they colony in less than two weeks. This brief narrative by a reliable eye-witness gives us a very vivid picture of the hardships and perils to which the Woodses, Lapsleys, Wallaces, McDowells, etc. were exposed in those far-off days, in what was then called the "Backwoods of Virginia".

"We must remember that what we now know as Washington and Lee University had its beginning almost in sight of the homes of the Lapsleys, Wallaces, Woodses and McDowells (and, almost certainly, with their active assistance) six years before this visit of Mr. McAden....Hence, we doubt not that Joseph Lapsley and his neighbors sent their boys and girls to good schools where they studied the humanities along with the Westminster Shorter Catechism and the Bible - a plan which not a few sensible Christian people in this day and generation consider most wise and desirable."
More About Magdelen Woods:
Fact 1: Her husband was killed in an Indian raid in early 1788.
Notes for John McDowell:
1. Per Dave Leebrick RTF file, "booklaps.rtf" sent by e-mail to Steve C. Johnson on 3/20/99: "Joseph LAPSLEY Sr. Capt. was born about 1721 in , , , North Ireland. He died in 1787 in Lexington, Rockbridge, Virginia. Will was made November 29, 1787. Joseph bought a farm of 338 acres from Benjamin Borden July 6, 1742, near where Lexington in Rockbridge county, Virginia now stands, which probably means he was at least 21 years old then. Borden had been granted the land by Gov. Gooch of Virginia. Borden gave Gooch a buffalo calf and in return he gave Burden enough land for a small principality. This was about six months prior to the Indian raid into the Valley which resulted in the cruel death of John McDowell, who was the husband of Magdalen Woods McDowell, his wife's own sister.

"Joseph may have come to Virginia by way of Pennsylvania, reaching Virginia about 1734. That is the year in which the Woods and Wallaces came to Virginia from Pennsylvania, and the Lapsleys may have been of the same party. Of his parents, we know nothing, except that it is said he was of Huguenot extraction.

"In 1752, ten years after his first purchase, Joseph Lapsley bought another tract of four hundred acres, this time from Sarah's nephew, James McDowell, her sister Magdalen's son. The Lapsleys were no doubt prominent people in Rockbridge from the earliest days - good, reliable, Scotch-Irish folk,who in any time or place make sturdy citizens and good neighbors. There is a little creek near Lexington now which, for generations, has been called "Sarah Lapsley's Run".

"Joseph Lapsley's home was visited in June, 1755, by the Rev. Hugh McAden, one of the pioneer Presbyterian missionaries of Virginia and North Carolina. From his diary we read "...preached on the second Sabbath of July to a considerable large congregation. Rode home with Joseph Lapsley, two miles from meeting, where I tarried till Wednesday morning (16th). Here it was I received the most melancholy news of the entire defeat of our army by the French at Ohio, the general killed, numbers of inferior officers, and the whole artillery taken. This, together with the frequent accounts of fresh murders being daily committed upon the frontiers, struck terror to every heart. A cold shuddering possessed every breast, and paleness covered almost every face. In short, the whole inhabitants were put into an universal confusion. Scarecely any man durst sleep in his own house, but all met in companies with their wives and children, and set about building little fortifications to defend themselves from such barbarians and inhuman enemies,whom they concluded would be let loose upon them at pleasure". This, of course, was Braddock's defeat, which occurred July 9th, and the news of which spread all over they colony in less than two weeks. This brief narrative by a reliable eye-witness gives us a very vivid picture of the hardships and perils to which the Woodses, Lapsleys, Wallaces, McDowells, etc. were exposed in those far-off days, in what was then called the "Backwoods of Virginia".

"We must remember that what we now know as Washington and Lee University had its beginning almost in sight of the homes of the Lapsleys, Wallaces, Woodses and McDowells (and, almost certainly, with their active assistance) six years before this visit of Mr. McAden....Hence, we doubt not that Joseph Lapsley and his neighbors sent their boys and girls to good schools where they studied the humanities along with the Westminster Shorter Catechism and the Bible - a plan which not a few sensible Christian people in this day and generation consider most wise and desirable."
More About John McDowell:
Fact 1: Was killed in an Indian raid into Rockbridge Co., Va.

  iii.   Michael Woods, born 1708 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath Co., Ireland; died May 11, 1777 in Virginia; married Ann Lambert 1733.
  More About Michael Woods:
Fact 1: Possible child David Woods b.1740 Bedford Co., Va.
Fact 2: Possible child John Woods b.1745 Lunenburg Co., Va.
More About Ann Lambert:
Fact 1: Possible child David Woods b.1740 Bedford Co., Va.
Fact 2: Possible child John Woods b.1745 Lunenburg Co., Va.

  iv.   Hannah Woods, born 1710 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath Co., Ireland; died Unknown; married William Wallace March 20, 1731/32.
  v.   John Woods, born February 19, 1711/12 in Ireland; died October 14, 1791 in Albemarle County, Virginia; married Susannah Anderson 1733.
  More About John Woods:
Fact 1: Was a Lt. Col. during the French-Indian War for county militia.

  vi.   Margaret Woods, born 1714 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath County, Ireland; died 1756 in Ivy, A, Virginia; married Andrew Wallace October 1735 in Virginia.
  vii.   Richard Woods, born 1715 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath Co., Ireland; died 1779 in Botetourt County, Virginia; married (1) Margaret (Spouse of Richard Woods) ---?--- Unknown; married (2) Elizabeth A. Stuart Unknown; married (3) Jennie (Spouse of Richard Woods) ---?--- Unknown.
  viii.   Archibald Woods, born May 11, 1716 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath Co., Ireland; died December 11, 1784 in Roanoke County, Virginia; married Isabella Gass 1734.
  Notes for Archibald Woods:
Per Jim & Sue Woods Web Site: "poss b. 11 May 1706".
More About Archibald Woods:
Fact 1: Was an original land owner. Had a 1737 land grant.
Fact 2: Served in Dunmore's War in 1774.
Notes for Isabella Gass:
1. Per Jim & Sue Woods Web Site: "Poss. Isabella Goss per DAC."

  ix.   Samuel Woods, born 1718 in Dunshauglin Castle, Meath Co., Ireland; died Unknown.
  x.   Martha Woods, born 1720 in Ireland; died 1790; married Peter Wallace , Jr. 1739 in Cecil County, Maryland.
  xi.   Andrew Woods, born 1722 in Albemarle County, Virginia; died 1781-1783; married Martha Poage 1750.
  More About Andrew Woods:
Fact 1: Possibly born in Botetourt Co., Va.

  143 xii.   Sarah Woods, born Abt. 1724 in Meath, Ireland; died 1804 in Gilberts Creek, Garrard County, Kentucky; married Joseph Lapsley , Sr. Abt. 1741 in Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia.


      288. Edward Mountjoy, born Abt. 1660 in Biddlestone, Wiltshire, England; died 1712 in Stafford County, Virginia. He was the son of 576. Thomas Mountjoy and 577. Sybilla Hancock. He married 289. Mary Crosby Abt. 1710.

      289. Mary Crosby, born Abt. 1676; died July 1756 in near Brooke, Stafford County, Virginia. She was the daughter of 578. George Crosby and 579. (Spouse of George Crosby) ---?---.

Notes for Edward Mountjoy:
LDS AFN: BVCO-R7

1. Per J.W. Johnson notes, 1946-1970, Ref.JOHN0259, p.8, citing Virginia Mag. of Hist. & Bio., Vol. 37, p.161: "Waugh - Doniphan. I wish to call your attention to some errors in 'The Sydney -
Smith and Claggett - Price Genealogy', by Doniphan families. She states, without authority, (pages 100, 104, and 105), that 'Mary Waugh, who married Alexander Doniphan in 1740, was daughter of John Waugh.' She was daughter of Joseph Waugh and Mary ( Crosby, Mountjoy, Mauzy), Waugh. See Stafford Co. Record Book S, folio 307! - etc.

2. Per J.W. Johnson notes, 1946-1970, Ref.JOHN0259, p.9, citing William & Mary College Quarterly, Vol. 16, p.291 and per des Cognets 1962: "Thomas Mountjoy, of the City of Bristol, merchant, appoints his brother, Edward Mountjoy, his attorney in Virginia. 26 June, 1695. Teste Gerard Hutt."

3. Per J.W. Johnson notes, 1946-1970, Ref.JOHN0259, p.9, citing Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 1, p.170: "F. Hurst. John Hurst (d.1747), undoubtedly a representative of the family of that name which was found also in Wicomico Parish in Northumberland (Bishop Meade, ii, 132), secured in 1719 from the proprietors of the Northern Neck a grant of 312 acres on the head branches of Accotink Run adjoining lands of Thomas Norman, Robert Carter, Esq., and Capt. Edward Mountjoy (Northern Neck Land Grants, v. 200), and there he died in 1747."

4. Per Caroline B. Lyles (CBLyles<CBLyles@aol.com>) e-mail to Steve C. Johnson dated 26 Dec 1997 09:18: "After I last e-mailed you I ran across some deeply buried notes in my files that I need to get into the computer...I had corresponded with another Mauzy descendant back in September and she sent me quite a few notes that she had obtained from a William and Mary Quarterly publication...

'Mauzy/Mountjoy notes
The last will of Mary Crosby Mountjoy Mauzy Waugh was dated March 27, 1749 and proved December 14, 1756. As it remains of record at Stafford Cty Court House. By a lone cedar tree in the cornfield of Mrs. robinson near Brooke Station in Stafford Cty, VA is the crumbling tombstone of Mary Crosby Waugh. This was once a large burying ground, but all of the stones have disappeared except that of Mary, which was broken and about to disintegrate. This tract of land is known as 'Locust Hill'.

'Her tombstone reads: 'Here lies the body of Mrs. Mary Waugh who departed from this life in the month of July in the year of our Lord 175?' The remainder of her tombstone could not be located.

'She has been referred to as Much Marrying Mary, because of her 3 marriages to Edward Mountjoy, John Mauzy, and Rev. Joseph Waugh.

'She had children by all three marriages.

'In the will of Mary Crosby Mountjoy Mauzy Waugh, she made in 1749, she left property to each of her children as follows: 'Totwnameend liam Mountjoy, 840 acres of land, to son Peter Mauzy, 300 acres of land in Prince William Cty where Frances Watt now lives, to daughter Elizabeth Mauzy Conway, 150 acres of land and to daughter Mary Doniphan personal estate.'

'Notes on Peter Mauzy, son of John and Mary Crosby Mauzy:
'On November 11, 1730, William Allen was appointed guardian for Peter, indicating Peter was not of age. This was necessary because young Peter's grandfather, George Crosby (Mary's father), had died in 1730, leaving him land on Town Run.

'On July 10, 1734, Peter in turn became guardian for Elizabeth Summers, eventually his wife, and his bond was ordered recorded with William Mountjoy and John Mauzy as security.

'From Overwharton Parish Records, Stafford Cty, VA, Peter Mauzy married Elizabeth Summers on February 9, 1735.

'Peter's will was made in 1750. Witnesses were William Mountjoy, Alexander Doniphan and John Mauzy, Sr. It should be recalled that William Mountjoy was Peter's half brother, by Mary Crosby's first marriage to Captain edward Mountjoy and that Alexander Doniphan had married Peter's half sister, Mary Waugh, born to Mary Crosby and Joseph Waugh."

More About Edward Mountjoy:
Fact 1: June 26, 1695, Appointed by his bro. Thomas as his atty. in Westmoreland Co., Va. on 6/26/1695.
Fact 2: Had a pre-1719 land grant in Northern Neck, Va. next to John Hurst.
Fact 3: Was the first husband of Mary Crosby.
Fact 4: Moved to Virginia prior to 1689.
Fact 5: Was a planter.
Fact 6: Attended the Episcopal Church.
Fact 7: Was a Captain.

Notes for Elizabeth Alexander:
May have been married to a ? Monroe and a ? Horner? Maiden name may have been Alexander?

More About Elizabeth Alexander:
Fact 1: Great great grandmother of James Monroe, 5th President of the U.S.

Notes for Mary Crosby:
LDS AFN: BVCO-SD

1. Per J.W. Johnson notes, 1946-1970, Ref.JOHN0259, p.8, citing Virginia Mag. of Hist. & Bio., Vol. 37, p.161: "Waugh - Doniphan. I wish to call your attention to some errors in 'The Sydney -
Smith and Claggett - Price Genealogy', by Doniphan families. She states, without authority, (pages 100, 104, and 105), that 'Mary Waugh, who married Alexander Doniphan in 1740, was daughter of John Waugh.' She was daughter of Joseph Waugh and Mary ( Crosby, Mountjoy, Mauzy), Waugh. See Stafford Co. Record Book S, folio 307! - etc.

2. Per Caroline B. Lyles (CBLyles<CBLyles@aol.com>) e-mail to Steve C. Johnson dated 26 Dec 1997 09:18: "After I last e-mailed you I ran across some deeply buried notes in my files that I need to get into the computer...I had corresponded with another Mauzy descendant back in September and she sent me quite a few notes that she had obtained from a William and Mary Quarterly publication...

'Mauzy/Mountjoy notes
The last will of Mary Crosby Mountjoy Mauzy Waugh was dated March 27, 1749 and proved December 14, 1756. As it remains of record at Stafford Cty Court House. By a lone cedar tree in the cornfield of Mrs. robinson near Brooke Station in Stafford Cty, VA is the crumbling tombstone of Mary Crosby Waugh. This was once a large burying ground, but all of the stones have disappeared except that of Mary, which was broken and about to disintegrate. This tract of land is known as 'Locust Hill'.

'Her tombstone reads: 'Here lies the body of Mrs. Mary Waugh who departed from this life in the month of July in the year of our Lord 175?' The remainder of her tombstone could not be located.

'She has been referred to as Much Marrying Mary, because of her 3 marriages to Edward Mountjoy, John Mauzy, and Rev. Joseph Waugh.

'She had children by all three marriages.

'In the will of Mary Crosby Mountjoy Mauzy Waugh, she made in 1749, she left property to each of her children as follows: 'To my son William Mountjoy, 840 acres of land, to son Peter Mauzy, 300 acres of land in Prince William Cty where Frances Watt now lives, to daughter Elizabeth Mauzy Conway, 150 acres of land and to daughter Mary Doniphan personal estate.'

'Notes on Peter Mauzy, son of John and Mary Crosby Mauzy:
'On November 11, 1730, William Allen was appointed guardian for Peter, indicating Peter was not of age. This was necessary because young Peter's grandfather, George Crosby (Mary's father), had died in 1730, leaving him land on Town Run.

'On July 10, 1734, Peter in turn became guardian for Elizabeth Summers, eventually his wife, and his bond was ordered recorded with William Mountjoy and John Mauzy as security.

'From Overwharton Parish Records, Stafford Cty, VA, Peter Mauzy married Elizabeth Summers on February 9, 1735.

'Peter's will was made in 1750. Witnesses were William Mountjoy, Alexander Doniphan and John Mauzy, Sr. It should be recalled that William Mountjoy was Peter's half brother, by Mary Crosby's first marriage to Captain edward Mountjoy and that Alexander Doniphan had married Peter's half sister, Mary Waugh, born to Mary Crosby and Joseph Waugh."




More About Mary Crosby:
Fact 1: Lived and buried at "Locust Hill", Stafford Co., Va.
Fact 2: Last will was dated 3/27/1749 and proved 12/14/1756.
Fact 3: Was Nicknamed "Much Marrying Mary".

      Child of Edward Mountjoy and Mary Crosby is:
  144 i.   William Mountjoy, born April 17, 1711 in Stafford County, Virginia; died September 27, 1777 in near Brooke, Stafford County, Virginia; married Phyllis (Phillis) Reilly 1734.


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