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View Tree for Queen of Iceni Boadicea (Victoria) of IceniansQueen of Iceni Boadicea (Victoria) of Icenians (d. Bef. 100)

Boadicea (Victoria) of Icenians2063 died Bef. 100 in Died in the year 612063. She married Prasutagus of Icenians.

 Includes NotesNotes for Boadicea (Victoria) of Icenians:
BOADICEA or BOUDICCA (d. 61 AD) queen of the Iceni in Norfolk. In 60 AD she led a revolt against Roman ill-treatment,and sacked Camulodenum (Colchester), Londinium (London) and Verulamium (St. Albans) before being defeated in 61. She reportedly took poison to avoid capture. "BOADICEA" New American Desk Encyclopedia. 1982.

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Statue of Boudica near Westminster Pier, with her two daughters upon a chariotBoudica (also Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. 60/61) was a queen of the Brythonic Celtic Iceni people of Norfolk in Eastern Britain who led a major uprising of the tribes against the occupying forces of the Roman Empire. Upon the death of her husband Prasutagus, the Romans annexed his kingdom and brutally humiliated Boudica and her daughters, spurring her leadership of the revolt.

In 60 or 61, while governor Gaius Suetonius Paulinus was leading a campaign on the island of Anglesey in north Wales, Boudica led the Iceni, along with the Trinovantes and others, in a rebellion which destroyed the former Trinovantian capital and Roman colonia of Camulodunum (Colchester), and routed the Roman Legio IX Hispana under Quintus Petillius Cerialis. Boudica's army then burned to the ground the twenty-year-old settlement of Londinium (London) and destroyed Verulamium (St Albans), killing an estimated 70,000-80,000 people. Roman emperor Nero briefly considered withdrawing Roman forces from the island, but ultimately Boudica was defeated at the Battle of Watling Street by the heavily outnumbered forces of governor Suetonius.

The chronicles of these events, as recorded by the historians Tacitus[1] and Dio Cassius[2], were rediscovered during the Renaissance and led to a resurgence of Boudica's legendary fame during the Victorian era, when Queen Victoria was portrayed as her "namesake". Boudica has since remained an important cultural symbol in the United Kingdom.
[Larimer Ancient Times.FTW]

BOADICEA or BOUDICCA (d. 61 AD) queen of the Iceni in Norfolk. In 60 AD she led a revolt against Roman ill-treatment,and sacked Camulodenum (Colchester), Londinium (London) and Verulamium (St. Albans) before being defeated in 61. She reportedly took poison to avoid capture. "BOADICEA" New American Desk Encyclopedia. 1982.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Boadicea)
Jump to: navigation, search

Statue of Boudica near Westminster Pier, with her two daughters upon a chariotBoudica (also Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. 60/61) was a queen of the Brythonic Celtic Iceni people of Norfolk in Eastern Britain who led a major uprising of the tribes against the occupying forces of the Roman Empire. Upon the death of her husband Prasutagus, the Romans annexed his kingdom and brutally humiliated Boudica and her daughters, spurring her leadership of the revolt.

In 60 or 61, while governor Gaius Suetonius Paulinus was leading a campaign on the island of Anglesey in north Wales, Boudica led the Iceni, along with the Trinovantes and others, in a rebellion which destroyed the former Trinovantian capital and Roman colonia of Camulodunum (Colchester), and routed the Roman Legio IX Hispana under Quintus Petillius Cerialis. Boudica's army then burned to the ground the twenty-year-old settlement of Londinium (London) and destroyed Verulamium (St Albans), killing an estimated 70,000-80,000 people. Roman emperor Nero briefly considered withdrawing Roman forces from the island, but ultimately Boudica was defeated at the Battle of Watling Street by the heavily outnumbered forces of governor Suetonius.

The chronicles of these events, as recorded by the historians Tacitus[1] and Dio Cassius[2], were rediscovered during the Renaissance and led to a resurgence of Boudica's legendary fame during the Victorian era, when Queen Victoria was portrayed as her "namesake". Boudica has since remained an important cultural symbol in the United Kingdom.



Children of Boadicea (Victoria) of Icenians and Prasutagus of Icenians are:
  1. +Dau of Prasutagus of Icenians.
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