JAMES SMITH OF WILKES COUNTY, GA, AND ALLIED FAMILIES

OF BARRON, FOSTER, WHITE, THOMPSON, CHAFFIN, AND COLLUM

 

 

By Vicki Barron Kruschwitz  and Donna Haygood Sarchet

 

In memory of Donna Haygood Sarchet (August 16, 1958 – July 4, 2005), whose fine research, inspiration and encouragement made this article possible.

 

Vicki Barron Kruschwitz

114 Kingston Drive

Waco, TX   76712

(254) 235-1437

vkruschwitz@gmail.com

 

 

 

Article originally posted August 2001.  Most recent update: March 2006.

 

Note:  The information in this article comes from many sources, including shared data from a number of Smith researchers, as well as primary research by both Donna Sarchet and Vicki Kruschwitz.  There are many gaps in our knowledge about this family.  And, as in all such documents, mistakes will be found.  But this information is offered to generate input from other researchers to correct and expand our knowledge of the James Smith family.  You are welcomed and encouraged to contact Vicki, who will attempt to incorporate new data as quickly as possible.

 

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JAMES SMITH, who d. 1797/1799 in Wilkes County, GA, was the father of nine known children, all of whom intermarried with a number of families who resided in or had connections to Wilkes County.  The SMITH and allied families of BARRON, FOSTER, SIMMONS, THOMPSON, CHAFFIN, WHITE, and COLLUM are addressed in this article.  In addition, the following surnames are included in the examination of the movements of James Smith’s descendants: GAMMON, COOK, MANNING, POOL, CATCHINGS, McINTOSH, and WATTS.

 

The migration paths taken by James Smith’s children were varied.  Some moved from Wilkes County to other counties in Georgia -- Greene, Hancock, Putnam, Jones, Jasper, Newton, Walton, Butts, Henry and Troup -- where they lived out their lives.  Others left Georgia and were among the first settlers of the Mississippi Territory.  The grandchildren of James Smith moved on to newly-opened Indian lands in Alabama -- most notably, Tallapoosa County -- in addition to other states including Tennessee, Louisiana, Kentucky, Arkansas, and Missouri, as well as the Republic of Texas.

 

 

JAMES SMITH

 

Prior to moving to Wilkes County, GA, James Smith was an early resident of Craven County, NC.  The Smiths and their close associates, the Rice and Foster families, all lived in Craven County, NC, just below the Trent River on or near Brice’s Creek and Island Creek.  The Trent River flows into the Neuse River at New Bern; thus, these families lived only a few miles south (but across the Trent River) from the colonial capital of North Carolina.  [Source: A Smith Family Odyssey, by Arthur R. Seder Jr., Genealogy Publishing Service, 1999].  Mr. Seder identifies James Smith as the son of James and Martha Smith, per the will of the elder James Smith in 1745.  The younger James Smith’s siblings included Mary, Thomas, Martha (who married William Shepherd Foster) and John Smith.  Evidently, Craven County records indicate that the elder James Smith and his brother, Thomas, purchased land on Brice’s Creek in 1729.  Thomas Smith’s 1750 will names wife, Elizabeth, and children Bazel, Boneta, Sarah, Thomas Rigdon, and Nathan Smith.  The names James, Mary, Martha, John, Basil, Sarah, and Nathan are passed on through the younger James Smith’s children and grandchildren.

 

The younger James Smith likely migrated to Georgia shortly before the Revolutionary War.  He and his son, Nathan Smith, a known Revolutionary War soldier, could well be the two men with those names listed as having served in the Battle of Kettle Creek there in Wilkes County.  John, David, and Nathan Rice, and William Foster also fought in this battle.  [Source: Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia, by Mrs. Howard H. McCall, 1968, pp. 248-249].  This also may be the James Smith who was granted 250 acres of bounty land in 1784, which was taken up by Elijah Clark.  James Smith’s certificate number was 1039, Nathan Smith received certificate 1043 and William Foster 1044.  [Source: Georgia’s Revolutionary Bounty Land Records, 1783-1785, by Nicole M. O’Kelley and Mary Bondurant Warrant, 1992, p. 44].

 

When Wilkes County began recording taxpayers in 1785, James Smith was listed as owning 200 acres of land.  Over the years, he continued to hold this land, variously identified in Wilkes County tax records as being located on Beaverdam Creek and adjacent Michael Moore, Edward Butler, and Nathan Smith.  Other neighbors included Rices and Fosters.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia Tax Records, 1785-1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson].  Smith’s land was situated north of Little River and south and west of the town of Washington, quite near the Kettle Creek battlefield.  (See Joseph Smith, child #7 below for more detail on James Smith’s homestead).  In his will, James Smith described the property as being “granted to James Smith” and bequeathed it to his son, Joseph.  The referenced grant was likely the 200 acres given to a James Smith in Wilkes County in 1787, Grant Book OOO, p. 552.  [Source: Index to the Headright and Bounty Grants of Georgia, 1756-1909, by Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas Jr., p. 606].  Apparently, James Smith settled and paid taxes on the property prior to gaining title.

 

It is interesting that on 1 November 1788, Hry Mounger Pro and Benj Catching C.W.C, Court of Justices of the County of Wilkes, authorized David Creswell, County Surveyor to lay out 150 acres of land for a James Smith “on his own headright.”  [Source: original document in the Headright/Bounty file, Georgia Archives].  However, Wilkes County tax records do not list this property under James Smith’s name.

 

On 24 January 1791, James Smith purchased 217 (elsewhere shown as 216) acres of land to the north on Long Creek from James Hart.  [Source: Wilkes County Deed Book GG, p. 204].  He may never have lived on this property.  On 25 June 1796, Smith deeded the land, which had since been taken from Wilkes County into the newly-created county of Oglethorpe, to his son, John, and son-in-law, William Barron.  [Source: Oglethorpe County Deed Book A, p. 335].

 

In his will dated 2 January 1797 (probated 9 July 1799 in Wilkes County, GA), James Smith mentions sons John Smith, Joseph Smith, Nathan Smith, Jacob Smith (deceased), and daughters Patty Barron, Mary White, Sarah Thompson, Elizabeth Smith, and Rachel Smith.  (Note:  The children do not appear to be listed in order of descending age).  Executors were Edward Butler, Nathaniel Rice, and Samuel Rice.  No wife is named in the will.  Her name is said to be Mary, but no proof of this given name has surfaced to date.  (See Appendix I below for full text of will).

 

From the returns on this estate filed from 1799-1803, the spouses of daughters have been determined.  (Key data from these returns is shown in Appendix I).  A summary of James Smith’s children appears as follows, with the two children of most interest to Barron researchers, Martha Smith Barron and John Smith, listed first:

 

1.  Martha “Patty” Smith, b. 14 March 1770, probably in Craven County, NC, d. after 1854 (1855?) possibly in Butts County, GA; m. William Barron c. 1790.  The family resided in Wilkes, Hancock, Baldwin/Putnam, Jasper/Newton, Meriwether, Butts and Troup Counties, GA.

 

2.  John Smith, b. 1767/1769, d. 16 June 1827 in Jones County, GA; believed to have m. (1) [Prudence?]  Barron; probably m. (2) Nancy Simmons on 11 December 1811 in Putnam County, GA; resided in Wilkes, Hancock, Baldwin/Putnam, and Jones Counties, GA.

 

3.  Nathan Smith, b. 9 March 1750/1751, d. 30 April 1816; m. Sarah “Sally” Foster; resided in Wilkes County, GA.

 

4.  Mary Smith, b. c. 1760, d. probably 1810/1815; m. Dempsey White; resided in Wilkes and Washington (?) Counties, GA, and Natchez District/Claiborne/Warren Counties, MS.

 

5.  Sarah Smith, b. possibly before 1765, d. unknown; m. William Thompson; resided in Wilkes and Washington (?) Counties, GA, and probably in Natchez District/Claiborne County, MS, or (less likely) in Putnam, and Jasper Counties, GA.

 

6.  Jacob Smith, b. before 1765, d. late 1790/early 1791; m. Susannah Thompson (daughter of Benjamin Thompson); resided in the part of Wilkes County that became first a part of Oglethorpe County, then Greene County, GA.

 

7.  Joseph Smith, b. c. 1775, d. 10 December 1865; m. (1) Polly Foster on 4 December 1799 in Wilkes County, GA; (2) Martha Guthrey Andrews on 30 January 1848 in Henry County, GA; resided in Wilkes, Greene, Putnam, Jasper and Henry Counties, GA.

 

8.  Rachel “Zechie” Smith, b. late 1770s, d. 23 September 1848; m. William Chaffin; resided in Wilkes, Walton/Jasper/Newton Counties, GA.

 

9.  Elizabeth Smith, b. early 1780s in Wilkes County, GA, d. (possibly) after 1837 in Kemper Co., MS; m. David Collum; resided in Wilkes (?), Hancock (?) Counties, GA, Claiborne/Warren Counties, MS, Missouri Territory, Jasper County, GA (?), and Kemper County, MS.

 

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1.  Martha “Patty” Smith, b. 14 March 1770, probably in Craven County, NC, d. after 1854 (1855?) possibly in Butts County, GA; m. William Barron (according to John Davis Garrard, he was a son of William Barron and Prudence Davis Barron of Wilkes County, GA, who may have previously resided in Craven County, NC).  He was b. May 1769, d. November 1848 in Butts County, GA. 

 

Most published Barron family histories to date list William Barron’s wife as Martha “Patty” Farr, based on documents written by John Davis Garrard in the 1890s.  [Source: 18 August 1892 letter to J.D. Barron and a document dated 1928 under the name of Mrs. Frank R. Hean, entitled “The Barron Family of Warren County, Georgia, and Descendants.”  Though Mrs. Hean may have updated this document, the original must have been Mr. Garrard’s work based on such personal comments as “I was present at his (William Barron, Jr.’s) death”].  However, the evidence presented by James Smith’s will and estate records (see Appendix I below for detail) and his deed of land in Oglethorpe County (transcribed below) which name his daughter, Patty Barron, and his son-in-law, William Barron, indicates that William Barron’s wife was actually Martha “Patty” Smith.

 

William Barron and Martha Smith are believed to have married c. 1790, based on the birth of their oldest child in 1791.  William Barron first appeared in Wilkes County, GA, in 1791 paying a poll tax.  His name is listed from 1791-1794 living near his mother, Prudence Davis Barron, and his brother, John Barron, who appeared through 1793.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia Tax Records, 1785-1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson].  (Note:  In 1790, his mother Prudence, John, and another brother, Samuel, were shown in Captain Lipham’s District.  From 1791 through 1793, Prudence, John, and William Barron were listed in the same district.  In 1794, Prudence and William were listed in Captain McFarlin’s District, but Prudence appeared to own the same land as in previous years.  In 1795, Prudence was still in McFarlin’s District, but William was listed in Thornton’s District, and for the first time, owned property: 125 acres located on Rocky Creek, adjacent John Carter).  Neither Prudence nor William owned slaves in the Wilkes County tax records.

 

In addition, the “Return of the Infantry of the Second Battalion of the First Regiment of Wilkes County Militia Commanded by Major Aaron Lipham” dated 18 October 1793 lists William Barron, (his brother) John Barrons (sic), and (brother-in-law) Jacob Garrott (sic) in the Fourth Company.  [Source: We Have This Heritage, by Robert M. Willingham, Wilkes Publishing County, 1969, pp. 63-65].

 

William Barron and family resided in Wilkes County, GA, until 1795.  He purchased his first land -- the 125 acres listed on the 1795 tax roll -- in Wilkes County in January 1795 and sold it seven months later, removing to Hancock County, GA, which was just a few miles to the southwest.  [Sources: Wilkes County Deed Book RR, p. 159: John Combs to William Barron, 20 January 1795; Wilkes County Deed Book NN, p. 169: William Barron to John Ridley, 30 August 1795, 125 acres on dry fork of Rocky Creek].  William’s brother, John, had moved with his family to Hancock County about 1794.  Another brother, Samuel, may have been in Greene, later Hancock, by 1791.  Since William Barron did not sell his land until August 1795, he was listed on the Wilkes County tax roll.   

 

William Barron was identified as a resident of Hancock County in June 1796, at which time his father-in-law, James Smith, gave him and John Smith (son of James, see child #2 below) 217 acres in Oglethorpe County.  The abstract of this deed is as follows:

 

p. 335, Deed Book A: 25 June 1796, James SMITH of Wilkes County, GA, to John SMITH of said county & William BARRON of Hancock County, GA. James Smith for $10 & for fatherly affection & goodwill to my son, John Smith, & my son in law, William Barron, 217 acres in Oglethorpe County on Long Creek waters, is part of 400 acres granted to James Hart, 30 May 1787.  217 acres was sold by James Hart to James Smith by deed, 24 January 1791….  (signed) James SMITH. Wit: Spencer Foster, Edward Butler, J.P. Wilkes County.

[Source: Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Books A-E, 1794-1809, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1999, p. 43]. 

(See reference to this same property in James Smith’s will in Appendix I below.  The will identifies the recipient of the property gift as his daughter, Patty Barron).

  

In December 1796, William Barron purchased 100 acres on Rocky Creek in Hancock County adjacent to a Samuel Barron.  This area is located east of the Oconee River, just north of the current Hancock/Baldwin County line.  [Source: Hancock County Deed Book D, pp. 10-11: Jesse Clements to William Barron, 12 December 1796, 100 acres on Little Rocky Creek, adjacent Clements, James Mitchell, Samuel Barron, and Clowers].

 

William Barron was found in the 1798 Hancock County, GA, tax returns (incorrectly identified by the DAR as 1795 returns in their transcription).  He was living on his 100 acres on Rocky Creek adjacent Pritchett, located in Captain (Samuel) Barron’s District.  (Samuel Barron was named militia captain in January 1798, according to The History of Hancock County, GA, Elizabeth Wiley Smith, vol. 1, 1974, p. 132).  Brothers John and Samuel Barron lived nearby. 

 

Sometime after moving to Hancock County, William Barron joined Island Creek Baptist Church by letter.  His name is recorded in the church’s second minute book in a membership list brought forward from the earlier book.  Unfortunately, the date he joined the church is not listed and the first record book did not survive.  However, the list appears to be in chronological order and placement of his name indicates that he joined sometime between 1795 and 1799. 

 

In 1801, William Barron and brother-in-law, John Smith, sold the land inherited from James Smith located in Oglethorpe County.  This deed appears as follows:

 

p. 258, Deed Book D - 21 March. 1801, William BARRON of Hancock County, GA, & John SMITH of Wilkes County, GA., to Elisha Smallwood of  Wilkes County, for $200, 216 acres in Oglethorpe County on Long Creek waters, is part of 400 acres granted to James Hart, 30 May 1787….  (signed) John (x) Smith, William Barron.  It is hoped the justices of Oglethorpe County will give due credit to same.  Wit: Thomas Porter, J.P. $200 recd.  

[Source: Oglethorpe County, GA, Deed Books A-E, 1794-1809, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1999, pp. 225-226].

 

In 1802, William Barron was listed in Captain Williams’ District in the Hancock County tax returns as owning 100 acres on “Rockey” Creek, adjacent (Brice) Miller (brother-in-law of Samuel Barron, William’s recently deceased brother).  Brother-in-law John Smith had arrived from Wilkes County and lived nearby.  [Source: 1802 Hancock County Tax Returns, pp. 74 and 76].

 

William Barron lived on his Rocky Creek property in Hancock County for a number of years.  No other land purchases made by William in the area have been found.  He sold the 100 acres on 27 February 1804 to Stephen Wright.  [Source: Hancock Deed Book H, pp. 503-504: Sale of 100 acres on Little Rocky Creek, bounded east by James Mitchell, west by James Greene].

 

In the 1804 Hancock County tax digest, Brice Miller paid tax in Kinchins’ District for a white poll on behalf of neighbor and relative-by-marriage, William Barron.  Miller and John Smith were again listed nearby.  [Sources: Tim Hudson’s abstracts and An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. III, 1804-1806, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, pp. 024 and 026 of the Hancock County Digest].

 

On 2 March 1805, Martha Barron was received into Island Creek Church by baptism.  [Source: Island Creek Baptist Church’s second minute book].  Martha was thirty-five years old and had been married about fifteen years.  This late conversion experience causes this Barron researcher to wonder if there is any credence to the family story that Martha was Jewish

 

On 5 July 1806, William and Martha Barron were dismissed by letter from the Island Creek Baptist Church in Hancock County.  There seemed to be a general decision by the Barrons and allied families to leave Hancock County about this time, probably due to the opening of new Indian lands to settlers.  William’s brother, John Barron, moved southwest to Jones County.  William and his sister-in-law, Jane Barron (widow of Samuel), and brothers-in-law, Jacob Garrard (husband of sister Elizabeth) and John Smith (brother of wife Martha and likely the husband of William Barron’s sister), moved their families west to Baldwin (now Putnam) County, GA.

 

In the few extant early Baldwin County records, it appears that William Barron purchased lot 253, possibly in late 1804, the same time frame that Jacob Garrard bought nearby lot 239.  Both lots were located on Rooty Creek.  (Though there is no record of William buying this land, he sold 60 acres of this lot to his son, Thomas, on 18 March 1816.  [Source: Putnam County, GA, Deed Book E, pp. 37-38].  The land was described as lying on Rooty Creek, adjoining James Barron’s lot 240 (on the southwest).  James, also a son of William Barron, had bought lot 240 in the second district of Baldwin (now Putnam) County, on 1 February 1814 from Richard and Mary Turner of White Marsh Island.  [Source: Putnam County, GA, Deed Book E, pp. 297-299].

 

Jacob and Elizabeth Barron Garrard were Baptists and attended Rooty Creek Baptist Church.  Though no records confirm it, it is likely that William and Martha’s family also attended the Rooty Creek Church.

 

William Barron, Jacob Garrard, and John Smith were listed in the 1807 Baldwin County tax digest.  [Source: Georgia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Fall 1994, Vol. 30, No. 3, “The First Families of Baldwin, Morgan, and Putnam Counties, 1807,” contributed by Robert S. Davis Jr., p. 161].  These men were listed under Stephens’ 2nd Land Lottery District (now Baldwin and Putnam Counties).  Since they were shown as paying property tax, they all had to have purchased land in Baldwin prior to this time.  Later that same year, the area of the county in which they were living was incorporated into newly-formed Putnam County.

 

In 1813, William Barron, Jacob Garrett (sic), John Roquemore (husband of William’s daughter Mary Elizabeth), John Doss (whose daughter married William’s son, James), and several Simmons families lived in Captain William S. Morgan’s District in Putnam County.  [Source: 1813 Tax Roll Putnam County, GA, contributed by Margie Glover-Daniels, found on the Putnam County GenWeb site]. 

 

William Barron, his son, James, Jacob Garrett (sic) and John Rockmore (sic) still resided in William S. Morgan’s District in Putnam County during the 1815 tax period.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. V, 1814-1817, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, pp. 075, 076 and 077 of the Putnam County Digest].  In nearby districts lived Martha Barron’s brother, Joseph Smith, (See child #7 for detail) and John McKissack, who had married Jane Barron, widow of William’s brother, Samuel.

 

William and Martha Smith Barron moved a few miles northwest to Jasper County, GA, in 1817.  On 29 November 1817, William sold his Putnam County property.  [Source: Putnam County Deed Book F, p. 243: 170.5 acres on a “branch” not named (possibly Rooty Creek) from William Barron to Thomas Edmundson].  Shortly thereafter, on 8 December 1817, William Barron “of Putnam County” purchased a tract of land on Shoal Creek in northern Jasper County.  [Source: Jasper County Deed Book B., p. 108: Mason Harvel sold to William Barron of Putnam County 202.5 acres, lot 208 in the 19th district of Baldwin County, now Jasper, on Sholl (Shoal) Creek].  By the following spring, William and Martha’s two adult sons -- James S. and Thomas Barron -- had sold out in Putnam County and joined their parents in Jasper County.  Their daughter and son-in-law, Mary Elizabeth and John Roquemore, followed later.  The 1820 Georgia census records William, James, and Thomas Barron living in Jasper County (pp. 236 and 252).  William was listed with 2 Ms 10-16, 1 M 16-26 (who was also between the ages of 16-18), 1 M 45+, 1 F 45+.  He was also shown as owning two female slaves aged 14-25.  Thomas and James each owned one slave.  This information is of interest, because no previous or subsequent tax, census, or other records found to date have indicated that William Barron or his sons owned slaves.  In “Recollections of John R. Barron (about 1940),” the great-grandson of William Barron (through his son, Smith) states:  “My father’s people never were slaveholders.  They didn’t believe in slaves.”  [Original manuscript in the possession of Edna (Mrs. Carl) Weber, Lubbock, TX, in 1962].  Whether the family owned slaves briefly, but had a change of heart, or whether the 1820 census record is incorrect is unknown at this time.

 

In the 1820 Jasper County census records, several of Martha Barron’s siblings lived nearby, indicating continuing close family ties over the years.  The family of Joseph Smith was listed on page 204.  William Chafin (sic), husband of Zechie Smith, was noted on page 228, near William and Martha Barron’s family on page 236.

 

William’s younger sons -- Henry, Joseph, Smith, and John Barron -- married in the next few years in Jasper or newly-formed Newton County.

 

In September 1818, soon after their move to Jasper County, William and Martha Barron joined Liberty Baptist Church.  Liberty Church was organized in 1815 in the area of Jasper County that became a part of Newton County in 1821.  The congregation survived until 1851, at which time it had so few members that the church disbanded and the members joined what is now Carmel Baptist Church near Mansfield, Newton County, GA.  [Source: Liberty and Carmel Baptist Church records, Newton County, GA, located on microfilm, Drawer 74, Box 72, in the Georgia State Archives].

 

The August 1822 minutes of this church state that “Bro. William Barron [was] ordained a Deacon by laying on hands by Bro. Nickols and Montgomery.”  (This latter name refers to David Montgomery, a Revolutionary War veteran).  William Barron’s son-in-law, John Roquemore, was made a deacon in 1826.  While at Liberty, William Barron served several times as church moderator, on appointed committees and as messenger to the annual Baptist association meetings.    

 

Among the host of recognizable surnames of relatives, close associates, and/or former Wilkes County neighbors (such as Martin, Smith, Thompson, Doster, Roquemore, Hays, Reeves, Strickland, Garrett/Garrard, Hammock, Farr, and Spears) who appear on Liberty Church’s membership list, there is one particularly interesting name: Rachel Chaffin.  The minutes indicate that Rachel Chaffin joined Liberty in early 1824 and was dismissed by letter later that year.  Apparently, this Rachel Chaffin was Zechie Smith Chaffin, sister of Martha Smith Barron (see child #8).

 

In 1826, William and Martha’s son, Smith Barron, followed his father-in-law, James Reeves, west across the Ocmulgee River into newly-opened Butts County, GA.  Smith settled adjacent to James Reeves in the north of the county near present-day Fincherville.  On 21 April 1827, William Barron resigned his deaconship from Liberty Baptist Church in Newton County, perhaps in anticipation of following his son to Butts County.  Sometime later that year, sons Henry and John, joined their brother, Smith, in Butts, settling near Smith’s property in the gently rolling red lands outside what is now the county seat of Jackson.  Smith, Henry and John were all listed in the 1828 Butts County Tax List.

 

Though William purchased land in Butts in October 1827 (located farther south than that of his son Smith), it is debatable whether he actually settled there that year.  [Source: Butts County Deed Book B, p. 26: On 2 October 1827 (less than two weeks after William’s youngest son, John, married in Newton County), William Barron purchased 127.5 acres of lot 85 in Henry (now Butts) County; witnesses: John Barron, Susan Barron].  William and Martha may have delayed their move until after 8 May 1829, the date they were dismissed from Liberty Church in Newton County. 

 

When Joseph Barron joined his father, William, and brothers in Butts County in 1830, he chose to settle next to his brother, Smith.  Perhaps William and Martha had moved closer to their sons, as well.  Even though William still owned his property farther south, he was listed in the 1830 census adjacent to three of his four youngest sons -- Henry, Smith and Joseph (p. 167); John Barron was enumerated four pages later (p. 171).  William’s family consisted of only himself and Martha: 1 M 60-70 and 1 F 60-70 with no slaves. 

 

Later that year, tragedy struck the family when William and Martha’s youngest child, John, who was just twenty years old, died.  John left a widow, Susan, and perhaps the young daughter who was listed with the family in the 1830 census.

 

In 1833, William sold the 127.5 acres that he had purchased in 1827.  [Source: Butts County Deed Book C, p. 425: On 26 December 1833, John Eidson purchased the west side of lot 85 in Henry (now Butts) County].  John Davis Garrard (grandson of William Barron’s sister, Elizabeth Barron Garrard) wrote in the 1890s that “in his (William’s) old age he broke up and lived with his son, James and then his son Henry in Butts County, Georgia.”  There is some truth to Garrard’s claim, though the story appears to be more complex.

 

In January 1836, William Barron, wife Martha, and daughter-in-law Susan (widow of son John), joined newly-formed Carmel Baptist Church in Mansfield, Newton County, Georgia.  Church records indicate that the three brought letters from Mount Pleasant Baptist Church, a sister church in Newton County.  (Other members of Mount Pleasant included Hiram Garrard, William Barron’s nephew, and Elizabeth and Keziah Farr, who were sister and step-mother of Susan Farr Barron).  Their earlier membership at Mount Pleasant indicates that William, Martha and Susan may have returned to Newton County from Butts soon after the settlement of the estate of John Barron – possibly as early as 1834.    William and Martha remained in their old county for several years. 

 

On 10 March 1838, William authorized the Carmel church clerk to grant letters of dismission to him and Martha “if called for.”  On 13 October 1838, the church furnished the couple with letters.  Susan Barron (later Susan Peters) remained a member of the church until February 1848.

 

Perhaps William and Martha Barron moved near their eldest son, James, in spring 1838.  James already resided in Meriwether County, GA, in the 1830 census (p. 151).  By the 1840 census, William and Martha lived next door to James’ now-motherless family.  [Source: 1840 Meriwether County census, p. 100].  Again, there were just the two family members: William aged 70-80 and Martha also aged 70-80, with no slaves. 

 

But the records of Hephsibah Baptist Church, Troup County, GA, complicate the story.  Since the 1840 census enumerates William and Martha in Meriwether County, living adjacent the family of son James, it would be expected that William and Martha would have joined Fellowship Baptist Church, where James was a deacon.  Instead, we find that on 24 September 1838, William and Martha Barron joined Hephsibah Baptist Church in Troup County by letter.  Hephsibah was some miles away from son James’ home in Meriwether.  But it was the church of William and Martha’s sons, Joseph and Smith Barron.  William and Martha remained at Hephsibah for 2 ½ years, during which time William served on a few church committees.  On 22 May 1841, William and Martha were dismissed by letter.  [Source: Hephsibah Baptist Church minutes, Troup County Archives].  Did they then move back to Butts County? 

 

According to John Davis Garrard, William was living with Henry in Butts County when “he died in Nov., 1848, being 81 years and 5 or 6 months old...  I saw him frequently until I was near 21 years of age.  I was present at his death and burial.  Was the only one besides his wife who witnessed his death, as he died very suddenly, although complaining of hurting in his breast all the forepart of the day.  I had gone on a visit to see him from Newton County presuming that I would not have the opportunity to visit him any more.”  [Source: 18 August 1892 letter to J.D. Barron].  Garrard described William’s teeth in his old age as being “all perfect and as white clean and pretty as a child’s could be at three or four years of age.”  [Source: “The Barron Family of Warren County, Georgia, and Descendants”].  Mrs. Margaret Etheredge, a descendant of William’s son, Henry, wrote, “In 1848 he (William) died at the home of his son, Henry, who lived on Lot No. 169 near Old Bethel Church.  He is buried in a pasture on this lot.”  [Source: History of Butts County, Georgia, p. 287].  Martha Barron, age 80, was living with Henry’s family in the 1850 Butts County census listing (p. 353).

 

But, by November 1852, Martha Barron had returned to Newton County once again.  On the 13th of that month she rejoined Carmel Baptist Church, some fourteen years after leaving the church to move to western Georgia.  Martha’s daughter, Mary Barron Roquemore, and her husband John were now members at Carmel, following the consolidation of its congregation with that of Liberty Baptist Church.  The Roquemores had been long-time members of Liberty, and Liberty was the church William and Martha Barron had joined when they first arrived in what was then Jasper County in 1818.  Newton County seemed to continue to draw the Barrons back from their westward migrations.

 

Martha remained a member at Carmel for just over two years.  During that time she probably lived with the Roquemore family.  On Christmas day, 1854, daughter Mary Barron Roquemore died.  A few weeks later, on 15 January 1855, “Sister Patsy Barron” was dismissed from Carmel Church by letter.  At almost 85 years of age, she must have been moving to live with another of her children.  Martha has not been found in the 1860 census.  One family source states she died while living with Henry's family in 1855.

 

The children of William Barron and wife, Martha “Patty” Smith, were:

 

a.  James S. Barron, b. 29 November 1791, d. 18 January 1856 in Meriwether County, GA; m. (1) Mary Doss on 10 December 1812.  She was b. 5 April 1794, d. 5 December 1839.  He m. (2) Sarah H. Martin on 14 November 1841.  She was b. 12 June 1807, d. 12 April 1891.  All bur. in Barron Cemetery, Gay, Meriwether County, GA.  [Source: Birth and death dates from grave stones.  Family Bible gives James’ death date as 1856 (written over 1855).  Bible dated January 22, 1838].

 

b.  Thomas Barron, b. 27 October 1793, d. c. 1858 in Pike County, AL; m. Elizabeth Doss on 2 January 1817 in Putnam County, GA.  She d. 1861 in Pike County, AL.

 

c.  Mary Elizabeth (Polly) Barron, b. 10 June 1792 (Bible record) or 5 September 1796 (grave stone), d. 25 December 1854 in Newton County, GA; m. John Roquemore on 5 August 1813 in Putnam County, GA.  He was b. 7 May 1789, d. 10 June 1859.  Both are bur. in Carmel Cemetery, Mansfield, Newton County, GA,

 

d.  Henry Barron, b. 8 November 1801, d. 12 August 1880; m. (1) Elizabeth Strickland on 21 June 1821 in Jasper County, GA.  She was b. 30 December 1799, d. 13 December 1842.  He m. (2) Penelope Eidson on 19 November 1843.  She was b. 10 June 1809.

 

e.  Joseph Barron, b. October 1803, d. 27 July 1839 in Troup County, GA; m. Sarah Graham Hays on 1 August 1822 in Newton County, GA.  She was b. 8 November 1804 in SC, d. 1 November 1879 in Smith County, TX and was bur. in New Harmony Cemetery, Smith County, TX.

 

f.  Smith Barron, b. August 1805, d. c. 1868 in Pike County, AL; m. (1) Lucy N. Reeves on 6 April 1824 in Jasper County, GA.  She was b. c. 1805, d. 29 October 1846.  He m. (2) Sarah Graham Hays Barron (widow of his brother Joseph) in c. 1847, probably in Troup County, GA.  She was b. 8 November 1804 in SC, d. 1 November 1879 in Smith County, TX, and was bur. in New Harmony Cemetery, Smith County, TX.

 

g.  John Barron, b. 5 March 1810, d. about October 1830 in Butts County, GA; m. Susan Farr on 2 October 1827 in Newton County, GA.  They had at least one child (1830 Butts County census).  Susan Farr Barron later married John Peters in Newton County, GA, on 31 December 1839.  She was b. 30 September 1801 in GA, d. 21 September 1878.

 

*************************************

 

 

2.  John Smith, b. 1767/1769, d. 16 June 1827 in Jones County, GA.  He is believed to have m. (1) [Prudence ?] Barron, and probably m. (2) Nancy Simmons on 11 December 1811 in Putnam County, GA.  Nancy was b. c. 1790, d. after 1860.

 

John’s first wife is believed to have been a Barron, a daughter of William (?) and Prudence Davis Barron, based on several pieces of evidence.  First, in the LDS Ancestral File submitted by Elzyvee S. Judd [Box 1, Springdale, UT 84767], John Smith’s wife is identified as Prudence, surname unknown.  (See www.familysearch.com).  Evidently Ms. Judd was not aware of a possible Barron connection.  But since the given name Prudence is relatively uncommon generally -- but very common in the Davis family of Craven County, NC -- the possibility that John Smith’s wife might have been named Prudence does fit with the expected naming pattern in the family of Prudence Barron.

 

Further, John Smith named a daughter Prudence (called “Prudy” in his will), and two men who appear to be John’s sons, James and Basil Smith, named daughters Prudence or Pruda.  The Barron wife possibility is strengthened when one considers that, in addition to a child named Prudence, James had another child named Hiram Barron Smith.  William and Prudence Davis Barron had a grandson named Hiram Barron -- son of John and Elizabeth Garrard Barron.  (See Appendix II below for more information on the James and Basil Smith families).

 

Another indication that John Smith married a Barron wife is that, in 1796, he appears to be one of the legatees who signed off on selling the deceased Prudence Davis Barron’s personal and real estate:

 

[Deed Book QQ, p. 156] Prudence BARRON, late of Wilkes County, decd., did by her last will & testament appoint James WILLIS & Samuel BARRON, exors.  WILLIS & BARRON made a sale of the personal estate of Prudence BARRON & now about to make sale of the real estate.  We the undersigned indemnify the exors. for the sale already made & about to be made, 19 October 1796. (signed) Samuel BARRON for Nancy BARRON, Jacob GARRARD, John (X) SMITH, Polley BARRON. Test: R. B. WASHINGTON, A. LIPHAM, J.P. Rec 17 March 1798.

[Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Deed Books A-VV, 1784-1806, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1996, p. 529].

 

Note that all of the individuals who signed off to sell Prudence Barron’s personal and real estate have the surname of Barron, with the exception of Jacob Garrard (a proven son-in-law of Prudence) and John Smith (believed to be a son-in-law).  The above abstracted item appears in Wilkes County, GA, deed records.  Prudence Barron’s will is lost.

 

In addition, John Smith bought Prudence Barron’s land two years later:

 

[Deed Book RR, p. 293] 9 January 1798, Samuel BARRON to John SMITH, both of Wilkes County, for $200, 100 acres, part of tract granted to Prudence BARRON on Little River waters, on N. side of said land, lying in an exact square, adj. N. by MILLS & PORTER, E. by PORTER, S. & S.W. by BROOKS, W. by LIPHAM. (signed) Samuel BARRON. Wit: Wm. TRIPLETT, A. LIPHAM, J.P. Rec. 18 July 1799.

[Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Deed Books A-VV, 1784-1806, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1996, p. 595].

 

John Smith first appeared in Wilkes County, GA, tax records in 1790, paying one poll and listed next to James Smith.  Thus, assuming this was his first tax to pay, John’s birth could be estimated at c. 1769.  However, since the Wilkes County tax lists for 1788 and 1789 are missing, he could have been born as early as 1767.  John Smith appeared as Prudence Barron’s neighbor from 1794 through her death in 1796.  Tax records show that he continued to live in this Wilkes County neighborhood through 1800.  He apparently was a resident there as late as March 1801, at which time he and his brother-in-law, William Barron (see Martha Smith, child #1 above for more detail), sold the 216 acres in Oglethorpe County, GA, that had been given them by James Smith in 1796.  (See Appendix I below for full text of will).

 

John Smith appeared in the 1797 Wilkes County tax records with the following land (and no slaves).  Similar entries occur through 1800:

 

1797 - J - Capt. Samuel Wilkerson’s Dist.

Line 9 - John SMITH -- (1) 216 acres in Oglethorpe County on Indian Creek adj. M. Moore and orig. granted to Jas. Hart, and (2) 100 acres in Wilkes County on Little river adj. Lewis Willis, orig. granted to P. Barron.

[Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Tax Records, 1785-1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson].

 

In July 1801, John Smith sold the 100 acres he owned in Wilkes County that had originally been granted to Prudence Barron:

 

[Deed Book UU, p. 95] 27 July 1801, John SMITH to William PROCTER (PRAETOR), both of Wilkes County, for $200, 100 acres in Wilkes County on water of N. side of Little River, being part of a tract originally granted to Prudence BARRON, adj. BROOKE’s old line, Thomas PORTER, PORTER & MILES, MILES fence, Lewis WILLIS, BROOKE’s old line. (signed) John (x) SMITH. Wit: Patrick SHANNON, Lewis WILLIS. Received $500 (not $200 as in deed), 20 July 1801. 13 February 1802, proved by Lewis WILLIS before Thomas PORTER, J.P. Rec 2 January 1804.

[Source: Wilkes County, Georgia Deed Books A-VV, 1784-1806, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1996, p. 739].

 

On 5 June 1801 in Hancock County, GA, John Smith, William Barron, and David Collum (all brothers-in-law) were buyers at the estate sale of one Charles Waller.  (Note: This may just be coincidental, but Wallers appear in mid-1700s Craven County, NC, records as contemporaries of the Smith, Rice, Foster, Barron, and Davis families.  Also, this Charles Waller estate in Hancock County had as appraisers John Bond Sr., Gideon Bond, and William Brooks -- all of whom had ties to the Samuel Barron, son of Prudence Barron).  [Source: Hancock County, GA, Wills and Estates, Vol. AAAA, pp. 83-86]. 

 

John Smith purchased 100 acres on Island Creek in Hancock County from John Hammok on 6 November 1801.  [Source: Hancock County Deed Book I, pp. 4-5].  Both John Smith and William Barron were listed in the 1802 Hancock County tax returns as living in Captain Williams’ District (pp. 74 and 76).  The two men were again shown as living in proximity in Kinchins’ District on the 1804 Hancock County tax digest.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. III, 1804-1806, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, pp. 024 and 026 of the Hancock County Digest].

 

In 1807, John Smith and William Barron were listed in the Baldwin County, GA, tax returns under Stephens’ 2nd Land Lottery District (now Baldwin and Putnam Counties).  [Source: “The First Families of Baldwin, Morgan, and Putnam Counties, 1807,” contributed by Robert S. Davis Jr., Georgia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Fall 1994, Vol. 30, No. 3, p. 161].

 

It appears that John Smith sold a portion of his Hancock County property to John Garrard (the father of Jacob Garrard, who married William Barron’s sister, Elizabeth).  [Source: Hancock County Deed Book L, p. 439: 14 February 1810, John Smith to John Garrard, both of Jones County for $200, tract in Hancock on Big Island Creek, 64 acres.  Witnesses: James Sockwell, Robert McGough].

 

John Smith is probably the man of this name who married Nancy Simmons in Putnam County, GA, on 11 December 1811.  (Note: Putnam County marriage records also show the marriage of Bazzel (sic) Smith to Malinda Simmons on 8 April 1814.  Basil, as mentioned above, was likely the son of John Smith, and Melinda was a sister to Nancy Simmons).  There are a number of land transactions involving a John Smith in both Putnam and Jones Counties, but most have not yet been identified as the “right” John Smith.

 

However, there are several Jones County deeds that tie a John Smith to the Simmons family and to the Hammock family from whom our presumed John Smith purchased his property in Hancock County:  On 3 December 1813, Jeremiah Jackson of Baldwin County sold to John Smith 50 acres of lot 53 in the 6th district of Jones (originally Baldwin).  The land was described as adjacent Simmons, Williams and Hammack.  [Source: Jones County Deed Book F, p. 206].  On 20 January 1814, William Simmons sold to James Hammock, 50 acres (the south corner) of lot 53 in the 6th district.  [Source: Jones County Deed Book E, p. 232].

 

In Jones County’s tax records for 1816, John Smith was listed in Jefferson #358 District with near neighbors, William and Richard Simmonds (sic) and Hugh M. Comer.  The Comers had ties to the Barrons from the early part of the century in Hancock County.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. V, 1814-1817, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, pp. 024-027 of the Jones County Digest].

 

As would be expected with such a common name, there were several John Smiths living in Jones County in the 1820 Georgia census.  The most likely candidate for John Smith, son of James, is the man found on page 152 in Captain George’s District, though the age is not correct.  This man was shown as aged 26 to 45.  The son of James Smith would have been at least 51, having been listed on the Wilkes County tax records as early as 1790.  Near neighbors included such recognizable allied names as Samuel Barron (relationship to the William and Prudence Barron family as of now unknown), George Cabiness, Henry Lockett (p. 151), Wilie Barron and John Cabiness (p. 149), Joel Gammon, Benjamin Lamar (p. 148), and Anderson Comer (p. 143).  This John Smith had children whose ages match relatively well with what is known about the children of James Smith’s son, John: 2 M <10, 2 M 16-26 (of which one was 16-18), in addition to the M 26-45 (John, Sr.); 1 F <10 and 2 F 10-16 (Prudence, Nancy and Sarah), 1 F 16-26 (wife, Nancy) and 1 F > 45.  John owned five slaves.  It is known that two of John’s sons (Basil and James) were already married, and William may have been married, as well.  Other children may have been born later.

 

John Smith wrote his will on 18 March 1826 and died on 16 June 1827 [Source: Smith Bible (probably belonged to son Nathan Smith), transcribed in Bible Records, Vol. 4, Louisiana Genealogical and Historical Society: Be It Known and Remembered, 1966, pp. 40- 41.  Complete transcription of Smith Bible recorded in the Nathan Smith section of Appendix II].  The will was filed on 2 July 1827 in Jones County, GA.  He named his wife, Nancy.  He then identified his sons John Jr., Nathan, Willis, Joseph, Asa, Bassel, James, William, and Henry Smith, and daughters Prudy Smith, Nancy Cook and Sarah Gammon.  [Jones County Will Book A, pp 160-161].  The will indicates that John, Prudence, Nathan, Willis, Joseph, and Asa Smith were either underage or unmarried.  Another son, Henry, must have been mentally or physically impaired, as John Smith directed that “the balance of my property to be for the maintainance (sic) of my Son Henry during his natural life…”  (See Appendix II below for full text of John Smith’s will).

 

From the 1830 Jones County census listing for John’s widow, Nancy Smith (p. 431), and the 1840 listing for Nancy Garner (p. 122), it appears that one, possibly two, son(s) could have been born after the 1820 census.  In addition, a daughter, Cynthia (named in the suit referenced in the next paragraph), apparently was born after John Smith’s will was written.  In 1830, Nancy Smith’s family consisted of 1 M 5-10 (probably Asa), 1 M 10-15 (probably Joseph), 1 M 40-50, 1 F <5 (Cynthia), 1 F 40-50 and five slaves.  Neighbors included James Gunn (p. 433), son-in-law John B. Manning, John Gunn, Moses Gunn (p. 434), and Anderson Comer and Samuel Gammon (p. 437).

 

On 1 June 1833, the widow of John Smith, Nancy Smith, married John Garner.  Within a year, they had a son.  But, on 20 December 1835, Garner had abandoned his wife and son and moved to Jasper County.  [Source: Nancy Garner vs. John Garner, Libel for Divorce, dated 10 October 1836, filed in Jasper County, GA; original document in Georgia Archives].  On the same date as the Libel for Divorce, Nancy and the heirs of John Smith, Senior, who had not yet received their full inheritance filed a complaint against John Garner to prevent him from taking slaves and land (located in Jones County) that belonged to the John Smith estate and were in possession of Nancy Garner.  John Garner was arrested on 7 December 1836 and posted $8000 bond on 10 December to ensure his compliance.  [Source: John Smith et al vs. John Garner, Bill for Discovery, Jasper County Superior Court; original document in Georgia Archives].  The significance of the documents in this case is the snapshot provided of the family of John Smith, Senior, nine years after his death.  All children were named: John, William, Sarah (and husband Silas Gammon), Joseph, Asa and Cynthia were plaintiffs in the case; Joseph, Asa and Cynthia were identified as minors.  Bassell and James had received their inheritance through a gift of land and did not participate; nor did James, Nathan, Prudy (widow of John B. Manning) and Nancy (and husband William A. Cooke); these children had completed their inheritance by dividing money received from sale of a slave after John Smith’s death.  Willis and Henry had died, leaving no descendants, sometime after John Smith’s 1826 will was written.

 

Nancy Smith Garner’s family is listed in the 1840 Jones County census with 1 M 5-10 (John W. Garner), 1 M 15-20 (possibly Asa), 1 M 20-30 (possibly a farm laborer), 1 F 15-20 (Cynthia) and 1 F 50-60 (Nancy Garner), with 8 slaves.  On the same page is listed the young family of Joseph Smith, likely her son.

 

Nancy Garner, age 63, b. GA, is listed in the 1850 Jones County census, living with her youngest son John W., age 17, student. (p. 225).  The family of her son, Joseph Smith, is enumerated on p. 198. The rest of John Smith’s children appear to have moved away from Jones County to other counties in Georgia, as well as Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and the Republic of Texas.

 

In 1860, a Nancy Garner, age 87, b. GA, owning personal property valued at $2000, is found living with the family of John Stewart, age 37, miller, and Narcissa (Ross) Stewart, age 35, b. GA.  Though the age for this Nancy Garner does not coincide with ages given in previous censuses, it seems likely that this was the same Nancy Garner.  Her relationship with the Stewarts is unknown, but living next door was the family of her son, Joseph Smith.  [Source: Jones County, GA, census, pp. 521 and 522].  Nancy Garner, the Stewarts and the Smiths have not been identified in the 1870 census.

 

Below is a summary of John Smith’s children.  Note that it has not been confirmed which children were those of his first wife (nee [Prudence?] Barron) versus those from his apparent second marriage to Nancy (nee Simmons?).  However, it is believed that John, Nathan, Basil, James, William, Nancy, Sarah, Willis and Prudence were from John Smith’s first marriage.  The 1850 and 1860 censuses indicate that Prudence Smith was born in 1810.  If this John Smith did indeed marry Nancy Simmons in December 1811, his first wife, [Prudence?] Barron Smith apparently died sometime in 1810/1811, soon after the birth of daughter, Prudence. 

 

From the ages given for Joseph, Asa, and Cynthia in the case against John Garner, they were definitely children of his second marriage; it is likely that Henry was, as well.  (Additional information on some of the children is given in Appendix II below).

 

a.  Basil Smith, b. 1 August 1793, d. 21 November 1879 in Rapides Parish, LA; m. Melinda Simmons on 8 April 1814 in Putnam County, GA.

 

b.  James Smith, b. 26 March 1797 in GA, d. 30 March 1880 in Lafayette County, MS; m. Martha Sarah Pool on 30 March 1819 in Jones County, GA.

 

c.  William Smith

 

d.  Sarah “Sally” Smith, b. c. 1800 in GA, d. before 1867 in Smith County, TX; m. Silas Gammon on 12 October 1820 in Jones County, GA.

 

e.  Nancy Smith, b. 28 February 1802 in GA, d. 1869 in Walker County, TX; m. William Alston Cook in c. 1819 in GA. 

 

f.  John Smith Jr.  Possibly the John Smith who m. Nancy Bridges on 20 April 1826 in Jones County, GA.

 

g.  Nathan Smith, b. 1 July 1807 in GA, d. 19 May 1885 in Claiborne Parish, LA; m. Levinia (Loveina) --?-- on 13 November 1828 in GA.   

 

h.  Willis Smith, d. 1827/1836 with no descendants.

 

i.  Prudence “Prudy” Smith, b. c. 1810 d. 29 July 1868 in Claiborne Parish, LA; m. (1) John B. Manning on 4 December 1827 in Jones County, GA; m. (2) John E. W. King on 23 April 1840 in Troup County, GA.

 

j.  Joseph Smith.  Likely the Joseph Smith who m. (1) unknown; m. (2) Nancy Cleland on 24 October 1844 in Jones County, GA. 

 

k.  Henry Smith, d. 1827/1836 with no descendants.

 

l.  Asa Smith, possibly b. c. 1822/1824 (?), m. Martha --?--.

 

m.  Cynthia Smith, b. c. 1826.

 

**********************************

 

 

3.  Nathan Smith, b. 9 March 1750/1751, d. 30 April 1816; m. Sarah “Sally” Foster (daughter of William and Phoebe/Phebe Foster, and granddaughter of William Shepherd Foster) c. 1782.  She was b. 13 December 1765, d. 4 April 1820 in Wilkes County, GA.  The Fosters and James Smith (father of Nathan) all were residents of Craven County, NC, prior to moving to Wilkes County, GA.  (See Appendix III for discussion of the Foster family). 

 

A Nathan Smith is listed as a Revolutionary War soldier who fought at the Battle of Kettle Creek in 1779.  [Source: Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia, by Mrs. Howard H. McCall, 1968, p. 249].  Also, in 1784, a Nathan Smith petitioned for 575 acres of bounty land.  This acreage indicates he was applying on the basis of service as a soldier.  [Source: Georgia’s Revolutionary Bounty Land Records, 1783-1785, by Nicole M. O’Kelley and Mary Bondurant Warrant, 1992, p. 115].  Whether this is the Nathan who was the son of James Smith is not known. 

 

However, it is likely that the Nathan Smith who applied for two certificates of 250 acres each was James’ son.  This quantity of 250 acres was the amount of bounty land reserved for citizens as a reward for not plundering or distressing the country.  [Source: “Georgia Bounty Land Grants,” by Alex M. Hitz, http://www.sos.state.ga.us/archives/rs/gblg.htm].  Certificate numbers 808 and 1043 for Nathan Smith and 809 and 1044 for William Foster (Smith’s father-in-law) for 250 acres each were taken up by Benjamin Catching.  [Source: Georgia’s Revolutionary Bounty Land Records, 1783-1785, by Nicole M. O’Kelley and Mary Bondurant Warrant, 1992, pp. 37 and 44].

 

Apparently, there were at least two Nathan Smiths living in Wilkes County, GA, during the early 1790s through the early 1800s.  Both owned land near Beaverdam Creek in the vicinity of James Smith, father of one of the Nathans.  Only by charting the two men through the various tax digests (published by Frank Parker Hudson) and by comparing neighbors and land acreage, grantees, and land descriptions in Wilkes County deeds can these two men be distinguished.  

 

In 1792, Nathan Smith of Rowan County, NC, purchased 150 acres of land from Jacob Autry.  This Nathan Smith was listed in 1792 and subsequent tax years through 1801 as owning 150 acres of property in the same area of Wilkes County.  In the tax records, this property is located near the headwaters of Beaverdam Creek, which Frank Parker Hudson labels tax district “K” or “M.”  In 1801, Nathan Smith Sr. sold the land to (his son?) Nathan Jr.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Deed Books A-VV, 1784-1806, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1996, pp. 176 and 747].

 

The other Nathan Smith was the son of James Smith.  This is probably the Nathan Smith who owned no property in the 1785 tax listing, living near both Jacob Autrey (sic) and William Foster.  In 1789, he purchased 200 acres from his father-in-law, William Foster.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Deed Books A-VV, 1784-1806, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1996, p. 154: Wilkes County Deed Book GG, p. 215].  However, he is listed as paying taxes on this land as early as 1786 and is listed as owning the property through 1805, the latest digest published.  Beginning in 1792, more detailed information was provided on the Wilkes tax list, and Nathan Smith’s 200 acres were described as located adjacent James Smith.  Nathan owned no slaves.  Two published tax lists for later years record only this Nathan Smith in Wilkes County.  In 1809, Nathan Smith is listed on the same page as his son Elbert, with son-in-law, Charles Philips (sic), on the following page.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. IV, 1809-1811, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, pp. 096 and 097 of the Wilkes County Digest].  In 1816, Nathan and Elbert Smith are again found on the same tax page, with son-in-law, Leonard Chaffin, living nearby.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. V, 1814-1817, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, pp. 126 and 121 of the Wilkes County Digest].

 

The property of this Nathan Smith was situated in the tax district listed by Frank Parker Hudson as “N,” which was located on Kettle and Beaverdam Creeks.  In 1798, he bought an additional 100 acres from William Foster’s nephew, William Shepherd Foster.  The land was described as being granted to William Foster and formerly held by Drury Brazeal, James Smith, Nathan Smith, and Charles Phillips.  (Charles Phillips Jr. married Nathan’s daughter).  Nathan Smith made a gift of this property to his son, Elbert, in 1805.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Deed Books A-VV 1784-1806, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1996, pp. 556 and 813.  See deed from William Shepherd Foster to Nathan Smith in Deed Book RR, p. 73, and deed from John and Sarah Rice, same book, p. 75.  Also, Nathan Smith to Elbert Smith in Deed Book VV, p. 358].

 

Evidently, Nathan Smith was the only child of James Smith to remain in Wilkes County, GA, where he left a will dated 20 April 1814 and probated 1 July 1816.  His wife, Sally, son, Elbert, and son-in-law, James Dorough, were named executors.  The estate records named the legatees of Nathan Smith.  [Source: Early Records of Georgia, Vol. I, by Grace Gilliam Davidson, pp. 99 and 197; also Vol. II, p. 293].  The descendants of this Nathan Smith and wife, Sarah Foster, have been extensively researched (and recently published) by Art Seder of Virginia and Florida.

 

The children of Nathan Smith and wife, Sarah Foster, all born in Wilkes County, GA, were:

 

a.  Elbert Smith, b. 4 April 1783, d. 10 July 1837 in Wilkes County, GA; m. Elizabeth Lybas in c. 1802.  She was the daughter of William Lybas, who emigrated to Georgia from Rockingham County, NC.  In the 1830 Wilkes County census, Elbert owned 18 slaves.

 

b.  Elizabeth Smith, b. c. 1785; m. James Dorough.

 

c.  Sally Smith, b. 1784, d. 1815 in Wilkes County, GA; m. Charles Phillips Jr., c. 1804.

 

d.  Mary “Polly” Smith, b. 1790; m. Leonard Chaffin on 23 January 1812.

 

e.  Phebe (Phoebe) Smith, b. 1800; m. Robert Moss on 4 February 1819.

 

f.  Nathan Foster Smith, b. 1800, d. December 1866 in Pulaski County, AR; m. Catherine Evans in 1827 in Newton County, GA.

 

g.  William B. Smith, b. 1802; m. (1) Elizabeth --?--; m. (2) Mary Snider (Snyder).

 

h.  James B. Smith, b. 1803; m. Barbary Nash on 13 December 1827 in Wilkes County, GA .

 

Some of this couple’s children resided in Newton County, GA, in the same time frame as descendants of Nathan’s siblings, indicating a continuing closeness of the extended family.

 

********************************

 

 

4.  Mary Smith, b. c. 1760, d. probably 1810/1815 in Claiborne County, MS; m. Dempsey White.  He was b. c. 1760, d. 1823 in Warren County, MS.

 

James Smith identified his daughter, Mary White, in his 1797 will, indicating that she was already married.  On 16 March 1801, Demsey (sic) White was among the heirs listed as receiving a share of James Smith’s estate.  (See Appendix I for will transcript and summary of estate records). 

 

Records for Dempsey White in Georgia are sparse.  In 1784, Dempsey White petitioned for bounty land for Revolutionary War service as a private in the Georgia State Legion.  He requested land in Washington County.  However, the bounty was not granted as his war service could not be proven.  [Source: Georgia’s Roster of the Revolution, by Lucien Lamar Knight, 1920, pp. 189 and 403].  Original documents housed in the Georgia Archives include a certification of Jas Jackson “late Lt Col G L Legion” dated 26 March 1784 “that Dempsey White served under me from the fall of Augusta to the evacuation of Savannah as a good and faithfull (sic) citizen.”  A second is “Demsy” White’s petition for 287 ½ acres of bounty land in Washington County.

 

Dempsey White appeared in Wilkes County, GA, tax returns in only one year -- 1785 -- at which time he paid taxes on 100 acres of land located in Capt. Thompson’s Militia District in Wilkes County; he owned no slaves.  This district was placed into Greene and Washington Counties in 1786.  (See Sarah Smith, child #5, for more information about the district).  Other Whites paying taxes in this militia district were James White (1 poll only) and William White (200 acres).  Perhaps this land was a portion of the 150 acres authorized to be laid out for “Demsey” White by Benj Catching CWC of the Court of Justices of the county of Wilkes on 1 August 1785.  [Source: original document Headright/Bounty file in Georgia Archives.]

 

From a 1998 post on GenForum appears the following (contact has not been made with the submitter although several attempts have been made):

“Looking for info on ancestors and descendants of Demsey White, from Wilkes Cty GA to Miss in 1795 w/son Reuben.  Reuben's son

Nathan S. was b. 1811 and m. Narcissa Ann Gayden.  The family later moved to Houston, TX. Dave Dixon <dixoneast@aol.com>"

 

If indeed Dempsey and Mary Smith White moved to Mississippi Territory in 1795, then they must have been living elsewhere besides Wilkes County, GA, from 1786 through 1794, as Dempsey White did not appear in Wilkes County tax records for that time period.

 

Only two other mentions of Dempsey White have been found between 1785 and James Smith’s will dated 1797.  In 1787, 150 acres were granted to Dempsey White in Wilkes County.  [Source: Index to the Headright and Bounty Grants of Georgia, 1756-1909, by Silas Emmett Lucas Jr., 1970, p. 702: Grant Book OOO, p. 188].  Reuben, Daniel, John, and William White also received grants in Wilkes County in 1787.

 

Additionally, a 1793 militia muster roll for Washington County included “Damey” White and Reuben White in District 5, Second Battalion, Second Regiment.  [Source: Records of Washington, County, Georgia, Marie De Lamar and Elisabeth Rothstein, 1985, p. 97].  It is assumed that “Damey” White was Dempsey White.  The possibility that Dempsey White lived in Washington County, along with brother-in-law, William Thompson, is strengthened by several pieces of evidence placing William Thompson in Washington County between 1789 and 1798.  (See Sarah Smith, child #5 below for detail).

 

Sometime between 1793 and 1798, Dempsey White moved his family to the Natchez District of the Mississippi Territory.  His brother-in-law William Thompson may have moved his family at the same time.

 

Returns for James Smith’s estate in March 1803 included receipts in November 1802 of “Wm Thompson for himself and Demcy [sic] White.”  It is possible that Thompson may have acted on behalf of Dempsey White since White (and possibly Thompson) had moved from the area.

 

On 30 March 1798, 640 acres on Bayou Pierre were patented for Demsey (sic) White in the northern part of the Natchez District that later became Claiborne and Warren Counties, MS.  [Source: First Settlers of the Mississippi Territory, by Frances Terry Ingmire and Carolyn Reeves Ericson, 1982, p. 85, Certificates entered with Register of Land Office for District West of Pearl River, September 1806: Cert. 30 recorded Vol. 4, p. 31].  Notation was made that the patent was derived by occupancy, inferring that White lived on the property prior to 1798. 

 

On the same date, 640 acres were patented to both Joseph and Thomas White, also derived by occupancy and situated on Bayou Pierre.  And on 13 September 1794, Thomas White was patented 400f (probably f equals arpents: a French land unit equal to about 0.85 acre) on Bayou Pierre.  Finally, 100 acres were registered in September 1806 for Reuben White on Bayou Pierre, but no patent date was given.  However, one claim stated that Ralph Humphreys purchased land on Bayou Pierre from Reuben White in about 1789.  [Source: First Settlers of the Mississippi Territory, by Frances Terry Ingmire and Carolyn Reeves Ericson, 1982, pp. 26, 89, 90, 93, and 95].  Records indicate that Thomas White Sr. moved with his family from North Carolina to Mississippi by 1793.  His sons included Thomas Jr., Joseph, Benjamin and Reuben White.  [Sources: Mississippi Court Records, 1799-1835, by J. Estelle Stewart King, 1936, 1969, pp. 72 and 76; also The Order of the First Families of Mississippi, 1699-1817, Charles Owen Johnson, 1981, p. 85].  However, Thomas White’s son, Reuben, had apparently died prior to 1806 and another Reuben (son of James and Jerusha White) had moved to Louisiana.  [Source: Research of Nancy Royce, Dickinson, TX, April 2001, e-mail correspondence, nanc@lsfm.org].  So could this Reuben White living on Bayou Pierre have been the brother or son of Dempsey White?  At this time it is not known how Thomas White’s family was related to Dempsey White.

 

It appears that Dempsey White lived near Reuben White and Ralph Humphreys.  In 1804, Ralph’s son, George W. Humphreys, claimed land on Bayou Pierre, adjoining Henry Green and Llewellyn Price, by right of his father’s occupancy.  The claim was contested, supported by a deed from Samuel or James (both names cited in document) Davenport to William Thompson, dated 1 December 1797, and witnessed by Dempsey White.  In order to be available as witness, White would likely have lived nearby.  [Source: The Natchez Court Records, 1767-1805, Abstracts of Early Records, The May Wilson McBee Collection, Vol. 2, 1953, p. 553: Claim #1455].  In addition, in February 1804, Dempsey White, George W. Humphreys, and Llewellen Price served together on a jury in Claiborne County.  [Source: Mississippi Court Records, from the May Wilson McBee Papers, 1958, p. 34].  And William Thompson, JP, married three possible children of Dempsey White in 1800 and 1801: Ann White to Samuel Goodwin, Elizabeth White to Noah Blackwell, and Robert White to Phillepina Hamberlin.  (See Appendix IV below for detail).

This William Thompson who purchased land from Davenport and served as a justice of the peace in the Natchez District may have been the husband of Sarah Smith, sister of Dempsey White’s wife, Mary Smith.  (See child #5 below for more detailed discussion).

 

In addition to Humphreys, Price, Davenport, and Thompson, other near neighbors were identified in an unrecorded land claim for 172 acres on Bayou Pierre by George Cochran on 29 March 1804.  The land plat showed Hezekiah Harman (sic), Christopher Braxton, and Dempsey White as owning adjoining land.  [Source: The Natchez Court Records, 1767-1805, Abstracts of Early Records, The May Wilson McBee Collection, Vol. 2, 1953, p. 559: Claim #1536].  Hezekiah Harmon’s property was described as being located on the south bank of Bayou Pierre, two leagues from its mouth, 40 miles north of Fort Panmure (also known as Natchez).  [Source: The Natchez Court Records, 1767-1805, Abstracts of Early Records, The May Wilson McBee Collection, Vol. 2, 1953, p. 367].

 

Extant Claiborne County, MS, tax and census records list Dempsey White from 1805 through at least 1816. By 1818, he no longer appears on the tax roll.  (And the 1820 census shows him in nearby Warren County).  Many of the tax records are enumerated in alphabetical order, which give no clue as to who his neighbors were.  However, the 1807 roll seems to list individuals by proximity.  Over three consecutive pages are found many of the expected neighbors of Dempsey White: first page – Sarah Thompson (probably William Thompson’s widow); second page – Shadrick and James Foster (sons of William Foster, a neighbor of White’s from Georgia), Hezekiah Harman, Josiah Flowers (who performed several White marriages); third page – Dempsey White, Reuben White, Noah Blackwell (husband of Elizabeth White, who was likely Dempsey’s daughter).  Other Whites (relationship unknown) were listed several pages farther down.

 

The 1810 tax list is equally interesting.  On the same page we find Hezekiah Harmon, Shem Thomson, James Devenport.  Skip a page, then are recorded Josiah Flowers and Spencer, James and Shedrick Foster.  On the next page are listed Gibson Foster and George W. Humphreys.  Skip a page, then are listed James Hermon, Levi Thomson, Sarah Thomson.  Next page: Waterman Crane, Robert Cochran.  Next page: William Foster and Noah Blackwell.  Next page Reuben and Dempsey White.

 

In 1810, the Dempsey White family was listed in the Claiborne County, MS, census with 1 M > 21, 3 Ms < 21, 1 F > 21, 2 Fs < 21 and no slaves.  Enumerated on the same page were Reuben White and Noah Blackwell.  [Source: research of Nancy Royce].  Living in the same county was Thomas White (Jr.), with several men who were apparently related.  [Sources: Mississippi Court Records, 1799-1835, by J. Estelle Stewart King, 1936, 1969, pp. 72 and 76; also The Order of the First Families of Mississippi, 1699-1817, Charles Owen Johnson, 1981, p. 85]. 

 

In an indenture dated 18 Apr 1812, Dempsey White “of Claiborne County” deeded to Noah Blackwell of same 230 acres, “part of a tract whereon I now reside,” containing 640 acres, witnessed by Reuben White.  [Source: Claiborne County Deed Book E, p.180].  This 640-acre tract was probably the land patent Dempsey White received in 1798.  And in the 1816 MS tax digest, Dempsey was recorded in Claiborne County on the same page as Samuel Goodwin, husband of Ann White (likely Dempsey’s daughter).  Reuben White and several of Thomas White Jr.’s sons were also living in Claiborne County.  [Sources: research of Nancy Royce; also Early Inhabitants of the Natchez District (MS), by Norman E. Gillis, 1963, p. 112]. 

 

If the female aged over 21 enumerated in Dempsey White’s family in the 1810 census was his wife, Mary Smith, she apparently died in the following years.  Two records indicate that by 1815 Dempsey White married Hannah Fake.  On 13 November 1815, Dempsey White was appointed guardian of George Fake, “an infant under 14 years.”  [Source: Claiborne County Records of Orphans Court 1805-1819]. 

 

In an indenture dated 21 December 1816, Dempsey White and Hannah, his wife, of Claiborne County, and Thomas Fake and Zilpha, his wife, and Christian Hackler and Elizabeth, his wife, of Jefferson County sold to Isac (sic) Perkins of Adams County 178 acres on the waters of the north fork of Coles Creek in Jefferson County, part of 500 arpents granted by the Spanish Government of Louisiana to Martin Hestler now deceased, being the same tract conveyed by Christian Hackler and others to John Fake now deceased.  The following exception applied: “George Fake an infant under 20 years is an heir at law of his father, said John Fake deceased, entitled to a child's part undivided in said tract of 178 acres, which said part is not intended to be conveyed by these indentures.”  [Source: Jefferson County, MS, Deed Book A1, p. 204].

 

From these records, it appears that Hannah was either the widow of John Fake (and mother of George, who became ward of her new husband, Dempsey White) or a daughter (with siblings: George, Thomas and Elizabeth Fake). 

 

Josiah Flowers, who had married a sister (Abial) of Hezekiah Harmon (neighbor of Dempsey White as early as 1804), performed the marriages of Phebe White to Joseph Powell in 1816, and Celia White to Edward Cook in 1817.  (It should also be noted that Dempsey White’s son, Nathan married one of Hezekiah Harmon’s daughters, Rebecca.  Another son, Reuben, married the daughter of another of Hezekiah Harmon’s sisters, Lovina Harmon Tabor).  [Source: The Order of the First Families of Mississippi, 1699-1817, Charles Owen Johnson, 1981, p. 35].

 

Dempsey White moved from Claiborne to neighboring Warren County, MS, sometime between 1816 and 1818.  In the 1820 census, Dempsey was enumerated in Warren County.  His family included 1 M 16-18, 2 Ms 18-26, 1 M >45 and 1 F >45, with 1 slave.  Two persons were employed in agriculture.  [Source: 1820 Warren County census, p. 124].  Nearby, lived three other men related to Dempsey’s family: son, Nathan White; likely sons-in-law, Edward Cook and Joseph Powell; and Felix Thompson, ward of Reuben White.  [Sources: 1820 Warren County census, pp. 119, 122 and 124; also Claiborne County Records of Orphans Court, 1805-1819.]  Reuben White and several of Dempsey White’s likely sons-in-law, Samuel Goodwin and Noah Blackwell, continued to live in Claiborne County near sons of Thomas White Jr.  [Source: 1820 Claiborne County, MS, census, pp. 4, 5, 7, and 9]. 

 

Also, of interest, was a set of men named Dempsey, Monty, and Reuben White listed in the 1820 Lawrence County, MS, census (pp. 61, 64, and 75).  Lawrence County is located some 100 miles southeast of Warren County.  In these families, both Dempsey and Reuben were aged 26 to 45 years old.  These men may have been related to the elder Dempsey White in Warren County.

 

There is a will filed in Warren County for a Demsey (sic) White, dated 21 April 1823, identifying property to go to wife, Hannah, with remainder of property to be divided between sons and daughters (not named).  Son, Nathan White, and likely son-in-law Edward Cook were named executors, John Labdell and likely son-in-law Joseph Powell, security.  Cook refused executorship.  [Sources: Mississippi Court Records, 1799-1835, by J. Estelle Stewart King, 1936, 1969, p. 129; also Warren County, MS, Wills and Bonds 1823-1827, p. 6]. 

 

A Nathan White and Foster Cook were bondsmen for the estate of William White in 1822.  Reuben White was estate administrator.  [Source: Mississippi Court Records, 1799-1835, by J. Estelle Stewart King, 1936, 1969, p. 134].  This Nathan White may have been Dempsey’s son, and it is possible that William White may have been Dempsey White’s brother (who lived nearby in 1785 Wilkes County, GA), but the relationship of the other two men to Dempsey White is undetermined.

 

There are no listings for the name Dempsey White in the 1830 Mississippi census index.

 

It has not been proven that the Dempsey White of Claiborne and Warren Counties, MS, was the man who married Mary Smith of Wilkes County, GA.  If this is the correct Dempsey White, Dempsey remarried after Mary’s death.  It is noteworthy that William Foster was formerly a neighbor of the Dempsey White in Wilkes County, GA, (and of Mary Smith’s father, James).  Foster’s daughters, Sarah and Polly, married Mary Smith White’s brothers, Nathan and Joseph Smith. (See Appendix III for details on the Foster connection).  Foster’s family moved Claiborne County, Ms, once again becoming neighbor to the Dempsey White there.  Also in the vicinity was David Collum, who married Mary Smith White’s sister, Elizabeth (see child #9 below).   And it is likely that the William Thompson who lived on Bayou Pierre in Claiborne County may have been the man who married Sarah Smith, sister of Mary Smith, wife of Dempsey White.  More research is needed on this family.

 

A partial list of likely children of this Dempsey White (and possibly Mary Smith) was created during the research of Nancy Royce and shared for use in this article (see Appendix IV for more detail):

 

a.  Elizabeth White, b. 1777/1780; m. Noah Blackwell on 2 October 1800.  Marriage performed by William Thompson, JP.

 

b.  Reuben White, b. 1777/1780, d. 1831; m. Nancy Tabor.

 

c.  Ann White, b. c. 1780; m. Samuel Goodwin on 25 June 1800 in Pickering County, MS (later Claiborne, then Jefferson County).  Marriage performed by William Thompson, JP.

 

d.  Robert White, b. before 1784; m. Phillepina Hamberlin on 6 December 1801.  Marriage performed by William Thompson, JP.

 

e.  Nathan White, b. 26 Aug 1792, d. 30 May 1835 in Yazoo County, MS; m. Rebecca Harmon.

 

f.  Phebe White, b. c. 1797; m. Joseph Powell on 26 December 1816 in Claiborne County, MS.  Marriage performed by Josiah Flowers.

 

g.  Celia White, b. 1795/1800; m. Edward Cook on 9 January 1817 in Claiborne County, MS.  Marriage performed by Josiah Flowers, bond by Edward Cook and Reuben White.

 

Bettye Green’s research added two children to this list: Margaret White, who married Elisha Flowers, and Lavina White, who married Moses Jones on 11 Oct 1827 in Claiborne County, MS by Levi Thompson.  Elisha Flowers’ name is linked to the White and allied families in the 1810s and 1820s, indicating a close relationship.  But additional evidence is required to determine whether he did indeed marry a daughter of Dempsey White.  Nothing more has been found about Lavina White and Moses Jones to corroborate Bettye Green’s research.

 

A letter written by Morris E. White (at age 93, from Tampa, Florida) to Gifford White on 27 September1984 indicated that there may have been another son named Dempsey: “Demsey and his oldest son, Rueben, were living in Wilkes County, Georgia in 1785.  About 1795 they came to Claiborne County, Mississippi.  There is a

family rumor that Demsey White has a son, who was also named Demsey, but who went to Kentucky and became quite wealthy, leaving many descendants.” However, documentary evidence regarding this Dempsey White is lacking.   

 

A separate list of children posted by James H. Sutton, Jr., (jayhsutton@aol.com) on Ancestry.com

(http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1179340&id=I55321325) does not include Elizabeth, Ann, Robert or Celia, but does include others.  Mr. Sutton identifies the following children of Dempsey White: Reuben, Charlotte, Nicholas, Harrison, Dempsey, Nathan, Phoebe, Margaret, Rachel, but attributes them to another wife, Eliza Bainbridge.  Mary Smith is named as his second wife and Hannah -- ?? -- as his third, with mention that the last two wives had five children (unnamed) between them.  Mr. Sutton advises that his information came from a relative who wrote the family line on a large piece of wallpaper many years ago.  He has no corroborating data.  So, though the information may be valid, it needs thorough investigation

 

*************************************

 

  

5.  Sarah Smith, b.probably before 1765, d. unknown; m. William Thompson.  He was b. probably before 1765.

 

Sarah Smith was married to William Thompson by 1797, based on her father’s will and estate returns.  There were many William Thompsons listed in the Wilkes County, GA, tax records between 1785 and 1797.  Some research has been done to determine which of these men was most likely to have married Sarah Smith.  The most promising candidate appears to be the William Thompson listed in Captain Thompson’s District of the 1785 Wilkes County tax digest, identified by Frank Parker Hudson as QQ District.  This William Thompson owned 700 acres in Wilkes County and 575 acres in Greene, likely a Revolutionary bounty land grant, with no slaves.  Nearby lived Demsey (sic) White (who married James Smith’s daughter, Mary), William White, Benjamin Thompson (whose daughter, Susannah, married Jacob Smith), Jesse Tomson (sic) (a son of Benjamin Thompson), Elizabeth Thompson, and James Beasley.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia Tax Records, 1785 - 1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson].  So it is quite possible that this William Thompson was the son of Benjamin Thompson. 

 

District QQ was located west of the Ogeechee River and below its south fork.  It was placed into Greene and Washington Counties, GA, in 1786.  Most of William Thompson’s neighbors were found in the 1789 Greene County tax list.  But Thompson, Dempsey White, and James Beasley were not in Greene.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. I, 1789-1799, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, Greene County Digest].  This could indicate that the men lived in a portion of Wilkes that was placed into Washington County.  However, little information is available for Washington County. 

 

It appears that several William Thompsons applied for land bounties following the Revolutionary War.  It is not possible to discern with certainty whether any of these applications came from the William Thompson identified above.  However, there is one interesting application for 575 acres of land in Washington County by a William Thompson as a refugee soldier.  The certificate was signed by Colonel James Jackson of the Georgia State Legion on 6 April 1784.  [Source: Georgia’s Roster of the Revolution, by Lucien Lamar Knight, 1920, p. 170].  This militia group was not often listed in bounty applications, but it was the same group named on Dempsey White’s application.

 

There are several original documents in the Headright/Bounty file of the Georgia Archives from the courts of justices of Wilkes and Greene counties, authorizing surveyors to lay out tracts of land for “William Thompson.”  Note that these grants could have gone to any of the men of this name living in Wilkes County in the 1780s.  However, three of these documents are of special interest: (1) a grant of 200 acres in Wilkes County “in the crook of the Beaverdam (crossed out: on the south fork of Little River) above the station including a mill seat;” signed by Sanders Walker CLC of the Court of Justices of the County of Wilkes, dated 5 August 1783.  This document places a William Thompson in the vicinity of the James Smith family.  (2) a grant of 200 acres in Wilkes County “on the waters of Ogeechee, in lieu of an old warrant of Wm White;” signed Sanders Walker C.W.C. on 10 August 1784.  Recall that the 1785 Wilkes County Tax Records listed the William Thompson who mostly likely married Sarah Smith living in District QQ near the Ogeechee River (as was William White).  (3) a grant of 500 acres to Benjamin Thompson in Greene County, “in lieu of part of an old warrant of 575 acres in the name of William Thompson on Bounty;” signed by Matt. Rabun, A.J, Test Hen. Graybill C.G.C. on 7 May 1787.  This document relates a William Thompson to Benjamin Thompson and mentions an old land grant to William Thompson of 575 acres.  William Thompson of 1785 Wilkes County Tax District QQ owned 575 acres in Greene County.

 

Both this last identified old land grant of 575 acres to William Thompson and the application by William Thompson for 575 acres in Washington County mentioned in a previous paragraph may refer to land actually granted to William Thompson in Washington County on 14 August 1784 and platted in Surveyor Plat Book A.  [Source: Washington County, Georgia, Surveyor’s Plat Book A – 1784, by Clifford S. Dwyer, 1985, p. 249.]  The plat shows the tract to be located on Rocky Fork and Hays (Creek), bounded on the east by Benjamin Thompson, all other sides vacant.  Benjamin Thompson was surveyor.  On the immediate preceding page are shown the surveyed lands of Benjamin Thompson and likely sons Zachy. and James.  The 575 acres in Washington in 1784 are probably the 575 acres listed in the 1785 Wilkes County tax digest as the property (due to changing county boundaries in Greene) of William Thompson of District QQ – the man most likely to have married Sarah Smith.

 

The William Thompson in Captain Thompson’s District in 1785 Wilkes County may be the man in the following two deeds:

 

5 August 1789, William Thompson and Sarah, his wife, of Washington County to Daniel Bankston of same, 234 acres in Greene Co., bounded NE by Ogeechee River, S by James Beasley and Joel Banckston, NW by James Runer?  Granted 1 May 1789.  Wit: Barton Hannon, Proved before Benj. Thompson JP.  Rec. 8 July 1793.  Greene County, GA, Deed Book B, p. 15.

[Source: Georgia Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 92, p. 102].

 

This deed is of particular interest for several reasons.  Thompson’s wife was named Sarah, though there is no proof that she was Sarah Smith.  The land was bounded by James Beasley, who was a neighbor of William Thompson in Captain Thompson’s District in Wilkes County, 1785.  Also, the deed was witnessed by Benjamin Thompson, JP.

 

A second deed seems to refer to the same William and Sarah Thompson:

 

[pp. 78-80:] 22 October 1791, William Thompson of Washington Co., GA to Joseph Howell of Burke Co., GA for sum of 150 pounds current money for a tract of land in Washington Co., GA on Ogech--(sic) River, containing 200 acres being grant (sic) to said Thompson dated 24th September 1784. Wit: Joseph Howell, Junr. and Jonathan Drake. This is to certify that I have examined Sarah, wife to the within mentioned William Thompson. This day of October 1791. Reg: 17 July 1798.

[Source: Land Deed Genealogy of Hancock County, Georgia, by Helen & Tim Marsh, p. 142].

Most early Washington County records were lost, and this couple has not been further identified.  However, there is a William Thompson listed as a tax defaulter in Washington County in 1798.  [Source: Records of Washington County, Georgia, by Marie De Lamar and Elisabeth Rothstein, 1985, p. 133].  Perhaps this William Thompson had moved out of the county before 1798.

 

At this time, there are two credible theories on what happened to William and Sarah Smith Thompson.  The first, and most likely, is that the Thompsons moved to Claiborne County, MS, near where Dempsey White settled.  This theory is presented in the paragraphs immediately following.  The second theory, discussed below in Appendix V, is that the Thompsons remained in Georgia and migrated in a similar pattern as the Barron, Chaffin, and Joseph Smith families, settling in the area of Jasper/Newton/Walton Counties.

 

The first theory is supported by the following data:

On 30 March 1798, in the part of the Natchez District which later became Claiborne County, MS, a William Thompson was patented 640 acres on Bayou Pierre (the same location and the same day as Dempsey White's patent; see Mary Smith, child #4, above for additional detail).  [Source: First Settlers of the Mississippi Territory, by Frances Terry Ingmire and Carolyn Reeves Ericson, 1982, p. 87: Certificate 93 recorded Vol. 4, p. 98].  In 1802, George W. Humphreys gave a quit claim to James Davenport on 280 acres, “on which William Thompson now resides.”  [Source: Mississippi Court Records, from the May Wilson McBee Papers, 1958, p. 20: Claiborne County deeds].  And in 1804, Humphreys claimed land on Bayou Pierre, adjoining Henry Green and Llewellyn Price.  The claim was contested, supported by a deed from Samuel Davenport to William Thompson, dated 1 December 1797 and witnessed by Dempsey White.  [Source: The Natchez Court Records, 1767-1805, Abstracts of Early Records, The May Wilson McBee Collection, Vol. 2, 1953, p. 553: Claim #1455].

 

On 26 March 1804, Stephen Douglass presented his land claim for 640 acres on Bayou Pierre, adjacent George Humphreys, Waterman Crane, ___ Thompson, Filmer Green, and Stephen Richards.  Witnesses were Samuel Goodwin (likely son-in-law of Dempsey White) and Hezekiah Harman (sic) (Dempsey White’s neighbor).  A deed was produced dated 1802 stating that the property adjoined the lands of Phoebe Goodwin (mother of Samuel Goodwin), Filmer Green, and Abraham Green.  In addition, Arthur Patterson provided a plat supporting his 26 November 1804 land claim on Bayou Pierre showing neighbors G. W. Humphreys, W. Crane, and William Thompson.  Samuel Goodwin was witness to Patterson’s claim.  [Source: The Natchez Court Records, 1767-1805, Abstracts of Early Records, The May Wilson McBee Collection, Vol. 2, 1953, pp. 543 and 584: Claims #1172 and #1978].  Indications are that Thompson was living in the same neighborhood as Dempsey White.

 

Strengthening the relationship of William Thompson and Dempsey White in Mississippi is the fact that a William Thompson, JP, married three possible children of Dempsey White in 1800 and 1801: Ann White to Samuel Goodwin, Elizabeth White to Noah Blackwell, and Robert White to Phillepina Hamberlin. 

 

Of special import are two deeds from Hancock County, GA [Deed Book F, pp. 140-141.]  In the first, on 4 November 1802, Ann Thompson of Hancock sold to “William Thompson of the Mississipi (sic) Teritory (sic) and Clabourn (sic) County one Negro Girl….”  Witnesses were Stephen Waller and Benj Thompson.  The second deed states that on 9 November 1802, Ann Thompson, widow of Benjamin Thompson and executor of his estate, sold to “William Thomson (sic) my Son of the Mississippi Territory one Negro boy named Abraham which is a part of the Estate said Benjamin Thompson deceased….”  Witnesses were James Wood, John Thompson and Benj Thompson.  These two deeds show that William Thompson, son of Benjamin and Ann Thompson of Wilkes and later Greene and Hancock Counties, had moved to Claiborne County, Mississippi Territory prior to 1802.  As indicated before, the William Thompson most likely to have married Sarah Smith was probably the son of Benjamin Thompson.

 

Note that Ann Thompson deeded two slaves to her son, William (of Mississippi Territory), in Hancock County, GA, in November 1802.  During that same month, William Thompson (husband of Sarah Smith) submitted in nearby Wilkes County receipts to James Smith’s estate: “Wm Thompson for himself and Demcy [sic] White in full of their legacies.”  [Source: Early Records of Georgia, Vol. II, by Grace Gilliam Davidson, p. 293].   It is interesting that Thompson provided a receipt not only for himself, but also for his brother-in-law, Dempsey White, known to be living in Mississippi.  Did William Thompson return to Georgia late in the year 1802 from his new home in the Mississippi Territory to complete transactions involving the estates of his father and father-in-law?  And if so, did he die en route from Georgia to Mississippi in late 1802/early 1803 or soon after his return?  The following Claiborne County records indicate that this scenario may be plausible.

 

The 640 acres patented to William Thompson in what became Claiborne County, MS, were granted on 9 February 1807 to legal representatives of William Thompson.  [Source: First Settlers of the Mississippi Territory, by Frances Terry Ingmire and Carolyn Reeves Ericson, 1982, p. 87].  This description of the grantees fits with evidence that William Thompson died sometime in 1803, when his estate was appraised (apparently in November 1803).  [Source: Mississippi Court Records, from the May Wilson McBee Papers, 1958, p. 33: Minutes of Claiborne County Orphans Court Book A, p. 6].  On 15 August 1809, authorization was given Thomas White and others to lay off land for Sarah Thompson, administratrix of  “Will Thompson.”  Further, Gadi Gibson was assigned to oversee the road from Widow Thompson’s branch to Robert Cochran’s gin with a crew of hands from Crane, Christian, Scott, William Smith, David Smith, and Robert Cochran.  [Source: Mississippi Court Records, from the May Wilson McBee Papers, 1958, p. 33: Minutes of Claiborne County Orphans Court Book A, p. 127].  Robert Cochran was related to George Cochran, who lived adjacent Dempsey White (see child #4 above).  [Source: The Natchez Court Records, 1767-1805, Abstracts of Early Records, The May Wilson McBee Collection, Vol. 2, 1953, p. 559: Claim #1537]. 

 

Sarah Thompson was listed in Claiborne County tax records as early as 1805.  This tax list was recorded in alphabetical order, but the next available list, 1807, showed nearby households, which included Hezekiah Harmon, sons of William Foster (a neighbor back in Wilkes County, GA), Dempsey and Reuben White and Noah Blackwell.  In 1810, Sary (sic) Thompson was listed in the census of Claiborne and Warren counties with 1 M >21, 3 M <21, 1 F >21, 2 F <21 and 3 slaves.  The Claiborne County tax list for that year identified her neighbors as Hezekiah and James Harmon, Shem and Levi Thompson, James Davenport, William, Spencer, James, Shadrack and Gibeon Foster, George W. Humphreys, James and Waterman Crane, Robert Cochran, Noah Blackwell and Dempsey and Reuben White. 

 

Sarah Thompson apparently died soon afterward.  Her name does not appear in later Claiborne County tax digests.  The 1813 and 1814 tax records include a line item for “The Heirs of William Thompson.”  In a deed dated 1814, Levi Thompson and Mary, his wife, sold to Richard Sheffield 640 acres on Bayou Pierre.  This land had been “confirmed to heirs of William Thompson, deceased,” and Levi was identified as one of the heirs.  Levi and Mary appeared before H. Harman, JQ.  [Source: Mississippi Court Records, from the May Wilson McBee Papers, 1958, p. 23: Claiborne County deeds].

 

The following children of William and Sarah Thompson of Mississippi were submitted to www.familysearch.com by Robert S. Duggan Jr., 1112 Mason Woods Dr., Atlanta, GA 30329-3804:

 

Shem Thompson, b. c. 1782 in MS.

Levi Thompson, b. c. 1784 in MS.

Ann Thompson, b. c. 1786 in MS.

Sarah Thompson, b. c. 1788 in MS.

Asa Thompson, b. c. 1790 in MS.

Rachel Thompson, b. c. 1792 in MS.

Will Thompson, b. c. 1794 in MS.

Mary Thompson, b. c. 1798 in MS, d. 1825; m. Thomas Berry in 1814 in MS.

 

However, no documentation of these children is available at this time.

 

The children’s names and their identified birthplace of Mississippi do not conclusively connect this William Thompson family with William and Sarah Smith Thompson of Wilkes County, GA.  However, they do provide interesting items for speculation.  Note that the first son's name was Shem.  In checking various sources, Shem appears to be a rather uncommon given name, not only generally, but within the surname of Thompson.  A Benjamin Thompson, who died in Bute County, NC, in 1771, was the father of Benjamin Thompson of Wilkes, Greene, and Hancock Counties, GA (father of the wife of Jacob Smith and, apparently, of William Thompson, husband of Sarah Smith).  The elder Benjamin Thompson had another son named Shem.  Perhaps William Thompson named son Shem for his uncle.  However, why did he not name one of his sons Benjamin for his father and grandfather?  And why were sons named Levi and Asa, given names that have not been found in either the Benjamin Thompson or James Smith families?  (Note: John Smith, son of James, did have a son named Asa, but it is believed that he was named for the brother of his mother, Nancy Simmons Smith).

 

The daughter, Ann, could have been named for William Thompson’s mother.  Sarah could have been named for her mother.  Rachel might have been named for an aunt (Rachel Thompson married Seymour Catching).  Will would have been named for his father.  And perhaps Mary was named for her Aunt Mary Smith White (wife of Dempsey).

 

The information on William Thompson of Mississippi is far from complete.  But it seems reasonable, if not likely, that this was the man who married Sarah Smith of Wilkes County, GA.  There are just too many coincidences to explain away:  the arrival in Claiborne County, MS, of the families of William and Sarah Thompson and Dempsey White soon after their disappearance in GA.  These two families were long-time close neighbors in Claiborne County.  Sarah Smith Thompson and Mary Smith White from Wilkes County, GA, were sisters.  Two of their brothers married daughters of William Foster of the Wilkes County, GA, area.  By 1807, several of William Foster’s sons were neighbors of the William and Sarah Thompson and Dempsey White of Claiborne County, MS.  By 1810, William Foster himself had removed from Georgia to become a near neighbor in Claiborne County.  After the deaths of Sarah Thompson and William Foster, the Thompson, Foster and White children continued to live as neighbors over a period of years.

 

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6.  Jacob Smith, b. before 1765, d. late 1790/early 1791 in Wilkes County, GA; m. Susannah Thompson.  She was the daughter of Benjamin Thompson, b. possibly 1760s, d. before 1830, probably in Greene County, TN.

 

An original document in the Headright/Bounty file, Georgia Archives, from Elijah Clarke certified that a Jacob Smith “was a prisioner (sic) with thee british a(t) thee siege (sic) of Augusta(,) since has served under me as a faithfull soldier and has always (sic) ben (sic) a friend (sic) to his Contry (sic)  Given under my hand 2d Decm 1784.”  A Jacob Smith requested Georgia land bounties in 1784, both as a soldier and for not plundering the countryside during the war.  The first request was for 287½ acres in Washington County; the second for 250 acres.  [Source: Georgia’s Revolutionary Bounty Land Records, 1783-1785, by Nicole M. O’Kelley and Mary Bondurant Warrant, 1992, pp. 81 and 112].  Either the bounties were not granted, were not taken up, or were sold, as these lands were not listed under Jacob Smith’s name on the Wilkes County, GA, tax lists.

 

Jacob Smith died prior to the writing of the will of his father, James Smith, on 2 January 1797, as his portion of the inheritance was left to his children.  In 1802, returns from the estate were paid to Abel McIntosh, guardian of the heirs of Jacob Smith.  (See Appendix I below for a complete transcription of James Smith’s will and probate records).

 

Evidence indicates that this was the Jacob Smith, who between the years 1785 and 1790, was listed in militia district EE, later GG, located on the western border of Wilkes County, near the south fork of Little River.  Each of these years Jacob owned 200 acres of land and no slaves.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Tax Records, 1785-1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson].  On 7 August 1786, “the Court of Justice of the county of Wilkes” authorized David Criswill, County Surveyor, to lay out for Jacob Smith a tract of land containing 200 acres in Wilkes County (signed Hry Mounger Pro and Benj Catching CWC).   This property apparently was the land on which Smith lived as early as 1785.  [Source: original document in Headright/Bounty file, Georgia Archives.]  This district was reasonably near James Smith’s home place, which was located to the northeast on Beaverdam Creek.  Jacob Smith had several neighbors of interest who recurred in the tax records.  In 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1790 (both 1788 and 1789 records are missing), Seymour Catching, Douglas Watson, and Frederick Williams were listed.  In 1790, the last year recording this Jacob Smith, additional neighbors of note were Richard Smith and Zachariah Thompson.  This Jacob Smith did not appear in later tax years.

 

On 24 March 1791, Nathan Adkinson sold to Zachariah Thompson 160 acres in the forks of Little River adjacent Douglas Watson, Frederick Williams, and Jacob Smith.  A second deed written on 20 April 1791 described the purchase of 20 acres on Little River by Zachariah Thompson from Douglass (sic) Watson.  This land was adjacent “widow Smith.”  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Deed Books A-VV 1784-1806, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1996, p. 231].  The first deed places Thompson, Watson, and Williams in proximity to Jacob Smith.  The second, which again mentions Thompson and Watson, indicates that Jacob Smith had died.

 

Jacob Smith’s death about 1791 was confirmed by the tax records for that year.  In district GG, “Seemore Catchings,” Frederick Williams, Zachariah Thompson, and Richard Smith were once again listed.  Next door to Richard Smith was a new name: Susannah Smith, who, like Jacob Smith before her, owned 200 acres of land and no slaves.  In 1792, Susannah Smith was living next door to Zachariah Thompson, with neighbors Richard Smith, Douglas Watson, Frederick Williams, and James Smith (who owned no land).  Joseph Citching (sic) returned a poll for Seamore Citching (sic).  It is assumed that Seymour Catching moved to Greene County, GA, since he was shown to own land there in previous Wilkes County tax records.  Susannah Smith owned 400 acres of land located on Little River adjacent to Duglass (sic) Watson and no slaves.  It seems a reasonable deduction that Susannah Smith was the widow of Jacob Smith.

 

In the 1793 tax records, Susannah Smith no longer appeared.  Instead, there was a new name: Abel McIntosh, who owned 200 acres adjacent to Thomson (sic).  Again, Richard Smith, Zechariah Thomson (sic), Frederick Williams, and Douglass (sic) Watson were in the neighborhood.  Since Abel McIntosh was identified in later probate records as the guardian of Jacob Smith’s orphans and in 1793 tax records replaced the position in the neighborhood first held by Jacob and then Susannah Smith, evidence indicates that McIntosh had married the widow Smith.

 

There were no further tax records of this district in Wilkes County as the district became a part of Oglethorpe County in 1794 and Greene County in 1799.  Abel McIntosh appeared in the 1796 and 1798 Oglethorpe County tax lists, and there were mentions of both Zachariah Thompson and Douglas Watson in Oglethorpe County deeds during this time frame.  [Sources: Georgia Genealogical Magazine, 1796 Oglethorpe County Tax List, Vol. 38, No. 3 (149), Summer 1998, p. 168; An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. I, 1789-1799, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, 1986, p. 004a of Roberts’ District in the Oglethorpe County Digest; and Oglethorpe County, Georgia, Deed Books A-E, 1794-1809, by Michal Martin Farmer].

 

In 1801 and 1805, Abel McIntosh was listed in Owen’s District in Greene County.  Living nearby was Joseph Citchings/Citchens (sic).  [Sources: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. II, 1800-1802, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, pp. 025, 026, and 028; also Vol. III, 1804-1806, pp. 052 and 053 in Oglethorpe County].  Seymour Catching was living in adjacent Hancock County in this time period.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. III, 1804-1806, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, p. 034 in Graybill’s District, Hancock County].

 

On 10 March 1797, Benjamin Thompson of Hancock County, GA, wrote a will naming his children, including Rachel Catching, Benjamin Thompson, (the heirs of) Zachariah Thompson, Jesse Thompson, William Thompson and Susannah McIntosh.  In probate records, Rachel Catching’s husband is identified as Seymore (sic) Catching, but there is no further mention of Susannah McIntosh or her husband.  However, the naming of Susannah McIntosh as a daughter of Benjamin Thompson adds further support to the likelihood that she was previously married to Jacob Smith.  As noted above, neighbors in Wilkes County of first Jacob Smith, then Susannah Smith, and finally Abel McIntosh were Susannah Thompson McIntosh’s brother, Zachariah Thompson, and sister, Rachel Catching.  [Source: Georgia Genealogical Magazine, Nos. 52-53, Spring-Summer 1974, pp. 142-143].

 

An 1803 deed in Greene County from Jesse Thompson, likely son of Benjamin Thompson, to Abel McIntosh provides additional evidence of ties to Susannah Thompson McIntosh’s family:

 

Jesse Thompson of Hancock County sold to Abel McIntosh of Greene County on 28 February 1801 for the sum of $234, one negro girl about five years old named Milicent. Wit: Nancy Corby, Hancock County.  Recorded 14 January 1803. Greene County Deed Book AA, Page 594. 

[Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 352].

 

A second deed not only confirms the marriage of Abel McIntosh and Susannah Thompson, but also names two allied couples:

 

Abel McIntosh and Susannah, his wife; James SMITH and Frances, his wife, and Holland Watts and Salatha, his wife, all of Greene County sold to Jesse Mercer of Greene County on 21 January 1807 for the sum of $1290, 200 acres of land in Greene County. Recorded 5 October 1807. Deed Book BB, Page 622 (No witnesses were listed.) 

[Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 469].

 

Salatha Smith married Hollon (sic) Watts on 22 July 1805 in Greene County, GA.  [Sources: Original marriage records from Greene County Probate Court and Colonial Georgia Marriage Records from 1760-1810, by Frances T. Ingmire, p. 138].  (The original page shows a date of 1806.  However, several books listing early Georgia marriages show the date as 1805.  There must be additional information on adjacent pages indicating the date was actually 1805).  The allied names of James Smith and Salatha Smith Watts to Abel and Susannah Thompson McIntosh provide additional circumstantial evidence of the relationship to Jacob Smith. 


But it was two 1809 deeds in Jasper County, GA, that finally brought together all of the puzzle pieces.  Abel McIntosh had been identified earlier as the guardian of Jacob Smith’s orphans and as the husband of Susannah Thompson.  By comparing neighbors of Jacob Smith, his widow Susannah Smith, and of Abel McIntosh, significant evidence pointed to Susannah Smith and Susannah Thompson McIntosh as being the same woman.  But the (surviving?) orphans of Jacob Smith were finally identified in Jasper County.

 

On 11 September 1809, James Smith, Holland Watts, and Salatha Watts, his wife, all of Greene County, TN, “lawful heirs of Jacob SMITH, deceased, appoint our friend Able (sic) McIntosh of the county and state afsd. as our lawful atty. to convey land, drawn as a Bounty by the heirs of Jacob Smith, dec’d, in the 15th Dist. Baldwin, lot 105, in GA.”  On 4 October 1809, McIntosh sold the property to Benjamin Thompson (Susannah Thompson McIntosh’s brother) of Hancock County.  [Source: Georgia Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 29, No. 3-4, pp. 223 and 227: Jasper County, GA, Deed Book 3, pp. 104 and 150].

 

The combination of information from James Smith’s and Benjamin Thompson’s wills, Wilkes County tax records, the 1809 Jasper County deeds, the 1807 Greene County, GA, deed, and Salatha Smith’s 1805 marriage confirmed that Susannah Thompson first married Jacob Smith, bore him at least two children: James and Salatha, and then married Abel McIntosh, who became the children’s guardian.

 

Evidently, the January 1807 sale of property in Greene County, GA, occurred just prior to a move by the McIntoshes, Smiths, and Watts from Greene County.  Since the property sold consisted of 200 acres and was conveyed not only by Abel and Susannah McIntosh, but also by her children by Jacob Smith, it is almost certain that this was the land owned originally by Jacob Smith as early as 1785.  The family must have remained on the farm during the time it moved from the jurisdiction of Wilkes County to Oglethorpe County and finally to Greene County.  After more than 20 years, the family was moving on.

 

By early 1807 there were numerous references to the three men in Greene County, TN, beginning with a 19 March 1807 deed, in which they purchased a tract of land from Daniel Jackson on Lick Creek.  Witnesses included Susannah Thompson Smith McIntosh’s brother-in-law, Saymore (sic) Catching, and John Catching. 

 

In about 1811, Holland Watts and James Smith moved their families to Kentucky.  Watts served in the War of 1812 as a private in the 2nd Regiment of Kentucky Volunteers commanded by Lieutenant Colonel W. Jennings.  [Source: Claim of service in War of 1812 to obtain bounty land, filed 30 June 1851 in Mercer County, MO].  And James Smith may be the James T. Smith who served as a private in Colonel Henry Renick’s Kentucky Mounted Militia.  [Source: Family Tree Maker CD519 Early Kentucky Settlers, 1700s-1800s, Kentucky Soldiers of the War of 1812].

 

On 31 December 1812, Watts, McIntosh, and Smith sold a portion of the property on Lick Creek in Tennessee to Joseph Davis.  McIntosh was identified as living in Greene County, TN; Watts and Smith were living in Knox County, KY.  On 17 August 1818, the three men sold additional acreage to Joseph Davis.  All three were identified as being from Knox County, KY.  [Source: Greene County, Tennessee, Deed Abstracts 1785-1810 and 1810-1822, by Joyce Martin Murray, 1996 and 1997, p. 125 and pp. 38 and 125, respectively: Deed Book 1, p. 101, and Deed Book 2, p. 89].

 

Abel McIntosh’s family was not found on the 1820 Greene County, TN, or Knox County, KY, census.  However, he was listed as a single M aged 70-80, living alone, in the 1830 Greene County, TN, census (p. 192).

 

On 17 January 1835, Abel McIntosh wrote his will.  His wife was not mentioned, as she had died prior to 1830.  Heirs were a son, Jesse, to whom he gave property adjacent George Crosby and Joseph Davis, and a daughter, Susannah, wife of David Woods (married 3 December 1829 in Greene County).  [Sources: Greene County, Tennessee, Wills, 1783-1890, p. 45; also Greene County, Tennessee, Marriages 1783-1868, both by Goldene Fillers Burgner, 1981].  McIntosh apparently died prior to 9 November 1835, on which date James T. Smith, Holland Watts and Salentha (sic) his wife filed a case against Jesse McIntosh, David Woods and Susanna his wife, heirs at law of Abel McIntosh, deceased.  The case was continued for testimony on 12 September 1836 and decided on 14 February 1837.  Thomas L. Williams, Chancellor, decided that the complainants were not entitled to relief and that they were to pay costs.  The Smiths and Watts then announced an appeal to the Tennessee Supreme Court.  [Source: Chancery Court Minutes, Greene County, TN, Nov. 1825 - Jan 1831 (actually continues through May 1876), by Goldene Fillers Burgner, 1987, pps. 57. 59. 61].  The outcome of the appeal is not known.  It is assumed, since James and Salatha Smith were not named in their stepfather’s will, that they were contesting the document.

 

James T. Smith and Holland Watts were found in the 1820, 1830, and 1840 Knox County, KY, censuses.  James T. Smith was found again in the 1850 Knox County, KY, census, living near various other Watts families.  (Seymour Catching was a neighbor in the 1820 and 1830 censuses, and John Catching lived nearby in 1840 and 1850).  There were many Smith and Watts marriages during these years including Salatha Smith, Susannah Smith, James Smith, Zachariah Smith, Abel Watts, and James Watts.  These names reflected the given names of Smiths, Thompsons, and McIntoshes of earlier generations.  [Sources: Knox County, KY, censuses – 1820 (pp. 288 and 290), 1830 (pp. 244 and 248), 1840 (pp. 309, 310 and 313), and 1850 (pp. 347, 354, 356 and 361)].

 

The known children of Jacob Smith and wife, Susannah Thompson, were:

 

a.  James T. Smith, b. c. 1786 in GA; m. Frances Brooks on 26 June 1806 in Oglethorpe County, GA.  (Note: The marriage transcription shows James L. Smith.  But it is likely that this is the right couple).  From the 1850 Knox County, KY, census: James T. Smith, age 64, wheelright, b. GA; Frances, age 64, b. GA; Mary, age 35; Minervy, age 33; James L., age 18; and Sarah, age 26.  (See Appendix VI below for a partial listing of their children).


b.  Salatha Smith, b. 1780-1790, d. 10 March 1846 in Knox County, KY; m. Holland Watts on 22 July 1805 in Greene County, GA.  He d. 1 March 1845 in Knox County, KY.  (See Appendix VI below for a listing of their children).

 

The known children of Abel McIntosh and wife, Susannah Thompson, were:

 

a.  Jesse McIntosh, b. c. 1790; m. Jane --?--.  From 1850 Knox County, KY, census: Jesse McIntosh, age 60, b. GA; Jane, age 49, b. VA; Susannah, age 28, b. TN; Jane, age 18, b. KY, Jesse G., age 10, b. KY.  (Note: it is possible that Jesse McIntosh was a child of Abel McIntosh and an earlier wife).

 

b.  Susannah McIntosh; m. David Woods on 3 December 1829 in Greene County, TN.

 

(Note: It is interesting that the surname McIntosh figures prominently with the Collums as discussed below under Elizabeth Smith (see child #9).  Specifically, a Jesse McIntosh was the first husband of Sophia Collum (b. 1818 in GA).  Sophia is believed to be the daughter of Wilkins Collum (suspected son of David Collum).  Sophia and her second husband, Jesse Dedwylder, and children are two households from Wilkins Collum (b. 1800 in SC) in the 1850 Lauderdale County, MS, census.  Other Collum neighbors heading families in this county in 1850 were Ephraim (b. 1800 in NC), Smith (b. 1810 in GA), Willis (b. 1814 in GA, living next door to Wilkins and six listings down from Smith), and Harris (b. 1820 in SC)].

 

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7.  Joseph Smith, b. c. 1775, d. 10 December 1865; m. (1) Polly Foster on 4 December 1799 in Wilkes County, GA.  She was b. likely late 1770s, d. before 1848.  He m. (2) Martha Guthrey Andrews (widow of William Andrews) on 30 January 1848 in Henry County, GA.  She was b. c. 1800 and died 11 July 1873 in Henry County, GA.  [Source: First Families of Henry County, Georgia, by the Genealogical Society of Henry and Clayton, Counties, GA, Inc., 1993, p. 36 (from an article on the James Andrews family by Doris Curry)]. 

 

 

Joseph Smith was given the family homestead in the will of his father, James Smith, dated 2 January 1797: "Item I give and bequeath to my Son Joseph Smith the Tract of land I now live on in the County of Wilkes containing two hundred Acres more or less granted to James Smith to him and his heirs forever.”  (See Appendix I below for full text of James Smith will).  James Smith had been listed in Wilkes County tax records as owning this property as early as 1785 (the first tax listing available) and again in 1786, 1787, and 1790 through 1796 (there are no existing tax records for 1788 and 1789).  The land was described as being located on Beaverdam Creek, adjacent Edward Butler and N. Smith.  In 1797, for the first time, Joseph Smith was listed in the tax record as owning this 200-acre property on Beaverdam Creek adjacent Edw. Butler, originally granted to Jas. Smith (who was recorded as a defaulter); Joseph owned no slaves.  Extant tax records for 1798 and 1799 are fragmentary and do not include a listing of this property.  In 1800 and 1801, James Smith was again shown as property owner.  James had died in 1799 and it is likely that since his estate was still in probate the tract was listed under his name.  In 1802, Joseph was once again paying taxes on his inherited property.  No tax records are available for 1803.  By 1804, Joseph was no longer listed in Wilkes County tax records.  Where previously Nathan Smith’s property was described as being located adjacent first James, then Joseph Smith, it was now adjacent Charles Phillips.  And Edward Butler’s land, previously adjacent James Smith was now adjoining Black.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Tax Records, 1785 - 1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson].

 

Deed records bear out the sale of James Smith’s homestead by his son, Joseph, in 1803.  On 4 December 1799, Joseph Smith married Polly Foster.  [Source: Early Records of Georgia, Vol. II, by Grace Gilliam Davidson, p. 356].  The will of William Foster of Claiborne County, MS, shows that Polly was the sister of Sarah “Sally” Foster, who married Joseph Smith’s older brother, Nathan.  (See Appendix III for discussion of the Foster family).  A Joseph Smith was given two draws in the 1803 Land Lottery, indicating that he had a wife and at least one child.  [Source: Early Records of Georgia, Vol. I, by Grace Gilliam Davidson, p. 315].  Joseph and Polly sold James Smith’s homestead after moving west to Greene County, GA, as evidenced by the following:

 

John Bustin of Greene Co. and Noame[sic], his wife, sold to Joseph SMITH of Wilkes Co. on 1 December 1802 for the sum of $425, 116 ½ acres of land in Greene County bounded by Kimbrough, Harps, and William Wiggans [sic]. Wit: Thomas Hightower. Rec. 14 September 1803. Deed Book AA, p. 670.  [Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 365].

 

[p. 278] 25 March 1803, Joseph SMITH & Polly, his wife, of Green Co., Ga., to Isaac Langdon of Wilkes Co., Ga., for $1,000, 200 acres in Wilkes Co. on Beaverdam Creek, adj. E. by Forster[sic], W. by James & Black, all other sides vacant. not signed. Test: James (\) Foster, Robt. Owsley, J.P. Rec. 12 June 1804.  Deed Book UU, p. 278.

[Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Deed Books A-VV, 1784-1806, by Michal Martin Farmer, 1996, p. 761].

 

Joseph Smith lived in Greene County for only a few years before moving west again.  The two deeds below identify Joseph Smith’s neighbors and record the sale of his property.
 

Wood Moreland of Hancock County sold to Arthur Harris of Greene County on 12 January 1804 for the sum of $200, part of tract of land granted to Joshua Spradling on which Spradling now lives. Bounded by William Wiggins, Joseph SMITH, John Kimbro, and John Ward. Wit: Isaac Moreland. Rec. 12 February 1806. Deed Book BB, p. 261. 

[Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 425].


Joseph SMITH of Greene County and Polly, his wife, sold to John Kimbrough of Greene County on 8 November 1805 for the sum of $350, 116 1/4 acres of land in Greene County bounded by Knowles and Kimbrough Ferguson. Wit: William Wiggins and Joshua Wilson. Recorded 14 January 1806.  Deed Book BB, p. 271. 

[Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 426].

 

Joseph Smith owned his property for three years and lost $75 on the sale!  Perhaps he was eager to join the exodus to the newly-opened lands in recently created Baldwin County.  Cursory research shows a Joseph Smith on the 1807 Baldwin County tax digest in a district that became a part of Putnam County later that year.  Listed nearby were William Glass, John Ledbetter, Micajah Brooks, and Richardson Black.  These surnames were tied to the Smiths and Barrons in Wilkes County in earlier years.  In the same area, William Chafin (sic) (likely the husband of Joseph Smith’s sister, Rachel) was listed as paying a poll only.  [Source: The First Families of Baldwin, Morgan, and Putnam Counties, 1807,” contributed by Robert S. Davis Jr., Georgia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Fall 1994, Vol. 30, No. 3, pp. 167 and 169].

 

Joseph Smith also appeared in Captain William E. Adams’ District on the 1813 Putnam County tax digest.  A familiar name nearby was that of Micajah Brooks, but others had replaced some of the neighbors of 1807.  The new names included Elijah Moseley, Levi Foster, Benjamin Simmons, Lucius Reeves, and Jesse T. Reeves.  Again, these are surnames with ties to the Barrons and Smiths.  Another neighbor of importance was John Caddenhead (sic), who had married Phoebe Foster in 1807 or 1808.  (See Appendix III for a detailed discussion of the Fosters).  Phoebe was the sister of Joseph Smith’s wife, Polly.  [Sources: “1813 Tax Roll Putnam County GA,” contributed by Margie Glover-Daniels, found on the Putnam County GenWeb site; Ancestry.com, Ancestry World Tree reports of lstanton@bellsouth.net, zacwheeler@aol.com  and drselman@prodigy.net (viewed January 2001)]. 

 

On 21 June 1811, Joseph Smith and Poly (sic), his wife, joined “by experience” Crooked Creek Primitive Baptist Church in Putnam County.  This church was constituted on 27 June 1807.  Charter members included Micajah and Mary Brooks.  The pastor was Elijah Moseley.  Other members with ties to the Smiths were William and Rebecca Williams, James and Polly Doster, Jane Maddox, John Cadenhead, and Jess (sic) T. and Martha Reeves.  Joseph Smith “and wife” were dismissed by letter on 21 February 1818.  [Source: Private Collection of Mrs. O.E. Lancaster, LDS microfilm 0365214, Church Records, transcription of minutes of Crooked Creek Primitive Baptist Church, Putnam County, GA].  Note that Crooked Creek is located near Rooty Creek, where Joseph Smith’s brother-in-law and sister, William and Martha Smith Barron, lived from about 1806 through 1817.

 

Also, of interest are the War of 1812 service records for the 4th Regiment Georgia Militia (Jones in command), formed at nearby Fort Hawkins, which include Joseph Smith, William Chaffin, and William L. Thompson (possibly the husband of another of Joseph Smith’s sisters, Sarah).  [Source: Index to War of 1812 Service Records for Volunteer Soldiers from Georgia, by Judy Swaim Kratovil].  (See the section on Rachel Smith, child #8, below for more information).

 

There was no Joseph Smith in the 1820 Putnam County, GA, census, but there was one in nearby Jasper County (p. 204).  The ages of the family members appear to be reasonable when compared with the expected age of Joseph and Polly Foster Smith.  Joseph was first listed as owning property in Wilkes County in 1797, making him over 21 at that time.  He would have been at least 44 in 1820.  The Joseph Smith in Jasper County was 45 or older.  Since Polly married in 1799, she was likely at least 18, which would make her age 39 in 1820, falling within the 26-45 years age range of the adult female.  The Jasper County couple had six children in the household (1 M 16-26 who was between the ages of 16 and 18, 2 Fs < 10, 3 Fs < 16) and 10 slaves.  Immediate neighbors were consistent with those found for the Joseph Smith in 1807/1813 Baldwin/Putnam Counties: Mecago (sic) Brooks, William B. Simmons, and Allen Simmons.  In addition there were John Barron, John Thompson, and William Thompson.  Other names of interest were James Rivers and William Williams.  [Source: 1820 Jasper County, GA, census, pp. 202-204].  These surnames were neighbors of the Barrons and John Smith in Hancock and Putnam Counties in the early 1800s.  In addition to possible brother-in-law, William Thompson, who lived a few doors from Joseph Smith, two other likely brothers-in-law, William Chafin and William Barron, lived in the vicinity.  [Source: 1820 Jasper County, GA, census, pp. 228 and 236].

 

In the 1830 Georgia census index, there were several Joseph Smiths living in or near Jasper County.  However, these men were too young to be the son of James Smith.  It appears that this Joseph Smith moved to Henry County, GA, together with Micajah Brooks in the mid-1820s.  In 1824, Brooks purchased land in Henry County.  The first mention of a Joseph Smith is as a witness to a land transaction between Thomas and Aaron Brooks, dated 7 April 1828.  [Source: Some Georgia County Records, Vol. 3, by Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas Jr., 1978, pp. 193 and 198: Henry County Deed Book A, pp. 475 and 519].

 

There were three Joseph Smiths in Henry County in 1830, two too young to be the correct man.  The third, listed as “Joseph Smith Senr.” (p. 202) was 50-60 years old, with 1 M aged 20-30, 1 F 5-10, 1 F 10-15, 1 F 15-20, 1 F 50-60, with 13 slaves.  On page 216, lived Micajah Brooks and wife, both aged 60-70.  Nearby were men with familiar surnames such as Strickland, Catching, and White.

 

On 6 December 1833, Micajah Brooks of Henry County sold to Abel Tatum of Monroe County the lot he had purchased in 1824.  Witnesses included Joseph Smith.  [Source: Henry County, Georgia, Land Records, 1824-1838, Deed Books C/D, F, G, H, by Freda Reid Turner, 1993, p. 188: Deed Book F, p. 503].  Brooks did not appear on the 1840 Henry County census, but the young family of Hillary Brooks (p. 324) lived near a Joseph Smith (p. 321), aged 60-70, with household of 1 M 30-40, 1 M 70-80 (print is lighter than other writing), and 1 F 60-70, with no slaves.  Joseph Smith was involved in various Henry County land transactions between 1839 and 1849.

 

A Joseph Smith married Martha Andrews on 30 January 1848 in Henry County.  [Source: 37,000 Early Georgia Marriages, by Joseph T. Maddox and Mary Carter, 1975, p. 94.]  On 29 March 1848, Joseph and Martha G. Smith relinquished dowry on the land of William Andrews, late of Henry County.  [Source: Henry County, Georgia, Land Records, 1839-1851, Deed Books J, K, L, M, by Freda Reid Turner, p. 339, Henry County Deed Book L, p. 413].  Page 216 of the 1850 Henry County census, enumerated on 11 September 1850, lists Joseph Smith, aged 75, farmer, born in Georgia, who could not read or write.  (The age of this Joseph Smith again correlates to the expected age of James Smith’s son).  Joseph’s wife, Martha, was aged 50 and born in Georgia.  A 23-year-old man named George Cagle, also born in Georgia, lived with them.  Nearby lived the families of Andrew and Clarinda (Smith) Henderson (p. 215), William F. Smith (p. 216), Jacob Smith and Asa and Mary (Smith) Miles (p. 218), John and Martha (Smith) Whaley (p. 219) and Elijah and Bettunia (sic) (Smith) Strickland (p. 221).  Clarinda, William F., Jacob, Mary, Martha and Bethena Smith are believed to have been children of Joseph and Polly Foster.  Additional confirmation of the identity of this Joseph Smith is needed. 

 

In 1851 the portion of Henry County in which this Joseph Smith lived became a part of newly-formed Spalding County, GA.  At about this time, it appears from the following deed that Joseph Smith was a member of Kings Hill (Baptist) Church (later called the Regular Baptist Church of Christ at Tirza):

#322  State of Ga., Cty. of Spalding, Date: 23 July 1853, pg. 300

Preamble & resolution introduced by Brother E. P. Bolton to the Regular Baptist Church of Christ at Tirza.  Hendley Varner donated to sd. church, then called Kings Hill Church, 2 acres of land known as Kings Hill Camp Ground, formerly Henry now Spalding Cty.  Deed to Deacons to said property executed without naming deacons.  Joseph Smith, one of deacons at time of execution of deed, was later excluded from membership.  Church resolved that Parker Eason, Hendley Varner, Jacob Smith & Thomas R. Bishop will be recognized as true & regular deacons & legal representatives.

Varney A. Gaskill, moderator, Pro Tem

Wit:Elisha P. Bolton, Ch. Clk.  Rec: 27 July 1853

Henry B. Holliday, Clk.

[Source: Abstracts of Deed Book A, Spalding County, GA, by Geraldine Purdy, 1983, p. 51.]

 

The deed provides some tantalizing bits of data and unanswered questions.  So far, the location of this church has not been determined.  It is noteworthy that Joseph Smith was a deacon – and then was later excluded from church membership.  Why he was excluded is unknown.  The most common reasons for exclusion from Baptist Churches during the nineteenth century were that the member had joined a church of another denomination, the member was too often absent from services, or because he was considered guilty of ungodly conduct.  Since Joseph Smith was in his 70s at the time of his exclusion, this last reason seems less likely.  It is also interesting that his son, Jacob continued to be recognized as a “true & regular deacon” after his father’s exclusion.

 

Joseph and Martha Smith deeded property in Spalding on 18 March 1854 to William Collins, the husband of Martha's sister Nancy.  [Source: Spalding County, GA, Deed Book A, p. 436].  Joseph and Martha were recorded living in the Africa District of Spalding County, GA, in the 1860 census (p. 236).  Joseph, age 84, a farmer, owned $3,000 in personal property and $20,000 in real property.  Martha was age 60.  Both were born in Georgia and could not read or write.  Nearby lived the families of Asa and Mary (Smith) Miles (p. 236) and Sarah Smith (widow of William F. Smith) (p. 238). 

 

Joseph Smith's will was dated 12 March 1864 and named his wife, Martha, his deceased son, William F., and daughter, Sarah Castleberry.  The document indicates that there were other children, not named.  Asa Miles, husband of Mary Smith, was one of the executors.  The other, James M. Barfield, was married to Miranda Andrews, daughter of Martha Smith by her first marriage.  Joseph died on 10 December 1865.  [Source: First Families of Henry County, Georgia, by the Genealogical Society of Henry and Clayton, Counties, GA, Inc., 1993, p. 36 (from an article on the James Andrews family by Doris Curry)].  His will was proven January 1866 in Spalding County, GA.  [Source: Spalding County, GA, Will Book A].  Martha died 11 July 1873 in Henry County.  [Source: First Families of Henry County, Georgia, by the Genealogical Society of Henry and Clayton, Counties, GA, Inc., 1993, p. 36 (from an article on the James Andrews family by Doris Curry)]. 

 

Through deed references, census data and other early documents, the following children are proposed for Joseph and Polly Foster Smith:

 

a.  Jacob Smith, b. c. 1801; m. Linsay Sisson on 19 September 1841 in Jasper County, GA.  She d. bef. 1860.  The family lived in Henry County, GA in 1850, but they removed to Pike County, AL, soon after 1855.  In 1858, Jacob and first cousins Thomas and Smith Barron (sons of Martha Smith, child #1), were charter members of Hephzibah Baptist Church in Pike County.  Jacob served as deacon and church clerk until 1869. 

 

b.  William F. Smith, b. c. 1802, d. c. 1858 in Spalding County, GA; m. Sarah Nichols on 14 October 1828 in Jasper County, GA. 

 

c.  Clarinda Smith, b. 1 September 1803, d. 29 November 1882; m. William Andrew Henderson on 19 October 1824 in Jasper County, GA.  He was b. 2 August 1804, d. 3 May 1863.  Both bur. in Henderson-Moore Family Cemetery, Henry County, GA.  (Note: Clarinda Smith Henderson was listed in two censuses with the birth state of SC, so she may not be a daughter of Joseph Smith.  Further study is needed.)

 

d.  Sarah Smith, b. c. 1805; m. Warren Castleberry on 15 December 1819 in Jasper County, GA

 

e.  Martha Smith, b. c. 1807, d. 8 March 1879 in Columbia County, AR; m. John Whaley on 19 December 1822 in Jasper County, GA.  He was b. c. 1800, d. 6 July 1863 in Columbia County, AR.  [Source of death information: www.familysearch.com data entered by Jackie Weeden, Beloit, WI].  One of their children, William Joseph, did not accompany his parents to AR, instead moving to Pike County, AL, to live near the families of Jacob Smith and Ruth Smith Whaley. 

 

f.  Ruth Smith, b. c. 1808, d. 22 February 1877; m. Isaac Whaley on 20 October 1825 in Jasper County, GA.  He d. 7 November 1858.  Both bur. in Whaley Cemetery, Pike County, AL.  The Whaleys moved from Henry County, GA, first to Chambers County, AL, in about 1833, then to Pike County, AL, in about 1853. 

 

g.  Bethena /Bethany Smith, b. c. 1811, d. between June and November 1857; m. Elijah Strickland on 26 September 1832 in Henry County, GA.  He was b. c. 1809; d. bef. November 1857. 

 

h.  Mary Smith, b. c. 1815; m. Asa Miles on 15 January 1833 in Henry County, GA.  He was b. c. 1808, d. bef. June 1869. 

 

Note: there may have been one or more additional children.  A female born between 1825 and 1830 was living with the Joseph Smith family in the 1830 census.  And it is interesting that there were two other Joseph Smiths living near "Joseph Smith senr" in the 1830 Henry County census.  One was age 30-40, the other 20-30.  A Joseph Smith married Elizabeth Ramsey in 1818 in Jasper County and a Joseph married Elizabeth Willis in Henry County in 1826.  In the 1840 Henry County census an Elizabeth Smith lived next door to Joseph Smith.  Was this the widow of one of these younger Joseph Smiths?  Only additional research will tell.

 

**************************************

 

 

8.  Rachel “Zechie” Smith, b. late 1770s, d. 23 September 1848 in Newton County, GA; m. William Chaffin.  He was b. late 1770s in VA, d. after 1860, probably in Newton County, GA.

 

Rachel Smith was unmarried at the time her father, James Smith, signed his will in 1797; however, based on the following February 1801 return on James Smith’s estate (and other evidence given below), apparently she was the Zechie Smith who married William Chaffin:

 

“…paid Jos. and Nathaniel [sic] Smith, paid Wm. Barron, paid David Collum and Wm. Chaffin, in right of his wife Zechie Smith, for their wives in part of their legacies.”

 

William Chaffin appeared in the Wilkes County, GA, tax records from 1799 through 1805.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Tax Records, 1785 - 1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson].  In all of these years, he was shown as owning no property.  In the 1803 and 1806 land lotteries, William Chaffin was given two draws, indicating that he had a wife and one or more children.  These lotteries awarded land in territory that later became Putnam, Wayne, and Wilkinson Counties.  [Source: Early Records of Georgia, Vol. I, by Grace Gilliam Davidson, pp. 306 and 323].

 

In 1807, a William Chafin (sic) was listed in Baldwin County, GA, as paying a poll only.  He was living in the portion of the county that became Putnam County later that year.  A Joseph Smith (probably Rachel Smith Chaffin’s brother) was located in the same area.  [Source: “The First Families of Baldwin, Morgan, and Putnam Counties, 1807,” contributed by Robert S. Davis Jr., Georgia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Fall 1994, Vol. 30, No. 3, pp. 167 and 169].

 

William Chaffin was living in Jasper County, GA, possibly as early as 1810.  The Jasper County deed index lists a deed dated 1 May 1810 from a Jno. M. McCoy to William Chaffin [Book 2, p. 230].

 

On 1 November 1814, during the War of 1812, Chaffin was mustered into Captain Samuel Lane’s Volunteer Rifle Company of Lt. Col. William Jones’ Battalion of the Georgia Militia at Fort Hawkins, GA.  (Note: Fort Hawkins was situated adjacent to present-day Macon, GA, located about 50 miles south of Jasper County, where William Chaffin lived in 1814).  At the conclusion of his six months’ enlistment, he was mustered out.  [Source: Scott Chafin, schafin@aol.com].

 

The 1820 Jasper County census (p. 228) lists the William Chafin (sic) family with 3 Ms <10, 1 M 10-16, 1 M 16-18, 1 M 26-45, 1 F <10, 1 F 26-45, 1 F > 45.  Nearby were the families of William Barron, a Joseph Smith, a William Thompson, and a William G. Thompson, some or all of whom were likely related through the Smiths.

 

Several deeds in 1823 and 1824 identify land purchases by William Chaffin in Jasper, Newton and Walton Counties.  (14 February 1824, Fredrick Tiftsion to William Chafin of Jasper, 40 acres in the 19th District of Baldwin, now Jasper, part lot 186 for $150: Jasper County Deed Book A, pp. 272-273.  6 November 1824, James Harrison (Chaffin's son-in-law) to William Chaffin, both of Walton County, part lot 122 in 1st District: Walton County Deed Book F, p. 98.  9 November 1824, James Herrin of Monroe County to William Chaffin of Newton County, 202 1/2 acres in 10th District of Henry, now Newton County, lot 110 for $200.] 

 

As mentioned in the Martha Smith Barron section (see child #1 above), the name “Rachel Chaffin” appeared as an early member of the Liberty Baptist Church of Jasper (later Newton) County, GA.  She joined by letter on 27 March 1824 and was dismissed by letter in October 1824. Rachel was the only Chaffin who was a member of Liberty during the 1820s.  It seems a reasonable assumption that this church reference was to the wife of William Chaffin, Zechie (i.e., Rachel) Smith.

 

This assumption is supported by information from the minutes of Harris Spring Baptist Church, also in Newton County, GA.  The church was founded on 19 June 1822 about one mile from the Walton County line.  On 18 February 1825, the church received "Sister Rachael Chaffin" by letter.  The time frame of Rachel Chaffin's dismissal from Liberty Church fits quite neatly with the date that she joined nearby Harris Spring Church.  Several of Rachel and William Chaffin's children and their spouses also joined Harris Spring:  Martha/Patsy Chaffin (by experience, 1827; wife of Joel Chaffin), John Chaffin (by experience in 1837), James Harrison (by experience, 1827; husband of Nancy Chaffin [a Nancy Harrison joined in 1841, but it seems more likely that she was the wife of Jerimiah Harrison]), and James Smith Chaffin (by experience, 1847). However, no record has been found that Rachel Chaffin’s husband, William, joined Harris Spring Church.  Rachel Chaffin's death was recorded in the church minutes as 23 September 1848. [Source: of Harris Spring Baptist Church minute book.  Note: this church is now known as Harris Springs Primitive Baptist Church.]

 

The Chaffins have not been found in the 1830 census.  But in 1840 Walton County, GA, (p. 116a) there is an aging couple recorded: Wm. Chaffin 1 M 60-70, 1 F 60-70, with no slaves.

 

William Chaffin has not been located in the 1850 Georgia census.  Perhaps after the death of Rachel in 1848 he moved around, living with his various children.  On 12 December 1850, William Chafin (sic) applied for bounty land, indicating his age was 81.  [Source: Scott Chafin, “Application for Bounty Land, Newton County, GA, William Chafin, applicant,” 12 December 1850].

 

On 6 November 1853, William Chaffin “in consideration for the love good will and affection which I have and bear towards my grandchildren” gave to the children of his son, James S., “one feather bed, bedstead and be clothing, one small birch table, one spinning wheel, one pine chest, four split bottom chairs...”  [Source: Newton County, GA, Deed Book K, p. 251].

 

By the 1860 Newton County, GA, census, William Chafin (sic), age 83, b. VA, was living with his son, Samuel Chafin (sic) (p. 445).  No record of William Chaffin has been found in the 1870 Georgia census.

 

Scott Chafin of Houston, TX, schafin@aol.com, provided the following list of descendants of William Chaffin and wife, Zechie Smith:

a.  Nancy Chaffin, b. c. 1802, d. c. 1908; m. James Harrison on 1 May 1817 in Jasper County, GA.  He was b. c. 1800 in GA, d. 1860/1870.

 

b.  Joel Chaffin [Sr], b. c. 1804 in GA, d. c. 3 September 1862; m. Martha R. Jones on 31 August 1826 in Walton County, GA.  She was b. 5 December 1805 in GA, d. 10 June 1888 in GA.

 

c.  John H. Chaffin, b. 8 August 1808, d. 26 September 1890 in Milton County, GA; m. Charlotte Harris on 14 February 1828 in Newton County, GA.  She was b. 2 October 1808 in GA, d. 16 April 1889 in Milton County, GA.  Both are buried in Union Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery in Milton, now Fulton County, GA.

 

d.  Samuel Chaffin, b. 10 October 1810 in GA, d. 11 September 1894; m. (1) --?-- Setzer.  She was b. c. 1811, d. c. August 1840.  He m. (2) Elender M. Pierce.  She was b. 12 July 1826 in GA, d. 7 August 1896.

 

e.  William Chafin Jr. , b. 1811 in GA, d. 12 July 1887 in Fayette Co, AL, bur. Stewart Family Cemetery, Fayette County, AL; m. (1) Sarah N. Jones on 4 August 1834 in Newton County, GA.  She was b. c. 1808 in GA, d. c. 1870 in AL.  He m. (2) Mary Ann --?-- in c. 1871 in AL.

 

f.  Edmon B. Chaffin, b. 15 December 1814 in GA, d. 24 September 1875 in AL; m. Mary H. Farr Jinks on 27 December 1835.  She was b. 17 March 1813, d. 28 June 1898 in Lee County, AL.

 

g.  James Smith Chaffin, b. c. 1821 in GA; m. Malenda Smith on 25 November 1838.  She was b. c. 1810.

 

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9.  Elizabeth Smith, b. early 1780s in Wilkes County, GA, d. probably after 1837 in Kemper County, MS; m. David Collum.  He d. probably before 1820.

 

Elizabeth Smith, like her sister Rachel, was unmarried at the time of her father James Smith’s 1797 will.  However, in 1801, the following entry appears in the estate returns of James Smith:

 

“…paid Jos. and Nathaniel [sic] Smith, paid Wm. Barron, paid David Collum and Wm. Chaffin, in right of his wife Zechie Smith, for their wives in part of their legacies.”

 

There is no known proof of an extant marriage record for David Collum and Elizabeth Smith; yet the above-mentioned estate returns indicate that David Collum was married to a daughter of James Smith.  Thus, this couple would have been married sometime between 2 January 1797, the date of her father’s will, and 24 February 1801, the date of the estate return cited above.

 

The Bible of William Barron and wife, Martha Smith (see child #1 above), contains two Collum entries:

 

Solomon Collom was born April the 21, 1806

James Collom was born May the 22th [sic] in the year of our Lord 1808

 

Although no relationships are stated regarding these two Collum entries, a logical explanation would be that Martha Smith Barron recorded the birthdates of her sister’s sons.  It should be noted that these two entries appear to have been recorded in the 1820s based on the dates of the surrounding entries in the Bible.  (Note: This Bible was in the possession of Mrs. Newt (Margaret) Etheredge of Georgia when it was microfilmed in the 1960s by the Georgia Archives.  It is included in the “Barron Collection”).

 

David Collum’s first recorded appearance is in the above-mentioned 24 February 1801 estate returns of his wife’s father, James Smith.  However, neither he nor any Collum appears in the published deed and tax records of early Wilkes County, GA.  Three months later, on 5 June 1801, David Collum, along with brothers-in-law, William Barron and John Smith, was a buyer at the estate sale of Charles Waller in Hancock County, which adjoins Wilkes County.  [Source: Hancock County, GA, Wills and Estates, Vol. AAAA, pp. 83-86].  Although William Barron and John Smith were residents of Hancock County by 1795 and 1801, respectively, and appear in various deed and tax records there, no further references to David Collum have been found in this county’s records.

 

David Collum next appears in the 1810 census of the Mississippi Territory in the combined listing for Claiborne and Warren Counties.  His family included 2 Ms < 21 (b. after 1789), 1 M > 21 (b. before 1789), 2 Fs < 21 (b. after 1789) and 1 F > 21 (b. before 1789).  Also listed in Claiborne/Warren Counties in 1810 was Dempsey White, husband of Mary Smith (sister to Elizabeth Smith Collum).  [Source: Early Inhabitants of the Natchez District (MS), by Norman E. Gillis, 1963, pp. 37 and 77].

 

The only other Collum entry in the 1810 Mississippi Territory census is that of Solomon Collum of nearby Amite County.  His family included 2 Ms < 21, 1 M > 21, 1 F < 21 and 1 F > 21.  [Source: Early Inhabitants of the Natchez District (MS), by Norman E. Gillis, 1963, p. 37].

 

References to the names David Collum and Smith Collum appear in the American State Papers in five land records dated 11 & 12 June 1811 for land on River Dubois, Territory of Missouri.  [Source: Vol. II, p. 718, and Vol. III, pp. 328 and 364].  If indeed this is the same David Collum, formerly of Georgia and the Mississippi Territory, then he must have received land grants in the Missouri Territory that he sold or failed to inhabit.  No Collum references appear in the 1820 Missouri census index or other published Missouri records for this time period.  The reference to Smith Collum has to refer to a man who was at least 21 years old in 1811, implying a birth year of 1780 or earlier.  This pre-1780 time period indicates some type of Collum-Smith connection made prior to the 1797/1800 marriage of David Collum and Elizabeth Smith.

 

The last known appearance of David Collum is in January 1813, at which time he enlisted as a private in the War of 1812 as part of the 1st Regiment of Mississippi Volunteers.  The period of service for this regiment was six months and re-enlistment was possible.  This regiment was organized at Baton Rouge, beginning in January 1813, with the re-enlisting members of the Mississippi regiment mentioned, as a nucleus, recruited by volunteers from the Territory.  This regiment and a Louisiana regiment, organized at the same time and place, formed a brigade which General Ferdinand L. Claiborne of Natchez was assigned to command.  [Sources: Mississippi Territory in the War of 1812, by Mrs. Dunbar Rowland, 1968, p. 28; also Military History of Mississippi 1803-1898, by Dunbar Rowland, 1998 (reprint), p. 5].

 

The 1st Regiment of Mississippi Volunteers was primarily mustered to quell the Creek Indian uprising in the Mississippi Territory.  On 23 December 1813, General Claiborne led the regiment into the Indian country and destroyed the Creek camp at Holy Ground.  As historian Dunbar Rowland stated, “This affair ended the record of the regiment, which was marked by great privation and suffering, with no opportunity for service or renown.”  General Claiborne wrote from Mt. Vernon: “My volunteers are returning to their homes with eight months’ pay due them, and almost literally naked.  They have served the last three months of an inclement winter without shoes or blankets and almost without shirts, but are still devoted to their country and properly impressed with the justice and necessity of the war.”  [Source: Military History of Mississippi 1803-1898, by Dunbar Rowland, 1998 (reprint), p. 6].

 

It is not known at present if David Collum survived the War of 1812.  A review of his military service records at the Mississippi Statel Archives would likely answer this question.  However, it is known that neither he nor anyone in his family applied for a pension.  Regardless of David Collum’s fate in this war, it is apparent that no one with the Collum surname (including variant spellings) is listed in the 1816 or 1820 Mississippi census indexes, although brother-in-law Dempsey White is listed in each.  This would indicate that the David and Solomon Collum listed as heads of households in the 1810 Mississippi Territory census had either died or moved from Mississippi by 1816.  While no further known reference to a David Collum appears in the indexed records of Mississippi, Alabama, or Georgia, there is a Solomon Collum of the right age range who appears in Hall County, GA, in the 1820 census.  The Solomon Collum of Hall County was evidently deceased by 1827, as the notation “orphans of Solomon Collum, deceased” appears in land lottery records for that year.  [Source: Reprint of Official Register of Land Lottery of Georgia, 1827, by Martha Lou Houston, 1967, p. 143].

 

Three counties south of Hall County in Jasper County appears another interesting Collum reference -- one that could refer to the widow of David Collum: A “Mrs. Elizabeth Collum” of Hays District, Jasper County, is shown in the 1821 Georgia land lottery to be a fortunate drawer of Land Lot #278, Section 7, located in Gwinnett County, GA.  To be eligible to draw, Elizabeth Collum would have resided in Georgia for at least three years.  [Source: The Third and Fourth or 1820 and 1821 Land Lotteries of Georgia].  A few years later (1823) in Jasper County, the marriage of Sarah Collum and John Osborn is recorded.  [Source: Laura C. Edwards, jledwards@mindspring.com].  These are to date the only known Collum references in published Jasper County records.

 

If indeed Elizabeth Smith Collum was widowed by the 1820s, Jasper County, GA, would be a logical locale for her new residence.  By 1820, a number of Elizabeth’s siblings and spouses were living there: William and Martha Smith Barron, William and Rachel/Zechie Smith Chaffin, and possibly Joseph Smith.  Elizabeth Smith Collum could have been living in the household of one of her siblings and thus would not have appeared as a head of household in the 1820 Georgia census.

 

However, Elizabeth Smith Collum may not have remained in Georgia.  In the 1837 state census for Mississippi, three Collums are listed in Kemper County, located on the Alabama-Mississippi border:

 

The proposed children for David Collum and wife, Elizabeth Smith, are as follows:

 

a.  Sarah Collum, b. 1803/1805 in GA (from 1850 and 1860 census records; it is possible that Sarah was born prior to the move from Georgia to Mississippi), d. 1870s in Chambers County, AL; m. John Osborn on 15 January 1823 in Jasper County, GA.  He was b. c. 1790, d. 1840s.  This couple resided in Tallapoosa County, AL, by 1840.  [Source: Laura Edwards, jledwards@mindspring.com].  Sarah bought land in Chambers County, AL, in 1851 and lived there until her death.

 

b.  Solomon Collum, b. 21 April 1806 (Bible record) in the Mississippi Territory, d. 25 February 1876 in Montgomery County, AR; m. Mary Cluster on 16 November 1827 in Monroe Co., GA.  (See a listing of known children in Appendix VII).

 

c.  James A. S. Collum, b. 22 May 1808 (Bible record) in the Mississippi Territory, d. after 1870, presumably in Choctaw County, MS; m. (1) Pemelia Spain (?) (per the death certificate of daughter Nancy); m. (2) Patience P. Sessions Solley (widow of Green W. Solley) on 13 November 1856 in Tallapoosa County, AL.  James Collum (shown as James A. Collum) was a resident of Paulding County, GA, in 1837 prior to moving to Alabama.  He began buying land (40 acres) in Tallapoosa County on 10 June 1848, and resided in that county for a number of years.  He moved to Choctaw County, MS, apparently between 1864 and 1870.  Some of his children were found in the 1880 census in this same area of MS, but, to date, James Collum has not been located.  Perhaps he died between 1870 and 1880.  [Sources: Whites Among the Cherokees, Georgia, 1828-1838, by Mary B. Warren and Eve B. Weeks, 1987, p. 197; also 1840 and 1860 Tallapoosa County, AL, censuses (listed as J. S. Collum and James S. Collom, respectively) and 1870 Choctaw County, MS, census (as James S. A. Collum); also http://www.glorecords.blm.gov; also Robert O. Collum, collum@sprynet.com; also Carla Vowell mrscrv@charter.net].  (See a listing of known children in Appendix VII).

 

Collum researchers have suggested additional children for David Collum and wife, Elizabeth Smith.  In particular, Wilkins Collum, Willis Collum, and Smith Collum are frequently mentioned as being possible children.  However, to date, it cannot be proven that David Collum lived, or at least made records, after 1813.  Solomon, James, and Sarah Collum, listed above as proposed children, all fit with (1) the ages and number of children in David Collum’s household in 1810 Mississippi and (2) the known locales of Elizabeth Smith Collum’s siblings and descendants.  In addition, Solomon and James Collum’s names, general ages, and birth states (according to census records) correspond with the two Collum Bible entries that appear in the Barron Bible. 

 

However, it should be noted that if the “Mrs. Elizabeth Collum” in the 1837 Kemper County, MS, state census was indeed the widow of David Collum, then it would be interesting to know the identity of the young female under the age of 16 (b. 1821/1837) living in this household.

 

Further research is warranted on this Collum family.

 

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APPENDIX I

 

The will and estate returns of James Smith, who d. 1797/1799 in Wilkes County, GA.  Information provided by Art Seder of Florida, ARSeder@aol.com.

 

The Will of James Smith, which was signed on 2 January 1797, and probated 9 July 1799, reads as follows:

 

    “In the name of God amen.  I James Smith of the County of Wilkes & State of Georgia being of perfect mind and memory do make & ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following, To Wit

    “Item I give and bequeath to my Son John Smith and to my Daughter Patty Barron a Tract of land on Long Creek in the County of Oglethorpe containing two hundred and sixteen acres be[ing] the same more or less granted to James Hart to be equally divided between them to them and their heirs forever.  Deed made to it.

    “Item I give and bequeath to my Son Joseph Smith the Tract of land I now live on in the County of Wilkes containing two hundred Acres more or less granted to James Smith to him and his heirs forever.

    “Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Elizabeth one Bedd & furniture to her & her heirs forever.

    “Item it is my Will and Desire that all the Rest of my Estate of Every kind whatever be sold on twelve months Credit and the money arising from such sale to be equally divided among my following Children or their heirs Viz Nathan Smith, John Smith, Joseph Smith, the children of my Son Jacob Smith, Mary White, Patty Barron, Elizabeth Smith, Rachel Smith, Sarah Thompson to them & their heirs forever.

    “Lastly I appoint my sons Nathan Smith, Jno Smith & Joseph Smith Executors to this my last Will & Testament utterly revoking and annulling all other Wills by me heretofore made do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament.  IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 2nd day of January in the year of Our Lord 1797 and of the Sovereignty and independence of America the twenty first year.”

 

The Will was attested to by Edward Butler, Nathaniel Rice, and Samuel Rice.

 

The returns filed with the probate court by the Executors, Nathan, John, and Joseph Smith, in February 1801, read as follows:

 

“…paid Jos. and Nathaniel [sic] Smith, paid Wm. Barron, paid David Collum and Wm. Chaffin, in right of his wife Zechie Smith, for their wives in part of their legacies.”

 

The returns of Jos. Smith, Executor, February 1802, include the receipt of Abel McIntosh, gdn of the heirs of Jacob Smith.  Returns for March 1803 include receipts of David Collum, Nathaniel [sic] Smith, Wm. Chaffin, Abel McIntosh, gdn, Wm Thompson for himself and Demcy [sic] White, November 1802 in full of their legacies.  [Source: Early Records of Georgia, Vol. II, by Grace Gilliam Davidson, p. 293].

 

The following appears in James Smith’s estate papers on file in the Georgia Department of Archives and History:

 

Report of Appraisers, Cory ___, ___ Junes, Joshua Chafin, Charles Phillips, Joseph Chafin, and Nath'l Harris, 16 July 1799:

    Return of Expenditures:

                Paid Edward Butler                                       3.05

                 "      Wm. Chafin                                          1

                 "      Nathan Smith                                        2

                 "      D. Terrell                                               .25

                 "      Able McIntosh, Guardian of the Heirs

                             of Jacob Smith                                 27--

                                                                                          _____

 

                                                                                           34.30

 

    By Cash of  Peter Harris                                            4

       "        Wm. Pollard                                                15.50

       "        Phil (?)                                                          2

       "        Joshua Chafin                                                  .50

       "        Henry Star     

    Sworn to by Joseph Smith (his mark), 26 February 1802

 

    D. Terrell - Rec'd of John Smith, Ex of James Smith, deceased, 25 cents for probate (1801).

 

    Record of Receipts and Payments by John and Joseph Smith, Executors of James Smith, 24 February 1801 [both by their marks]

    Of Cash received from Sundry Persons from the sales of the

estate  $135.74 1/4                 Per Contra

    1.    By cash pd Davis Merriwether, his acc’t                            4.50

    2.    do          pd John Smith in part of his part of estate            28.74

    3.    do          pd _____ Smith           do                                  28.74

    4.    do          pd Wm Barron             do                                 27.00

    5.    do          pd David Collum (for wife)                                27.00

    6.    do          pd Tipley Gats (?) his acc’t                                  2.82

    7.    do          pd Nathan Smith in part of his part of estate        25.00

    8.    do          pd Wm. Chafin for wife [his mark]                     25.00

    9.    do         pd D. Terrell his acc't                                           6.6 1/4

   10.   do         pd for stamp papers                                                .20

   11.   do         pd Wm. Hay, his acc’t for making one coffin         2.00

                                                                                              $177.06  1/4

 

    Return 16 March 1801 by Joseph Smith

    Rec'd of Lesley (?)                                                  14.68

       "          P. J. Stark                                                   .37

       "          Joshua Chafin                                             4.50

    Pd.         D. Terrell                                                      .25

       "          D Collum                                                     .16

       "         Nathan Smith                                             27.18 3/4

       "         Wm. Thompson                                         27.16 1/2

       "         Demsey White                                           27.16

       "         Wm. Chafin                                               27.16

       "         A. McIntosh, Guardian                               27.16   

 

 

 

APPENDIX II

 

The will of John Smith, transcribed from a copy of the original, found in Jones County, GA, Will Book A, pp. 160-161:

 

“In the name of God Amen, I John Smith, Senr. of the county of Jones & State of Georgia being in perfect mind and memory but calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner following that is to say, First after my Just debts are paid I give and bequeath unto my wife Nancy Smith all my property both real & personal as follows that is to say as my children does arrive to lawful age or marry that is to say John Smith Junr.[,] Prudy Smith[,] Nathan Smith[,] Willis Smith[,] Joseph Smith[,] Asa Smith and any others that may be born my lawful heirs to have out of my Estate when ever they arrive to lawful age or marry as before mentioned, one horse[,] bridle & saddle[,] cow & calf & feather bed and furniture except my son John Smith who has his horse[,] saddle & bridle already, if he be spared at the time or times of their arriving of age or marrying without injuring the property so as to effect the maintainance[sic] of my family & to be judged of by my executors & I do hereby confirm what I have given my Son Bassel Smith and my Son James Smith and my Son William [sic] Smith and my daughter Nancy Cook and my Daughter Sarah Gammon & at the death of my wife Nancy Smith all my children except my two Sons Bassel and James Smith to have each of them the value in money or property of land my said sons Bassel and James Smith has already had and the balance of my property to be for the maintainance of my Son Henry during his natural life should he survive the death of his mother to be equally divided among all my children at his death & if he should not survive the death of his mother to be equally divided at her death the property to be applied to the maintainance of my Son Henry in the best way & manner my executors may --age for his benefit and I do hereby constitute[,] make and name my wife Nancy Smith[,] my son John Smith Jr. and my friend Abraham S. Wright my sole Executor of this my last will & testament, and I do hereby utterly disallow[,] revoke[,] and disannul [sic] all and every other testament[,] will[,] legacies[,] bequeaths and Executors by me in any wise[sic] before named ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will & testament.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand seal this Eighteenth day of March[,] one thousand eight hundred and twenty six.

 

Signed and sealed in

the presence of

Test:  Joseph Horsley    )                                 his         

          Moses Gunn        }                      John (X) Smith

          James Satterwhite)                               mark

 

Georgia          }

Jones County }  Court of Ordinary July Term 1827.  Then came into open court Joseph Horsley who being duly sworn say [sic] he was present and saw John Smith make his mark sign[,] seal[,] execute and pronounce the above and fore going instrument of writing to be his last will and testament & that he was of sound mind at the execution thereof that he did sign the same as a witness thereto at the same time at the request of the testator & in his freewill & in the presence of each other.

 

Sworn to & Subsribed in open court this

2nd July 1827.                   }

Charles Macarthy C.C.C.  }                      Joseph Horsley

 

 

Information on some of the families of the children of John Smith, son of James Smith:

 

a.  Basil Smith, b. 1 August 1793, d. 21 November 1879 in Rapides Parish, LA; m. Melinda Simmons on 8 April 1814 in Putnam County, GA.  She was b. 1 January 1796, d. 17 April 1875 in Rapides Parish, LA.  She was the daughter of William and Patience Simmons and sister to the Nancy Simmons who married a John Smith (possibly Basil’s father) in Putnam County on 11 December 1811.  (Note: Melinda’s grave stone reads: “Malinda Simmions wife of Basil Smith,” confirming that this is the couple who married in Putnam County, GA). 

 

The children of Basil Smith and wife, Melinda Simmons, were:

 

a 1.  Basil Smith

a 2.  John Smith, b. 1 January 1817, d. 13 July 1899 in Cheneyville, Rapides Parish, LA; m. (1) Sarah Ann Adams on 2 March 1842; m. (2) Sarah Margaret Smith on 19 November 1860 in LA.

a 3.  Patience Smith, b. July 1818 in GA, d. 2 March 1801 in Rapides Parish, LA; m. Josiah Abner Miller on 31 July 1837 in Avoyelles, LA. 

a 4.  William Smith, b. c. 1820 in MS, d. in TX; m. Emily Neal in c. 1840 in LA.

a 5.  Sanders Smith, b. c. 1825 in MS; m. Catherine Merchant.

a 6.  Nathaniel Smith, b. 1 July 1829 in MS, d. 12 June 1909 in Gay Hill, Milam County, TX; m. Mary Winegeart.

a 7.  Ezekial Smith, b. c. 1831 in LA, m. Martha --?--.

a 8.  Pruda/Prudence Smith, b. c. 1834 in LA.

a 9.  Joseph/Josiah Smith, b. 24 September 1836 in LA (MS?), d. 15 July 1863 in Rapides Parish, LA; m. Vashti Wells on 15 July 1863 in LA.  She was b. 3 December 1833 in MS, d. 11 March 1920 in Rapides Parish, LA.

 

The naming of the children and the order of the names given are significant: the oldest son, Basil, was named for his father.  The next son, John, was likely named for his paternal grandfather; the third son, William, possibly for his maternal grandfather.  The name Sanders is interesting because of the association of Sanders Walker with the Smiths in Georgia.  And Nathaniel is reminiscent of “Nathan,” a family name used for several generations in the Smith family.

 

There are two daughters: the first, Patience, named for her maternal grandmother.  This leaves Prudence, also known as “Pruda.”  Since all three other grandparents were represented in the children’s names, surely Pruda was named after her paternal grandmother (assumed to be Prudence Barron, daughter of William and Prudence Davis Barron).

 

[Sources: Information provided by e-mail communication from Brian Smith: bksmith@outdrs.net, and Shari Simonds: shari@viptx.net in 2000, and from Sue Meinhart: SUEMEINHRT@aol.com].

 

 

b.  James Smith, b. 26 March 1797 in GA, d. 30 March 1880 in Lafayette County, MS; m. Martha Sarah Pool on 30 March 1819 in Jones County, GA.  She was b. 5 Jan 1800 in Columbia County, GA, d. 27 April 1888 in Lafayette County, MS (daughter of Samuel Pool, Revolutionary War soldier, and Agnes Bullock Pool).  Based on birth and marriage records below, the Smiths had removed from Jones to Upson County, GA, by 1828 and were in Tallapoosa County, AL, by 1848.

 

Their children of James Smith and wife, Martha Sarah Pool, were:

 

b 1.  William Basil Smith, b. 18 December 1819 in Jones County, GA, d. 29 December 1864; m. Uzeba Elliot on 21 December 1837.

b 2.  Telitha Smith, b. 11 June 1821 in Jones County, GA, d. 20 July 1888; m. David King Norman on 13 August 1838 in Upson Co, GA.

b 3.  Prudence Smith, b. 25 August 1823 in Jones County, GA, d. 22 December 1885 in Lafayette County, MS, bur. Shiloh Cemetery; m. Matthew Segler on 18 November 1847 in Tallapoosa County, AL.

b 4.  John S. Smith, b. 25 March 1825 in Jones County, GA; m. Angelica Segler on 6 February 1848.

b 5.  Sarah Smith, b. 16 January 1827 in Jones County, GA, d. 24 February 1901 in Lafayette County, MS; m. George Howell Welch on 21 December 1848 in Tallapoosa County, AL.

b 6.  Samuel P. Smith, b. 3 October 1828 in Upson County, GA; m. Hannah Caroline Brewster on 19 December 1848.

b 7.  Mary Elizabeth Smith, b. 4 November 1830 in Upson County, GA, d. 5 June 1831 in Upson County, GA.

b 8.  Ellen Smith, b. 12 March 1832 in Upson County, GA, d. before 1880; m. George W. Poole on 23 September 1852 in Tallapoosa County, AL.

b 9.  Phereby Smith, b. 12 August 1834 in Upson County, GA, d. 9 September 1834 in Upson County, GA.

b 10.  Kerenhappuch Smith, b. 4 July 1835 in Upson County, GA, d. 16 September 1920; m. Daniel Gardner on 10 September 1854 in Tallapoosa County, AL.

b 11.  James Matthew Smith, b. 6 December 1837 in GA, d. 1 January 1859.

b 12.  Hiram Barron Smith, b. 3 October 1839 in GA, d. 16 December 1914; m. Frances E Grice on 13 July 1865.

b 13.  Martha Anna Rebecca Smith, b. 18 December 1841, d. in AL.

 

As in the case of the Basil and Melinda Simmons Smith family, the James and Martha Pool Smith family gave their children names that indicate descent from John Smith and a Barron wife.  Their oldest son was named William Basil Smith.  John Smith (son of the elder James Smith) named a son “Bazzel” in his 1826 will.  Their oldest daughter was named Prudence, also a daughter named in John Smith’s will.  

 

In addition, there were children named Phereby and Hiram Barron Smith.  Hiram Barron (son of John Barron, grandson of Prudence Davis Barron) married Pheriby Pool on 16 November 1820 in Jones County, GA.  Pheriby Pool Barron was a sister to Martha Sarah Pool.  Both of these women were named as daughters in the Revolutionary War pension application of Samuel Pool.  Also, Hiram Barron and his family are listed in the 1850 Randolph County, AL, census.  (Note: Randolph County was located near where the James Smith family lived in Tallapoosa County).  Hiram Barron died in Randolph County in 1872; his wife Pheriby Pool Barron also died in Randolph County (b. 15 May 1802, d. 24 December 1871).  Hiram Barron’s brother, Henry Barron, migrated from Upson County, GA, to Tallapoosa County, AL, which were also the residences of James Smith.

[Sources: Sharon Rowan of Adel, GA; also LDS Ancestral Files of Mary Helen Longfellow Mitchell (89 Lynette Drive, Pickerington, OH 43147) and Elzyvee S. Judd (Box 1 Springdale, UT, 84767)].

 

 

c.  William Smith

 

 

d.  Sarah “Sally” Smith, b. c. 1800 in GA, d. before 1867 in Smith County, TX; m. Silas Gammon on 12 October 1820 in Jones County, GA.

 

The Gammons resided in Jones County, GA, until 1824 when they moved to nearby Monroe County.  By 1833, they had moved to Troup County, GA, then lived briefly in the Arkansas Territory and Louisiana before arriving in Montgomery County, Republic of Texas, by 1838.  Preceding them to Texas were Sarah’s sister, Nancy, and her husband, William Alston Cook.  Sarah’s brother, Nathan Smith, had also located in Montgomery County by this time (see Commissioners Court Minutes under Nathan Smith, child #g, below).  Though Nancy and her husband remained in Montgomery County, the Gammons moved back to Louisiana by 1849.  But by 1851, the Gammons returned to Texas, this time to Smith County, where their son, Smith, had briefly lived.  The Gammons remained in Smith County for the remainder of their lives.  In 1857, the Gammons were charter members of Indian Creek Baptist Church in western Smith County.  The church membership was composed of extended family, including Sarah’s first cousin (once removed), John Wood Barron, grandson of Martha Smith Barron.  Was it coincidence that family members joined together after so many years and miles living apart?  (For more information about the history and the members of Indian Creek Baptist Church, see http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~famlytre/IndianCreek.htm).

 

(Note: Silas Gammon, b. 1796/1800, d. 1868, was the son of Smith Gammon and wife, Elizabeth Monk, daughter of Willis and Elizabeth Monk.  Smith Gammon married Elizabeth Monk on 7 January 1781 in Wake County, NC; Elizabeth Monk Gammon was last known to be residing in Jones County, GA, in 1821.  Smith Gammon also had a brother named Willis Gammon, who m. Rebecca Willis in 1807.  It is interesting to see yet additional Smith-Willis connections).

 

The children of Silas Gammon and wife, Sarah Smith, were:

 

d 1.  Smith M. Gammon, b. c. 1821 in Jones County, GA, d. after 1867 in Smith County, TX; m. Elizabeth Splawn on 13 February 1842 in Montgomery County, Republic of Texas.

d 2.  John G. Gammon, b. c. 1823 in Jones County, GA, d. after 1870 in Hunt County, TX; m. (1) Clarissa Martin on 17 March 1853 in Hot Spring County, AR; m. (2) Catherine Fenter on 26 October 1856 in Hot Spring County, AR; m. (3) unknown after 1860 in AR (TX); m. (4) Josanna C. “Josie” Ice on 23 November 1865 in Smith County, TX.

d 3.  Wiley Bonaparte Gammon, b.17 January 1825 in Monroe County, GA, d. 23 February 1904 in Motz (now Artex), Miller County, AR, bur. In Rock Springs Cemetery, Miller County, AR; m. Nancy Alice Price in c. 1849 in Claiborne Parish, LA.  She was b. April 1832 in LA.

d 4.  Jefferson Jackson Gammon, b. 1 September 1827 in Monroe County, GA, d. 13 November 1877 in Van Zandt County, TX; m. Martha Ann Pierce in c. 1848 in LA.  She was b. 29 October 1831, d. 31 August 1899 in Van Zandt County, TX.

d 5.  (Female) Gammon, b. 1825/1830 in GA.

d 6.  Serena Gammon, b. c. 1835 in Arkansas Territory; m. William Henry Brittain on 18 May 1873 in Van Zandt County, TX.

d 7.  Martha Ann Gammon, b. c. 1837 in LA, d. January 1870 in Smith County, TX; m. Willis Jarrell Ellis on 27 October 1859 in Smith County, TX.  He was b. 6 August 1841 in Pike County, GA, d. 28 September 1876 in Smith County, TX.

d 8.  Minerva A. Gammon, b. c. 1840 in Montgomery County, Republic of Texas, d. after December 1879 in the Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory (now probably Atoka County, OK); m. (1) George J. Price on 14 January 1858 in Smith County, TX.  He d. on 5 February 1863 in Camp Douglas, Chicago, IL, m. (2) John William Null on 23 April 1864 in Smith County, TX.  He was b. 6 February 1846 in Louisville, Winston County, MS.

 

[Source: Bobby J. Wadsworth: bobby.jay@verizon.net.  For more information on the children of Silas and Sarah Smith Gammon, see Bobby Wadsworth’s website at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~famlytre/index.htm.  His data on the Silas Gammon family begins at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~famlytre/Gammon~1.htm#Silas~G.

 

e.  Nancy Smith, b. 28 February 1802 in GA; d. 1869 in Walker County, TX; m. William Alston Cook in c. 1819 in GA.  He was b. 2 October 1794 in GA, d. 26 October 1848 in Walker County, TX.  Both are buried at the abandoned Stanley Cemetery on the old home place.
           
Timeline:

  February 1827 – Sold land in Monroe County, GA
 
1834 – Arrived in what is now Texas with four children
 
14 March 1835 – William received title to 4,428 acres from State of Coahuila and Texas: land located 8 miles NW of Huntsville in Montgomery (now Walker) County
 
30 September 1836 – William discharged from the Texas Revolutionary Army; later received 640 acres of bounty land adjoining his league of land
 
08 August 1840 – William & Nancy Smith Cook joined Mount Pleasant Baptist Church of Montgomery County (later members of Rock Springs Baptist Church)

The children of William Alston Cook and wife, Nancy Smith, were:

e 1.  Zion Wilson Cook, b. c. 1820 in GA, d. c. 31 October 1861, bur. in Stanley Cemetery.
e 2.  Missouri Cook, b. 4 June 1824 in GA, d. 12 February 1871; m. Peter Petree.
e 3.  Nancy Elizabeth Cook, b. December 1827 in GA, d. 29 January 1879, bur.in Bethel Cemetery, Grimes County, TX; m. Harrison Wells.
e 4.  John William Cook, b. c. 1830 in GA, d. 27 May 1864 at the Battle of New Hope Church in the Atlanta (GA) campaign; m. Sisley Ann Wells on 10 April 1851.
e 5.  Charles Monroe Cook, b. 17 December 1835 in Walker County, Republic of Texas, d. 1 March 1863 at Camp Butler, IL (US military prison); m. Julia Lucindy Flint on 24 December 1857.
e 6.  Elmira MARY Cook, b. c. 1838 in Walker County, Republic of Texas d. 9 July 1856, bur. in Stanley Cemetery.
e 7.  Elvira MARTHA Cook, b. c. 1838 in Walker County, Republic of Texas, bur. in Madison County, TX, m. John W. Manning on 22 December 1853.
e 8.  Georgia Ann America Cook, b. c. 1841 in Walker County, TX; m. William W. Brantley on 28 September 1856.
e 9.  Phelisa Jiney Cook, b. 22 November 1844 in Walker County, TX, d. 28 February 1924, bur. in Memorial Cemetery, Johnson County, TX; m. (1) Lysander E. Stanley on 19 April 1860, m. (2) Jesse J. Cole on 29 December 1886.                                                                                                                                  [Source: article by Lois Cook Owen on the William A. Cook family in Montgomery County (TX) History, Montgomery County Genealogical Service, 1981, p. 231].

 

 

f.  John Smith Jr.  Possibly the John Smith who m. Nancy Bridges on 20 April 1826 in Jones County, GA.

 

 

g.  Nathan Smith, b. 1 July 1807, d. 19 May 1885 in Claiborne Parish, LA; m. Levinia --?-- on 13 November 1828 in GA.  [Sources: transcription from grave stone in Old Homer Cemetery, Claiborne Parish, LA, ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/claiborne/cemeteries/oldhomr.txt; Nathan’s stone states that he was “born in GA.”  Same dates given by the Smith Bible (probably belonged to Nathan Smith), transcribed in Bible Records, Vol. 4, Louisiana Genealogical and Historical Society: Be It Known and Remembered, 1966, pp. 40- 41].  No marriage record has been found in GA].   Levinia (spelled Loveina on her grave stone and both Lovina and Levina in the Smith Bible) was b. 7 March 1807, d. 13 November 1884.  [Sources: Death date of “Thursday the 13 of November 1884” listed in the Smith Bible (probably belonged to Nathan Smith), transcribed in Bible Records, Vol. 4, Louisiana Genealogical and Historical Society: Be It Known and Remembered, 1966, pp. 40- 41.  Transcription from Old Homer Cemetery, ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/claiborne/cemeteries/oldhomr.txt shows the day as the 14th (as do the Lebanon Church minutes).  Her stone identifies her as the wife of Nathan Smith].  A transcription of the dates in the Smith Bible follow the list of Nathan Smith’s children.

 

Nathan was in Monroe County, GA, in 1830 (1830 census, p. 221).  By 1831, he may have moved farther west to Harris County, GA.  [His son, William J., was born in Harris County according to his Confederate pension application.  Copy in possession of Carol Young of Haughton, LA, lcjyoung@yahoo.com.] He was living in Montgomery County, Republic of Texas, in 1838 with his sisters, Sarah and Nancy, and their husbands, Silas Gammon and William Alston Cook.  [Source: “Montgomery County, Texas, Commissioners Court Minutes,” The Herald, (Montgomery County Genealogical & Historical Society) 13:3 (Fall 1990), p. 116: March Term 1838; the men assigned to work on the Cincinnati-to-Washington road in Precinct No. 7 were Benjamine Robinson (overseer), W.A. Cooke (sic), Nathan Smith, Silas Gammon, Smitt McGammon (sic), T. Housley, ____ Young and I. Housley.]  By 1840, Nathan had settled in Claiborne Parish, LA, (per census records, p. 102), where he remained for the rest of his life.  Though he cannot be located on the 1850 census, Nathan received many land patents in Claiborne Parish from 1843 through 1860, including some dated 1850.  [Source: www.glorecords.blm.gov].  Also, it should be noted that the Gammon family is listed in the 1850 Claiborne Parish, LA, census with some of the same neighbors shown previously for Nathan Smith in the 1840 census.  In 1860, N. Smith, age 52, born in GA, is listed with his wife, Levinia, also 52 (no birth location).   

 

Nathan and Levinia were members of Lebanon Primitive Baptist Church in Claiborne Parish.  Church records show that Nathan Smith joined on 3 July 1858, "Luvina" Smith on 4 April 1873.  The minutes also record death dates.  [Source:  Claiborne Parish, LA, rootsweb page: ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/claiborne/churches/mtlebanon.txt].

 

The children of Nathan and Levinia Smith were:

 

g 1.  James L. Smith, b.23 March 1830 in GA; d. 18 November 1864; m. Charlotte Talbert on 2 November 1848.
g 2.  William J. Smith, b.12 November 1831 in GA, d.25 Feb.1909, bur. in Lebanon Cemetery, Claiborne Parish, LA.  He m. (1) Sarah Ann Welden on 11 February 1849; m. (2) Nancy A. Allen Adkins, widow of Zaccheus Frank Adkins, on 9 April 1854 in Claiborne Parish, LA.  She was b. 22 May 1832, d. 7 June 1912.   Both William and Nancy are buried in Lebanon Cemetery, Claiborne Parish, LA.  Note: William J. Smith and John E. Smith both served in Company D, 28th LA Infantry Regiment, in the Civil War. Company D was raised in Claiborne Parish and both men enlisted on 11 May 1862.
g 3.  Mary Jane Smith, b.15 September 1834 in GA, d. 31 December 1908, b. Old Cemetery Minden, Webster, LA; m. (1) Columbus Letchworth Welden on 10 August 1848 in Claiborne Parish, LA.  He was b. 10 August 1823 and d. September 1863.  He served in Company D, 19th LA Infantry.  She m. (2) William Life on 1 July 1873 in Webster, LA. 
g 4.  John E. Smith, b.12 Nov.1836 in GA, d.31 July 1862; m. Nancy Fannie Mann on 15 January 1860 in Claiborne Parish, LA.  She m. John H. Wheeler after John Smith’s death.  (See note under William J. Smith).

g 5.  Daughter?, b. 1835-1840 (per 1840 Claiborne Parish, LA, census record though no indication given in Smith Bible).

[Source: Information on Nathan Smith’s children from Smith Bible and Robert Rainey Morris, raineymorris@hotmail.com.]

 


SMITH BIBLE

Bible printed in 1829 at Cooperstown (N.Y.). Copied by Mrs. Harlon A.Lee of Shreveport and sent to the Society through Mrs. S. J. Nation.

                                   
Family Records
W. J. Smith was borned on the 12 day of November A.D. 1831
Nancy A. Allin was borned on the 22 day of May A.D. 1832


Births

Marthey Jane Adkins was borned on the 18 day of March A.D. 1849  } Note from V. Kruschwitz:  Martha Jane and Sarah Adkins were Nancy Allen
Sarah ? Adkins was borned on the 22 day of September A.D. 1851     }  Adkins children by her first marriage
Lovina Smith was borned on the 14 day of Oct. A.D. 1854
Mary C. Smith was borned on the 8 day of February A.D. 1857.

                                   
Marriages
Nathan Smith and Lovina was married the 13th. of November in the year of Our Lord 1828
James L. Smith and Charlotta was married the 2 day of November in the year of Our Lord 1848
Columbus L. Weldin and Mary Jane Smith were married on the 10 day of August A.D. 1848
James L. Smith and Charlotte Talbert were married on the 2 day of November A.D. 1848
William J. Smith and Sarah Ann Weldin were married on the 11 day of February A.D. 1849
John E. Smith and Nancy F. ?man was married the 15 of January in the year of Our Lord 1860.


                                    Births
Nathan Smith was borned the 1 of July in the year of Our Lord 1807
Lovina Smith was borned the 7 of March in the year of Our Lord 1807
James L. Smith was borned on the twenty third day of March in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and thirty
William J. Smith was borned on the twelfth day of November in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and thirty one
Mary Smith was borned on the fifteenth day of September eighteen hundred and thirty four
John E. Smith was borned the 12 of November in the year of Our Lord 1836
Benjamine McCullough Harrington was born Oct. 13, 1864 in Columbia County Ark.
Thomas J. Pitts was born on the 20 of January in the year of Our Lord 1846. Departed this life on Friday night fourteen minutes after ten clock Feb. the 8, 1878.
A. Jane was borned on the 27 day of December 1857
Carline was borned on the 4 day of March 1859.

                                   
Deaths
John Smith departed this life on the Sixteenth day of June in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and twenty seven.
John E. Smith departed this life on Thursday the 31 day of July 1862.
James L. Smith departed this life on Friday the 18 day of November in the year of Our Lord A.D. 1864.
Hulda E. McDaniel departed this life 10 o'clock Monday the 7 of March 1868.
Prudenc Kind departed this life Wednesday half past Eleven o'clock July the 29, 1868.
Levina Smith departed this life Thursday the 13 of November 1884.
Nathan Smith departed this life May 19, 1885
William J. Smith departed this life on the early morning of Feb. 25, 1909 age 78 years 3 months and 13 days "Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord."
Nancy Smith departed this life June 7, 1912.


Note found in the Smith Bible: B. H. Hart was borned the 26th day of May A.D. 1839. Died the 12th day of August A.D. 1882.


            Part of a letter found in the Smith Bible:
"letters I recieved was glad to here from you we are all wel the babys name is Deller Sarah (?lawons) and She is the swetest thing you ever saw well you say you are not a camelite I am glad you ar not but I do want you to bee a christian and you cant bee a christan without faith repentence and confession and baptism the scripure is with the hart and beliveth unto righteousness and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation I have herd the camolite teach water salvation but the christens dont do that, they teach the hole bible and nothing else."

[Source: Bible Records, Vol. 4, Louisiana Genealogical and Historical Society: Be It Known and Remembered, 1966, pp. 40- 41].


NOTE: Martha Jane and Sarah Prudence Adkins were daughters of Nancy Allen and her first husband Zaccheus Frank Adkins.

            B. H. Hart was Barney C. Hart, husband of Martha Jane Adkins.

 

 

h.  Willis Smith, d. 1827/1836 with no descendants.

 

 

i.  Prudence “Prudy” Smith, b. c. 1810, d. 29 July 1868 in Claiborne Parish, LA; m. (1) John B. Manning on 4 December 1827 in Jones County, GA (he d. bef. October 1836); m. (2) John E. W. King on 23 April 1840 in Troup County, GA.  The John B. Manning family was listed in the 1830 Jones County census (p. 434) with 1 M < 5 and 1 F < 5.  On 26 October 1833, John B. Manning “of Jones County” purchased lot 217 in District 3 of Henry County from William Johnson.  [Source: Henry County, Georgia, Land Records, 1824-1838, Deed Books C/D, F, G, H, by Freda Reid Turner, 1993, p. 168: Deed Book F, p. 410].  Sometime before January 1836, Manning moved to Troup County, GA, where he died, as estate returns began on that date. 

 

The children of John B. Manning and wife, Prudence Smith, included:

 

i 1.  Martha E. Manning, b. c. 1828 in Jones County, GA; m. John M. Johnson on 22 January 1860 in Chambers County, AL.

i 2.  William I. or J. Manning, b 18 or 28 October 1828, d. 7 Aug 1914; m. Nancy Ann Elder on 13 September 1848 in Harris County, GA.  She was b. 29 December 1832, d. 29 January 1907.

i 3.  Mary M. Manning; m. Irvin Gilleland probably before 1849 in GA

i 4.  Sarah Jane Manning, b. 1 April 1834 in GA, d. 21 August 1885 in Clay County, AL; m. Joseph William Elder on 28 December 1852 in Chambers County, AL.  He was b. 22 March 1831 and d. 8 November 1913.  Both are buried in Union-D Cemetery, Clay County, AL.

i 5.  Nancy B. Manning, b. c. 1835 in GA.

 

On 23 April 1840 in Troup County, Prudence Smith Manning married John E. W. King, a man 13 years her junior.  Elijah Satterwhite, whose wife Rebecca was the sister of Prudence’s deceased husband, performed the ceremony. [Source of Satterwhite/Manning relationship: www.familysearch.com: ancestral file submitted by Vera E. Culpepper (P.O. Box 2054, Provo UT, 84603)].  By 1848, John E. King had received land grants in Chambers County, AL, near Barrons, Satterwhites, and Smiths.  The King family still lived in the county during the 1850 census (p. 320).  By the 1860 census, the Kings had moved west to nearby Tallapoosa County (p. 226).  Sometime between daughter Missouria’s marriage in Tallapoosa County in 1863 and 1867, Prudence King moved near her brother Nathan in Claiborne Parish, LA.  To date no record has been found indicating that any of her family moved to Claiborne Parish with her.  She joined Lebanon Primitive Baptist Church in Claiborne Parish on 3 August 1867.  Her brother, Nathan, was already a member.  Nathan’s Bible recorded her death date as “Wednesday half past Eleven o'clock July the 29, 1868.”  [Source: Smith Bible (probably belonged to Nathan Smith), transcribed in Bible Records, Vol. 4, Louisiana Genealogical and Historical Society: Be It Known and Remembered, 1966, pp. 40- 41].  The church minutes list her death date as August 1868.  [Source:  Claiborne Parish, LA, rootsweb page: ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/claiborne/churches/mtlebanon.txt].

 

 

The children of John E. W. King and wife, Prudence Smith, included:

 

i 6.  Frances A. King, b. c. 1839 in GA; m. Sheriff A. Brewster on 9 December 1858 in Chambers County, AL.

i 7.  Missouria King, b. 1840/1844 in GA; m. James W. Bishop on 27 August 1863 in Tallapoosa County, AL.

i 8.  Emily King, b. c. 1843 in GA.

 

[Sources: Early Marriages, Troup County, Georgia, 1828-1900, by Merle Massengale Bruce; also Histories of LaGrange and Troup County, Georgia, Vol. 1 and III (sic), by Forrest Clark Johnson, III; also Estate Records of Troup County, Georgia 1827-1850, by Randall A. Allen and Danny Knight; also Chambers County, AL ,Tract Book, by Ruth Royal Crump, 1984; also Marriage Records  of Chambers Co., Alabama, Book 1, 1833-1859, by Marjorie Andrews, 1974; also Marriage Records of Tallapoosa County, Alabama, Vol. 1, 1834-1863, by Robert C. and Julia F. Horn, 1989].

 

 

j.  Joseph Smith.  Likely the Joseph Smith who m. (1) unknown; m. (2) Nancy Glass Cleland (widow of William Cleland) on 24 October 1844 in Jones County, GA.  This Joseph Smith first appeared in the 1840 Jones County census on the same page as Nancy Garner (p. 122).  From the 1850 and 1860 Jones County censuses (pp. 198 and 521, respectively), he was born 1815/1816.  His children included: Ophelia, Nancy J., Eliza, Mary, Joanna, John W., Isaac, and Georgia Smith.

 

 

k.  Henry Smith, d. 1827/1836 with no descendants.

 

 

l.  Asa Smith.  Since he was the last child named in his father’s will, Asa was probably the one of the youngest children, possibly born after 1820.  He may be the Asa Smith listed in the 1850 Jasper County, GA, census (p. 95) with a wife named Martha.  This family was later found in the 1860 and 1870 Stewart County, GA, censuses.  From these census records Asa was b. 1822/1824.  Named children were Henry, Nancy, Mary, John, and Syntha Smith.

 

 

m.  Cynthia Smith, b. c. 1826. in GA.  Born after the writing of her father’s will, she was identified as a minor child in the Libel for Discovery filed by the family against John Garner in October 1836.

 

 

John Smith’s sons, Basil and James, generally followed a recognizable naming pattern for their children, incorporating common family names from past generations.  This was not the case for daughters, Nancy, Sarah, and Prudence.  Nancy’s son, John William Cook, may have been named after her father (William Simmons) and her husband (John Smith), or less likely after William Barron, believed to be the father of John Smith’s first wife.  

 

Sarah’s son, Smith M. Gammon, is likely named after his paternal grandfather, Smith Gammon, and son, John G. Gammon, after his maternal grandfather, John Smith.  It is possible that Prudence’s son, William J. Manning, could be named for his grandfather Barron and daughter, Martha E. Manning, for her aunt, Martha Smith Barron.  However, the names of the other children in these families do not appear to be traditional.

 

 

Child of Nancy Smith Garner and John Garner:

 

a.  John W. Garner, b. about 1834.

 

 

APPENDIX III

 

William Foster of "Green" County, GA, wrote his will on 3 December 1808, listing daughters Sally Smith, Eliza Heath, Polly Smith, Phebe Catuehead (sic), Rutha Foster, Patsy Foster, Rebecca Foster, and sons Truett, James, Spencer, and Shadrack Foster.  Executors were William Johnson and John Slaughter.  The will was filed 10 February 1812 in Claiborne County, MS.  (See below for a full transcription of the will). 

 

Just prior to writing his will, William Foster sold property in Greene County:

William Foster of Greene County sold to Richard Smith of Greene County on 3 November 1808 for the sum of $750, 182 acres of land in Greene County.  Wit: John Slaughter and Nathan Atkinson.  Recorded 2 March 1809.  [Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 504].  It is noteworthy that a witness to this deed was John Slaughter, co-executor of William Foster's will.

 

According to the book Passports issued by Governors of Georgia, by Mary G. Bryan, 1959, passports through the Creek Nation were ordered for a William Foster on 22 November 1808 and 26 November 1808 (pp. 243 and 247).  It seems likely that William Foster sold his property in Greene County, obtained passports for the hazardous journey through Indian Territory to Mississippi and then wrote his will before his departure.

 

The information provided in William Foster's will indicate that this was the man whose two daughters, Sarah and Polly, married Nathan and Joseph Smith, sons of James Smith.  Art Seder, in his book, A Smith Family Odyssey, states that Sarah “Sally” Foster married Nathan Smith in c. 1782.  Nathan Smith was listed in Wilkes County tax records as early as the mid-1780s.  Wilkes County records list the marriage of Polly Foster and Joseph Smith (on 4 December 1799). 

 

Phebe Catuehead (sic), identified as another Foster daughter, was married to John Cadenhead in Greene County, GA, on 2 December 1808 by William Johnson, JP.  The marriage license was issued on 27 November 1808 in Greensboro and identified both parties as residents of Greene County.  [Source: Curt Ledbetter, Montgomery AL, curtl@msn.com.  Also, see Southern Cadenheads - James Cadenhead, Sr. and His Descendants in the Southern United States, by Kenneth Cadenhead and Bill Germany, 1997.].  If the marriage date is correct, Phoebe Foster married the day before her father drafted his will.  (Note: The Cadenhead family Bible dates the marriage of Phoebe Foster and John Cadenhead as 2 December 1806.  The date is variously recorded as 27 November 1807, 2 December 1807, and 2 December 1808 in books listing Greene County, GA, marriages).  [Sources: Bible Records, volume II, Barbour County, Alabama, by Helen S. Foley, 1976, p. 29; Colonial Georgia Marriage Records from 1760-1810, by Frances T. Ingmire; also 40,000 Early Georgia Marriages, by Mattox; Georgia Genealogist State Records; and DAR Historical Records].

 

William and sons, Truett, James, and Spencer Foster left many records in Wilkes, Greene and Hancock Counties, GA.  William Foster, who owned land in Greene County, appeared in the 1790 Wilkes tax returns living near Truett Foster, who owned no land or slaves, which likely meant that Truett had just come of age.  (Note: William Foster had been granted land in Greene County on 3 January 1785.  [Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 392]).  Nearby were living Shipherd (sic) Foster and Kimey (sic) Foster, identified by Art Seder as the father and brother of William Foster.  [Sources: Wilkes County, Georgia, Tax Records, 1785 - 1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson; also A Smith Family Odyssey, by Arthur R. Seder Jr., 1999].  By 1796, William and Truett Foster had moved to nearby Hancock County.  Living in the vicinity were Chapel and Thomas Heath.  (Possibly one of these men married Eliza Foster).  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. I1, 1789-1799, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, pp. 055 and 053 of the Hancock County Digest].  That same year, Spencer and James Foster were listed in Wilkes County, with no land or slaves, next to James Smith, the patriarch of the Smith family outlined in this article.  [Source: Wilkes County, Georgia, Tax Records, 1785 - 1805, Vol. 1 & II, by Frank Parker Hudson].  Spencer Foster also witnessed the 1796 deed of land located in Oglethorpe County from James Smith to his son-in-law, William Barron, and son, John Smith.  (See Martha Smith, child #1, above for transcription of deed).  And James Foster witnessed the sale of property in Wilkes by his brother-in-law and sister, Joseph and Polly Foster Smith, in 1803.  (See child #7 above for deed transcription).

 

Several Georgia deeds confirm the identity of Truett and Spencer Foster as sons of William Foster:

I, William Foster of Hancock County for the consideration of the love and good will and affection which I have and do bear towards my beloved son Truets (?) [sic] Foster of the same place have granted unto him a tract of land in Hancock County adjoining on Dread Creek, and containing 211 acres.  Wit: Hardy W(illegible) and John Coulter, J.P.  Reg: 19 February 1801.  (No date of deed given).  [Source: Land Deed Genealogy of Hancock County, Georgia, by Helen & Tim Marsh, pp. 242-243].

 

William Foster of Hancock County on 24 December 1799, for love, good will, and affection toward my beloved son, Spencer Foster, land in Greene County bounded by Clemons.  Wit: John Foster and John Coulter.  Rec. 1 September 1800.  [Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 220].

 

Spencer Foster may have sold the land given to him by his father in the following deed.  Though the dates of the gift to Spencer Foster and his sale of property are not quite in sync, and the purchaser of the property is identified as Reuben Foster, rather than Reuben Foreman, this may be the property that is referenced in one item of William Foster's 1808 will: 

Spencer Foster of Greene Co. and Mary, his wife, sold to Reuben Foster of Greene Co. on 10 Dec 1799 for the sum of $276, land in Greene
Co., 100 acres.  Wit: John Foster.  Rec. 1 Sept 1800.  [Source: Greene County, Georgia, Land Records: Deeds 1785-1810, by Freda R. Turner, p. 324].

 

 

William Foster’s sons, Shadrack and James must have preceded him to Claiborne County, as they are found on the 1807 tax lists, living near Dempsey White and Sarah Thompson.  William apparently moved from Georgia to Mississippi between December 1808 and early 1810.  He and sons James, Shedrick (sic) and Spencer, as well as Gibeon Foster (of unknown relationship) were enumerated in the 1810 Claiborne/Warren Counties, MS, census.  These Fosters were also listed in the 1810 Claiborne County tax digest, with neighbors Hezekiah Harmon, Shem, Levi and Sarah Thompson, Josiah Flowers, George W. Humphreys, Robert Cochran, Waterman Crane, Noah Blackwell and Reuben and Dempsey White.

 

 In 1811, James, Spencer and William (also Gibeon) are found.  William is not listed after 1811, but, James is found from 1812-1815 and 1817-1818, Spencer is named from 1812-1818 and Shadrack appears in 1812, 1814, 1817-1820.  (Gibeon Foster also appears through 1820.)   [Source: Claiborne County, MS tax returns through 1817 on microfilm in Clayton Library, Houston, TX.  Reviewed by Annette Bowen, Webster, TX, aandbowen@netscape.net.  1818-1820 returns reviewed on AGLL microfilm by Vicki Kruschwitz]. 

 

The Foster family, according to Art Seder, had ties to the Smiths in Craven County, NC, prior to moving to Wilkes County, GA, in the mid 1770s.  These ties were strengthened in Georgia through marriage of William Foster’s daughters to James Smith’s sons.  When William Foster moved to Claiborne County, MS, he settled near Dempsey White and William Thompson (by then deceased) and in the general vicinity of David Collum, believed to be the men of those names who had married daughters of James Smith.  Whether the proximity of his new home in Mississippi to White and Thompson was planned or coincidental is not known at this time, though it is interesting that Shem Thompson, believed to be a son of William Thompson, was an appraiser of William Foster’s estate in 1812.

 

  

Will of William Foster

 

  "In the name of God amen. I William Foster, of the County of Green & State of Georgia, being in good health and of a sound mind, a memory and calling to mind
the uncertainty of this transitory Life do make and ordain this my last Will and testament, in manner and form following.
  It is my will and desire that all my debts should be paid out of my Estate.
  Item. I give my Daughter Salley Smith, one negro girl named Esther.
  Item. The Land whereon my son Truett Foster now lives upon I have given him as his part.
  Item. The Land that I gave my son James Foster that he sold to his uncle Philemon Foster to be his part.
  Item. The Land that I gave my son Spencer Foster that he sold to Reuben Foreman to be his part.
  Item. I lend my daughter Eliza Tbeath (Heath?), one negro girl named Eose, during her natural Life, and after her death I give the said girl to her children.
  Item. I give my Daughter Polly Smith one negro boy named Philip.
  Item. I lend my Daughter Phebe Catuehead one negro girl named Nancy, and after her death I give the said girl to the children of her body.
  Item. I give my daughter Rutha Foster one negroe woman named Patience also one bed & furniture.
  Item. I give unto my daughter Patsey Foster one negroe girl named Rachel also one bed and Furniture.
  Item I give my daughter Rebeckah Foster one negroe boy named Fendall & one negro girl named Linda, also one bed & Furniture.
  Item. I give my son Shadrack Foster one negro boy named Sam, and whatsoever I am possessed of at my death, except what I have already given.

  I do hereby  acknowledge this to be my last will & testament, utterly disannulling all other wills made by me heretofore made by me. I do appoint William Johnson & John Slaughter Executors to this my last Will & Testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 3rd day of December in the year of our Lord 1808.
Test
John Slaughter   William Foster {seal}

The above is a true record of said last will & testament made per order of Court, 10th February 1812 - certified.
attest  D P [can't read signature]"

[Source: Transcription by Annette Bowen, aandbowen@netscape.net, from a copy of the will recorded by the clerk in Claiborne County, MS].

 

   

APPENDIX IV

 

Likely children of Dempsey White, of Claiborne and Warren Counties, MS, and possibly Mary Smith:

  

a.  Elizabeth White, b. 1777/1780; m. Noah Blackwell on 2 October 1800.  Marriage performed by William Thompson, JP.  Noah Blackwell was living next to Reuben White and Dempsey White on the 1810 census of Claiborne County and next to Reuben White on the 1820 census, with 3 Ms < 10, 1 M 10-16, 1 M 26-45, 2 Fs < 10, 1 F 10-16, 1 F 16-26, 1 F 26-45 (p. 9).  An Elizabeth Blackwell, age 60-70, was enumerated on the 1840 Warren County, MS, census (p. 277); her sister Phoebe Powell was listed on the previous page (p. 276).

 

 

b.  Reuben White, b. 1777/1780, d. 1831 in Claiborne County, MS; m. Nancy Tabor (daughter of William and Lovina Harmon Tabor) in 1799.  She was b. 1 May 1785, d. 25 December 1859 in Hinds County, MS.  Lovina’s brother, Hezekiah Harmon, owned land on Bayou Pierre near Reuben’s father, Dempsey White, as early as 1804.  Reuben and Nancy had 13 children, seven of whom had died before 1860. 

 

Reuben White was found in the 1810 Claiborne County census with 1 M > 21, 2 Ms < 21, 1 F > 21, 1 F < 21 residing next to Demsey (sic) White and Noah Blackwell.  In the 1816 Claiborne County census, his family consisted of 1 M > 21, 4 Ms < 21 and 1 F > 21.  In 1820 Claiborne County census, Reuben White was living adjacent likely brother-in-law, Noah Blackwell, with 4 Ms < 10, 1 M 10-16, 1 M 26-45, 1 F 16-26 and 1 F 26-45 (p. 9).  In 1830 Claiborne County census, Reuben’s family contained 2 Ms 0-5, 1 M 5-10, 1 M 10-15, 3 Ms 15-20, 1 M 20-30, 1 M 50-60, 1 F 0-5, 1 F 5-10, 1 F 40-50.

 

Reuben wrote his will on 20 April 1831, and the order to appraise his estate was given in January 1832.  His wife, Nancy, remarried to Benjamin Miller in c. 1834.  The marriage was dissolved after a few years. 

 

Known children of Reuben White and wife, Nancy Tabor, were:

 

b 1. William H. White, d. c. 1834 in Claiborne County, MS; m. Philena Marble on 13 November 1822 in Claiborne County, MS.

b 2. Nathan I. (or S.) White, b. 1811; m. Narcissa Ann Gayden on 28 March 1833 in Claiborne County, MS.  He moved to Hinds County, MS, by 1844.

b 3. Isaac B. White, b. c. 1818, m. Minda ___.  In Polk County, TX by 1850, living adjacent Sidney B. White.

b 4. Sidney B. White, b. 19 January 1819, d. 18 March 1878 in Polk County, TX.  Buried in Peebles Cemetery, East Goodrich, TX.  Married Sarah J. McNulthy on 26 Jan 1848 in Polk County, TX.

b 5. Josiah F. White, b. c. 1820.  He was living in Hinds County, MS, by 1850.

b 6. Ann Eliza White; m. Duncan McDougal.

b 7. Reuben Burch White, b. c. 1827.  He was living in Hinds County, MS, by 1850.

b 8. Mary Lavina White, b. c. 1829; m. John McKay.

 

c.  Ann White, b. c. 1780; m. Samuel Goodwin on 25 June 1800.  Marriage performed by William Thompson, JP.  The Samuel Goodwin family appeared on the 1816, 1820, and 1830 Claiborne County, MS, censuses.  In 1816, the family was listed on the same page as Dempsey White.  In 1820, the family consisted of 2 Ms < 10, 1 M 10-16, 2 Ms 16-26, 1 M 26-45, 3 Fs < 10, 2 Fs 10-16, 1 F 16-26, 2 Fs 26-45 and 1 slave and was listed near the family of Ann’s sister, Elizabeth White Blackwell [Source: Claiborne County census, pp. 5 and 9].  By 1830 Ann may have died, as the family contained 1 M 5-10, 3 Ms 10-15, 1 M 15-20, 1 M 50-60, 2 Fs < 5, 1 F 5-10, 1 F 10-15 2 Fs 15-20 and 1 F 20-30 [Source: Claiborne County census, p. 80].

 

 

d.  Robert White, b. before 1784; m. Phillepina Hamberlin on 6 December 1801.  Marriage performed by William Thompson, JP.  A Robert White was enumerated in Jefferson County, MS, in 1805 with 1 M > 21, 7 Ms < 21, 4 Fs; in 1808 with 7 Ms > 21, 1 M < 21, 1 F > 21, 1 F < 21; and in 1810 with 1 M > 21, 6 Ms < 21, 1 F > 21 and 2 Fs < 21.  A Robert White was in Adams County in 1816 with 1 M > 21 and no others.

 

 

e.  Nathan White, b. 26 August 1792, d. 30 May 1835 in Yazoo County, MS; m. Rebecca Harmon, daughter of Hezekiah Harmon and Mercy Leonard, on 18 January 1814 in Claiborne County, MS.  She was b. 20 October 1790, d. 15 January 1857 in Yazoo County, MS.  Both bur. in White Family Cemetery, near Dover, Yazoo County, MS.

 

Nathan White was enumerated on the 1816 census of Jefferson County, MS, with 1 M > 21, 1 F > 21, and 1 F < 21.  He was listed (p. 119) a few pages from Dempsey White (p. 124) on the 1820 Warren County census with 1 M < 10, 1 M 26-45, 2 F < 10 and 1 F 26-45.  Nathan White was mentioned as a deacon in Antioch Baptist Church, Adams County, MS, in January 1823.  [Source: the journal of Sophia Adams Goodrum from Warren County, MS.  The journal is in the possession of Ridgley Goodrum Bayley of Vicksburg, MS.  Information from Cyd Rawls’s CydRawls@aol.com website: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rawls/diary.html,].  Elisha Flowers, Levi Thompson and John Lobdell were also mentioned in the journal in relation to the church.  Some sources indicate that this Elisha Flowers may have been the husband of Margaret White, thought to be a daughter of Dempsey White.  Levi Thompson was a son of William Thompson, likely brother-in-law to Dempsey White; he moved to Yazoo County, MS.  John Lobdell must have been related to this family – he was one of the securities for Dempsey White’s will.

 

Indenture __ October 1828, Nathan White and Rebecca White, his wife, to Joseph Harmon sell all their rights to 500 acres on the north side of Bayou Pierre known as Harmons Donation, given by LW&T to James and Joseph Harmon and conveyed by Joseph Harmon to the said Nathan White by deed October 1828.  Acknowledged in open court 14 May 1831 by Nathan and Rebecca White.  [Source: Claiborne County, MS, Deed Book L, p. 539].  James and Joseph Harmon were twin brothers of Rebecca Harmon White and sons of Hezekiah Harmon, neighbor to Dempsey White on Bayou Pierre early in the century.

 

About the time of the sale of this property, the Whites moved.  By 1830, Nathan White’s family resided in Yazoo County, recorded in the census as: 1 M < 5, 1 M 10-15, 1 M 20-30, 1 M 30-40, 2 Fs < 5, 1 F 5-10, 1 F 10-15, 1 F 15-20 and 1 F 40-50 (p.297).  They lived on Paradise Plantation, near Dover.  [Source: Yazoo, Its Legends and Legacies, by Harriet DeCell and JoAnne Prichard, 1976, page 481.]

 

Nathan White wrote his will on 22 June 1834, naming his wife, Rebecca, but not his children.  He died on 30 May 1835.  In June 1835, letters of administration were granted to Allen Bridges and Rebecca White on his estate.  [Source: Yazoo County, Mississippi, Pioneers, by Betty Couch Wiltshire, 1992, p. 17 (Will Book A, p. 16) and p. 57 (Probate Minute Book A, p. 66)].  The 1840 census of Yazoo County shows Rebecca White with 1 M < 5, 1 M 10-15, 2 M 20-30, 1 F 5-10, 2 Fs 10-15, 1 F 15-20, 1 F 40-50 (p. 320).  Interestingly, a William Thompson lived two doors away.  Levi, son of William and Sarah Thompson, also lived in Yazoo County in the 1830s and his wife lived there until her death in the 1850s.  [Source: Yazoo County, Mississippi, Pioneers, by Betty Couch Wiltshire, 1992].  The 1850 census (p. 497) shows Rebecca White, age 60, born MS, and children: Nathan H., b. 1829; Louisann, b. 1830; and Frances, b. 1832.  She died 15 January 1857.

 

Nathan and Rebecca had ten children:

 

e 1. Eliza Bainbridge White, b. 6 October 1814 in Bayou Pierre, Claiborne County, MS.

e 2. Hezekiah Harmon White, b. 1 June 1817 in Bayou Pierre, Claiborne County, MS.  He m. Miss Ellison.

e 3. Mercia Louisa White, b. 13 April 1819 in Bayou Pierre, Claiborne County, MS, d. 16 February 1881 in Yazoo County, MS; m. Thomas Castillo Barfield on 1 October 1835.  He was b. 30 April 1805 in Duplin County, NC, d. 17 June 1890 in Yazoo County, MS.  Both bur. at Rocky Springs Church, Yazoo County, MS.

e 4. Mary Elizabeth White, b. 2 March 1821 in Bayou Pierre, Claiborne County, MS, d. in Yazoo County, MS.  She m. Samuel A. Guthrie.

e 5. Joseph Smith White, b. 20 August 1823 in Bayou Pierre, Claiborne County, MS.

e 6. Rebecca Ann White, b. 12 April 1825 in Bayou Pierre, Claiborne County, MS.

e 7. Phebe Jane White, b. 1 March 1830 in Yazoo County, MS, d. in Yazoo County, MS; m. L.P. Collins.  Both bur. in White Family Cemetery, Dover, Yazoo

County, MS.

e 8. Nathan Morris White, b. 1831 in Yazoo County, MS, d. 28 April 1901 in Yazoo County, MS; m. Elizabeth Belcher on 11 September 1859 in Yazoo County, MS.  He was b. 1842, d. 1925.

e 9. Louisiana Matilda White, b. 5 March 1830 in Yazoo County, MS, d. 22 September 1914 in Yazoo County, MS; m. Robert Fountain Johnstone on 26 January 1851 in Yazoo County, MS.  He was b. 9 December 1822 in Charlottesville, VA, d. 5 June 1870 in Yazoo County, MS.

e 10. Frances Emily White, b. 7 November 1833 in Yazoo County, MS, d. 21 December 1912 in Yazoo County, MS; m. Robert Newton Pearce on November 1857 in Yazoo County, MS.  Both bur. at Shiloh Baptist Church, Yazoo County, MS.

 

 

f.  Phebe White, b. c. 1797; m. Joseph Powell on 26 December 1816 in Claiborne County, MS.  Marriage performed by Josiah Flowers, bond by Joseph Powell and Reuben White, both of Claiborne County.  The Joseph Powell family was listed next to Dempsey White in the 1820 Warren County, MS, census (p. 124) with 1 M <10, 1 M 26-45, 1 F 26-45.  The family was also found in 1830 Warren County with 2 Ms < 5, 1 M 5-10, 2 Ms 20-30, 1 F 20-30 (p. 212).  Joseph Powell was named the administrator of the estate of Edward Cook, husband of Phebe’s sister, Celia White Cook.  Later, Phebe Powell became administrator of her husband’s estate.  No dates were given in the reference book.  [Source: Warren County, Mississippi, Probate Index, by Mary Lois Ragland and Jane J. Williams, 1993, pp. 35 and 147: Probate Nos. 660 and 7655].  Phoebe Powell was on the 1840 Warren County census with 1 M 5-10, 1 M 10-15, 1 M 15-20, 1 F < 5, 1 F 5-10, 1 F 40-50 (p. 276) near her sister, Elizabeth White Blackwell (p. 277).  In 1850 Warren County, she was 53 years old, born in MS (p. 227); living with her were three children; Jefferson, Mary and Concudes(?).  She still resided in Warren (Vicksburg) in 1860 with children Jeff and Clarissa (p. 1047); her age, 42, was incorrect, her birthplace MS. 

 

 

g.  Celia White, b. 1795/1800; m. Edward Cook on 9 January 1817 in Claiborne County, MS.  Marriage performed by Josiah Flowers, bond by Edward Cook and Reuben White.  Edward Cook was enumerated in the 1820 Warren County census (p. 122) with 2 Ms < 10, 1 M 16-26. 2 Ms 26-45, 2s F <10, 1 F 26-45.  No Edward Cook family has been found in the 1830 Mississippi or surrounding state censuses.  As mentioned above, Phebe White’s husband, Joseph Powell, was appointed administrator of Edward Cook’s estate.  Since Powell himself had died by 1840, Cook died likely in the 1830s.  No Celia Cook is listed in 1840 or later Mississippi census indexes.

 

Margaret White (married Elisha Flowers), Lavina White (married Moses Jones) and Dempsey White may also be children of Dempsey White and should be studied further.

 

[Sources: Nancy Royce of Dickinson, TX, nanc@lsfm.org and Betty White of Flower Mound, TX, biswhite@verizon.net].

 

 

 

APPENDIX V

 

The second theory regarding the family of William and Sarah Smith Thompson has them remaining in Georgia and migrating in a similar pattern as the Barron, Chaffin, and Joseph Smith families, settling in the area of Jasper/Newton/Walton Counties.

 

It is possible that this is the couple that appeared in the church minutes of the Bethlehem Baptist Church (org. 1821) in Jasper County.  William L. Thompson (also listed as W. L. Thompson) and Sarah Thompson both joined the church by letter in January 1823; no dismissal date was indicated for either one.  Other Thompsons in this congregation were Littleton and James (both joined by letter in August 1823), and Elvira and Agnes (both received by experience in August and October 1823, respectively).  There were also several contemporary members with the surname of White who were members of this congregation (with given names of Cyrus, John, Arthur D., Malinda, Lester (female?), Elizabeth, Sarah, and Sinthia).  The Bethlehem Baptist Church congregation was apparently closely associated with the Liberty Baptist Church congregation (this latter church mentioned extensively in the section on Martha Smith Barron – see child #1 above).  At least two of the Bethlehem Baptist members (Cyrus White and John Reeves) delivered sermons in 1823 at the Liberty Baptist Church.  And Bethlehem member, Lucy Reeves, daughter of member James Reeves, married Sarah Smith Thompson’s nephew, Smith Barron, son of William and Martha Smith Barron.

 

A William L. Thompson was found living near a Robert Thompson as early as 1801 in Greene County, GA.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. II, 1800-1802, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, p. 037 of the Greene County Digest].  In 1805, a William L. Thompson appeared in Clarke County, GA, with a Joseph Smith nearby.  [Source: An Index to Georgia Tax Digests, Vol. III, 1804-1806, R. J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, p. 037 of the Clarke County Digest].  The proximity of a Joseph Smith is intriguing in this last tax record.  However, the information uncovered about Joseph Smith, son of James Smith, indicates that he lived in Greene County in 1805.

 

A William L. Thompson appeared in Jasper County, GA, by 1810.  [Source: Jasper Deed Book A, p. 52: William L. Thompson sold property to Miles Harvy on 14 May 1810].  As mentioned in the Joseph Smith section (see child #7 above), a William L. Thompson served in the War of 1812 4th Georgia Militia Regiment with Joseph Smith and William Chafin (husband of Rachel Smith), also of Jasper County, GA.  And a William Thompson family is located on the same page of the 1820 Jasper County census record as Joseph Smith’s family (p. 204).  The family consisted of 1 M <10 years, 1 M 10-16, 1 M 16-18, 1 M 26-45 and 1 F 26-45.

 

In the 1830 Jasper County census, there was a William L. Thompson of the proper age, with neighbor David Montgomery listed on the same census page.  Montgomery was the long-time pastor of Providence Baptist Church (mentioned in more detail under Martha Smith Barron – see child #1 above).  Also living in the vicinity were Chaffins, Smiths, and Hammocks.  However, there were more children living in this household than would be expected, particularly in comparison with the 1820 figures: 2 M <5, 2 M 10-15, 1 M 50-60, 1 F <5, 1 F 5-10, 1 F 10-15, 1 F 15-20, 1 F 20-30, with four slaves.  It is possible, though strictly conjecture, that the youngest children and the female (age 20-30) were from a second marriage for William Thompson.  Or possibly a widowed daughter’s family was living at Thompson’s home.  In either case, if this was the family of the William Thompson who married Sarah Smith, Sarah died sometime between 1820 and 1830.

 

 

APPENDIX VI

 

Information on some of the families of the children of Jacob Smith, son of James Smith:

 

Some of the children of James T. Smith and Frances Brooks:

(from the 1850 Knox County, KY, census, p. 356)

 

a 1.  Mary Smith, b. c. 1815.

a 2.  Minervy Smith, b. c. 1817.

a 3.  Sarah Smith, b. c. 1824; probably m. John Rickett on 12 August 1850.

a 4.  James L. Smith, b. c. 1832.

 

Other likely children from marriage records of Knox County, KY:

Susannah Smith m. Richard Price on 18 April 1839.

Frances Smith m. John Chick on 25 May 1841.

Salatha Smith m. Joseph Bennett on 20 October 1845.

Zachariah Smith m. Fanis Ann Vanny on 11 December 1845.

[Source: Knox County, Kentucky, Marriages 1800-1850, Wills 1804-1842, by Joan Colbert Gioe, 1991, p. 11].

 

 

Children of Salatha Smith and Holland Watts:

b 1.  Sarah “Sally” Watts, b. 24 May 1806 in Greene County, GA; m. Benjamin Gregory on 18 August 1831 in Knox County, KY.

b 2.  Elizabeth Watts, b. 18 October 1807 in Greene County, TN; m. Noah Laws on 1 March 1827 in Knox County KY.

b 3.  William Watts, b. 9 November 1809 in Greene County, TN.

b 4.  Susannah Watts, b. 13 September 1811; m. Thomas Rodes/Rhodes (son of William and Keziah Rhodes) on 21 October 1830 in Knox County, KY.

b 5.  Rebecca Watts, b. 26 January 1814 in Knox County, KY, d. February 1861 in Mercer County, MO; m. William Laws (son of Thomas Laws) on 2 April 1835 in Knox Co., KY.

b 6.  Mary “Polly” Watts, b. 2 April 1816 in Knox County, KY, d. after 1880 in KY; m. Elijah (Kesiah) Rodes/Rhodes (son of William and Keziah Rhodes) on 19 June 1834 in Knox Co., KY.

b 7.  Abel Watts, b. 15 August 1818 in Knox County, KY; m. Seliney Ross on 26 Dec 1839 in Knox Co., KY.

b 8.  Frances “Fannie” Watts, b. 8 July 1821 in Knox County, KY.

b 9.  James Watts, b. 24 October 1823 in Knox County, KY, d. 19 May 1863 in Regimental Hospital, Helena, AR, of “disease,” probably typhoid fever, while serving in 35th Regiment of Missouri Volunteers, Union Army; m. Louisa Cox (daughter of Noah Cox and Nancy Lee) on 13 May 1845 in Knox County, KY.  She died 1889 in Marysville, WA.

b 10.  Salatha Watts, b. 2 March 1827 in Knox County, KY.

b 11.  Holland Smith Watts, b. 8 October 1831 in Knox County, KY, d. 1931 in Mercer County, MO.

 

[Sources: Claim of service in War of 1812 to obtain bounty land, filed 30 June 1851 in Mercer County, MO; also January 2001 e-mails from Carla Reukema, DLReukema@email.msn.com and Verda Hansberry, verdah@premier1.net; also Knox County, Kentucky, Marriages, 1800-1850, Wills 1804-1842, by Joan Colbert Gioe, 1991].

 

 

APPENDIX VII

 

Information on the families of some of the children of Elizabeth Smith and David Collum.

 

Children of Solomon Collum and Mary Cluster:

b 1.  Margaret Elizabeth Collum b. abt. 1828 in GA, d. abt. 1869 in Montgomery Co., AR; m. (1) William B. Grant, Jr.; m. (2) Joseph Jones on 1 Feb 1857 in Montgomery Co., AR.

b 2.  David M. Collum, b. 14 May 1829, d. 6 Mar. 1913 in Cleburne Co., AL; m. Lucinda Herndon (Henden) on 30 Mar 1851 in Cherokee Co., GA.  Both buried in Pinetucky Baptist Church Cemetery, Cleburne Co., AL.

b 3.  James Asa Collum, b. Mar 1834, m. Permelia J. ___.  In Tallapoosa County, AL, by 1860.  After the Civil War, he moved to Clark Co., AR, where he lived in the 1870 census.  By 1880, he lived in nearby Montgomery Co., AR.  By 1900, resided in Red River Co., TX.  He died in Paris, Lamar Co., TX, on 10 Feb 1909.

b 4.  Sarah Ann Collum, b. abt. 1837, m. Harden Miller on 2 Apr 1854 in Cass Co., GA.

b 5.  Nancy G. Collum b. abt. 1838, m. Benjamin Fields on 12 Apr 1857 in Montgomery, Co., AR.

b 6.  John M. Collum b. abt. 1839; m. (1) Elizabeth ____; (2) Rebecca J. Solley on 9 July 1865 in Tallapoosa Co., AL; (3) Nancy Ann Sanley on 20 Jan 1867 in Montgomery Co., AR.  (Note:  Was the John M. Collum who m. Rebecca Solley the son of Solomon Collum, or another John M. Collum?  No other likely John M. Collum has been found – and Solomon’s son, James Asa, resided in Tallapoosa Co. at this time.  Even though John M. resided in AR before the war and fought with AR troops in the Civil War, he may have visited his brother James Asa while returning home from the war and married Rebecca Solley.)

b 7.  Mary Emily Melissa Collum, b. abt. 1841, m. John H. Bradshaw on 5 July 1874 in Montgomery Co., AR.

b 8.  George Willis Collum, b. abt. 1844, d. 24 Oct. 1912 in AR; m. (1) Nancy Jane Short; (2) Nancy Childress; (3) Martha A. Nelson Jester on 26 Oct 1892 in Clark Co., AR.

b 9.  William Callaway Collum, b. abt. 1847, d. 1946; m. Susan A. (or Susanna) Forester on 1 Jan 1874 in Montgomery Co., AR.

b 10.  Rebecca Louisa Collum, b. abt. 1850; m. James N. Golden on 30 Jan 1871 (or 25 Dec 1870) in Montgomery Co., AR.

 

 

Children of James A. S. Collum and his first wife, Pemelia Spain (?):

Note: the 1840 census listing for J. S. Collum showed three sons, who are likely those named as c 1., c 3 and  c. 4 below:

c 1.  male, born 1830-1835 (possibly John David Collum b. 2 Aug 1832 in GA, who married (1) Araminta (or Aramitia) Whaley on 31 Dec 1854 in Tallapoosa Co., AL.  She was b. 22 Aug 1838, d. 22 Feb 1892.  He m. (2) Martha E. ___ about 1892 in MS; she was b. 15 Jul 1857, d. 1 Jan 1934.   John died 24 Nov 1918 in Choctaw Co., MS.  He and his wives are buried in McCurtain’s Creek Baptist Church Cemetery).

c 2.  Phronissia J. Collum b. Dec 1834, married (1) Perry G. Wooten on 5 Aug 1858 in Tallapoosa Co., AL.  After the Civil War, the family left Tallapoosa Co. for Choctaw Co., MS.  By 1880, they had moved again, to Red River Co., TX.  Married (2) A. Anderson on 10 Apr 1886 in Red River Co., TX.  She was listed as a widow, using the surname Wooten, in the 1900 Red River Co., TX, census.

c 3.  male, born 1835-1840 (possibly Solomon B. Collum b. 1835-1840 who married (1) Cynthia M. Whaley on 2 Sep 1860 in Tallapoosa Co., AL; (2) Emma F. ____; (3) Martha J. Morris on 9 Apr 1884).

c 4.  male, born 1835-1840 (possibly Littleberry Collum b. 18 Feb 1839, who married Amanda Malvina Spain Morris on 10 Aug 1865 in Tallapoosa Co., AL; Littleberry d. 9 Apr 1907, buried at Red Ridge Cemetery in Tallapoosa Co., AL).

c 5.  Julia A. Collum, b. 1842/1843.  In the 1880 Red River Co., TX, census, Julia was unmarried and lived in the home of her brother-in-law, Perry Wooten.

c 6.  Amanda L. Collum, b. 1844/1845

c 7.  James Collum, b. ca. 1847

c 8.  Nancy Taylor Collum, b. Jul 1849, m. (1) ___ Hutto; (2) T. F. Layhe on 12 Aug 1885 in Red River Co., TX.  In the 1880 Red River Co., TX, census, Nancy Hutto was widowed; she and her son, O. E., lived in the home of brother-in-law, Perry Wooten.  In 1900, Nancy Layhe, widow, lived with her sister, P. J. Wooten, in Red River Co., TX.  In 1920 and 1930, she resided with her son, Oscar Emmit Hutto, in Lamar Co., TX.  She died in Lamar Co. on 24 Jul 1934 and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Paris, Lamar Co., TX.

c 9.  William Henry Collum, b. abt. 1851, m. Martha Elizabeth Green on 27 Aug 1874 in Sumner Co., MS.  Lived in Montgomery Co., MS, in 1880 and in Lonoke Co., AR, in 1900.    

 

Children of James A. S. Collum and his second wife, Patience P. Sessions Solley:

c 10.  Sarah L. Collum, b. 1856/1857.  May be the 22-year-old sister-in-law, Eugenia, living in the household of Perry Wooten in the 1880 Red River Co., TX, census.

c 11.  Wiley Collum, b. ca. 1859

c 12.  Ardela W. Collum, b. 1861/1862.  May be the 18-year-old sister-in-law, A. S., living in the household of Perry Wooten in the 1880 Red River Co., TX, census.  Della Colloms m. John Golson on 26 Sep 1880 in Red River Co., TX.

c 13.  Alonzo Collum, b. 1864/1865.  Worked on the farm of Jesse Cummings in the 1880 Oktibbeha Co., MS census.