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View Tree for Daniel G. Miller, Sr.Daniel G. Miller, Sr. (d. date unknown)

Daniel G. Miller, Sr. died date unknown. He married Unknown.

 Includes NotesNotes for Daniel G. Miller, Sr.:



On 26 Aug 1851 when Eliza C. was 19, she married Leander MILLER, M, son of Daniel G. MILLER Sr., M, in Claiborne Co., TN. Born in (about 1808). Occupation: He Was Double His Wife's Age. Education: Moved To St. Louis, MO. Religion: P. G. Fulkerson Papers.

Some info from "Claiborne Co., TN Marriage Records - Book III" by Malone & Parkey
Above info obtained from:
Denny & Marla Brubaker
Claiborne Co., TN Pioneer Project
Updated web page (3/31/04) is located at the following address
CLAIBORNE COUNTY PIONEER PROJECT (CCPP)
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ccpp/pioneer/index.htm



CNIDR Isearch-cgi 1.20.06 (File: 40)Hi; Becky glad to find you here. All, there are is a document that has some more info on Yellow Creek. Seems in 1799 the Government Troops burned out these people including my Joseph Baker. Here is a little history on the matter in this document. Also, note that your ancestor may be listed still in Lincoln CO. Ky 1800 as was Joseph Baker, and son William Baker although Bryce/Brice Baker was listed in Knox CO. Guess it may be problem of the date Knox CO. was formed, and the census taker's??? Listed in this document are several names who lived on Yellow Creek at the time. 1799. Some with the (*) see below, removed from Yellow Creek, Knox CO. ( in today's Bell CO). and located else where in Knox CO.

Joseph had send a map to the government of where he thought his land was. The government wrote him back, said that they had surveyed it. and found his map erroneous to Campbells Survey. *note I looked up the Double Mountain, and found it in todays Giles and Bland CO. VA. Obviously, Campbell survey was way off.

Joseph Baker appears on the tax list 1800 Lincoln Co. KY. with his son William Baker, 1800 Brice Baker is listed in Knox Co. KY. formed 1799-1800 from Lincoln Co. KY. In 1799 Joseph Baker, was living on Yellow Creek. (todays Bell Co. KY.) His house was burned in 1799 by Military Troups. Joseph wrote to the Government in VA. concerning his Improvements which was burned in 1799 on Yellow Creek. and had sent a map of his land and house where he lived. Document recorded in Knox Co. KY. of the reply of the government to Joseph Baker from
1808 pg. 361.
Claim for Property destroyed by the Military pg. 361
Southwest Point, May 5, 1803
I have examined the closing of the lines on the Cumberland Mountain, agreeable to your directions. It is my opinion that the point of Campbell's line is not on Cumberland Mountain proper, but is on a part of the same pile of mountains, but not on the main ridge. By the language of the several treaties and of the law, it appears that it was thought at that time that the point of Campbell's line was on the main ridge of Cumberland Mountain, although it is not clearly expressed in every instance.
I find by inquiry, that Campbell supposed he had commenced his survey on the top of Cumberland Mountain. Tho land is nearly as high as the main mountain, and a person coming from the eastward to the place where he began his survey, would at that time, 1778, have taken it to be Cumberland Mountain.
I am informed that commissioners from Virginia and Kentucky, in settling their boundaries some years ago, agreed and reported that the main ridge of Cumberland is the same as I have now reported, and which is designated by the letter O, in the sketch accompanying this letter. The sketch I received with you letter is now returned. It is erroneous in point of distance and representation. Colonel Ballenger, county surveyed for Knox county Kentucky, was with me, measured the distance carefully, and the chainmen were sworn. The mountain on which the point of Campbell's line was fixed is called Double Mountain, and very properly, from the shape of its connection with the main ridge, as may be seen on the sketch. I have endeavored to ascertain what compensation would probably satisfy the settlers on Yellow creek for a relinquishment of their little farms. Colonel Ballenger and Major Moore, disinterested person, assisted me in estimating the value of the property. The settlers were mostly present. The estimations for which they will give up their Claims, respectively, are as follows, viz:

*Joseph Baker , one cabin and cleard land $60 00
William White, three cabins and cleared land - $579.00
John Brown, three cabins and cleared land - $270.00
William Robinson two cabins and cleared land $193.00
Moses and John Gordon, (this may be Goodin) One cabin and cleared land$107.00
Edward Giddins, one cabin and cleared land $107.00
*Daniel Miller, one cabin and cleared land, $80.00
*Robert Belew, one cabin and cleared land, $65.00
*Samuel Mosley, one cabin and cleared land, $90.00
Thompson Nichols, one cabin and cleared land, $50.00

These persons had their property destroyed by the troops in 1799. Those with this mark, annexed (*) have not returned to the lands. I am sir, very respectfully, your obediant servant
Heyrt Deshsorn, Esq., Secretary of War Return J. Meigs.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------

10th Congress NO. 191 First Sesson
Claims of Certain inhabitants of Knox Co., Kentucky, for property Destroyed by Military Force.
Communicated to the House of Representatives, Feb. 25, 1808
Mr. Holmes, from the Committee of Claims, to whom whas referred the petition of sundry inhabitants of Knox County Kentucky, praying compensation for the losses they sustained by the military of the United States. In the year 1801, made the following report:

The treaty between the Untied states and the Cherokee nation of Indians, called the treaty of Holston was made in the year 1791, and contains, inthe article describing the boundary between the citzens of the United States and the said Indian nation, the following words: "Thence up the river Clinch, to Campbell's line, and along the same to top of Cumberland Mountain; thence a direct line to the ford of Cumberland river, where the Kentucky road crosses it." It appears that the line last called for had not been run by authority previous ie; the petitioners making their settlements on Yellow Creek. They, in order to know how to make them sefs to avoid any encroachment upon the Indian lands, employed a surveyor to run the line from where the course of Campbbell's line struck the top of Cumberland mountain to the ford of Cumberland river, by which survey it appeared that the lands whereon they afterwards settled were within United States boundary line, established, as they supposed, by the treaty aforesaid. They continued to dwell unmolested for several years on these lands; but, when the said line was run by authority of Government, it appeared that Campbell's line ended on top of the Double Mountain. which is two hundred and ninety poles short of the top of Cumberland Mountain, and that, by closing the line from the top of Double Mountain to the ford of Cumberland river, the petitioners were included in the Indian boundary line. They were afterwards removed, in pursuance of authority given by law of Congress, and their settlements entirely destroyed by the troops of the United States. In the year 1803, Return J. Meigs, Esq. was directed by the Secretary of War to examine into the matter, and estimated the loss of the petitioners; ------------------------------------
Resolve, That the prayer of the petition of sundry inhabitants of Knox County, in the State of Kentucky, is reasonable, and ought to be granted.

(When the military re-surveyed they found this land to be in Indian land)
Tellico Series: This area of Kentucky of which Whitley Co. Knox and south. is a part was purchased from the Cherokee Indians in 1805. In 1810 the Kentucky General assembly passed an act appropriating this land under the patent system. There are 590 patents in this series and it remains a mystery to this writer that patents were issued to settlers of this area before it was purchased from the Cherokees.

Dated 1816-Joseph Baker gave Power of Attorney to a Martin Beady Lawyer of Washington Co. VA to represent him in the land matter of Yellow Creek, to collect money owed him from the United States in Congress of the damages which he sustained by the burning of his improvements. Stating Martin Beady his friend. (Still trying to collect)
According to my grandpa Emery Mattison Clark, his ggg-Grandpa Joseph Baker was a Long Hunter.

In the Knox Co. Book by A Sol Warren on Knox Co. it states Joseph Baker was Rev. War Vet. Book by Warren states Rev. War Vet. of NC And article by Susan Arthur, Joseph Baker was Rev. War Soldier and lived in Flat Lick, Knox Co. KY.

Joseph Baker Rev. War NC---Knox Co. KY
Private in Col. A Lytle of NC ---Land number 1034

Carol Wyatt

Daniel Miller

One of the oldest settlers of Ferndale was Drury Mayes. When the road was widened in front of the Thomas Jefferson Kellems house at Ferndale a few years ago, the road men cut off a point of the hill and unearthed the grave of Drury Mayes and one of his children. His tombstone showed that he was born in 1771 and died in 1827. It is said that after his death, his family became frightened and left the community. He is supposed to have been the first man to take up land in and around Ferndale.
Simon Delph, former County Superintendent of the Schools of Bell County, tells the story of Drury Mayes, which follows in all of the details he gave to it.
"One of Bell County's pioneers was Drury Mayes, who settled at Ferndale on a tract of land containing 150 acres, patented to Daniel Miller, signed by Governor Christopher Greenup, of the date February 12, 1807. On October 7th, 1826, Drury Mayes had a 50 acre tract surveyed on Canyon Creek, County of Harlan, (afterwards Bell), adjoining the 150 acre tract on which he lived. The patent was signed by Joseph Desha, Governor of Kentucky, July 10, 1827.
"Drury Mayes lived, died, and was buried on his farm. at Ferndale. In 1932, a slide of earth carried the grave and tombstone into the state highway. The words 'Drury Mayes,' born November 19, 1771. Died September 6, 1827,' were plainly visible on the tomstone. The contents of the grave consisted of a strata of brown dust, about four inches thick, three feet wide, and six feet long. A few pieces of bone and some square cut rusty nails could be seen in the dust.
"All that remained of Drury Mayes, after he had been dead one hundred and five years, was about three bushels of brown dust, sufficient to fertilize a few hills of corn or potatoes.
"The state highway maintenance crew removed the slide of earth from the highway and dumped it on the side of the highway near the L & N depot, where most of it soon found it way into Canyon Creek (now Cannon Creek). Consequently, the dust of what was once Drury Mayes has been scattered from Ferndale to the Gulf of Mexico and some of it may have been carried by the current into the ocean. http://www.tcnet.net/ky/bell/fuson.html
HISTORY OF BELL COUNTY KENTUCKY VOLUME 1 By HENRY HARVEY FUSONDANIEL MILLER TO GEORGE POFF - Deed
date - 15 Jan 1824 between Daniel Miller and George Poff, both of Harlan
Co - for two hundred and fifty dollars - land lying on Cannon Creek, a
branch of Yellow Creek.

http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/u1/textindices/K/KYHARLA N+1998+321507829+MESSAGE-BODY


> --------- Subject: TELLICO Land Grants (part 1 of 3)
> > Date: Saturday, March 07, 1998 3:32 PM
> >
> > This information was provided in the Corbin Historical Society's
> > publication, "Our Heritage", Volumn VI Number 4 - April 1994.
Reposted
> > with permission from C.H.S. Please send Carolyn Kennedy
> (cskennedy@kih.net)
> > and the Corbin Historical Society your thanks.
> >
> > These land grants are lands ceded from the Cherokee Indians to the
United
> > States under the treaty of 1805. The grants are recorded between 1803
> and
> > 1853. Some included Knox and eastern Kentucky Counties. These grants
> and
> > others are recorded by Willard Rouse Jillson, THE KENTUCKY LAND GRANTS,
> and
> > published by the Filson Club. Copies may be ordered from The Kentucky
> Land
> > Office, Kentucky State Capitol, Frankfort, KY 40601. Please write for
> price
> > and send a SASE. Please include all information.
> >
> > These are all for the 1803-1813 version of Knox County - an area which
> now
> > includes several other counties, HARLAN is one.
> >
> > GRANTEE Acres Book Page Date
> Water
> > Course
> > White, Wm 200 1 82
> 7-1-1803
> > Yellow Creek
> > Goin, Clabon 200 1 76
> 4-20-1803
> > Blakes Creek
> > Goin, Clabon 200 1 213
> 4-20-1803
> > Blakes Creek
> > Laughlin, James 200 1 213
5-20-1803
> > Watts Creek
> > Pemberton, Wm 200 1 211 6-1-1803
> > Blakes Creek
> > Farris , Wm 200 1 151
> 8-9-1803
> > Little Rockcastle
> > Sharp, Powell 200 1 584
> 10-12-1803
> > Clear Fork
> > Gatliff, Cornelius 200 1 174
> 4-23-1804
> > Watts Creek
> > Duncan, Joseph 310 1 176 6-1-1804
> > Wates Creek
> > Duncan, Joseph 200 1 177 6-1-1804
> > Cumberland River
> > Miller, Daniel 150 1 240

2-15-1806

http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/u1/textindices/K/KYHARLA N+1998+14051935414+MESSAGE-BODY
All, there are is a document that has some more info on Yellow Creek. Seems in 1799 the Government Troops burned out these people including my Joseph Baker. Here is a little history on the matter in this document. Also, note that your ancestor may be listed still in Lincoln CO. Ky 1800 as was Joseph Baker, and son William Baker although Bryce/Brice Baker was listed in Knox CO. Guess it may be problem of the date Knox CO. was formed, and the census taker's??? Listed in this document are several names who lived on Yellow Creek at the time. 1799. Some with the (*) see below, removed from Yellow Creek, Knox CO. ( in today's Bell CO). and located else where in Knox CO.

Joseph had send a map to the government of where he thought his land was. The government wrote him back, said that they had surveyed it. and found his map erroneous to Campbells Survey. *note I looked up the Double Mountain, and found it in todays Giles and Bland CO. VA. Obviously, Campbell survey was way off.

Joseph Baker appears on the tax list 1800 Lincoln Co. KY. with his son William Baker, 1800 Brice Baker is listed in Knox Co. KY. formed 1799-1800 from Lincoln Co. KY. In 1799 Joseph Baker, was living on Yellow Creek. (todays Bell Co. KY.) His house was burned in 1799 by Military Troups. Joseph wrote to the Government in VA. concerning his Improvements which was burned in 1799 on Yellow Creek. and had sent a map of his land and house where he lived. Document recorded in Knox Co. KY. of the reply of the government to Joseph Baker from
1808 pg. 361.
Claim for Property destroyed by the Military pg. 361
Southwest Point, May 5, 1803
I have examined the closing of the lines on the Cumberland Mountain, agreeable to your directions. It is my opinion that the point of Campbell's line is not on Cumberland Mountain proper, but is on a part of the same pile of mountains, but not on the main ridge. By the language of the several treaties and of the law, it appears that it was thought at that time that the point of Campbell's line was on the main ridge of Cumberland Mountain, although it is not clearly expressed in every instance.
I find by inquiry, that Campbell supposed he had commenced his survey on the top of Cumberland Mountain. Tho land is nearly as high as the main mountain, and a person coming from the eastward to the place where he began his survey, would at that time, 1778, have taken it to be Cumberland Mountain.
I am informed that commissioners from Virginia and Kentucky, in settling their boundaries some years ago, agreed and reported that the main ridge of Cumberland is the same as I have now reported, and which is designated by the letter O, in the sketch accompanying this letter. The sketch I received with you letter is now returned. It is erroneous in point of distance and representation. Colonel Ballenger, county surveyed for Knox county Kentucky, was with me, measured the distance carefully, and the chainmen were sworn. The mountain on which the point of Campbell's line was fixed is called Double Mountain, and very properly, from the shape of its connection with the main ridge, as may be seen on the sketch. I have endeavored to ascertain what compensation would probably satisfy the settlers on Yellow creek for a relinquishment of their little farms. Colonel Ballenger and Major Moore, disinterested person, assisted me in estimating the value of the property. The settlers were mostly present. The estimations for which they will give up their Claims, respectively, are as follows, viz:

*Joseph Baker , one cabin and cleard land $60 00
William White, three cabins and cleared land - $579.00
John Brown, three cabins and cleared land - $270.00
William Robinson two cabins and cleared land $193.00
Moses and John Gordon, (this may be Goodin) One cabin and cleared land$107.00
Edward Giddins, one cabin and cleared land $107.00
*Daniel Miller, one cabin and cleared land, $80.00
*Robert Belew, one cabin and cleared land, $65.00
*Samuel Mosley, one cabin and cleared land, $90.00
Thompson Nichols, one cabin and cleared land, $50.00

These persons had their property destroyed by the troops in 1799. Those with this mark, annexed (*) have not returned to the lands. I am sir, very respectfully, your obediant servant
Heyrt Deshsorn, Esq., Secretary of War Return J. Meigs.

http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/u1/textindices/C/CUMBERL AND-RIVER+1997+7981385146+MESSAGE-BODY


U.S. House of Representative Private Claims, Vol. 2
Viewing records 1-4 of 4 Matches


Name Nature of Claim Congress Session Manner Brought Journal Page Referred to Committee Date Report Bill House Disposed Senate Disposed Congress Date Comments
Daniel Miller, (Ky.) Compensation for damages to property by United States troops 10 1 Petition 177 Claims 25 Feb 1808 Favorable Referred to Committee Whole House
Daniel Miller, (Ky.) Compensation for damages to property by United States troops 10 2 Petition 350 Claims 18 Nov 1808 Favorable; bill 106 Passed
Daniel Miller, (Ky.) Compensation for damages to property by United States troops 11 2 Petition 127 Claims 26 Dec 1809 Favorable; bill 51 Referred to Committee Whole House
Daniel Miller, (Ky.) Compensation for damages to property by United States troops 13 3 Petition 455 Claims 15 Favorable; bill 242 Passed Passed 28 Jan 1815 App'd; Petitioner's name omitted



KNOX COUNTY KENTUCKY HISTORY
by
ELMER DECKER
When the courthouse was rebuilt a great number of records were hauled to the dump. So this manuscript written in 1939 by Elmer Decker has records listed that may not have survived

Page 37:
At the March 1805 term of the Knox County Court he made the following

May 26th to cash received . . . . . . . . . $404.00
June 10th to cash received . . . . . . . . . 44.00
July 20th to cash received . . . . . . . . . 40.50
Sept. 19th to cash received . . . . . . . . . 124.00
Oct. 30th to cash received . . . . . . . . . 62.00
TOTAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $674.50

CONTRA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credit

by cash paid John Dougherty for 11 3/4 steel pr.,
16 lbs. iron at 2-6 and iron at 9 pence . . . . . . . . . .Ll-9-4 1/2 ........

By Nat Herberd & Daniel Miller for sundries . . . . . . . . 0-12-0

Page 45:
THE MILITIA SYSTEM

Kentucky counties inherited their road laws and militia system from Virginia, which, in turn, received hers from England. It was a modification of the old feudal system. In 1657-58 Virginia gave to county courts jurisdiction over roads. February 25, 1797, Kentucky enacted a law similar to that of Virginia.

The system called for an organized militia, which in time of emergency
could be mustered into the military service. Counties were divided into
districts and militia captains appointed in each district.

All "male laboring titheables" between certain ages (the age limit varied, but, in general, those required to pay poll tax) resident in the different districts were made to work the roads, or provide substitutes. The Old State Road had been kept in repair by those living within a certain number of miles of it. They were required to work from four to six days a year. To maintain the Old State Road other labor became necessary. An Act was passed by the General Assembly (1813) empowering the commissioners to engage laborers by the years, or they might "purchase, with any funds in their hands arising from said turnpike, any number of young able-bodied healthy Negro men, not exceeding ten, to be employed in working on the said road when necessary."

In 1912 an act was approved by the Governor establishing a Department of Roads, creating the office of state commissioner of Public Roads and a fund in the treasury of the state to be known as the state road fund. It has been aptly described as "The act which lifted Kentucky out of the mud." This law
(Page 46)
practically abolished the militia system of building and maintaining roads. However, a Knox County order, dated August 24, 1914, reads as follows:
It having been ordered by the Fiscal Court at a special term of said Court, held August 3, 1814, that the militia of Knox County, be required to work the County roads as provided in Section 85, Chapter 80, Acts 1914, and in conformity with Section 86, Chapter 80, Acts of 1914, it is ordered that the roads of Knox County be, and is hereby divided and laid off in sections and precincts, said boundaries as is now of record in Clerk's office, Knox County Court, of the sections that were last laid off and last overseer appointed on,
when the law working militia was abolished December 1, 1912.

Thus it can be determined that the militias system was never really abolished. Under Section 43,560, Carroll's Kentucky Statutes, 1956, "the fiscal court of any county may require all able-bodied male citizens of the county, over eighteen and under fifty years of age, except licensed ministers of the Gospel, and citizens of incorporated towns and cities, to provide themselves with necessary tools and implements and to work on the public roads of the county not exceeding two days in a week, and six days in each year, and in cases of unusual emergency, the overseers may require the road hands to work a greater number of days in any week or year."

Lists of Knox County Militia Captains follows:

1810--Ambrose Arthur, Andrew Craig, William Morgan, James McNeil, Joseph Eve, Isaac Martin, Hugh Cummins, Elijah Gherton, James Smith, William Brittain, James Stotts, Benjamin Harris, DANIEL MILLER, and Reubin Hendrickson. 1814--
Angus Ross, Hugh Allison, Thomas Swift - ------ Meadows, Joseph Gilless, George Tye, Isaac Martin, Joseph Parman, Jarvis Jackson, Joab Moore, Ambrose Arthur, David Johnson, John Hendrixon, John Skidmore, Gobin Bailey, and William Reed


Page 59 and 60:
March 10, 1828, "David Miller deeded to Richardson Herndon, Harris H. Hopper and James T. Smith, Trustees of the Church of Liberty, a certain tract or parcel of land-supposed to be one acre - to begin on a buckeye and beach on a
branch east of the meeting house of Liberty on the waters of Brush Creek." This was, and is, a Baptist Church. When it was organized and who the first pastor was, unless Rev. Richardson Herndon first filled its pulpit, is not known. (Virginia Ballinger Miller was the daughter of
Mildred Herndon and Richard Ballinger).

Page 206:

The method was again changed, and agents for the different Militia companies were appointed to list the taxable property of the county, 1810:
Andrew Craig in Capt. Daniel Miller's Company


Page 218
TAVERN KEEPERS, PREACHERS, DOCTORS, MILLS, etc.
Daniel Miller, licensed March 7, 1814, Andrew Craig, security.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIERS FROM VIRGINIA
Robert Miller, Virginia


REGIMENTS 54th, 75th, 89th. War of 1812.
54th Regiment October 8, 1812
Vice D.Miller promoted
69th Regiment
Daniel Miller Major March 29, 1812 April 28, 1812
Richard Ballinger Lt. Colonel March 29, 1812 April 28, 1812
(Resigned) (Virginia Ballinger Miller's Father)



VOLUME 1
By
HENRY HARVEY FUSON
Page 139:
"One of Bell County's pioneers was Drury Mayes, who settled at Ferndale on a tract of land containing 150 acres, patented to Daniel Miller, signed by Governor Christopher Greenup, of the date February 12, 1807. On October 7th, 1826, Drury Mayes had a 50 acre tract surveyed on Canyon Creek, County of Harlan, (afterwards Bell), adjoining the 150 acre tract on which he lived. The patent was signed by Joseph Desha, Governor of Kentucky, July 10, 1827.

P. G. Fulkerson (1840-1929), a prominent lawyer in Tazewell, TN, was very interested in genealogy. He wrote about the beginnings of Claiborne Co., TN and short paragraphs about some of the early settlers of Claiborne Co., TN. His granddaughter, Katherine Dyer, had his articles published in the weekly newspaper "The Tazewell-New Tazewell Observer" in 1979 and extending into 1981.
Your requested entries are listed below. I'll type them just as they appear in the newspaper. Be aware that there have been a few errors found so follow up with other verified information.

Miller, Daniel May 28, 1980
Daniel Miller came to Big Springs (Springdale) prior to 1840. His children were: Daniel, who married Ann Rose; a daughter, who married Joab Shultz, removed to Mo.; Leander, married 1st S. Ballinger, 2nd Eliza Dickenson, removed to Mo.; Thursa, married Hugh Jones; Isaac, married 1st Polly Hodges, 2nd a Mason, removed to Mo.; Hiram Y., married Nancy Mayes, removed to Mo.; Herald W., married Eliza Shultz, removed to Mo.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Home: Surnames: Miller Family Genealogy Forum
Herrold W. Miller, VA, KY, MO & kin 1796
Posted by: William Miller Date: February 28, 2001 at 13:51:40
of 26345
Per www.genealogy.com msg boards

I've run into a dead end with my great-great grandfather, Herrold. He was born in 1796 in Lee Co., VA. Married Margaret "Peggy" Gibson and sired: Sallie Eliza (1817), Sophia Ann (11-12-1820), Susan Jane (1824), Thursa Ann (6-4-1825), Daniel Leander (abt 1827), Zacharia Solomon (1-17-1830), Herrold Richardson (?), & Elizabeth Virginia (8-25-1838). Think most of the kids were born in KY & the whole family moved to NW MO. His siblings were Hiram G.(3-8-1794), Isaac (1-2-1798), Daniel C.(5-8-1800), Alexander (2-2-1802) Thursa Ann (10-6-1804) and Ann (7-18-1806). Herrold died 1838 in Buchanan Co., MO. Have no forebearers for Herrold or Margaret. I'm related through Zacariah's son, William Harvey Miller. Can someone recognize a name and throw me a bone here? Thanks.


Children of Daniel G. Miller, Sr. and Unknown are:
  1. Hiram Y. Miller, b. March 08, 1794, d. date unknown.
  2. +Herald W. Miller, b. November 22, 1796, Lee County, VA, d. 1838, Buchanan County, MO.
  3. +Issac Miller, b. January 02, 1798, d. date unknown.
  4. Daniel G. Miller, Jr., b. May 08, 1800, KY, d. date unknown.
  5. +Leander Miller, b. February 02, 1802, KY, d. September 16, 1858, St Joseph, Buchanan Co., MO.
  6. +Thursie Ann Miller, b. October 06, 1804, KY, d. date unknown.
Created with Family Tree Maker


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