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Jean Henri Lastrapes

Updated March 7, 2003

Paul Leon Lastrapes, Sr.
1065 Denbo Drive
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806
United States
Pho: 225-928-9761
Fax: Page: 1-888-448-6829
PL10is@aol.com

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The Lastrapes genealogy dates back to 1600, in Peyrens, France. The Coat of Arms was created in 1750, and, researched in 1935 and later in 1956, is believed to be accurate.

The Lastrapes home and surrounding 400 acres were purchased by Jean Henri Lastrapes in 1793 from J. Carriere's widow. Today, it includes 500 acres, and remains in the continuous stewartship of the Lastrapes family.

The landmark, "Seven Brothers Oak", is an interesting story. Thrilled with the birth of his seventh son in 1810 Jean Henri called his workers to bring seven Oak saplings from the woods to be planted around the large one story Lastrapes home. Returning late in the afternoon, the workers were instructed to place the saplings in a hastily dug hole in front of the home, to be replanted the next day. But a cotton plantation has many chores associated with it and the replanting never took place.

Today, five huge trunks remain in this massive Oak, a member of both the National and Louisiana Live Oak Society email cpl700600@aol.com (lower case of letter L). In June, 2001, the Lastrapes family engaged a well recognized service to trim dead wood, take soil samples, and perform other work to strenthen one of Washington's many landmarks.

Washington, repuded to be Louisiana's third settlement in 1720, was an important steamboat port from 1825 to 1910. A round trip passage in the year,1855, beginning from 1 of 7 warehouses on Bayou Courtableau ("Cor-taa-blew")to New Orleans cost $11. The trip left on Saturday, arrived in New Orleans on Wednesday. From New Orleans Thursday morning, the "J.E.Trudeau" (one of some 90 steamboats documented as having a share of similar commerce)would return with all manner of products from around the world. The cargo could then be offloaded onto a Wells Fargo Stagecoach westward along the Old Texas Road, passing through a community later incorporated as Lake Charles. Or it might leave Washington traveling north to Alexandria via oxen-drawn flatboats along a bayou which was so clean..."one could not gather a switch along it's banks."

Family Photos

  • Jean Henri and Celeste Genevieve Lastrapes (86 KB)
    This pen drawing was made at the time of their wedding in October, 1790. She is age 20 while Jean is 34 years of age.
  • Looking Back at Washington, La. (674 KB)
    This 1997 Louisiana "Best Seller" describes a unique lifestyle in the steamboat town of Washington, Louisiana from the mid 1800s to 1915. It can be ordered on the Internet at barnesandnoble.com.
  • Lastrapes Oak, "Seven Brothers" (483 KB)
    Jean Henri's seventh son was born April 4, 1809. Excited, Jean sent his workers into the woods to gather seven small live oak trees to plant aroud the home. Dismayed when the men returned late in the day the workers were told to put the oaks in a single hole in front of the homestead, to be replanted the next day. The cotton was being planted and the seven small trees fused together...a member of the National and Louisiana State Live Oak Socities. Located 1.2 miles south of Washington, State Hwy #10.
  • The Lastrapes Coat of Arms, created in 1750. (156 KB)
    The moon represents Noel Lastrapes, who commissioned the Coat of Arms. The crown signifies important service to the King. The three wood triangles each have a spike which the soldiers droped behind them during war to slow the enemy calvery horses.
 

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