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View Tree for Henry LambHenry Lamb (b. Abt. 1697, d. February 10, 1761)

Henry Lamb was born Abt. 1697, and died February 10, 1761. He married Elizabeth.

 Includes NotesNotes for Henry Lamb:
Henry Lamb (Abt. 1697-1761)

Things that I would like to have concrete info on are Elizabeth's lastname (?Henley)and if an d who she remarried. A link that proves if JoshuaLamb is the father of Henry, beside The Qua ker Yeoman and reference fromthe Colonial Dames, which I don't feel, support these claims. A nd proofof a second wife named Gulielma. Of these things that I have justmention, I believ e there is no proof.
In the eighteenth century Nansemond County, Virginia, adjoinedPerquimans County, North Carol ina, and there was a natural movement ofNansemond residents to Perquimans as Virginia's popul ation overflowed.The destruction by fire of Nansemond's early records obscures themovement an d renders it impossible to trace the history of manyPerquimans families.
My first record of a Henry Lamb in North Carolina was found inHathaway's "North Carolin a Historical and Genealogical Register" where,on page 147 it lists the July 1715 Court note s at Chowan, N.C. It sayshere "Patrick Laughly proves rights for importation of 13 people,in cluding Thomas Lamb and Henry Lamb." This was not the first of thetravels of the Lamb fami ly, Isaac Lamb states in the Memoirs of WayneCounty page 38, that he could trace his ancestr y back to 1658, to oneHenry Lamb, a glove-maker, who came to this country from Scotland andse ttled in North Carolina. They seem to have possessed a spirit ofwanderlust. Henry Lamb wa s a Member of the Society of Friends (Quakers),and Virginia's harsh treatment of that sect ma y have induced hismigration to North Carolina. The Monthly Meeting of Friends inPerquimans ( sometimes called Wells, later Piney Woods) received the Lambfamily on a certificate from Nans emond Monthly Meeting on April 4, 1739.(The certificate was a statement from a Quaker meetin g that a person wasa member in good standing and was used by that person as credentials and a means of transferring membership to another meeting.)
Henry Lamb purchased a hundred-acre farm from Samuel Newby onOctober 12, 1740, located i n the Ballahack section of Perquimans (nowHertford Township), near Cypress Swamp (now Goodwin s Mill Creek). Heappeared on the 1740 tax list of Perquimans with three titheables. Henryi s listed in the "1740 list of Jurymen, Perquimans County, NorthCarolina" (source: Colonial re cords of North Carolina Volume IV, pages517-518.) He purchased another fifty acres in the sa me area from JamesPadget on Aug. 24, 1743, per deed #131.
In a 1754 Militia Muster Roll of Perquimans Co. North Carolina listThomas, William, Isaa c, and Henry Lamb along with 38 other Quakers inCaptain Miles Harvery's Company (source for t his info is ColonialSoldiers of the South, 1732-1774 yrs pages 741-744.) After twentyoneyea rs' residence in Perquimans, He decided to migrate again. On July 29,1760 he sold all his la nd in Perquimans and on the first of Octoberfollowing, he requested Friend in Perquimans to g rant him a certificateto New Garden Monthly Meeting, which received him on the 29th ofNovembe r. He followed his sons Jacob and Joseph to Rowan County, whichthen included the entire nort hwest quarter of North Carolina. Most ofhis children also settled there.
The rapid growth of the North Carolina backcountry, filling withVirginians, Pennsylvania ns, Germans and people from the eastern counties,is illustrated by the formation of new count ies. Rowan County was formedin 1753 and part of it was joined to part of Orange to form Guil fordCounty in 1770. Nine years later part of Guilford became RandolphCounty. Similarly, par t of New Garden Monthly Meeting (established 1754)became Center Monthly Meeting in 1792. Ref erences to Lambs occur in allthree counties and all thee meetings, suggesting they lived in t hepresent Greensboro-Asheboro-High Point vicinity. Among the Lambs'neighbors were Beesons fr om Pennsylvania and the Hoovers, ancestors ofPresident Herbert Hoover.
Henry Lamb did not survive long in his new home. He made his willin St. Luke's Parish , Rowan County, on February 7, 1761 and died on the10th. The 1761 tax list of Rowan Co. list s Elizabeth Lamb and son Jacoband 2 negroes. The will was probated the following April, wit h his sonsJacob and Joseph named executors.
Little is known of Elizabeth Lamb, wife of Henry She survived herhusband by fourteen yea rs, dying September 13, 1774 according to recordsof Center Monthly Meeting.

Their children were

1. Thomas
2. Mary
3. William
4. Isaac (My direct line)
5. Reuben
6. Esau
7. Jacob
8. Joseph
9. Elizabeth
10. Bethia

Henry Lamb (Abt. 1697-1761)

Things that I would like to have concrete info on are Elizabeth's lastname (?Henley)and if an d who she remarried. A link that proves if JoshuaLamb is the father of Henry, beside The Qua ker Yeoman and reference fromthe Colonial Dames, which I don't feel, support these claims. A nd proofof a second wife named Gulielma. Of these things that I have justmention, I believ e there is no proof.
In the eighteenth century Nansemond County, Virginia, adjoinedPerquimans County, North Carol ina, and there was a natural movement ofNansemond residents to Perquimans as Virginia's popul ation overflowed.The destruction by fire of Nansemond's early records obscures themovement an d renders it impossible to trace the history of manyPerquimans families.
My first record of a Henry Lamb in North Carolina was found inHathaway's "North Carolin a Historical and Genealogical Register" where,on page 147 it lists the July 1715 Court note s at Chowan, N.C. It sayshere "Patrick Laughly proves rights for importation of 13 people,in cluding Thomas Lamb and Henry Lamb." This was not the first of thetravels of the Lamb fami ly, Isaac Lamb states in the Memoirs of WayneCounty page 38, that he could trace his ancestr y back to 1658, to oneHenry Lamb, a glove-maker, who came to this country from Scotland andse ttled in North Carolina. They seem to have possessed a spirit ofwanderlust. Henry Lamb wa s a Member of the Society of Friends (Quakers),and Virginia's harsh treatment of that sect ma y have induced hismigration to North Carolina. The Monthly Meeting of Friends inPerquimans ( sometimes called Wells, later Piney Woods) received the Lambfamily on a certificate from Nans emond Monthly Meeting on April 4, 1739.(The certificate was a statement from a Quaker meetin g that a person wasa member in good standing and was used by that person as credentials and a means of transferring membership to another meeting.)
Henry Lamb purchased a hundred-acre farm from Samuel Newby onOctober 12, 1740, located i n the Ballahack section of Perquimans (nowHertford Township), near Cypress Swamp (now Goodwin s Mill Creek). Heappeared on the 1740 tax list of Perquimans with three titheables. Henryi s listed in the "1740 list of Jurymen, Perquimans County, NorthCarolina" (source: Colonial re cords of North Carolina Volume IV, pages517-518.) He purchased another fifty acres in the sa me area from JamesPadget on Aug. 24, 1743, per deed #131.
In a 1754 Militia Muster Roll of Perquimans Co. North Carolina listThomas, William, Isaa c, and Henry Lamb along with 38 other Quakers inCaptain Miles Harvery's Company (source for t his info is ColonialSoldiers of the South, 1732-1774 yrs pages 741-744.) After twentyoneyea rs' residence in Perquimans, He decided to migrate again. On July 29,1760 he sold all his la nd in Perquimans and on the first of Octoberfollowing, he requested Friend in Perquimans to g rant him a certificateto New Garden Monthly Meeting, which received him on the 29th ofNovembe r. He followed his sons Jacob and Joseph to Rowan County, whichthen included the entire nort hwest quarter of North Carolina. Most ofhis children also settled there.
The rapid growth of the North Carolina backcountry, filling withVirginians, Pennsylvania ns, Germans and people from the eastern counties,is illustrated by the formation of new count ies. Rowan County was formedin 1753 and part of it was joined to part of Orange to form Guil fordCounty in 1770. Nine years later part of Guilford became RandolphCounty. Similarly, par t of New Garden Monthly Meeting (established 1754)became Center Monthly Meeting in 1792. Ref erences to Lambs occur in allthree counties and all thee meetings, suggesting they lived in t hepresent Greensboro-Asheboro-High Point vicinity. Among the Lambs'neighbors were Beesons fr om Pennsylvania and the Hoovers, ancestors ofPresident Herbert Hoover.
Henry Lamb did not survive long in his new home. He made his willin St. Luke's Parish , Rowan County, on February 7, 1761 and died on the10th. The 1761 tax list of Rowan Co. list s Elizabeth Lamb and son Jacoband 2 negroes. The will was probated the following April, wit h his sonsJacob and Joseph named executors.
Little is known of Elizabeth Lamb, wife of Henry She survived herhusband by fourteen yea rs, dying September 13, 1774 according to recordsof Center Monthly Meeting.

Their children were

1. Thomas
2. Mary
3. William
4. Isaac (My direct line)
5. Reuben
6. Esau
7. Jacob
8. Joseph
9. Elizabeth
10. Bethia

Children of Henry Lamb and Elizabeth are:
  1. Thomas Lamb, d. date unknown.
  2. Mary Lamb, d. date unknown.
  3. William Lamb, d. date unknown.
  4. Thomas Lamb, d. date unknown.
  5. +Isaac Lamb, b. 1728, Probably in Nansemond County, Virginia, d. 1782.
  6. Reuben Lamb, b. Abt. 1732, d. date unknown.
  7. +Esau Lamb, b. 1734, d. March 08, 1790.
  8. +Joseph Lamb, b. Abt. 1738, d. date unknown.
  9. +Elizabeth Lamb, b. Abt. 1740, d. April 02, 1801.
  10. +Bethia Lamb, b. Abt. 1742, d. date unknown.
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