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View Tree for Josiah TerryJosiah Terry (b. 1780, d. 1868)

Josiah Terry (son of John Terry and Esther Brown)93 was born 1780 in Jasper, Wythe County, Virginia93, and died 1868 in Wayne County, Kentucky93. He married (1) Nancy Thomas. He married (2) Nancy Stevens on 1815, daughter of Edmund Stevens and Richardson.

 Includes NotesNotes for Josiah Terry:
Josiah was the first settler of Oneida in 1815 (probably the year his father moved to Indiana). Josiah had a land grant which included most of the present city limits of Oneida. He built his home near the present four-lane highway in North Oneida.

Josiah and Elijah moved to Scott County at the time they were having trouble in their personal lives. Josiah separated from his wife Nance Thomas and left her and the two boys, Joseph and William. We know very little about Nancy and what happened to her. We do have a copy of a Madison County Kentucky, Court record in 1821 at Richmond, Kentucky, Order Book E, page 122, where an indenture was made to bind out Joseph and William , the children of Nancy Terry, to William Bentley to learn the tanning business. We presume Nance had moved to the vicinity of Richmond, Kentucky.

Clay Smith states that the early settlers called the community "Pine Creek". He said that Josiah Terry staked out three hundred acres of land that started near Tunnell Hill, extended northward through the town of Oneida to a point beyond the present Oneida Housing Project. He said the south line ran near where the Scott County Hospital is now located. The north line covered much of all of north Oneida up to and including the Jeffers Cemetery. This line extended to the top of Dick Smith Hill and back to the starting line near where Jim Carson lives in south Oneida. The northeast line ran with the Chitwood lands near the present Scott County Funeral Home to the Jeffers Cemetery. Uncle John described Josiah's land as a large tract of land that extended northwardly from a point near the residence of James Carson through the town of Oneida to a point on the top of a hill southwest of the Shepherd residence east wardly so as to include the lands of J.M. Terry, A.C. Terry, Claude Terry, Letcher Stanfill, N. W. Stanley, Joe Chambers, John Carson, Jr., and James Terry. Josiah built his house near the present North Star Drive-in on Highway 27 North on the four lane. I have copies of tow Kentucky Land grants which cover most of this land.

The oldest written record of Scott County that I have knowledge of is that of the Bethlehem Church of Oneida. The church was organized in 1834, and they have written records dating from the first Saturday in June, 1842. Josiah Terry was a prominent member of the church and is mentioned in several entries. The church split in 1842, and Josiah was elected acting moderator to take the vote. Fifteen of the 31 members were dismissed. Josiah was with the majority. It is in these church records that we learn of Josiah's death in 1868.

Josiah is listed with his wife and 10 of his children in the 1840 Campbell County Census. His son Josiah, was not born until 1842

BIOGRAPHY: ***NOTES***
The first reference to Josiah Terry is in the Anderson Co. TENNESSEE tax list of 1805.Josiah Terry is listed in the 1810 census with his first wife Nancy Thomas and their two boys. Josiah separated from Nancy Thomas in about 1814. We know very little about Nancy and what happened to their sons Joseph and William. Josiah married Nance Stevens in 1815
In 1815 Josiah and Elijah left Wayne Co. KENTUCKY and came to what is now called Scott County TENNESSEE. They were both having troubles in their personal lives. Josiah left Nancy Thomas and the two boys. According to divorce papers of Wayne Co. KENTUCKY dated in 1828, Elijah Terry left Wayne Co. in about 1815 at night with one Sally Rice Foster, wife of Charles Foster and came to TENNESSEE and lived with her as his wife.
At the time they came to Scott Co. Old VIRGINIA and NORTH CAROLINA had driven out or made treaties with the Indians, and had obtained in this way all the territory of the present state of TENNESSEE. In the fall of 1790, John Sevier raised or gathered quite an army of volunteers mostly from East TENNESSEE, and participated in the "Battle of King's Mountain" in North Carolina, indicating that there were a considerable number of people in East Tennessee. The first emigrants made their settlements along the larger streams - the Tennessee, Holston, French Broad, Clinch, and other rivers.
Among the first explorers was Daniel Boone, who lived in North Carolina. In 1769 with others he made an exploring and hunting expedition, he went through the Cumberland Gap into Central Kentucky and explored that part of Kentucky. He went back to North Carolina and organized a bunch of emigrants who with their families and stock started for KENTUCKY by of Powell's Valley and Cumberland Gap in the fall of that year. As they traveled through the wilderness toward the Cumberland Gap, they were attacked by Indians who killed some of them. Among those killed was one of Boone's sons. This disrupted the emigrants so they returned to the settlement in Powell's Valley and remained there that winter. This was about the year 1781 or 1782.
There was another expedition of explorers or hunters in the southern part of KENTUCKY along the Cumberland River that explored as far west as Wayne Co. KENTUCKY at the same time Boone and his party was exploring further north in Kentucky.
Thus were the first explorations in southeast KENTUCKY and in this section of TENNESSEE and they were probably the first of note, because at that time Boone's party had some trouble with Indians. From this time on there were probably some hunting parties in Scott Co. and the adjoining territory.
About 1800 Josiah and Elijah Terry, James Litton, Edmond Stephens, and eight others, probably Jack Phillips, Jonathan Phillips, William Roysden, Irving Foster came to Scott Co. then Campbell Co. to hunt. Game was so plentiful and they liked the country so well they decided to move their families there, but this was not accomplished until 1815. There were probably a few settlers in Scott Co. before 1800, but if so, they did not attempt to obtain grants to the land until later. The oldest grant in Scott Co. is 1818, but from clearings and improvements the first emigrants lived here several years before they attempted to obtain titles to there lands from the States.
"Why did these first emigrants stop and take up land in this part of TENNESSEE?" Perhaps because when we take into consideration how the people lived, the stock they raised, their buildings, etc. we may find the answer. Scott. CO was of the best timbered sections, practically no underbrush, but large trees that were easily split into fence rails for fencing, boards for floors and roofs for buildings. There was an abundance of nuts for fattening hogs, grass and cane brakes along the streams that provided ample feed for all stock the year round. Lots of natural springs of pure water and water power to run mills to grind their corn and other grain. Also many kinds of wild game such as black bear, deer, turkeys, etc.
The early settlers called this place "Pine Creek". Josiah Terry staked out 300 acres of land that started near Tunnel Hill north through the present town of Oneida to a point beyond the Oneida Housing Project; south to near where the Scott Co. Hospital is located; the north line covered much of all North Oneida up to and including the Jeffers Cemetery. This line extended to the top of Dick Smith Hill and back to the starting line near where Jim Carson Lives in South Oneida. Josiah built his house near the present North Star Drive-In on Highway 27 North.
Josiah gave his Daughter Rachel a place on the Old Montgomery Road near the present Pentecostal Church. He gave his son James land north of the tunnel on the Tennessee Railroad about one mile south Oneida. He gave his daughter Esther land about where the Oneida High is now. His daughter Alsie was given land near where the W.J. Jeffers now live. He gave Edmund land at the old Carson Jr. place. Josiah gave Milton land that is now on Highway 27 North on the land where Claude Terry Jr. and Ralph Hoffman now live.
Josiah Terry was the father of thirteen known children. Born about 1780 in VIRGINIA, he died 1868 while visiting his daughter Melinda and is buried at the Mr. Pisgah Cemetery Wayne Co. KENTUCKY.[4-12-03.fbc.FTW]

Josiah was the first settler of Oneida in 1815 (probably the year his father moved to Indiana). Josiah had a land grant which included most of the present city limits of Oneida. He built his home near the present four-lane highway in North Oneida.

Josiah and Elijah moved to Scott County at the time they were having trouble in their personal lives. Josiah separated from his wife Nance Thomas and left her and the two boys, Joseph and William. We know very little about Nancy and what happened to her. We do have a copy of a Madison County Kentucky, Court record in 1821 at Richmond, Kentucky, Order Book E, page 122, where an indenture was made to bind out Joseph and William , the children of Nancy Terry, to William Bentley to learn the tanning business. We presume Nance had moved to the vicinity of Richmond, Kentucky.

Clay Smith states that the early settlers called the community "Pine Creek". He said that Josiah Terry staked out three hundred acres of land that started near Tunnell Hill, extended northward through the town of Oneida to a point beyond the present Oneida Housing Project. He said the south line ran near where the Scott County Hospital is now located. The north line covered much of all of north Oneida up to and including the Jeffers Cemetery. This line extended to the top of Dick Smith Hill and back to the starting line near where Jim Carson lives in south Oneida. The northeast line ran with the Chitwood lands near the present Scott County Funeral Home to the Jeffers Cemetery. Uncle John described Josiah's land as a large tract of land that extended northwardly from a point near the residence of James Carson through the town of Oneida to a point on the top of a hill southwest of the Shepherd residence eastwarly so as to include the lands of J.M. Terry, A.C. Terry, Claude Terry, Letcher Stanfill, N. W. Stanley, Joe Chambers, John Carson, Jr., and James Terry. Josiah built his house near the present North Star Drive-in on Highway 27 North on the four lane. I have copies of tow Kentucky Land grants which cover most of this land.

The oldest written record of Scott County that I have knowledge of is that of the Bethlehem Church of Oneida. The church was organized in 1834, and they have written records dating from the first Saturday in June, 1842. Josiah Terry was a prominent member of the church and is mentioned in several entries. The church split in 1842, and Josiah was elected acting moderator to take the vote. Fifteen of the 31 members were dismissed. Josiah was with the majority. It is in these church records that we learn of Josiah's death in 1868.

Josiah is listed with his wife and 10 of his children in the 1840 Campbell County Census. His son Josiah, was not born until 1842

BIOGRAPHY: ***NOTES***
The first reference to Josiah Terry is in the Anderson Co. TENNESSEE tax list of 1805.Josiah Terry is listed in the 1810 census with his first wife Nancy Thomas and their two boys. Josiah separated from Nancy Thomas in about 1814. We know very little about Nancy and what happened to their sons Joseph and William. Josiah married Nance Stevens in 1815
In 1815 Josiah and Elijah left Wayne Co. KENTUCKY and came to what is now called Scott County TENNESSEE. They were both having troubles in their personal lives. Josiah left Nancy Thomas and the two boys. According to divorce papers of Wayne Co. KENTUCKY dated in 1828, Elijah Terry left Wayne Co. in about 1815 at night with one Sally Rice Foster, wife of Charles Foster and came to TENNESSEE and lived with her as his wife.
At the time they came to Scott Co. Old VIRGINIA and NORTH CAROLINA had driven out or made treaties with the Indians, and had obtained in this way all the territory of the present state of TENNESSEE. In the fall of 1790, John Sevier raised or gathered quite an army of volunteers mostly from East TENNESSEE, and participated in the "Battle of King's Mountain" in North Carolina, indicating that there were a considerable number of people in East Tennessee. The first emigrants made their settlements along the larger streams - the Tennessee, Holston, French Broad, Clinch, and other rivers.
Among the first explorers was Daniel Boone, who lived in North Carolina. In 1769 with others he made an exploring and hunting expedition, he went through the Cumberland Gap into Central Kentucky and explored that part of Kentucky. He went back to North Carolina and organized a bunch of emigrants who with their families and stock started for KENTUCKY by of Powell's Valley and Cumberland Gap in the fall of that year. As they traveled through the wilderness toward the Cumberland Gap, they were attacked by Indians who killed some of them. Among those killed was one of Boone's sons. This disrupted the emigrants so they returned to the settlement in Powell's Valley and remained there that winter. This was about the year 1781 or 1782.
There was another expedition of explorers or hunters in the southern part of KENTUCKY along the Cumberland River that explored as far west as Wayne Co. KENTUCKY at the same time Boone and his party was exploring further north in Kentucky.
Thus were the first explorations in southeast KENTUCKY and in this section of TENNESSEE and they were probably the first of note, because at that time Boone's party had some trouble with Indians. From this time on there were probably some hunting parties in Scott Co. and the adjoining territory.
About 1800 Josiah and Elijah Terry, James Litton, Edmond Stephens, and eight others, probably Jack Phillips, Jonathan Phillips, William Roysden, Irving Foster came to Scott Co. then Campbell Co. to hunt. Game was so plentiful and they liked the country so well they decided to move their families there, but this was not accomplished until 1815. There were probably a few settlers in Scott Co. before 1800, but if so, they did not attempt to obtain grants to the land until later. The oldest grant in Scott Co. is 1818, but from clearings and improvements the first emigrants lived here several years before they attempted to obtain titles to there lands from the States.
"Why did these first emigrants stop and take up land in this part of TENNESSEE?" Perhaps because when we take into consideration how the people lived, the stock they raised, their buildings, etc. we may find the answer. Scott. CO was of the best timbered sections, practically no underbrush, but large trees that were easily split into fence rails for fencing, boards for floors and roofs for buildings. There was an abundance of nuts for fattening hogs, grass and cane brakes along the streams that provided ample feed for all stock the year round. Lots of natural springs of pure water and water power to run mills to grind their corn and other grain. Also many kinds of wild game such as black bear, deer, turkeys, etc.
The early settlers called this place "Pine Creek". Josiah Terry staked out 300 acres of land that started near Tunnel Hill north through the present town of Oneida to a point beyond the Oneida Housing Project; south to near where the Scott Co. Hospital is located; the north line covered much of all North Oneida up to and including the Jeffers Cemetery. This line extended to the top of Dick Smith Hill and back to the starting line near where Jim Carson Lives in South Oneida. Josiah built his house near the present North Star Drive-In on Highway 27 North.
Josiah gave his Daughter Rachel a place on the Old Montgomery Road near the present Pentecostal Church. He gave his son James land north of the tunnel on the Tennessee Railroad about one mile south Oneida. He gave his daughter Esther land about where the Oneida High is now. His daughter Alsie was given land near where the W.J. Jeffers now live. He gave Edmund land at the old Carson Jr. place. Josiah gave Milton land that is now on Highway 27 North on the land where Claude Terry Jr. and Ralph Hoffman now live.
Josiah Terry was the father of thirteen known children. Born about 1780 in VIRGINIA, he died 1868 while visiting his daughter Melinda and is buried at the Mr. Pisgah Cemetery Wayne Co. KENTUCKY.

More about Josiah Terry:

Buried near Mt. Pisgah, KY.

Josiah was the first settler of Oneida, Tennessee,

Came to present-day Oneida in 1815 (probably the year his father moved to Indiana} Josiah had a land grant which included most of the present city limits of Oneida. He built his home near the present four-lane highway in North Oneida.

Josiah and Elijah moved to Scott County at the time they were having trouble in their personal lives. Josiah separated from his wife, Nancy Thomas and left her and the two boys, Joseph and William. We know very little about Nancy and what happened to her. We do have a copy of a Madison County, Kentucky, Court record in 1821 at Richmond, Kentucky, Order Book E, page 122, where an indenture was made to bind out Joseph and William, the children of Nancy Terry, to William Bentley to learn the tanning business. We presume Nancy had moved to the vicinity of Richmond, Kentucky.

Clay Smith states that the early settlers called the community "Pine Creek". He said that Josiah Terry staked out three hundred acres of land that started near Tunnell Hill, extended northward through the town of Oneida to a point beyond the present Oneida Housing Project. He said the south line ran near where the Scott County Hospital is now located. The north line covered much of all of north Oneida up to and including the Jeffers Cemetery. This line extended to the top of Dick Smith Hill and back to the starting line near where Jim Carson lives in south Oneida. The northeast line ran with the Chitwood lands near the present Scott County Funeral Home to the Jeffers Cemetery. Uncle John described Josiah's land as a large tract of land that extended northwardly from a point near the residence of James Carson through the town of Oneida to a point on the top of a hill southwest of the Shepherd residence eastwardly so as to include the lands of J. M. Terry, A. C. Terry, Claude Terry, Letcher Stanfill, N. E. Stanley, Joe Chambers, John Carson, Jr., and James Terry. Josiah built his house near the present North Star Drive-In on Highway 27 North on the four lane. I have copies of two Kentucky land grants which cover most of this land.

The oldest written record of Scott County that I have knowledge of is that of the Bethlehem Church of Oneida. The church was organized in 1834, and they have written records dating from the first Saturday in June, 1842. Josiah Terry was a prominent member of the church and is mentioned in several entries. The church split in 1842, and Josiah Terry was elected acting moderator to take the vote. Fifteen of the thirty-one members were dismissed. Josiah was with the majority. It is in these church records that we learn of Josiah's death in 1868.

Josiah is listed with his wife and 10 of his children in the 1840 Campbell County Census. His son Josiah, was not born until 1842


More About Josiah Terry:
Burial: Unknown, Mt. Pisgah, Kentucky.93
Record Change: December 27, 200193
Tax List: 1805, Anderson Co. Tennessee.

More About Josiah Terry and Nancy Stevens:
Marriage: 1815

Children of Josiah Terry and Nancy Thomas are:
  1. +Joseph Terry, b. March 07, 1806, Wayne County, KENTUCKY93, d. September 17, 1863.
  2. +William Terry, b. October 30, 1808, Wayne County, KENTUCKY93, d. date unknown.

Children of Josiah Terry and Nancy Stevens are:
  1. James Terry, b. December 181793, d. date unknown.
  2. Rachel Terry, b. May 03, 182193, d. February 15, 1890.
  3. Jasper Terry, b. 182293, d. date unknown.
  4. +Martin Terry, b. January 17, 182393, d. 189093.
  5. Esther Terry, b. 182593, d. date unknown.
  6. Alsie Terry, b. 182793, d. date unknown.
  7. Edmond Terry, b. 1828, Scott Co. TENNESSEE93, d. date unknown.
  8. Milton Terry, b. July 17, 1834, Scott Co. TENNESSEE93, d. December 29, 1904.
  9. Nancy Jane Terry, b. 183593, d. date unknown.
  10. Thema Terry, b. June 07, 183693, d. date unknown.
  11. Malinda Terry, b. August 22, 183993, d. August 04, 1909.
  12. Josiah Terry, b. 184293, d. October 31, 1911.
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