Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 1
1.

Aaron Jackson-1[1, 2] was born on 23 Feb 1723 in Caven, Ireland[1]. He died in 1768 in Pennsylvania, USA.

Notes for Aaron Jackson:

General Notes:

Aaron Jackson came to Philadelphia from Lorne, Antrim Co., North Ireland before the Revolutionary War, where his four sons first worked in Benjamin Franklin's print shop. Sometime later he moved his family to Stokes/Surry Co., NC (source - Leola Grim's Jacksons)

 

Although no positive proof has been offered at this time, everything I have read points to Aaron Jackson being the father of my ancestor Samuel Jackson. (Jo Martin 6/25/2005)

:

Mr. Luther N. Byrd, grew up in Mt. Airy, NC and while a teacher of the Westfield High School, became interested in the history of the early Quakers that had settled in that area. He started his students working on family trees, and in order to help the students he did genealogical research himself. In his research on the Jacksons, he gives the name of Aaron Jackson, son of a William Jackson as the father of, Samuel, and Priscilla Jackson Jessup as a sister of Samuel.

Aaron Jackson of Pasquotank Co, NC did have a son by the name of Samuel and a brother named Samuel. He also had a daughter Priscilla, who became the wife of Joseph Jessup. This couple moved in the New Garden Area of Guilford Co and made the move from Guilford to the Westfield community around the same time that Samuel with his family moved from Rowan Co to the Westfield Area. Two of Samuel's sons, William and Joseph married the daughters of Priscilla and Joseph Jessup, Mary and Sarah Jessup. Thus becoming the first two marriages between the Jessup and the Jacksons.

Samuel Jackson's birth is estimated to be ca. 1720-25 as his eldest son was born in 1747. Aaron Jackson of Pasquotank Co, NC was born in 1725, so the two men would be around the same age and could not be father and son. These Pasquotank Jacksons were descendants of Samuel Jackson of Maryland and some of the names are the same names found in the Jackson settlement. If there should be any truth in this statement, would mean that Samuel Jackson, brother of Aaron, went back to PA before he moved to North Carolina, and therefore could have been the uncle of Priscilla Jackson Jessup, and not her brother.

 

 

Unknown Spouse was born on Unknown. She died on Unknown.

Aaron Jackson and Unknown Spouse were married on Unknown. They had the following children:

2. i.

Samuel Jackson Sr.[3] was born between 1729-1730 in Antrim, Northern Ireland[1]. He married Mary Catherine Plankinhorn about 1747 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA[3]. He died in 1806 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

3. ii.

Priscilla Jackson[3, 4] was born in 1742 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[1, 4]. She married Joseph Jessup on 21 Apr 1762 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[5]. She died in Feb 1819 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[4].

iii.

Charles Jackson was born on Unknown. He died on Unknown.

iv.

Moses Jackson was born on Unknown. He died on Unknown.

v.

Parthena Jackson was born on Unknown. She died on Unknown.

vi.

William Jackson was born on Unknown. He died on Unknown.

Sarah Woolley was born on Unknown. She died on Unknown.

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 1 (con't)

Aaron Jackson and Sarah Woolley were married on Unknown. They had no children.

Generation 2
2.

Samuel Jackson Sr.-2 (Aaron-1)[3] was born between 1729-1730 in Antrim, Northern Ireland[1]. He died in 1806 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

Notes for Samuel Jackson Sr.:

General Notes:

It is rumored among Jackson genealogists that Samuel was born in Chester Co., PA, however he does not show up on any birth records in Chester Co, PA. He moved to North Carolina in the early 1750's. Lucille Jackson Vernon stated in her research that they lived in an area that is now in Davidson Co.,North Carolina before moving on to Westfield, North Carolina . Samuel and Catherine came to Surry Co.,North Carolina around 1770-72, settling on Tom's Creek, later called Westfield. They were the first Jacksons in the Westfield area. Much of what is known about these people is from Quaker records. Samuel Jackson was living in Chester Co., PA at the time when several Quaker families by the name of Jackson were in the area, so most researchers have made the assumption that Samuel was a Quaker. Lucille Vernon wrote to the Quaker College at Guilford Co., North Carolina ; they wrote back saying they had no record of Samuel or his wife, Catherine, ever being members of the New Garden congregation. Lucille assumed the other researchers were wrong; however in Henshaw's "Encyclopeida of America Quaker Genealogy" Vol I, page 504 (New Garden MM) lists Samuel, Catherine as follows: page 182, Samuel Jackson; Catherine Jackson, d.4-24-1780; Joseph b. 12-27-1761; Elizabeth b. 5-12-1763; Jehu b. 7-4-1765; William b. 5-15-1767; Amer b. 6-19-1769. Page 14 of same volume shows Samuel and Catherine were present for marriage of Jacob Jackson and Ann Beales. This becomes a difficult thing to document as Lucille Vernon found in Jacob Jackson's application for membership at New Garden MM, he stated he was not a Quaker and that his parents were not members of the Society of Friends. I do not know if Samuel was a Quaker, but certainly his sons, Curtis, Jacob, John and Joseph, were as their names show up on the list of Charter members of the Westfield Friends. Jacob was a minister and received his brother, Samuel, Jr., into the membership at his request. Most all of the Jacksons migrated west with the exception of Joseph who married Sarah Jessup. They and many of their descendants remained in North Carolina .

 

The descendants of Samuel and Catherine Plankinhorn Jackson who are now living in the Westfield area of Surry Co.,North Carolina will tell you that Samuel's father was Aaron Jackson, son of William Jackson, born ca 1710. This information came to them from Luther Byrd of Westfield and can be found in the Guilford College library. Mr. Luther N. Byrd, grew up in Mount Airy,North Carolina and while a teacher in the Westfield High School, became interested in the history of the early Quakers that settled in the area. He started his students working on family trees and in order to help the students he did genealogical research, also. In his research he gives the name of Aaron Jackson, son of a William Jackson as the father of Samuel and Priscilla Jackson Jessup as a sister of Samuel. I was privileged to have had Luther Byrd as a teacher in the 8th grade.

 

Joe Willard Snyder states the following in his Jackson research:

Samuel and his three brothers, Moses, Charles and William worked in Benjamin Franklin's print shop in Philadelphia (his source was Leola Grim Tobin's Jackson Family Records)

 

Professor Edwin P. West, great-grandson of Jacob and Ann Jackson, gave an account which was used in the History of Clinton Co, OH. This article had been written earlier by Judge Harlan on "Sketches of Clinton Co", which stated that three brothers Jacob, John, and Samuel Jackson were among the first settlers of Clinton Co and that their father was Samuel Jackson who was the son of Isaac Jackson, who was the son of Anthony Jackson, who was a descendant of Ralph Jackson who was burned at the stake as a martyr at Stratford, England in 1556. He also stated that Samuel was probably a first cousin and intimate friend of President Andrew Jackson.

I have found many discrepancies in this article. First, the Isaac Jackson, son of Anthony Jackson, married Ann Evans, and brought his family to America in 1725 when he was sixty years of age and settled in Chester Co, PA. His life has been well documented in Quaker records and Pennsylvania histories. They did not have a son by the name of Samuel, so Samuel Jackson was not the son of Isaac and Ann Evans Jackson.

The brother Samuel that he speaks of is believed to be the son of Jacob and not his brother. Jacob had a son named Samuel born in Surry Co,North Carolina in 1774 and would have been old enough to be the Samuel that Professor West wrote about.

He stated that Samuel was probably an intimate friend and first cousin of President Andrew Jackson. Records show that Andrew Jackson received his license to practice law in Surry Co at the old Richmond court house (now gone) which was located on the banks of the Yadkin River, just below where Samuel and his family lived. It is possible that they did become friends with Andrew. From information that has been handed down, it is apparent they never liked Andrew, and could not believe that it was the Andy Jackson they knew who had been elected President of the United States, as he was such a rough character, always getting into brawls, fighting, gambling, etc.

Samuel Jackson was around forty-five years old when Andrew Jackson was born, and had been in America for several years before Andrew Jackson Sr. came to America and settled at Waxhaw. Andrew Sr. did have a brother named Samuel, "Called Sam the Sailor" and as the story goes was instrumental in getting the Jackson and Hutchins family out of Ireland and to America.

If there is any relationship between Samuel Jackson of Westfield and Andrew Jackson, it would be way back in England or Ireland where they may have had a common ancestor, as I can find no close connection between these two families in America.

With so many descendants of Samuel Jackson Sr. and Samuel Jr. doing research on both families, maybe some day one of them will get lucky and find the clue that will lead to the identity of their parents.

More from Lucille Jackson: Samuel and Catherine were natives of Chester Co, PA, and "Old" New Castle, Delaware. When they first came to North Carolina, they lived on the Davidson-Randolph County line, were there was a Jackson settlement named Jackson Creek, and a Church.

 

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 2 (con't)

Notes for Samuel Jackson Sr.:

General Notes:

It is rumored among Jackson genealogists that Samuel was born in Chester Co., PA, however he does not show up on any birth records in Chester Co, PA. He moved to North Carolina in the early 1750's. Lucille Jackson Vernon stated in her research that they lived in an area that is now in Davidson Co.,North Carolina before moving on to Westfield, North Carolina . Samuel and Catherine came to Surry Co.,North Carolina around 1770-72, settling on Tom's Creek, later called Westfield. They were the first Jacksons in the Westfield area. Much of what is known about these people is from Quaker records. Samuel Jackson was living in Chester Co., PA at the time when several Quaker families by the name of Jackson were in the area, so most researchers have made the assumption that Samuel was a Quaker. Lucille Vernon wrote to the Quaker College at Guilford Co., North Carolina ; they wrote back saying they had no record of Samuel or his wife, Catherine, ever being members of the New Garden congregation. Lucille assumed the other researchers were wrong; however in Henshaw's "Encyclopeida of America Quaker Genealogy" Vol I, page 504 (New Garden MM) lists Samuel, Catherine as follows: page 182, Samuel Jackson; Catherine Jackson, d.4-24-1780; Joseph b. 12-27-1761; Elizabeth b. 5-12-1763; Jehu b. 7-4-1765; William b. 5-15-1767; Amer b. 6-19-1769. Page 14 of same volume shows Samuel and Catherine were present for marriage of Jacob Jackson and Ann Beales. This becomes a difficult thing to document as Lucille Vernon found in Jacob Jackson's application for membership at New Garden MM, he stated he was not a Quaker and that his parents were not members of the Society of Friends. I do not know if Samuel was a Quaker, but certainly his sons, Curtis, Jacob, John and Joseph, were as their names show up on the list of Charter members of the Westfield Friends. Jacob was a minister and received his brother, Samuel, Jr., into the membership at his request. Most all of the Jacksons migrated west with the exception of Joseph who married Sarah Jessup. They and many of their descendants remained in North Carolina .

 

The descendants of Samuel and Catherine Plankinhorn Jackson who are now living in the Westfield area of Surry Co.,North Carolina will tell you that Samuel's father was Aaron Jackson, son of William Jackson, born ca 1710. This information came to them from Luther Byrd of Westfield and can be found in the Guilford College library. Mr. Luther N. Byrd, grew up in Mount Airy,North Carolina and while a teacher in the Westfield High School, became interested in the history of the early Quakers that settled in the area. He started his students working on family trees and in order to help the students he did genealogical research, also. In his research he gives the name of Aaron Jackson, son of a William Jackson as the father of Samuel and Priscilla Jackson Jessup as a sister of Samuel. I was privileged to have had Luther Byrd as a teacher in the 8th grade.

 

Joe Willard Snyder states the following in his Jackson research:

Samuel and his three brothers, Moses, Charles and William worked in Benjamin Franklin's print shop in Philadelphia (his source was Leola Grim Tobin's Jackson Family Records)

 

Professor Edwin P. West, great-grandson of Jacob and Ann Jackson, gave an account which was used in the History of Clinton Co, OH. This article had been written earlier by Judge Harlan on "Sketches of Clinton Co", which stated that three brothers Jacob, John, and Samuel Jackson were among the first settlers of Clinton Co and that their father was Samuel Jackson who was the son of Isaac Jackson, who was the son of Anthony Jackson, who was a descendant of Ralph Jackson who was burned at the stake as a martyr at Stratford, England in 1556. He also stated that Samuel was probably a first cousin and intimate friend of President Andrew Jackson.

I have found many discrepancies in this article. First, the Isaac Jackson, son of Anthony Jackson, married Ann Evans, and brought his family to America in 1725 when he was sixty years of age and settled in Chester Co, PA. His life has been well documented in Quaker records and Pennsylvania histories. They did not have a son by the name of Samuel, so Samuel Jackson was not the son of Isaac and Ann Evans Jackson.

The brother Samuel that he speaks of is believed to be the son of Jacob and not his brother. Jacob had a son named Samuel born in Surry Co,North Carolina in 1774 and would have been old enough to be the Samuel that Professor West wrote about.

He stated that Samuel was probably an intimate friend and first cousin of President Andrew Jackson. Records show that Andrew Jackson received his license to practice law in Surry Co at the old Richmond court house (now gone) which was located on the banks of the Yadkin River, just below where Samuel and his family lived. It is possible that they did become friends with Andrew. From information that has been handed down, it is apparent they never liked Andrew, and could not believe that it was the Andy Jackson they knew who had been elected President of the United States, as he was such a rough character, always getting into brawls, fighting, gambling, etc.

Samuel Jackson was around forty-five years old when Andrew Jackson was born, and had been in America for several years before Andrew Jackson Sr. came to America and settled at Waxhaw. Andrew Sr. did have a brother named Samuel, "Called Sam the Sailor" and as the story goes was instrumental in getting the Jackson and Hutchins family out of Ireland and to America.

If there is any relationship between Samuel Jackson of Westfield and Andrew Jackson, it would be way back in England or Ireland where they may have had a common ancestor, as I can find no close connection between these two families in America.

With so many descendants of Samuel Jackson Sr. and Samuel Jr. doing research on both families, maybe some day one of them will get lucky and find the clue that will lead to the identity of their parents.

More from Lucille Jackson: Samuel and Catherine were natives of Chester Co, PA, and "Old" New Castle, Delaware. When they first came to North Carolina, they lived on the Davidson-Randolph County line, were there was a Jackson settlement named Jackson Creek, and a Church.

 

 

 

Mary Catherine Plankinhorn daughter of Peter Plankinhorn and Susanna Unknown[3] was born in 1730 in Chesapeake Bay States[3]. She died on 24 Apr 1780 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

Notes for Mary Catherine Plankinhorn:

General Notes:

Catherine Plankinhorn was born abt 1730 in the Chesapeake Bay States and died 24 Apr 1780 in Surry Co., North Carolina . Jackson researchers over the years have tried to find Catherine Plankinhorn's parents or anyone by the name of Plankinhorn. Every available source has been researched in the states of NY, PA, MD, NJ and DE. The libraries in Washington,DC including the Library of Congress and the D.A.R. Library has been searched. Research was done in archives, county seats and tax records and in all of this research, only two small articles have been found on the name of Plankinhorn and they were on Peter and Susanna Plankinhorn.

 

Lucille Jackson Vernon felt that one of the reasons for not finding the name is that prior to the war in 1776 the name was changed from Plankinhorn to Plankenton. Information has been found in PA on the Plankenton families who were the children and grandchildren of Peter and Susanna Plankinhorn.

 

The first valuable source of information on the Plankinhorn's was compiled in 1901 by Gilbert Cope, on the descendants of George and Sarah Smedley, early settlers of Chester Co., PA, who's descendants had married into the Robins family of Edgemont Twp., Delaware Co., PA. Two of the Robin sisters, Jane and Sarah, married Jesse and Samuel Plankenton, son of Peter Plankinhorn, Jr. Jane and Sarah were the granddaughters of Joseph and Lear Crayton Robins of NJ and the daughters of Joseph and Jane Hooper Robins of Edgemont. In 1901, Cope wrote that Peter and Susanna Plankinhorn who, in 1778 (now deceased) were mentioned as "Late of Gloucester in the Providence of New Jersey." He named four known children: Jacob, John, Peter, Jr. and Elizabeth. Information on these four is found in census, tax records, and marriages of PA. He did not research the family, but they probably had other children.

 

The second piece of information written on the family of Peter and Sarah Plankinhorn was four pages written out in long hand and very hard to read. It was written by one of the great-grandsons of Peter Plankinhorn, Jr. and placed in one of the libraries in Washington, DC. Mr. Keith Parrish from Washington, DC found these pages while researching the family and sent copies to Lucille Jackson Vernon. The name of the writer was not given.

 

Peter and Susanna may have had other children named Susannah, Michael, and Bridget. One Susannah Blankinhorn was married to John Hepperset 27 Aug 1763 at St. Michael and Zion Lutheran Church in Philadelphia, PA. One Bridget Blackenton was baptized in 1760 at the age of 23. In 1777, Michael Blankinhorn was in the Revolutionary War, and in 1780 he was listed as Michael Plankinhorn. In Colonial days, the "P" and "B" were often used interchangeably.

 

Joseph Plankinton has said he thought the origin of the Plankinhorns were from Great Britain (Wales) Cope said he thought they came from Wales, since no one has found any written information on where they came from or how many children they had. The origin could even be German instead of from Wales. The Moravians had settled in PA around 1722. They had come from Hernhut,Germany. Their religion is very similar to that of the Lutheran Church. In the early 1800's a John Plankinhorn settled in Lycoming Co., PA. He was from Germany. The Susannah Blankinhorn was married in a Lutheran Church. Elizabeth was married in the Old Swede Church, (now Lutheran), so the religion of the early Plankinhorn's may have been Lutheran. One of their sons, John, married a Quaker girl and later joined the Concord MM in Philadelphia.

 

Lucille Jackson Vernon expresses her thanks to Keith Parrish who sent her most of the information that she had on the family, along with Mrs. Edith Hankins of Memphis, TN.

 

From the LDS site (www.familysearch.org) comes:

 

Plankenhorn 160 entries Black Forest, Germany

Planckenhorn 20 entries Black Forest, Germany

Plankinhorn - no entries in Germany

Catharina/Katharina/Catharine/Kathraine Plankenhorn 12 entries

Catharina Planckenhorn 1 entry

Plankinton/Plankenton 232 entries

Plankenhorn 87 entries

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 2 (con't)

Notes for Mary Catherine Plankinhorn:

General Notes:

Catherine Plankinhorn was born abt 1730 in the Chesapeake Bay States and died 24 Apr 1780 in Surry Co., North Carolina . Jackson researchers over the years have tried to find Catherine Plankinhorn's parents or anyone by the name of Plankinhorn. Every available source has been researched in the states of NY, PA, MD, NJ and DE. The libraries in Washington,DC including the Library of Congress and the D.A.R. Library has been searched. Research was done in archives, county seats and tax records and in all of this research, only two small articles have been found on the name of Plankinhorn and they were on Peter and Susanna Plankinhorn.

 

Lucille Jackson Vernon felt that one of the reasons for not finding the name is that prior to the war in 1776 the name was changed from Plankinhorn to Plankenton. Information has been found in PA on the Plankenton families who were the children and grandchildren of Peter and Susanna Plankinhorn.

 

The first valuable source of information on the Plankinhorn's was compiled in 1901 by Gilbert Cope, on the descendants of George and Sarah Smedley, early settlers of Chester Co., PA, who's descendants had married into the Robins family of Edgemont Twp., Delaware Co., PA. Two of the Robin sisters, Jane and Sarah, married Jesse and Samuel Plankenton, son of Peter Plankinhorn, Jr. Jane and Sarah were the granddaughters of Joseph and Lear Crayton Robins of NJ and the daughters of Joseph and Jane Hooper Robins of Edgemont. In 1901, Cope wrote that Peter and Susanna Plankinhorn who, in 1778 (now deceased) were mentioned as "Late of Gloucester in the Providence of New Jersey." He named four known children: Jacob, John, Peter, Jr. and Elizabeth. Information on these four is found in census, tax records, and marriages of PA. He did not research the family, but they probably had other children.

 

The second piece of information written on the family of Peter and Sarah Plankinhorn was four pages written out in long hand and very hard to read. It was written by one of the great-grandsons of Peter Plankinhorn, Jr. and placed in one of the libraries in Washington, DC. Mr. Keith Parrish from Washington, DC found these pages while researching the family and sent copies to Lucille Jackson Vernon. The name of the writer was not given.

 

Peter and Susanna may have had other children named Susannah, Michael, and Bridget. One Susannah Blankinhorn was married to John Hepperset 27 Aug 1763 at St. Michael and Zion Lutheran Church in Philadelphia, PA. One Bridget Blackenton was baptized in 1760 at the age of 23. In 1777, Michael Blankinhorn was in the Revolutionary War, and in 1780 he was listed as Michael Plankinhorn. In Colonial days, the "P" and "B" were often used interchangeably.

 

Joseph Plankinton has said he thought the origin of the Plankinhorns were from Great Britain (Wales) Cope said he thought they came from Wales, since no one has found any written information on where they came from or how many children they had. The origin could even be German instead of from Wales. The Moravians had settled in PA around 1722. They had come from Hernhut,Germany. Their religion is very similar to that of the Lutheran Church. In the early 1800's a John Plankinhorn settled in Lycoming Co., PA. He was from Germany. The Susannah Blankinhorn was married in a Lutheran Church. Elizabeth was married in the Old Swede Church, (now Lutheran), so the religion of the early Plankinhorn's may have been Lutheran. One of their sons, John, married a Quaker girl and later joined the Concord MM in Philadelphia.

 

Lucille Jackson Vernon expresses her thanks to Keith Parrish who sent her most of the information that she had on the family, along with Mrs. Edith Hankins of Memphis, TN.

 

From the LDS site (www.familysearch.org) comes:

 

Plankenhorn 160 entries Black Forest, Germany

Planckenhorn 20 entries Black Forest, Germany

Plankinhorn - no entries in Germany

Catharina/Katharina/Catharine/Kathraine Plankenhorn 12 entries

Catharina Planckenhorn 1 entry

Plankinton/Plankenton 232 entries

Plankenhorn 87 entries

 

 

Samuel Jackson Sr. and Mary Catherine Plankinhorn were married about 1747 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA[3]. They had the following children:

4. i.

Jacob Jackson[3] was born in 1749 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA[6]. He married Ann Beales on 10 Aug 1774 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA (Old Westfield Friends Church)[7]. He died on 14 Nov 1844 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[6].

5. ii.

Curtis Isaac Jackson[3] was born in 1751 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA[3]. He married Ruth Beales on 25 Nov 1775 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 25 Sep 1829 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[8].

6. iii.

John Jackson[3] was born in 1753 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA[3]. He married Phebe Beales on 10 Nov 1779 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 10 Aug 1810 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[3].

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Generation 2 (con't)
7. iv.

Susanna Jackson[6] was born in 1755 in Probably in Chester, Pennsylvania[6]. She married Daniel Beales on 05 Apr 1775 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[9]. She died on 09 Aug 1840 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[6].

8. v.

Samuel Jackson Jr.[10] was born on 23 Jan 1758 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA[10, 11]. He married Hannah Gibson on 23 Jan 1782 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[10]. He died on 06 Jun 1834 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6].

9. vi.

Joseph Jackson[3] was born on 27 Dec 1761 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Sarah Jessup on 21 Apr 1787 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 22 Oct 1815 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

10. vii.

Elizabeth Jackson[3] was born on 12 May 1763 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Charles Simmons on 08 Mar 1786 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died before 1808 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

11. viii.

Jehu Jackson[3] was born on 04 Jul 1765 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Hope Jessup on 22 Mar 1788 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 06 Jul 1844[3].

12. ix.

William Jackson[3] was born on 15 May 1767 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Mary Jessup on 10 Sep 1790 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 20 Sep 1841 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

13. x.

Amer Jackson[12] was born on 09 Jun 1769 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[12]. He married Violet Forkner about 1797[13]. He died in Aug 1843 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12].

Sarah Unknown[3] was born on Unknown[3]. She died on Unknown.

Samuel Jackson Sr. and Sarah Unknown were married after 1780[3]. They had no children.

3.

Priscilla Jackson-2 (Aaron-1)[3, 4] was born in 1742 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[1, 4]. She died in Feb 1819 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[4].

Notes for Priscilla Jackson:

General Notes:

PRISCILLA JACKSON JESSOP'S WILL

 

Whereas I, Priscilla Jessop, of Surry County and State of North Carolina, being weak of body, though of disposing mind and memory, and calling to mind the mortality of my body, do constitute the following as my last Will and Testament, and desire that it be received by all as such:

 

First and principally, I will my soul to God that gave it, and that my body be decently buried, at the discretion of my executors hereafter named. And as touching my worldly goods, I give and dispose of them in the manner and form following:

 

Item 2. It is my will that my dearly beloved daughter, Hannah Jessop, have my mare and colt, and my best cow and calf, and two big hogs, and also my feather bed and bedstead, also my chest, and to have choice of my two big pots, to have a smaller pot, and two ovens, also one cotton wheel, one flax wheel, one loom and small table, and two smoothing irons, three pails, three common chairs, and the arm chair, also to have a large basin and dish, and four quart basins, and one pint basin, and also to have my corner cupboard, with the articles standing on it, consisting of Queen's ware, glass ware, and clear glass bottles.

 

Item 3. It is my will that my son, Eli Jessop, have one pint basin, one plate and the wheat fan. It si my will that my son, Elijah Jessop, have one dish, one plate and one pint basin.

 

Item 4. It is my will that all the balance of my estate consisting of cattle and hogs, and some household and kitchen furniture, be sold at auction, and that the money arising thereby be equally divided among all my children, both sons and daughters, and particularly that my executors pay one legatees part unto the children of my son, Jacob Jessop, deceased, to be equally divided amongst them.

 

And lastly, I appoint my sons Joseph and William Jessop, Executors to this my last Will and Testament, and hereby revoke, disannul and make void all former wills by me made, and declare this to be my last Will and Testament.

 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twelfth day of the seventh month in the year of our Lord, one thousand, eight hundred and eighteen.

 

Signed, sealed and acknowledged

In the presence of Priscilla Jessop (her mark) ( )

Abijah Pinson

William Pearce

February Term AD 1819. The foregoing is a copy of the last Will and Testament of Priscilla Jessop which was proved at this term by the oath of William Pearce, one of the subscribing witnesses, thereof.

 

Test: J. Williams, CL.

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 2 (con't)

Notes for Priscilla Jackson:

General Notes:

PRISCILLA JACKSON JESSOP'S WILL

 

Whereas I, Priscilla Jessop, of Surry County and State of North Carolina, being weak of body, though of disposing mind and memory, and calling to mind the mortality of my body, do constitute the following as my last Will and Testament, and desire that it be received by all as such:

 

First and principally, I will my soul to God that gave it, and that my body be decently buried, at the discretion of my executors hereafter named. And as touching my worldly goods, I give and dispose of them in the manner and form following:

 

Item 2. It is my will that my dearly beloved daughter, Hannah Jessop, have my mare and colt, and my best cow and calf, and two big hogs, and also my feather bed and bedstead, also my chest, and to have choice of my two big pots, to have a smaller pot, and two ovens, also one cotton wheel, one flax wheel, one loom and small table, and two smoothing irons, three pails, three common chairs, and the arm chair, also to have a large basin and dish, and four quart basins, and one pint basin, and also to have my corner cupboard, with the articles standing on it, consisting of Queen's ware, glass ware, and clear glass bottles.

 

Item 3. It is my will that my son, Eli Jessop, have one pint basin, one plate and the wheat fan. It si my will that my son, Elijah Jessop, have one dish, one plate and one pint basin.

 

Item 4. It is my will that all the balance of my estate consisting of cattle and hogs, and some household and kitchen furniture, be sold at auction, and that the money arising thereby be equally divided among all my children, both sons and daughters, and particularly that my executors pay one legatees part unto the children of my son, Jacob Jessop, deceased, to be equally divided amongst them.

 

And lastly, I appoint my sons Joseph and William Jessop, Executors to this my last Will and Testament, and hereby revoke, disannul and make void all former wills by me made, and declare this to be my last Will and Testament.

 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twelfth day of the seventh month in the year of our Lord, one thousand, eight hundred and eighteen.

 

Signed, sealed and acknowledged

In the presence of Priscilla Jessop (her mark) ( )

Abijah Pinson

William Pearce

February Term AD 1819. The foregoing is a copy of the last Will and Testament of Priscilla Jessop which was proved at this term by the oath of William Pearce, one of the subscribing witnesses, thereof.

 

Test: J. Williams, CL.

 

 

Joseph Jessup son of Thomas Jessup II and Sarah Small[3, 5] was born on 07 Sep 1738 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on 10 Mar 1796 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

Notes for Joseph Jessup:

General Notes:

The Jessup family of the Westfield area of Surry Co.,North Carolina has one of the most complete historical and genealogical records of any family in the county. Such a history was made possible by the wonderful records in the Quaker Church, the church with which so many Jessups have been associated for more than 300 years. Much of my information has come from these Quaker Records and it is my joy to share what I have learned about my ancestors with others interested in preserving our heritage. My research has been enhanced also by the help of so many Jessup family genealogists who have shared their findings with me.

 

The Westfield Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, better known in this area as "Old Westfield", is the oldest church in Surry or Stokes County and probably the oldest religious group in Northwest North Carolina this side of the Moravian settlements of what is now Winston Salem. The Meeting dates back to the 1760's when pioneer Quakers from New Garden (now Guilford College) crossed Quaker Gap of the Sauratown mountains to plant a new community in the valleys of Big Creek and Tom's Creek. Early Quakers began holding meetings at Westfield by 1772 under the care of New Garden Quarterly Meeting and continued until the monthly meeting was established in 1786. Representatives from New Garden were sent to hold services for them. This is said to have lead to the name, "Westfield." The Quakers at New Garden regarded the work as a mission project and since it was located west of New Garden it was referred to as, "The Western Field." Thus comes the name, "Westfield."

 

The meeting was officially established November 13, 1786. The Westfield friends would send representatives all the way to New Garden, 67 miles, every month. Bowater Sumner was named the first clerk of the Monthly Meeting.

 

Quaker records show that between 1801-1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families who migrated to Indiana and Ohio and the Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832. It was revived again in 1868 when Albert Peele and Isom Cox came from New Garden to Westfield and met on a Sunday morning in the open air with about 150 people. "The people decided from that time to have a Friends Meeting again and made up among themselves to do it." John Y. Hoover began serving as pastor in 1872.

 

The dates of the erection of the first building is uncertain, but a deed dated 1797 for nine acres of land "including the Westfield Meeting House" seem to indicate that the building was constructed soon after the establishment of the Meeting. Three meetings have served as Meeting Houses for the congregation. The first build in the 1780's decayed before the Civil War. It was rebuild about 1870 and was used until 1885 when a new and more modern building was erected. This building has been remodeled and additions made to it through the years.

 

The "Old Westfield Friends Meeting" has stood for 200 years as a monument to the faithful foresight of dedicated Quakers. It has weathered the storms of strife, war, and depression, and is a witness to the stability of the Church which Jesus came to establish in the hearts and lives of people.

 

From Luther N. Byrd, Elon College,North Carolina Feb 20, 1951

 

Deed records in Surry County and Rowan County show that the earliest settlement of people in the area which later was to center about the Old Westfield Quaker Church was between 1760 and 1770, for there are records of people buying or claiming land in that section between those dates. Since most of the early settlers were Quakers, we may assume that there was some semblance of religious group at or near Westfield before 1770.

 

Westfield Church was established as an off-spring of the historic New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College, for the church records at New Garden prove that to be a fact. The Quakers at New Garden regarded the church work at Westfield as a sort of mission project in its early years, and since it was located west of Guilford College, it was referred to as "the western field", and thus came the name of Westfield.

 

The minutes of the New Garden Monthly Meeting for August 29, 1772 state that "Also the Friends near the Mountains request the indulgence of holding meetings on week-days among themselves." The people near the mountains were those at Westfield, so that is proof that there were enough Quakers in the Westfield section prior to 1772 to be interested in holding meetings.

 

The minutes for New Garden for September, 1772 show that "the committee appointed to visit Friends near the mountains reports that they complied with instructions, …. And its the sense and judgment that they (the Friends near the Mountains) be indulged the privilege of holding such meetings and appoints them the fourth day of he week." These meetings were the first official church gatherings at Westfield. (1772).

 

The Westfield meeting operated for several years under the guidance and care of the New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College. It was referred to as "the little meeting nigh Tom's Creek" in minutes of the New Garden Meeting for May29, 1773.

 

The Westfield Quakers expressed themselves in 1779 (during the American Revolution) as opposed to war, which is an ancient Quaker belief.

 

The church at Westfield was established on a more permanent basis when the Western Quarterly Meeting met at Cane Creek o n November 9,m 1782 and authorized a committee to inspect the Westfield group and report at the next quarterly session. The Westfield Quakers had requested such a preparative meeting in August, 1782. Formal organization of he Westfield Meeting as a preparative body was finally and definitely granted August 14, 1784.

 

The first recorded minutes of a regular Monthly Meeting at Westfield bare the date of December 23, 1786. Bowater Sumner was appointed first clerk.

 

The exact date of he first church building at Westfield is not known, but it was probably built soon after the meeting first started, for there is a deed on file in Quaker Archives at Guilford College, dated August 1797 for nine acres "including the Westfield Meeting House." That is proof that there was already a church building there at that date.

 

I have in my files a hand-written statement from the late Mrs. Effie Ann Hill, who stated that the first church building was build right after the meeting was started, and she states that the first church stood down in the present grave yard and that it was located abut twenty steps west of our father's (Ira Chilton) grave. She writes "when he was put there, his grave was made at the lower side of the East Yard of the church." Mrs. Hill stated that the old church stood on the east side of the road, but in 1939 when they had that big home-coming and celebration at the renovation of the present church, someone located some old rocks just below the present church toward the cemetery (but on the west side of the road along with the present location of Ira W. Chilton's grave, but seems to me that it was not too far down in the cemetery, so it seems likely that the oldest church might have been where those rocks were located to form a square for the old foundation. Ira Chilton died in 1885.

 

Now, Mrs. Hill also wrote that "the old log walls of he old church was still standing" when services were started again after the Civil War, so evidently that first church was practically gone at that time. Quaker records show that between 1801 and 1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families, who migrated to Indiana and Ohio, and the Westfield Monthly Meeting was laid down in 1832. The bulk of the migration began in 1817. The result was that from 1832 until after the Civil War there was no Westfield Monthly Meeting. In April 1860, there was still a meeting house there, for there is a deed on record made by the Trustees of Friends to the trustees of the Westfield community for "a tract of land known as the Westfield Meeting House and graveyard, the same to be known for all time to come as a public burying ground and meeting place for all respectable religious peoples." So the Westfield Quaker property belongs to the community form 1860 to 1872. In 1872 the Trustees of the Friends (Sandy Cook, William H. Pell, and Benjamin F. Davis) paid $125 for the nine acre tract, and it once more became the property of the Friends church, with the provision that it was to be held forever by the Society of Friends.

 

At this point let us point out the Quarterly Meetings of which Westfield Monthly Meeting has been a part. It was originally founded in 1786 as a member of the Western Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the newly organized New Garden Quarterly Meeting in 1787. Within the next few years, Westfield itself branched out and formed new Monthly Meetings at Lost Creek in Tennessee in 1793, at New Hope in Tennessee in 1795, Mount Pleasant and Fruit Hill in Virginia in 1797, at North Providence in 1801, and so in 1803 the Westfield Quarterly Meeting set off. Apparently this Westfield Quarterly Meeting continued until the Westfield Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832, but when the Westfield church revived in 1883, it belonged to Deep River Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the new Yadkin Valley Quarterly Meeting in 1889 and was again transferred to the new Surry Quarterly Meeting in 1898.

 

Excerpts from Hinshaw, Volume I Westfield Monthly Meeting

 

Tom's Creek Meeting, the predecessor of Westfield, was located in Surry County, North Carolina , not far from the Virginia Line. The meeting for worship was organized about 1771; the preparative meeting in 1784. The name was changed to Westfield when the monthly meeting was established, in 1786. Previous to this time, Tom's Creek Preparative Meeting had been attached to New Garden Monthly Meeting.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

Joseph Jessup became the first Jessup to settle at Westfield, North Carolina . He was accompanied to Westfield by three of his brothers but all three of them later moved to Indiana and other western states. Joseph was the only son of Thomas Jessup that remained in North Carolina . He married Priscilla "out of unity, settled on a farm in Stokes, North Carolina , near the headwaters of the Dan River, not far from the southern border of VA. His father, Thomas Jessup, signed the disownment papers at Cane Creek MM. Joseph, alone of his father's sons, lived and died in North Carolina . The children of Joseph and Priscilla Jessup were found on two wills dated 29 Feb 1791 and 10 Mar 1796. Quaker records were submitted to Beth Cox Rowe by Linda Jessup. She also gives credit to Rev. Jasper Newton Jessup.

 

WILL OF JOSEPH JESSUP:

 

I, Joseph Jessop, of Surry County & State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory, ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First, my will is that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid in due time by my Executors.

 

Item 2. My Will is that son Jacob Jessop have five shillings.

 

Item 3. My Will is that my daughter, Sarah Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 4. My Will is that my daughter, Mary Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 5. My Will is that my son, William Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 6. My Will is that my son, John Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 7. My Will is that my daughter, Rachel Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 8. My Will is that my beloved wife, Priscilla Jessop shall have the plantation, whereon I now live and all the appurtenances thereunto belonging while she remains my widow, the plantation to be equally divided between her and Eli and she to have her choice of halves and at her decease then Eli is to have the aforesaid plantation and all the land lying between the line that divides of my son, William and my son, Jacob, land and sixty acres lying on both sides of the grassee fork joining the county line.

 

Item 9. My Will is that my beloved wife shall have all the income of my mill while she remains my widow.

 

Item 10. My Will is that as long as my sons keep my mill up they shall have their grain ground at her clear of expense except the miller's part.

 

Item 11. My Will is that my daughter, Hannah Jessop, shall have thirty-five pounds

 

Item 12. My Will is that my survey of land of three hundred and ten acres lying on Forbush Creek in Surry County and one hundred and ninety and one half acres of my land on Arches Creek in Surry County, and fifty acres of land on the waters of the Stock Fork in Stokes County all to be sold and equally divided between my wife, Priscilla Jessop and all my children; namely, Jacob, Sarah, Mary, Joseph, William, John, Rachel, Caleb, Elijah, Hannah and Eli.

 

Item 13. Thereby ordain, constitute and appoint my trusty and well beloved brother, Timothy Jessop and my son, Joseph Jessop, the whole and sole Executors of this my last Will and Testament to act and dispose thereof according to my Will and desire to the best of their knowledge.

 

And lastly, thereby utterly revoke and disannul and make void all other will or wills or testaments by me made or done, except such as made and done lawfully in my life time. Rectifying, confirming and allowing this and no other to be my last Will and Testament, whereunto I have interchangeably set my hand and affixed my seal this tenth day of the third month in the year of our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-six.

 

Test_________

Thomas Sumner

Benjamin C________

Seal

Hannah Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

A CODICIL TO A WILL

 

Be it known to all men by these present that I, Joseph Jessop, of the county of Surry and State of North Carolina, planter, have made and declared my last Will and Testament in writing, bearing date the tenth of the third month, one thousand, seven hundred ninety_______

 

I the said, Joseph Jessop, by this present codicil do ratify and confirm my said last Will and Testament and do further give and bequeath unto my son, John, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be levied and raised out of my Estate, and so I give and bequeath to my sun, Caleb Jessop, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the same manner. I also give and bequeath to my son, Elijah Jessop, forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the like manner to be paid unto them by my Executors out of my estate and that this codicil is judged to be a part and parcel of my last Will and Testament and that all things therein mentioned and contained be faithfully and truly performed and as fully and amply in every respect as if the same one so declared and set down in my said last Will and Testament witness my hand the seventeenth of tenth month of the year one thousand and ninety ___.

 

Signed, sealed

 

Sept

Seal

William Jessop

(name that can't be read)

Caleb Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

The first Surry County deed record was dated October 18, 1786, shows a purchase of land lying along Big Creek near the village of Westfield, North Carolina , but Joseph Jessop may have been living in the area prior to that time. He eventually owned vast holdings of land in both Surry and Stokes Counties, North Carolina . His land extended for twenty-five miles from Chestnut Ridge to the Clemmons Ford of the Dan River and on to Buck Island in the Dan River.

 

 

Page 6 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:23 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 2 (con't)

Notes for Joseph Jessup:

General Notes:

The Jessup family of the Westfield area of Surry Co.,North Carolina has one of the most complete historical and genealogical records of any family in the county. Such a history was made possible by the wonderful records in the Quaker Church, the church with which so many Jessups have been associated for more than 300 years. Much of my information has come from these Quaker Records and it is my joy to share what I have learned about my ancestors with others interested in preserving our heritage. My research has been enhanced also by the help of so many Jessup family genealogists who have shared their findings with me.

 

The Westfield Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, better known in this area as "Old Westfield", is the oldest church in Surry or Stokes County and probably the oldest religious group in Northwest North Carolina this side of the Moravian settlements of what is now Winston Salem. The Meeting dates back to the 1760's when pioneer Quakers from New Garden (now Guilford College) crossed Quaker Gap of the Sauratown mountains to plant a new community in the valleys of Big Creek and Tom's Creek. Early Quakers began holding meetings at Westfield by 1772 under the care of New Garden Quarterly Meeting and continued until the monthly meeting was established in 1786. Representatives from New Garden were sent to hold services for them. This is said to have lead to the name, "Westfield." The Quakers at New Garden regarded the work as a mission project and since it was located west of New Garden it was referred to as, "The Western Field." Thus comes the name, "Westfield."

 

The meeting was officially established November 13, 1786. The Westfield friends would send representatives all the way to New Garden, 67 miles, every month. Bowater Sumner was named the first clerk of the Monthly Meeting.

 

Quaker records show that between 1801-1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families who migrated to Indiana and Ohio and the Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832. It was revived again in 1868 when Albert Peele and Isom Cox came from New Garden to Westfield and met on a Sunday morning in the open air with about 150 people. "The people decided from that time to have a Friends Meeting again and made up among themselves to do it." John Y. Hoover began serving as pastor in 1872.

 

The dates of the erection of the first building is uncertain, but a deed dated 1797 for nine acres of land "including the Westfield Meeting House" seem to indicate that the building was constructed soon after the establishment of the Meeting. Three meetings have served as Meeting Houses for the congregation. The first build in the 1780's decayed before the Civil War. It was rebuild about 1870 and was used until 1885 when a new and more modern building was erected. This building has been remodeled and additions made to it through the years.

 

The "Old Westfield Friends Meeting" has stood for 200 years as a monument to the faithful foresight of dedicated Quakers. It has weathered the storms of strife, war, and depression, and is a witness to the stability of the Church which Jesus came to establish in the hearts and lives of people.

 

From Luther N. Byrd, Elon College,North Carolina Feb 20, 1951

 

Deed records in Surry County and Rowan County show that the earliest settlement of people in the area which later was to center about the Old Westfield Quaker Church was between 1760 and 1770, for there are records of people buying or claiming land in that section between those dates. Since most of the early settlers were Quakers, we may assume that there was some semblance of religious group at or near Westfield before 1770.

 

Westfield Church was established as an off-spring of the historic New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College, for the church records at New Garden prove that to be a fact. The Quakers at New Garden regarded the church work at Westfield as a sort of mission project in its early years, and since it was located west of Guilford College, it was referred to as "the western field", and thus came the name of Westfield.

 

The minutes of the New Garden Monthly Meeting for August 29, 1772 state that "Also the Friends near the Mountains request the indulgence of holding meetings on week-days among themselves." The people near the mountains were those at Westfield, so that is proof that there were enough Quakers in the Westfield section prior to 1772 to be interested in holding meetings.

 

The minutes for New Garden for September, 1772 show that "the committee appointed to visit Friends near the mountains reports that they complied with instructions, …. And its the sense and judgment that they (the Friends near the Mountains) be indulged the privilege of holding such meetings and appoints them the fourth day of he week." These meetings were the first official church gatherings at Westfield. (1772).

 

The Westfield meeting operated for several years under the guidance and care of the New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College. It was referred to as "the little meeting nigh Tom's Creek" in minutes of the New Garden Meeting for May29, 1773.

 

The Westfield Quakers expressed themselves in 1779 (during the American Revolution) as opposed to war, which is an ancient Quaker belief.

 

The church at Westfield was established on a more permanent basis when the Western Quarterly Meeting met at Cane Creek o n November 9,m 1782 and authorized a committee to inspect the Westfield group and report at the next quarterly session. The Westfield Quakers had requested such a preparative meeting in August, 1782. Formal organization of he Westfield Meeting as a preparative body was finally and definitely granted August 14, 1784.

 

The first recorded minutes of a regular Monthly Meeting at Westfield bare the date of December 23, 1786. Bowater Sumner was appointed first clerk.

 

The exact date of he first church building at Westfield is not known, but it was probably built soon after the meeting first started, for there is a deed on file in Quaker Archives at Guilford College, dated August 1797 for nine acres "including the Westfield Meeting House." That is proof that there was already a church building there at that date.

 

I have in my files a hand-written statement from the late Mrs. Effie Ann Hill, who stated that the first church building was build right after the meeting was started, and she states that the first church stood down in the present grave yard and that it was located abut twenty steps west of our father's (Ira Chilton) grave. She writes "when he was put there, his grave was made at the lower side of the East Yard of the church." Mrs. Hill stated that the old church stood on the east side of the road, but in 1939 when they had that big home-coming and celebration at the renovation of the present church, someone located some old rocks just below the present church toward the cemetery (but on the west side of the road along with the present location of Ira W. Chilton's grave, but seems to me that it was not too far down in the cemetery, so it seems likely that the oldest church might have been where those rocks were located to form a square for the old foundation. Ira Chilton died in 1885.

 

Now, Mrs. Hill also wrote that "the old log walls of he old church was still standing" when services were started again after the Civil War, so evidently that first church was practically gone at that time. Quaker records show that between 1801 and 1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families, who migrated to Indiana and Ohio, and the Westfield Monthly Meeting was laid down in 1832. The bulk of the migration began in 1817. The result was that from 1832 until after the Civil War there was no Westfield Monthly Meeting. In April 1860, there was still a meeting house there, for there is a deed on record made by the Trustees of Friends to the trustees of the Westfield community for "a tract of land known as the Westfield Meeting House and graveyard, the same to be known for all time to come as a public burying ground and meeting place for all respectable religious peoples." So the Westfield Quaker property belongs to the community form 1860 to 1872. In 1872 the Trustees of the Friends (Sandy Cook, William H. Pell, and Benjamin F. Davis) paid $125 for the nine acre tract, and it once more became the property of the Friends church, with the provision that it was to be held forever by the Society of Friends.

 

At this point let us point out the Quarterly Meetings of which Westfield Monthly Meeting has been a part. It was originally founded in 1786 as a member of the Western Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the newly organized New Garden Quarterly Meeting in 1787. Within the next few years, Westfield itself branched out and formed new Monthly Meetings at Lost Creek in Tennessee in 1793, at New Hope in Tennessee in 1795, Mount Pleasant and Fruit Hill in Virginia in 1797, at North Providence in 1801, and so in 1803 the Westfield Quarterly Meeting set off. Apparently this Westfield Quarterly Meeting continued until the Westfield Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832, but when the Westfield church revived in 1883, it belonged to Deep River Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the new Yadkin Valley Quarterly Meeting in 1889 and was again transferred to the new Surry Quarterly Meeting in 1898.

 

Excerpts from Hinshaw, Volume I Westfield Monthly Meeting

 

Tom's Creek Meeting, the predecessor of Westfield, was located in Surry County, North Carolina , not far from the Virginia Line. The meeting for worship was organized about 1771; the preparative meeting in 1784. The name was changed to Westfield when the monthly meeting was established, in 1786. Previous to this time, Tom's Creek Preparative Meeting had been attached to New Garden Monthly Meeting.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

Joseph Jessup became the first Jessup to settle at Westfield, North Carolina . He was accompanied to Westfield by three of his brothers but all three of them later moved to Indiana and other western states. Joseph was the only son of Thomas Jessup that remained in North Carolina . He married Priscilla "out of unity, settled on a farm in Stokes, North Carolina , near the headwaters of the Dan River, not far from the southern border of VA. His father, Thomas Jessup, signed the disownment papers at Cane Creek MM. Joseph, alone of his father's sons, lived and died in North Carolina . The children of Joseph and Priscilla Jessup were found on two wills dated 29 Feb 1791 and 10 Mar 1796. Quaker records were submitted to Beth Cox Rowe by Linda Jessup. She also gives credit to Rev. Jasper Newton Jessup.

 

WILL OF JOSEPH JESSUP:

 

I, Joseph Jessop, of Surry County & State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory, ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First, my will is that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid in due time by my Executors.

 

Item 2. My Will is that son Jacob Jessop have five shillings.

 

Item 3. My Will is that my daughter, Sarah Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 4. My Will is that my daughter, Mary Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 5. My Will is that my son, William Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 6. My Will is that my son, John Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 7. My Will is that my daughter, Rachel Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 8. My Will is that my beloved wife, Priscilla Jessop shall have the plantation, whereon I now live and all the appurtenances thereunto belonging while she remains my widow, the plantation to be equally divided between her and Eli and she to have her choice of halves and at her decease then Eli is to have the aforesaid plantation and all the land lying between the line that divides of my son, William and my son, Jacob, land and sixty acres lying on both sides of the grassee fork joining the county line.

 

Item 9. My Will is that my beloved wife shall have all the income of my mill while she remains my widow.

 

Item 10. My Will is that as long as my sons keep my mill up they shall have their grain ground at her clear of expense except the miller's part.

 

Item 11. My Will is that my daughter, Hannah Jessop, shall have thirty-five pounds

 

Item 12. My Will is that my survey of land of three hundred and ten acres lying on Forbush Creek in Surry County and one hundred and ninety and one half acres of my land on Arches Creek in Surry County, and fifty acres of land on the waters of the Stock Fork in Stokes County all to be sold and equally divided between my wife, Priscilla Jessop and all my children; namely, Jacob, Sarah, Mary, Joseph, William, John, Rachel, Caleb, Elijah, Hannah and Eli.

 

Item 13. Thereby ordain, constitute and appoint my trusty and well beloved brother, Timothy Jessop and my son, Joseph Jessop, the whole and sole Executors of this my last Will and Testament to act and dispose thereof according to my Will and desire to the best of their knowledge.

 

And lastly, thereby utterly revoke and disannul and make void all other will or wills or testaments by me made or done, except such as made and done lawfully in my life time. Rectifying, confirming and allowing this and no other to be my last Will and Testament, whereunto I have interchangeably set my hand and affixed my seal this tenth day of the third month in the year of our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-six.

 

Test_________

Thomas Sumner

Benjamin C________

Seal

Hannah Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

A CODICIL TO A WILL

 

Be it known to all men by these present that I, Joseph Jessop, of the county of Surry and State of North Carolina, planter, have made and declared my last Will and Testament in writing, bearing date the tenth of the third month, one thousand, seven hundred ninety_______

 

I the said, Joseph Jessop, by this present codicil do ratify and confirm my said last Will and Testament and do further give and bequeath unto my son, John, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be levied and raised out of my Estate, and so I give and bequeath to my sun, Caleb Jessop, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the same manner. I also give and bequeath to my son, Elijah Jessop, forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the like manner to be paid unto them by my Executors out of my estate and that this codicil is judged to be a part and parcel of my last Will and Testament and that all things therein mentioned and contained be faithfully and truly performed and as fully and amply in every respect as if the same one so declared and set down in my said last Will and Testament witness my hand the seventeenth of tenth month of the year one thousand and ninety ___.

 

Signed, sealed

 

Sept

Seal

William Jessop

(name that can't be read)

Caleb Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

The first Surry County deed record was dated October 18, 1786, shows a purchase of land lying along Big Creek near the village of Westfield, North Carolina , but Joseph Jessop may have been living in the area prior to that time. He eventually owned vast holdings of land in both Surry and Stokes Counties, North Carolina . His land extended for twenty-five miles from Chestnut Ridge to the Clemmons Ford of the Dan River and on to Buck Island in the Dan River.

 

 

Page 7 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:23 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 2 (con't)

Notes for Joseph Jessup:

General Notes:

The Jessup family of the Westfield area of Surry Co.,North Carolina has one of the most complete historical and genealogical records of any family in the county. Such a history was made possible by the wonderful records in the Quaker Church, the church with which so many Jessups have been associated for more than 300 years. Much of my information has come from these Quaker Records and it is my joy to share what I have learned about my ancestors with others interested in preserving our heritage. My research has been enhanced also by the help of so many Jessup family genealogists who have shared their findings with me.

 

The Westfield Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, better known in this area as "Old Westfield", is the oldest church in Surry or Stokes County and probably the oldest religious group in Northwest North Carolina this side of the Moravian settlements of what is now Winston Salem. The Meeting dates back to the 1760's when pioneer Quakers from New Garden (now Guilford College) crossed Quaker Gap of the Sauratown mountains to plant a new community in the valleys of Big Creek and Tom's Creek. Early Quakers began holding meetings at Westfield by 1772 under the care of New Garden Quarterly Meeting and continued until the monthly meeting was established in 1786. Representatives from New Garden were sent to hold services for them. This is said to have lead to the name, "Westfield." The Quakers at New Garden regarded the work as a mission project and since it was located west of New Garden it was referred to as, "The Western Field." Thus comes the name, "Westfield."

 

The meeting was officially established November 13, 1786. The Westfield friends would send representatives all the way to New Garden, 67 miles, every month. Bowater Sumner was named the first clerk of the Monthly Meeting.

 

Quaker records show that between 1801-1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families who migrated to Indiana and Ohio and the Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832. It was revived again in 1868 when Albert Peele and Isom Cox came from New Garden to Westfield and met on a Sunday morning in the open air with about 150 people. "The people decided from that time to have a Friends Meeting again and made up among themselves to do it." John Y. Hoover began serving as pastor in 1872.

 

The dates of the erection of the first building is uncertain, but a deed dated 1797 for nine acres of land "including the Westfield Meeting House" seem to indicate that the building was constructed soon after the establishment of the Meeting. Three meetings have served as Meeting Houses for the congregation. The first build in the 1780's decayed before the Civil War. It was rebuild about 1870 and was used until 1885 when a new and more modern building was erected. This building has been remodeled and additions made to it through the years.

 

The "Old Westfield Friends Meeting" has stood for 200 years as a monument to the faithful foresight of dedicated Quakers. It has weathered the storms of strife, war, and depression, and is a witness to the stability of the Church which Jesus came to establish in the hearts and lives of people.

 

From Luther N. Byrd, Elon College,North Carolina Feb 20, 1951

 

Deed records in Surry County and Rowan County show that the earliest settlement of people in the area which later was to center about the Old Westfield Quaker Church was between 1760 and 1770, for there are records of people buying or claiming land in that section between those dates. Since most of the early settlers were Quakers, we may assume that there was some semblance of religious group at or near Westfield before 1770.

 

Westfield Church was established as an off-spring of the historic New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College, for the church records at New Garden prove that to be a fact. The Quakers at New Garden regarded the church work at Westfield as a sort of mission project in its early years, and since it was located west of Guilford College, it was referred to as "the western field", and thus came the name of Westfield.

 

The minutes of the New Garden Monthly Meeting for August 29, 1772 state that "Also the Friends near the Mountains request the indulgence of holding meetings on week-days among themselves." The people near the mountains were those at Westfield, so that is proof that there were enough Quakers in the Westfield section prior to 1772 to be interested in holding meetings.

 

The minutes for New Garden for September, 1772 show that "the committee appointed to visit Friends near the mountains reports that they complied with instructions, …. And its the sense and judgment that they (the Friends near the Mountains) be indulged the privilege of holding such meetings and appoints them the fourth day of he week." These meetings were the first official church gatherings at Westfield. (1772).

 

The Westfield meeting operated for several years under the guidance and care of the New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College. It was referred to as "the little meeting nigh Tom's Creek" in minutes of the New Garden Meeting for May29, 1773.

 

The Westfield Quakers expressed themselves in 1779 (during the American Revolution) as opposed to war, which is an ancient Quaker belief.

 

The church at Westfield was established on a more permanent basis when the Western Quarterly Meeting met at Cane Creek o n November 9,m 1782 and authorized a committee to inspect the Westfield group and report at the next quarterly session. The Westfield Quakers had requested such a preparative meeting in August, 1782. Formal organization of he Westfield Meeting as a preparative body was finally and definitely granted August 14, 1784.

 

The first recorded minutes of a regular Monthly Meeting at Westfield bare the date of December 23, 1786. Bowater Sumner was appointed first clerk.

 

The exact date of he first church building at Westfield is not known, but it was probably built soon after the meeting first started, for there is a deed on file in Quaker Archives at Guilford College, dated August 1797 for nine acres "including the Westfield Meeting House." That is proof that there was already a church building there at that date.

 

I have in my files a hand-written statement from the late Mrs. Effie Ann Hill, who stated that the first church building was build right after the meeting was started, and she states that the first church stood down in the present grave yard and that it was located abut twenty steps west of our father's (Ira Chilton) grave. She writes "when he was put there, his grave was made at the lower side of the East Yard of the church." Mrs. Hill stated that the old church stood on the east side of the road, but in 1939 when they had that big home-coming and celebration at the renovation of the present church, someone located some old rocks just below the present church toward the cemetery (but on the west side of the road along with the present location of Ira W. Chilton's grave, but seems to me that it was not too far down in the cemetery, so it seems likely that the oldest church might have been where those rocks were located to form a square for the old foundation. Ira Chilton died in 1885.

 

Now, Mrs. Hill also wrote that "the old log walls of he old church was still standing" when services were started again after the Civil War, so evidently that first church was practically gone at that time. Quaker records show that between 1801 and 1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families, who migrated to Indiana and Ohio, and the Westfield Monthly Meeting was laid down in 1832. The bulk of the migration began in 1817. The result was that from 1832 until after the Civil War there was no Westfield Monthly Meeting. In April 1860, there was still a meeting house there, for there is a deed on record made by the Trustees of Friends to the trustees of the Westfield community for "a tract of land known as the Westfield Meeting House and graveyard, the same to be known for all time to come as a public burying ground and meeting place for all respectable religious peoples." So the Westfield Quaker property belongs to the community form 1860 to 1872. In 1872 the Trustees of the Friends (Sandy Cook, William H. Pell, and Benjamin F. Davis) paid $125 for the nine acre tract, and it once more became the property of the Friends church, with the provision that it was to be held forever by the Society of Friends.

 

At this point let us point out the Quarterly Meetings of which Westfield Monthly Meeting has been a part. It was originally founded in 1786 as a member of the Western Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the newly organized New Garden Quarterly Meeting in 1787. Within the next few years, Westfield itself branched out and formed new Monthly Meetings at Lost Creek in Tennessee in 1793, at New Hope in Tennessee in 1795, Mount Pleasant and Fruit Hill in Virginia in 1797, at North Providence in 1801, and so in 1803 the Westfield Quarterly Meeting set off. Apparently this Westfield Quarterly Meeting continued until the Westfield Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832, but when the Westfield church revived in 1883, it belonged to Deep River Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the new Yadkin Valley Quarterly Meeting in 1889 and was again transferred to the new Surry Quarterly Meeting in 1898.

 

Excerpts from Hinshaw, Volume I Westfield Monthly Meeting

 

Tom's Creek Meeting, the predecessor of Westfield, was located in Surry County, North Carolina , not far from the Virginia Line. The meeting for worship was organized about 1771; the preparative meeting in 1784. The name was changed to Westfield when the monthly meeting was established, in 1786. Previous to this time, Tom's Creek Preparative Meeting had been attached to New Garden Monthly Meeting.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

Joseph Jessup became the first Jessup to settle at Westfield, North Carolina . He was accompanied to Westfield by three of his brothers but all three of them later moved to Indiana and other western states. Joseph was the only son of Thomas Jessup that remained in North Carolina . He married Priscilla "out of unity, settled on a farm in Stokes, North Carolina , near the headwaters of the Dan River, not far from the southern border of VA. His father, Thomas Jessup, signed the disownment papers at Cane Creek MM. Joseph, alone of his father's sons, lived and died in North Carolina . The children of Joseph and Priscilla Jessup were found on two wills dated 29 Feb 1791 and 10 Mar 1796. Quaker records were submitted to Beth Cox Rowe by Linda Jessup. She also gives credit to Rev. Jasper Newton Jessup.

 

WILL OF JOSEPH JESSUP:

 

I, Joseph Jessop, of Surry County & State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory, ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First, my will is that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid in due time by my Executors.

 

Item 2. My Will is that son Jacob Jessop have five shillings.

 

Item 3. My Will is that my daughter, Sarah Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 4. My Will is that my daughter, Mary Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 5. My Will is that my son, William Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 6. My Will is that my son, John Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 7. My Will is that my daughter, Rachel Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 8. My Will is that my beloved wife, Priscilla Jessop shall have the plantation, whereon I now live and all the appurtenances thereunto belonging while she remains my widow, the plantation to be equally divided between her and Eli and she to have her choice of halves and at her decease then Eli is to have the aforesaid plantation and all the land lying between the line that divides of my son, William and my son, Jacob, land and sixty acres lying on both sides of the grassee fork joining the county line.

 

Item 9. My Will is that my beloved wife shall have all the income of my mill while she remains my widow.

 

Item 10. My Will is that as long as my sons keep my mill up they shall have their grain ground at her clear of expense except the miller's part.

 

Item 11. My Will is that my daughter, Hannah Jessop, shall have thirty-five pounds

 

Item 12. My Will is that my survey of land of three hundred and ten acres lying on Forbush Creek in Surry County and one hundred and ninety and one half acres of my land on Arches Creek in Surry County, and fifty acres of land on the waters of the Stock Fork in Stokes County all to be sold and equally divided between my wife, Priscilla Jessop and all my children; namely, Jacob, Sarah, Mary, Joseph, William, John, Rachel, Caleb, Elijah, Hannah and Eli.

 

Item 13. Thereby ordain, constitute and appoint my trusty and well beloved brother, Timothy Jessop and my son, Joseph Jessop, the whole and sole Executors of this my last Will and Testament to act and dispose thereof according to my Will and desire to the best of their knowledge.

 

And lastly, thereby utterly revoke and disannul and make void all other will or wills or testaments by me made or done, except such as made and done lawfully in my life time. Rectifying, confirming and allowing this and no other to be my last Will and Testament, whereunto I have interchangeably set my hand and affixed my seal this tenth day of the third month in the year of our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-six.

 

Test_________

Thomas Sumner

Benjamin C________

Seal

Hannah Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

A CODICIL TO A WILL

 

Be it known to all men by these present that I, Joseph Jessop, of the county of Surry and State of North Carolina, planter, have made and declared my last Will and Testament in writing, bearing date the tenth of the third month, one thousand, seven hundred ninety_______

 

I the said, Joseph Jessop, by this present codicil do ratify and confirm my said last Will and Testament and do further give and bequeath unto my son, John, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be levied and raised out of my Estate, and so I give and bequeath to my sun, Caleb Jessop, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the same manner. I also give and bequeath to my son, Elijah Jessop, forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the like manner to be paid unto them by my Executors out of my estate and that this codicil is judged to be a part and parcel of my last Will and Testament and that all things therein mentioned and contained be faithfully and truly performed and as fully and amply in every respect as if the same one so declared and set down in my said last Will and Testament witness my hand the seventeenth of tenth month of the year one thousand and ninety ___.

 

Signed, sealed

 

Sept

Seal

William Jessop

(name that can't be read)

Caleb Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

The first Surry County deed record was dated October 18, 1786, shows a purchase of land lying along Big Creek near the village of Westfield, North Carolina , but Joseph Jessop may have been living in the area prior to that time. He eventually owned vast holdings of land in both Surry and Stokes Counties, North Carolina . His land extended for twenty-five miles from Chestnut Ridge to the Clemmons Ford of the Dan River and on to Buck Island in the Dan River.

 

 

Page 8 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:23 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 2 (con't)

Notes for Joseph Jessup:

General Notes:

The Jessup family of the Westfield area of Surry Co.,North Carolina has one of the most complete historical and genealogical records of any family in the county. Such a history was made possible by the wonderful records in the Quaker Church, the church with which so many Jessups have been associated for more than 300 years. Much of my information has come from these Quaker Records and it is my joy to share what I have learned about my ancestors with others interested in preserving our heritage. My research has been enhanced also by the help of so many Jessup family genealogists who have shared their findings with me.

 

The Westfield Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, better known in this area as "Old Westfield", is the oldest church in Surry or Stokes County and probably the oldest religious group in Northwest North Carolina this side of the Moravian settlements of what is now Winston Salem. The Meeting dates back to the 1760's when pioneer Quakers from New Garden (now Guilford College) crossed Quaker Gap of the Sauratown mountains to plant a new community in the valleys of Big Creek and Tom's Creek. Early Quakers began holding meetings at Westfield by 1772 under the care of New Garden Quarterly Meeting and continued until the monthly meeting was established in 1786. Representatives from New Garden were sent to hold services for them. This is said to have lead to the name, "Westfield." The Quakers at New Garden regarded the work as a mission project and since it was located west of New Garden it was referred to as, "The Western Field." Thus comes the name, "Westfield."

 

The meeting was officially established November 13, 1786. The Westfield friends would send representatives all the way to New Garden, 67 miles, every month. Bowater Sumner was named the first clerk of the Monthly Meeting.

 

Quaker records show that between 1801-1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families who migrated to Indiana and Ohio and the Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832. It was revived again in 1868 when Albert Peele and Isom Cox came from New Garden to Westfield and met on a Sunday morning in the open air with about 150 people. "The people decided from that time to have a Friends Meeting again and made up among themselves to do it." John Y. Hoover began serving as pastor in 1872.

 

The dates of the erection of the first building is uncertain, but a deed dated 1797 for nine acres of land "including the Westfield Meeting House" seem to indicate that the building was constructed soon after the establishment of the Meeting. Three meetings have served as Meeting Houses for the congregation. The first build in the 1780's decayed before the Civil War. It was rebuild about 1870 and was used until 1885 when a new and more modern building was erected. This building has been remodeled and additions made to it through the years.

 

The "Old Westfield Friends Meeting" has stood for 200 years as a monument to the faithful foresight of dedicated Quakers. It has weathered the storms of strife, war, and depression, and is a witness to the stability of the Church which Jesus came to establish in the hearts and lives of people.

 

From Luther N. Byrd, Elon College,North Carolina Feb 20, 1951

 

Deed records in Surry County and Rowan County show that the earliest settlement of people in the area which later was to center about the Old Westfield Quaker Church was between 1760 and 1770, for there are records of people buying or claiming land in that section between those dates. Since most of the early settlers were Quakers, we may assume that there was some semblance of religious group at or near Westfield before 1770.

 

Westfield Church was established as an off-spring of the historic New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College, for the church records at New Garden prove that to be a fact. The Quakers at New Garden regarded the church work at Westfield as a sort of mission project in its early years, and since it was located west of Guilford College, it was referred to as "the western field", and thus came the name of Westfield.

 

The minutes of the New Garden Monthly Meeting for August 29, 1772 state that "Also the Friends near the Mountains request the indulgence of holding meetings on week-days among themselves." The people near the mountains were those at Westfield, so that is proof that there were enough Quakers in the Westfield section prior to 1772 to be interested in holding meetings.

 

The minutes for New Garden for September, 1772 show that "the committee appointed to visit Friends near the mountains reports that they complied with instructions, …. And its the sense and judgment that they (the Friends near the Mountains) be indulged the privilege of holding such meetings and appoints them the fourth day of he week." These meetings were the first official church gatherings at Westfield. (1772).

 

The Westfield meeting operated for several years under the guidance and care of the New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College. It was referred to as "the little meeting nigh Tom's Creek" in minutes of the New Garden Meeting for May29, 1773.

 

The Westfield Quakers expressed themselves in 1779 (during the American Revolution) as opposed to war, which is an ancient Quaker belief.

 

The church at Westfield was established on a more permanent basis when the Western Quarterly Meeting met at Cane Creek o n November 9,m 1782 and authorized a committee to inspect the Westfield group and report at the next quarterly session. The Westfield Quakers had requested such a preparative meeting in August, 1782. Formal organization of he Westfield Meeting as a preparative body was finally and definitely granted August 14, 1784.

 

The first recorded minutes of a regular Monthly Meeting at Westfield bare the date of December 23, 1786. Bowater Sumner was appointed first clerk.

 

The exact date of he first church building at Westfield is not known, but it was probably built soon after the meeting first started, for there is a deed on file in Quaker Archives at Guilford College, dated August 1797 for nine acres "including the Westfield Meeting House." That is proof that there was already a church building there at that date.

 

I have in my files a hand-written statement from the late Mrs. Effie Ann Hill, who stated that the first church building was build right after the meeting was started, and she states that the first church stood down in the present grave yard and that it was located abut twenty steps west of our father's (Ira Chilton) grave. She writes "when he was put there, his grave was made at the lower side of the East Yard of the church." Mrs. Hill stated that the old church stood on the east side of the road, but in 1939 when they had that big home-coming and celebration at the renovation of the present church, someone located some old rocks just below the present church toward the cemetery (but on the west side of the road along with the present location of Ira W. Chilton's grave, but seems to me that it was not too far down in the cemetery, so it seems likely that the oldest church might have been where those rocks were located to form a square for the old foundation. Ira Chilton died in 1885.

 

Now, Mrs. Hill also wrote that "the old log walls of he old church was still standing" when services were started again after the Civil War, so evidently that first church was practically gone at that time. Quaker records show that between 1801 and 1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families, who migrated to Indiana and Ohio, and the Westfield Monthly Meeting was laid down in 1832. The bulk of the migration began in 1817. The result was that from 1832 until after the Civil War there was no Westfield Monthly Meeting. In April 1860, there was still a meeting house there, for there is a deed on record made by the Trustees of Friends to the trustees of the Westfield community for "a tract of land known as the Westfield Meeting House and graveyard, the same to be known for all time to come as a public burying ground and meeting place for all respectable religious peoples." So the Westfield Quaker property belongs to the community form 1860 to 1872. In 1872 the Trustees of the Friends (Sandy Cook, William H. Pell, and Benjamin F. Davis) paid $125 for the nine acre tract, and it once more became the property of the Friends church, with the provision that it was to be held forever by the Society of Friends.

 

At this point let us point out the Quarterly Meetings of which Westfield Monthly Meeting has been a part. It was originally founded in 1786 as a member of the Western Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the newly organized New Garden Quarterly Meeting in 1787. Within the next few years, Westfield itself branched out and formed new Monthly Meetings at Lost Creek in Tennessee in 1793, at New Hope in Tennessee in 1795, Mount Pleasant and Fruit Hill in Virginia in 1797, at North Providence in 1801, and so in 1803 the Westfield Quarterly Meeting set off. Apparently this Westfield Quarterly Meeting continued until the Westfield Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832, but when the Westfield church revived in 1883, it belonged to Deep River Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the new Yadkin Valley Quarterly Meeting in 1889 and was again transferred to the new Surry Quarterly Meeting in 1898.

 

Excerpts from Hinshaw, Volume I Westfield Monthly Meeting

 

Tom's Creek Meeting, the predecessor of Westfield, was located in Surry County, North Carolina , not far from the Virginia Line. The meeting for worship was organized about 1771; the preparative meeting in 1784. The name was changed to Westfield when the monthly meeting was established, in 1786. Previous to this time, Tom's Creek Preparative Meeting had been attached to New Garden Monthly Meeting.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

Joseph Jessup became the first Jessup to settle at Westfield, North Carolina . He was accompanied to Westfield by three of his brothers but all three of them later moved to Indiana and other western states. Joseph was the only son of Thomas Jessup that remained in North Carolina . He married Priscilla "out of unity, settled on a farm in Stokes, North Carolina , near the headwaters of the Dan River, not far from the southern border of VA. His father, Thomas Jessup, signed the disownment papers at Cane Creek MM. Joseph, alone of his father's sons, lived and died in North Carolina . The children of Joseph and Priscilla Jessup were found on two wills dated 29 Feb 1791 and 10 Mar 1796. Quaker records were submitted to Beth Cox Rowe by Linda Jessup. She also gives credit to Rev. Jasper Newton Jessup.

 

WILL OF JOSEPH JESSUP:

 

I, Joseph Jessop, of Surry County & State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory, ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First, my will is that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid in due time by my Executors.

 

Item 2. My Will is that son Jacob Jessop have five shillings.

 

Item 3. My Will is that my daughter, Sarah Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 4. My Will is that my daughter, Mary Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 5. My Will is that my son, William Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 6. My Will is that my son, John Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 7. My Will is that my daughter, Rachel Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 8. My Will is that my beloved wife, Priscilla Jessop shall have the plantation, whereon I now live and all the appurtenances thereunto belonging while she remains my widow, the plantation to be equally divided between her and Eli and she to have her choice of halves and at her decease then Eli is to have the aforesaid plantation and all the land lying between the line that divides of my son, William and my son, Jacob, land and sixty acres lying on both sides of the grassee fork joining the county line.

 

Item 9. My Will is that my beloved wife shall have all the income of my mill while she remains my widow.

 

Item 10. My Will is that as long as my sons keep my mill up they shall have their grain ground at her clear of expense except the miller's part.

 

Item 11. My Will is that my daughter, Hannah Jessop, shall have thirty-five pounds

 

Item 12. My Will is that my survey of land of three hundred and ten acres lying on Forbush Creek in Surry County and one hundred and ninety and one half acres of my land on Arches Creek in Surry County, and fifty acres of land on the waters of the Stock Fork in Stokes County all to be sold and equally divided between my wife, Priscilla Jessop and all my children; namely, Jacob, Sarah, Mary, Joseph, William, John, Rachel, Caleb, Elijah, Hannah and Eli.

 

Item 13. Thereby ordain, constitute and appoint my trusty and well beloved brother, Timothy Jessop and my son, Joseph Jessop, the whole and sole Executors of this my last Will and Testament to act and dispose thereof according to my Will and desire to the best of their knowledge.

 

And lastly, thereby utterly revoke and disannul and make void all other will or wills or testaments by me made or done, except such as made and done lawfully in my life time. Rectifying, confirming and allowing this and no other to be my last Will and Testament, whereunto I have interchangeably set my hand and affixed my seal this tenth day of the third month in the year of our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-six.

 

Test_________

Thomas Sumner

Benjamin C________

Seal

Hannah Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

A CODICIL TO A WILL

 

Be it known to all men by these present that I, Joseph Jessop, of the county of Surry and State of North Carolina, planter, have made and declared my last Will and Testament in writing, bearing date the tenth of the third month, one thousand, seven hundred ninety_______

 

I the said, Joseph Jessop, by this present codicil do ratify and confirm my said last Will and Testament and do further give and bequeath unto my son, John, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be levied and raised out of my Estate, and so I give and bequeath to my sun, Caleb Jessop, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the same manner. I also give and bequeath to my son, Elijah Jessop, forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the like manner to be paid unto them by my Executors out of my estate and that this codicil is judged to be a part and parcel of my last Will and Testament and that all things therein mentioned and contained be faithfully and truly performed and as fully and amply in every respect as if the same one so declared and set down in my said last Will and Testament witness my hand the seventeenth of tenth month of the year one thousand and ninety ___.

 

Signed, sealed

 

Sept

Seal

William Jessop

(name that can't be read)

Caleb Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

The first Surry County deed record was dated October 18, 1786, shows a purchase of land lying along Big Creek near the village of Westfield, North Carolina , but Joseph Jessop may have been living in the area prior to that time. He eventually owned vast holdings of land in both Surry and Stokes Counties, North Carolina . His land extended for twenty-five miles from Chestnut Ridge to the Clemmons Ford of the Dan River and on to Buck Island in the Dan River.

 

 

Page 9 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:23 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 2 (con't)

Notes for Joseph Jessup:

General Notes:

The Jessup family of the Westfield area of Surry Co.,North Carolina has one of the most complete historical and genealogical records of any family in the county. Such a history was made possible by the wonderful records in the Quaker Church, the church with which so many Jessups have been associated for more than 300 years. Much of my information has come from these Quaker Records and it is my joy to share what I have learned about my ancestors with others interested in preserving our heritage. My research has been enhanced also by the help of so many Jessup family genealogists who have shared their findings with me.

 

The Westfield Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, better known in this area as "Old Westfield", is the oldest church in Surry or Stokes County and probably the oldest religious group in Northwest North Carolina this side of the Moravian settlements of what is now Winston Salem. The Meeting dates back to the 1760's when pioneer Quakers from New Garden (now Guilford College) crossed Quaker Gap of the Sauratown mountains to plant a new community in the valleys of Big Creek and Tom's Creek. Early Quakers began holding meetings at Westfield by 1772 under the care of New Garden Quarterly Meeting and continued until the monthly meeting was established in 1786. Representatives from New Garden were sent to hold services for them. This is said to have lead to the name, "Westfield." The Quakers at New Garden regarded the work as a mission project and since it was located west of New Garden it was referred to as, "The Western Field." Thus comes the name, "Westfield."

 

The meeting was officially established November 13, 1786. The Westfield friends would send representatives all the way to New Garden, 67 miles, every month. Bowater Sumner was named the first clerk of the Monthly Meeting.

 

Quaker records show that between 1801-1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families who migrated to Indiana and Ohio and the Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832. It was revived again in 1868 when Albert Peele and Isom Cox came from New Garden to Westfield and met on a Sunday morning in the open air with about 150 people. "The people decided from that time to have a Friends Meeting again and made up among themselves to do it." John Y. Hoover began serving as pastor in 1872.

 

The dates of the erection of the first building is uncertain, but a deed dated 1797 for nine acres of land "including the Westfield Meeting House" seem to indicate that the building was constructed soon after the establishment of the Meeting. Three meetings have served as Meeting Houses for the congregation. The first build in the 1780's decayed before the Civil War. It was rebuild about 1870 and was used until 1885 when a new and more modern building was erected. This building has been remodeled and additions made to it through the years.

 

The "Old Westfield Friends Meeting" has stood for 200 years as a monument to the faithful foresight of dedicated Quakers. It has weathered the storms of strife, war, and depression, and is a witness to the stability of the Church which Jesus came to establish in the hearts and lives of people.

 

From Luther N. Byrd, Elon College,North Carolina Feb 20, 1951

 

Deed records in Surry County and Rowan County show that the earliest settlement of people in the area which later was to center about the Old Westfield Quaker Church was between 1760 and 1770, for there are records of people buying or claiming land in that section between those dates. Since most of the early settlers were Quakers, we may assume that there was some semblance of religious group at or near Westfield before 1770.

 

Westfield Church was established as an off-spring of the historic New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College, for the church records at New Garden prove that to be a fact. The Quakers at New Garden regarded the church work at Westfield as a sort of mission project in its early years, and since it was located west of Guilford College, it was referred to as "the western field", and thus came the name of Westfield.

 

The minutes of the New Garden Monthly Meeting for August 29, 1772 state that "Also the Friends near the Mountains request the indulgence of holding meetings on week-days among themselves." The people near the mountains were those at Westfield, so that is proof that there were enough Quakers in the Westfield section prior to 1772 to be interested in holding meetings.

 

The minutes for New Garden for September, 1772 show that "the committee appointed to visit Friends near the mountains reports that they complied with instructions, …. And its the sense and judgment that they (the Friends near the Mountains) be indulged the privilege of holding such meetings and appoints them the fourth day of he week." These meetings were the first official church gatherings at Westfield. (1772).

 

The Westfield meeting operated for several years under the guidance and care of the New Garden Monthly Meeting at Guilford College. It was referred to as "the little meeting nigh Tom's Creek" in minutes of the New Garden Meeting for May29, 1773.

 

The Westfield Quakers expressed themselves in 1779 (during the American Revolution) as opposed to war, which is an ancient Quaker belief.

 

The church at Westfield was established on a more permanent basis when the Western Quarterly Meeting met at Cane Creek o n November 9,m 1782 and authorized a committee to inspect the Westfield group and report at the next quarterly session. The Westfield Quakers had requested such a preparative meeting in August, 1782. Formal organization of he Westfield Meeting as a preparative body was finally and definitely granted August 14, 1784.

 

The first recorded minutes of a regular Monthly Meeting at Westfield bare the date of December 23, 1786. Bowater Sumner was appointed first clerk.

 

The exact date of he first church building at Westfield is not known, but it was probably built soon after the meeting first started, for there is a deed on file in Quaker Archives at Guilford College, dated August 1797 for nine acres "including the Westfield Meeting House." That is proof that there was already a church building there at that date.

 

I have in my files a hand-written statement from the late Mrs. Effie Ann Hill, who stated that the first church building was build right after the meeting was started, and she states that the first church stood down in the present grave yard and that it was located abut twenty steps west of our father's (Ira Chilton) grave. She writes "when he was put there, his grave was made at the lower side of the East Yard of the church." Mrs. Hill stated that the old church stood on the east side of the road, but in 1939 when they had that big home-coming and celebration at the renovation of the present church, someone located some old rocks just below the present church toward the cemetery (but on the west side of the road along with the present location of Ira W. Chilton's grave, but seems to me that it was not too far down in the cemetery, so it seems likely that the oldest church might have been where those rocks were located to form a square for the old foundation. Ira Chilton died in 1885.

 

Now, Mrs. Hill also wrote that "the old log walls of he old church was still standing" when services were started again after the Civil War, so evidently that first church was practically gone at that time. Quaker records show that between 1801 and 1822 there were fifty-nine members, including thirty-six families, who migrated to Indiana and Ohio, and the Westfield Monthly Meeting was laid down in 1832. The bulk of the migration began in 1817. The result was that from 1832 until after the Civil War there was no Westfield Monthly Meeting. In April 1860, there was still a meeting house there, for there is a deed on record made by the Trustees of Friends to the trustees of the Westfield community for "a tract of land known as the Westfield Meeting House and graveyard, the same to be known for all time to come as a public burying ground and meeting place for all respectable religious peoples." So the Westfield Quaker property belongs to the community form 1860 to 1872. In 1872 the Trustees of the Friends (Sandy Cook, William H. Pell, and Benjamin F. Davis) paid $125 for the nine acre tract, and it once more became the property of the Friends church, with the provision that it was to be held forever by the Society of Friends.

 

At this point let us point out the Quarterly Meetings of which Westfield Monthly Meeting has been a part. It was originally founded in 1786 as a member of the Western Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the newly organized New Garden Quarterly Meeting in 1787. Within the next few years, Westfield itself branched out and formed new Monthly Meetings at Lost Creek in Tennessee in 1793, at New Hope in Tennessee in 1795, Mount Pleasant and Fruit Hill in Virginia in 1797, at North Providence in 1801, and so in 1803 the Westfield Quarterly Meeting set off. Apparently this Westfield Quarterly Meeting continued until the Westfield Monthly Meeting was discontinued in 1832, but when the Westfield church revived in 1883, it belonged to Deep River Quarterly Meeting. It was transferred to the new Yadkin Valley Quarterly Meeting in 1889 and was again transferred to the new Surry Quarterly Meeting in 1898.

 

Excerpts from Hinshaw, Volume I Westfield Monthly Meeting

 

Tom's Creek Meeting, the predecessor of Westfield, was located in Surry County, North Carolina , not far from the Virginia Line. The meeting for worship was organized about 1771; the preparative meeting in 1784. The name was changed to Westfield when the monthly meeting was established, in 1786. Previous to this time, Tom's Creek Preparative Meeting had been attached to New Garden Monthly Meeting.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

Joseph Jessup became the first Jessup to settle at Westfield, North Carolina . He was accompanied to Westfield by three of his brothers but all three of them later moved to Indiana and other western states. Joseph was the only son of Thomas Jessup that remained in North Carolina . He married Priscilla "out of unity, settled on a farm in Stokes, North Carolina , near the headwaters of the Dan River, not far from the southern border of VA. His father, Thomas Jessup, signed the disownment papers at Cane Creek MM. Joseph, alone of his father's sons, lived and died in North Carolina . The children of Joseph and Priscilla Jessup were found on two wills dated 29 Feb 1791 and 10 Mar 1796. Quaker records were submitted to Beth Cox Rowe by Linda Jessup. She also gives credit to Rev. Jasper Newton Jessup.

 

WILL OF JOSEPH JESSUP:

 

I, Joseph Jessop, of Surry County & State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory, ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First, my will is that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid in due time by my Executors.

 

Item 2. My Will is that son Jacob Jessop have five shillings.

 

Item 3. My Will is that my daughter, Sarah Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 4. My Will is that my daughter, Mary Jackson, have five shillings.

 

Item 5. My Will is that my son, William Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 6. My Will is that my son, John Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 7. My Will is that my daughter, Rachel Jessop, have five shillings.

 

Item 8. My Will is that my beloved wife, Priscilla Jessop shall have the plantation, whereon I now live and all the appurtenances thereunto belonging while she remains my widow, the plantation to be equally divided between her and Eli and she to have her choice of halves and at her decease then Eli is to have the aforesaid plantation and all the land lying between the line that divides of my son, William and my son, Jacob, land and sixty acres lying on both sides of the grassee fork joining the county line.

 

Item 9. My Will is that my beloved wife shall have all the income of my mill while she remains my widow.

 

Item 10. My Will is that as long as my sons keep my mill up they shall have their grain ground at her clear of expense except the miller's part.

 

Item 11. My Will is that my daughter, Hannah Jessop, shall have thirty-five pounds

 

Item 12. My Will is that my survey of land of three hundred and ten acres lying on Forbush Creek in Surry County and one hundred and ninety and one half acres of my land on Arches Creek in Surry County, and fifty acres of land on the waters of the Stock Fork in Stokes County all to be sold and equally divided between my wife, Priscilla Jessop and all my children; namely, Jacob, Sarah, Mary, Joseph, William, John, Rachel, Caleb, Elijah, Hannah and Eli.

 

Item 13. Thereby ordain, constitute and appoint my trusty and well beloved brother, Timothy Jessop and my son, Joseph Jessop, the whole and sole Executors of this my last Will and Testament to act and dispose thereof according to my Will and desire to the best of their knowledge.

 

And lastly, thereby utterly revoke and disannul and make void all other will or wills or testaments by me made or done, except such as made and done lawfully in my life time. Rectifying, confirming and allowing this and no other to be my last Will and Testament, whereunto I have interchangeably set my hand and affixed my seal this tenth day of the third month in the year of our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-six.

 

Test_________

Thomas Sumner

Benjamin C________

Seal

Hannah Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

A CODICIL TO A WILL

 

Be it known to all men by these present that I, Joseph Jessop, of the county of Surry and State of North Carolina, planter, have made and declared my last Will and Testament in writing, bearing date the tenth of the third month, one thousand, seven hundred ninety_______

 

I the said, Joseph Jessop, by this present codicil do ratify and confirm my said last Will and Testament and do further give and bequeath unto my son, John, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be levied and raised out of my Estate, and so I give and bequeath to my sun, Caleb Jessop, the sum of forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the same manner. I also give and bequeath to my son, Elijah Jessop, forty-five pounds lawful money to be raised in the like manner to be paid unto them by my Executors out of my estate and that this codicil is judged to be a part and parcel of my last Will and Testament and that all things therein mentioned and contained be faithfully and truly performed and as fully and amply in every respect as if the same one so declared and set down in my said last Will and Testament witness my hand the seventeenth of tenth month of the year one thousand and ninety ___.

 

Signed, sealed

 

Sept

Seal

William Jessop

(name that can't be read)

Caleb Sumner Joseph Jessop (his mark) ( )

 

 

The first Surry County deed record was dated October 18, 1786, shows a purchase of land lying along Big Creek near the village of Westfield, North Carolina , but Joseph Jessop may have been living in the area prior to that time. He eventually owned vast holdings of land in both Surry and Stokes Counties, North Carolina . His land extended for twenty-five miles from Chestnut Ridge to the Clemmons Ford of the Dan River and on to Buck Island in the Dan River.

 

 

Joseph Jessup and Priscilla Jackson were married on 21 Apr 1762 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[5]. They had the following children:

14. i.

Jacob Jessup[5] was born on 20 Dec 1762 in Carteret or Perquimans, North Carolina USA[5, 14]. He married Sarah Lee in 1786 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died in 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

15. ii.

Sarah Jessup[4] was born on 20 Aug 1764 in Carteret, North Carolina, USA[4]. She married Joseph Jackson on 21 Apr 1787 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on 20 Jan 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[4].

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16. iii.

Mary Jessup[3] was born on 11 Jan 1766 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married William Jackson on 10 Sep 1790 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died before 1837[15].

17. iv.

Joseph Jessup Jr.[5] was born on 22 Mar 1767 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Betty McKinney on 10 Sep 1791 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on 09 Sep 1820 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

18. v.

William Jessup[4, 5] was born on 06 Feb 1769 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[4]. He married Mary Polly Lee in 1789 in North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 09 Aug 1853 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[3].

vi.

Thomas Jessup[5] was born on 29 Dec 1770 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on Unknown.

vii.

John Jessup[5] was born on 01 Feb 1773 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[9]. He died on Unknown in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[16].

viii.

Rachel Jessup[5] was born on 21 Jun 1776[5]. She married Joseph Cloud about 1800[16]. She died on Unknown.

19. ix.

Caleb Jessup[17] was born on 20 Oct 1778 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[17]. He married Nancy Elizabeth Clark on 10 Dec 1798 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[17]. He died on 26 Sep 1843 in Greene, Indiana, USA[16].

20. x.

Elijah Jessup[5] was born on 31 Mar 1781 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Nancy Smith on 18 Apr 1816 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on Unknown in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[16].

xi.

Hannah Jessup[5] was born on 18 May 1783[5]. She married William Pearce on 08 Feb 1819 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[16]. She died on Unknown.

xii.

Eli Jessup[5] was born on 06 Jun 1785 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Pensey Jenny Smith on 02 May 1806 in Patrick, Virginia, USA[5]. He died in Jan 1871 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

Notes for Eli Jessup:

General Notes:

Eli Jessup and wife Pensey Jennie Smith Jessup had no children. He left all of his property to his slaves. He lived at the Joseph Jessup place on Big Creek near Westfield. The old house was still standing in 1942.\

 

Eli Jessup's Last Will and Testament

 

In the name of God amen

 

I, Eli Jessup, of the County of Surry and State of North Carolina, being in sound mind and memory to make this as my last Will and Testament in manner and form following viz

 

Item the first - My will and desire is that all my just debts be punctually paid in due time by my Executor and out of my Estate.

 

Item the second - My will and desire is that my dear and beloved wife, Jane, have all of my real, personal and perishable estate of all description whatsoever during her natural life and after the decease of my beloved wife, my will and desire is most solemnly that all of my Negroes be emancipated and set free and their every increase, if any, namely to be set free also viz: Sarah Ruth, Sarah's first child, Leatha, Sarah's second child, Lucinda, Sarah's third child, Samuel, Sarah's fourth child, and Alfred. Sarah's fifth child. The above mentioned Negroes constitute a family of Negroes which family I desire to be free after the decease of my beloved wife immediately. Also, one Negro woman, Rachel and her increase, if any, my will and desire that the said Racheal and her increase be emancipated and set free immediately after the death of my beloved wife.

 

Item the third - My will and desire is that all of my estate after the death of my dear and beloved wife's debts are paid and that the estate be equally divided amongst all my Negroes by my Executor or cause the same to be done so that they may enjoy the same to their benefit and their heirs forever.

 

Item the fourth - My will and desire that my burial and funeral charges be paid punctually in due time by my Executor and the burial and funeral charges of my dear and beloved wife also be paid in due time. I, Eli Jessup, do in this my last will and testament nominate and appoint my worthy and revered friend, George Smith, my Executor.

 

Item the fifth - I do give and bequeath my Executor George Smith, fifty dollars over and above the legal fees prescribed by Law for his trouble and expenses in carrying this my last will and testament into execution for the purposes herein mentioned.

 

Signed and acknowledged before us on the 27th day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand, eight hundred and thirty. (1830)

 

Witnesses present:

Eli Jessup (Seal)

 

John J. Var____

Jos. V. Gregg

 

"On the 9th day of January 1871, at my office, a paper writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Eli Jessup is offered for probate by Jane Jessup, the widow of the said Eli Jessup which paper writing is in the words and figures following: to wit"

 

"And thereupon John J. Var_____, one of the subscribing witnesses to the said paper writing being first duly sworn, says that he became a subscribing witness to the said paper writing at the request of the said Eli Jessup and that he signed his name as witness to the said paper writing in the presence of the said Eli Jessup - that J. V. Gregg the other subscribing .........." (here the copy ran off the page)

 

 

JESSUPS QUIT CLAIM DEED STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA

 

In obedience with an agreement made by the devisees of Eli Jessup, deed and Job Worth who holds under said devisees, we the undersigned proceeded on this the 12th day of August 1872 to divide and set apart to Job Worth, Smith France and wife, Ruth, Henry Dearman and wife Lucinda, Alfred Jessup, Racheal Jessup and Leatha Jessup, the lands bequeathed and devised by Eli Jessup, deceased.

 

Lot 1 - Smith France and wife Ruth - 74 acres valued at $481.00

 

Lot 2 - Henry Dearman and wife Lucinda - 85 1/2 acres valued at $569.50

 

Lot 3 - Leatha Jessup - 88 3/10 acres valued at $529.80

 

Lot 4 - Racheal Jessup - 88 3/10 acres valued at $573.95

 

Lot 5 - Alfred Jessup - 80 6/10 acres valued at $403.00

 

Lot 6 - Job Worth* - 190 1/2 acres valued at $2095.50

 

Given under our hand and seal this the 14th day of August 1872 - William H. Pell

Joseph W. Neal

Thos. L. Sorles

 

 

* (according to 1850 Census, Job Worth was a very wealthy white millwright.)

 

 

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Notes for Eli Jessup:

General Notes:

Eli Jessup and wife Pensey Jennie Smith Jessup had no children. He left all of his property to his slaves. He lived at the Joseph Jessup place on Big Creek near Westfield. The old house was still standing in 1942.\

 

Eli Jessup's Last Will and Testament

 

In the name of God amen

 

I, Eli Jessup, of the County of Surry and State of North Carolina, being in sound mind and memory to make this as my last Will and Testament in manner and form following viz

 

Item the first - My will and desire is that all my just debts be punctually paid in due time by my Executor and out of my Estate.

 

Item the second - My will and desire is that my dear and beloved wife, Jane, have all of my real, personal and perishable estate of all description whatsoever during her natural life and after the decease of my beloved wife, my will and desire is most solemnly that all of my Negroes be emancipated and set free and their every increase, if any, namely to be set free also viz: Sarah Ruth, Sarah's first child, Leatha, Sarah's second child, Lucinda, Sarah's third child, Samuel, Sarah's fourth child, and Alfred. Sarah's fifth child. The above mentioned Negroes constitute a family of Negroes which family I desire to be free after the decease of my beloved wife immediately. Also, one Negro woman, Rachel and her increase, if any, my will and desire that the said Racheal and her increase be emancipated and set free immediately after the death of my beloved wife.

 

Item the third - My will and desire is that all of my estate after the death of my dear and beloved wife's debts are paid and that the estate be equally divided amongst all my Negroes by my Executor or cause the same to be done so that they may enjoy the same to their benefit and their heirs forever.

 

Item the fourth - My will and desire that my burial and funeral charges be paid punctually in due time by my Executor and the burial and funeral charges of my dear and beloved wife also be paid in due time. I, Eli Jessup, do in this my last will and testament nominate and appoint my worthy and revered friend, George Smith, my Executor.

 

Item the fifth - I do give and bequeath my Executor George Smith, fifty dollars over and above the legal fees prescribed by Law for his trouble and expenses in carrying this my last will and testament into execution for the purposes herein mentioned.

 

Signed and acknowledged before us on the 27th day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand, eight hundred and thirty. (1830)

 

Witnesses present:

Eli Jessup (Seal)

 

John J. Var____

Jos. V. Gregg

 

"On the 9th day of January 1871, at my office, a paper writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Eli Jessup is offered for probate by Jane Jessup, the widow of the said Eli Jessup which paper writing is in the words and figures following: to wit"

 

"And thereupon John J. Var_____, one of the subscribing witnesses to the said paper writing being first duly sworn, says that he became a subscribing witness to the said paper writing at the request of the said Eli Jessup and that he signed his name as witness to the said paper writing in the presence of the said Eli Jessup - that J. V. Gregg the other subscribing .........." (here the copy ran off the page)

 

 

JESSUPS QUIT CLAIM DEED STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA

 

In obedience with an agreement made by the devisees of Eli Jessup, deed and Job Worth who holds under said devisees, we the undersigned proceeded on this the 12th day of August 1872 to divide and set apart to Job Worth, Smith France and wife, Ruth, Henry Dearman and wife Lucinda, Alfred Jessup, Racheal Jessup and Leatha Jessup, the lands bequeathed and devised by Eli Jessup, deceased.

 

Lot 1 - Smith France and wife Ruth - 74 acres valued at $481.00

 

Lot 2 - Henry Dearman and wife Lucinda - 85 1/2 acres valued at $569.50

 

Lot 3 - Leatha Jessup - 88 3/10 acres valued at $529.80

 

Lot 4 - Racheal Jessup - 88 3/10 acres valued at $573.95

 

Lot 5 - Alfred Jessup - 80 6/10 acres valued at $403.00

 

Lot 6 - Job Worth* - 190 1/2 acres valued at $2095.50

 

Given under our hand and seal this the 14th day of August 1872 - William H. Pell

Joseph W. Neal

Thos. L. Sorles

 

 

* (according to 1850 Census, Job Worth was a very wealthy white millwright.)

 

 

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Notes for Eli Jessup:

General Notes:

Eli Jessup and wife Pensey Jennie Smith Jessup had no children. He left all of his property to his slaves. He lived at the Joseph Jessup place on Big Creek near Westfield. The old house was still standing in 1942.\

 

Eli Jessup's Last Will and Testament

 

In the name of God amen

 

I, Eli Jessup, of the County of Surry and State of North Carolina, being in sound mind and memory to make this as my last Will and Testament in manner and form following viz

 

Item the first - My will and desire is that all my just debts be punctually paid in due time by my Executor and out of my Estate.

 

Item the second - My will and desire is that my dear and beloved wife, Jane, have all of my real, personal and perishable estate of all description whatsoever during her natural life and after the decease of my beloved wife, my will and desire is most solemnly that all of my Negroes be emancipated and set free and their every increase, if any, namely to be set free also viz: Sarah Ruth, Sarah's first child, Leatha, Sarah's second child, Lucinda, Sarah's third child, Samuel, Sarah's fourth child, and Alfred. Sarah's fifth child. The above mentioned Negroes constitute a family of Negroes which family I desire to be free after the decease of my beloved wife immediately. Also, one Negro woman, Rachel and her increase, if any, my will and desire that the said Racheal and her increase be emancipated and set free immediately after the death of my beloved wife.

 

Item the third - My will and desire is that all of my estate after the death of my dear and beloved wife's debts are paid and that the estate be equally divided amongst all my Negroes by my Executor or cause the same to be done so that they may enjoy the same to their benefit and their heirs forever.

 

Item the fourth - My will and desire that my burial and funeral charges be paid punctually in due time by my Executor and the burial and funeral charges of my dear and beloved wife also be paid in due time. I, Eli Jessup, do in this my last will and testament nominate and appoint my worthy and revered friend, George Smith, my Executor.

 

Item the fifth - I do give and bequeath my Executor George Smith, fifty dollars over and above the legal fees prescribed by Law for his trouble and expenses in carrying this my last will and testament into execution for the purposes herein mentioned.

 

Signed and acknowledged before us on the 27th day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand, eight hundred and thirty. (1830)

 

Witnesses present:

Eli Jessup (Seal)

 

John J. Var____

Jos. V. Gregg

 

"On the 9th day of January 1871, at my office, a paper writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Eli Jessup is offered for probate by Jane Jessup, the widow of the said Eli Jessup which paper writing is in the words and figures following: to wit"

 

"And thereupon John J. Var_____, one of the subscribing witnesses to the said paper writing being first duly sworn, says that he became a subscribing witness to the said paper writing at the request of the said Eli Jessup and that he signed his name as witness to the said paper writing in the presence of the said Eli Jessup - that J. V. Gregg the other subscribing .........." (here the copy ran off the page)

 

 

JESSUPS QUIT CLAIM DEED STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA

 

In obedience with an agreement made by the devisees of Eli Jessup, deed and Job Worth who holds under said devisees, we the undersigned proceeded on this the 12th day of August 1872 to divide and set apart to Job Worth, Smith France and wife, Ruth, Henry Dearman and wife Lucinda, Alfred Jessup, Racheal Jessup and Leatha Jessup, the lands bequeathed and devised by Eli Jessup, deceased.

 

Lot 1 - Smith France and wife Ruth - 74 acres valued at $481.00

 

Lot 2 - Henry Dearman and wife Lucinda - 85 1/2 acres valued at $569.50

 

Lot 3 - Leatha Jessup - 88 3/10 acres valued at $529.80

 

Lot 4 - Racheal Jessup - 88 3/10 acres valued at $573.95

 

Lot 5 - Alfred Jessup - 80 6/10 acres valued at $403.00

 

Lot 6 - Job Worth* - 190 1/2 acres valued at $2095.50

 

Given under our hand and seal this the 14th day of August 1872 - William H. Pell

Joseph W. Neal

Thos. L. Sorles

 

 

* (according to 1850 Census, Job Worth was a very wealthy white millwright.)

 

 

Generation 3
4.

Jacob Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[3] was born in 1749 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA[6]. He died on 14 Nov 1844 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[6].

Notes for Jacob Jackson:

General Notes:

After the arrival of his family in North Carolina , Jacob's father, Samuel, placed him in the home of a Quaker to learn a trade. He remained in the care of this family for several years. He became a member of the New Garden MM in Guilford Co., upon his personal application for membership, soon after arriving at manhood. His parents moved from Rowan Co. to Surry Co.,North Carolina around 1774, settling on Tom's Creek. Jacob must have been quite an influence on his brothers and sisters as they all became members of the Society of Friends. There is no record of his parents ever joining either the New Garden or the Westfield MM. A Quaker meeting house was built and called Tom's Creek MM. Jacob, along with his brothers, Curtis, John, and Samuel, Jr., were among the charter members. They later helped build the new church called "Westfield." A new brick church has been built to take the place of the old one on the same location, and just across the highway is the grave yard. Unfortunately all of the early Quaker graves have been plowed under and now there is just an open field. It gives you a very sad feeling to stand and look out over this plowed field where so many of the Jackson family and their relatives were buried. The Jessup, Sumner, Simmons, Hiatt, Garrett and many other families were also buried there.

 

Jacob bought his first land (recorded at Dobson, North Carolina ) from Lewis Conners, which contained 100 acres and was located on the waters of Tom's Creek, not far from the VA line and the Blue Ridge Mtns. He moved his family to New Hope MM in Green Co., TN on 24 Dec 1797 where he remained for seven years. On 17 Dec 1804, he moved with his family to Miami, OH and in 1811 to Clinton Co., OH where he remained until his death at the age of 97.

 

After the division which took place in the Quaker Yearly and Subordinate Meetings in the years 1828 and 1829, Jacob and other members were attached to Miami Quarterly meetings, from which he resided more than twenty miles and not with-standing his great age, the distance, the frequent inclemency of the weather and the bad roads, he seldom failed attending meetings, exhibiting a fervency for the good of "this People" as he frequently called the Society.

 

His last illness which was of a complicated character, confined him mostly to his room for about three weeks, but to his bed only a few hours. A sudden change took place about two o'clock in the afternoon on the 14th day of the eleventh month, 1844. On being helped to bed he said he did not expect ever to rise again, and spoke but little afterwards, though he appeared to be quite sensible and composed, and lay in that situation until near eleven o'clock in the evening of the same day, when he passed away quietly, and thus closed his long and useful life.

 

 

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Notes for Jacob Jackson:

General Notes:

After the arrival of his family in North Carolina , Jacob's father, Samuel, placed him in the home of a Quaker to learn a trade. He remained in the care of this family for several years. He became a member of the New Garden MM in Guilford Co., upon his personal application for membership, soon after arriving at manhood. His parents moved from Rowan Co. to Surry Co.,North Carolina around 1774, settling on Tom's Creek. Jacob must have been quite an influence on his brothers and sisters as they all became members of the Society of Friends. There is no record of his parents ever joining either the New Garden or the Westfield MM. A Quaker meeting house was built and called Tom's Creek MM. Jacob, along with his brothers, Curtis, John, and Samuel, Jr., were among the charter members. They later helped build the new church called "Westfield." A new brick church has been built to take the place of the old one on the same location, and just across the highway is the grave yard. Unfortunately all of the early Quaker graves have been plowed under and now there is just an open field. It gives you a very sad feeling to stand and look out over this plowed field where so many of the Jackson family and their relatives were buried. The Jessup, Sumner, Simmons, Hiatt, Garrett and many other families were also buried there.

 

Jacob bought his first land (recorded at Dobson, North Carolina ) from Lewis Conners, which contained 100 acres and was located on the waters of Tom's Creek, not far from the VA line and the Blue Ridge Mtns. He moved his family to New Hope MM in Green Co., TN on 24 Dec 1797 where he remained for seven years. On 17 Dec 1804, he moved with his family to Miami, OH and in 1811 to Clinton Co., OH where he remained until his death at the age of 97.

 

After the division which took place in the Quaker Yearly and Subordinate Meetings in the years 1828 and 1829, Jacob and other members were attached to Miami Quarterly meetings, from which he resided more than twenty miles and not with-standing his great age, the distance, the frequent inclemency of the weather and the bad roads, he seldom failed attending meetings, exhibiting a fervency for the good of "this People" as he frequently called the Society.

 

His last illness which was of a complicated character, confined him mostly to his room for about three weeks, but to his bed only a few hours. A sudden change took place about two o'clock in the afternoon on the 14th day of the eleventh month, 1844. On being helped to bed he said he did not expect ever to rise again, and spoke but little afterwards, though he appeared to be quite sensible and composed, and lay in that situation until near eleven o'clock in the evening of the same day, when he passed away quietly, and thus closed his long and useful life.

 

 

Ann Beales daughter of Bowater Beales and Sarah Ann Cook[3] was born on 03 Sep 1755 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on 27 Aug 1835[18].

Notes for Ann Beales:

General Notes:

Ann Beales was born 3 Sep 1755 in Guilford Co., North Carolina . She became an Elder in the Friends church. She was a woman of good example in the common walks of life, and particularly in the diligent attendance of her religious meetings, in which she encouraged her children and those around her.

 

 

Jacob Jackson and Ann Beales were married on 10 Aug 1774 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA (Old Westfield Friends Church)[7]. They had the following children:

21. i.

Rachel Jackson[19] was born on 15 Jul 1775 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[19]. She married Enoch Graham in 1799[6]. She died on 23 Sep 1846 in Highland, Ohio, USA[20].

22. ii.

Ruth Jackson[19] was born on 04 Nov 1776 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[19]. She married Joseph Hoggatt on 09 Nov 1796 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3, 20]. She died on Unknown.

iii.

Samuel Jackson[19] was born on 10 Aug 1778 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[19]. He died on Unknown.

Notes for Samuel Jackson:

General Notes:

Samuel Jackson was born Aug. 10, 1778, in Surry Co, North Carolina . He was eldest son and third child born to Jacob and Ann (Beals) Jackson. He was about eighteen years old when his parents moved from Westfield to TN in 1797. There is no information on Samuel Jackson t this time. There was a marriage recorded in Green Co for one Samuel Jackson and Susannah Bent on Nov. 26, 1812, and may have been the Samuel we are researching.

 

 

 

Several articles have been written on the history of Clinton and Highland Counties in OH. One mentions one Samuel Jackson who came to Jefferson Co around 1800-01. He was a great hunter and frontiersman. Professor Edwin West stated that he was the brother of Jacob and John Jackson, early settlers of Wayne Co, OH. The Samuel Jackson living in Stokes Co,North Carolina married Hannah Gibson, lived and died in Stokes Co and is believed by many Jackson researchers to be the brother of Jacob and John Jackson, and if he is a brother, then Samuel the hunter would not be a brother.

 

 

 

Samuel the hunter is said to have built the first cabin in Jefferson Township in 1812. Samuel, son of Jacob at that time, would have been thirty-four years of age, and he is possibly the son but not the brother of Jacob Jackson.

 

 

 

Since we have been unable to find any information on Samuel, son of Jacob and Ann, the following articles found on Samuel the hunter is used here.

 

 

 

The following was taken from "Highland Pioneer Sketches and Family Genealogies" by Elsie Johnson Ayres, Hillsboro, OH:

 

"Samuel Jackson and his brothers, Jacob and John, Quakers from North Carolina, settled on Rocky Fork as early as 1801. They were the sons of Samuel Jackson Sr., native of Ireland. Samuel Jackson the immigrant, was a direct descendant of Ralph Jackson who was burned at the stake as a martyr in Stratford, England, in 1556.

 

 

 

The brothers remained in a crude log cabin for a few years after their arrival. They were all good hunters who had served as Indian spies. They made enough money to live or the equivalent, by selling pelts. Samuel Jackson remained in the cabin after both his brothers had cleared land of their own. He was a rugged individual who remained in the woods for weeks at a time. His favorite region to hunt was the Brushcreek and Sunfish Hills. In 1801, during the hunting season in the Sunfish Hills, Samuel Jackson killed two panthers, a number of huge bears, deer, and other animals. In 1812, he moved to Clinton Co, where he erected the first cabin in what is now Jefferson Township. In 1818 he moved to Cass Co, Texas, and lived to be over one hundred years of age."

 

 

From "A History of Highland Co, Ohio"

 

"In the fall of 1809, as Samuel Jackson was passing along a trace down the banks of Sunfish Creek, about three miles east of Sinking Springs, he saw a large bear crossing the path before him. The bear, not seeing him, went into a hole in the rocks while yet in sight, near the creek. Jackson determined to have him out but knew that he could not effect his purpose alone. He therefore went to the nearest cabin, which happened to be John Lowman's, for assistance. John immediately returned with him to the den of the bear. They took a chunk of fire with them. When they reached the place, they first filled the hole with dry branches, which they set on fire. After this, they stationed themselves thirty of forty yards distant, rifles in hand. The smoke soon entered the hole and forced the bruin out. As he emerged Jackson fired and wounded him. The bear then retreated to another hole close to the first.

 

The entrance of this was just large enough for him to pass through, but increased in size further in. The hunters again filled the mouth with leaves and fired them. But after waiting for upwards of an hour for the reappearance of the bear, and neither seeing nor hearing him, they concluded to go home and wait till evening. When evening came they returned to the den or cave in the rocks, and after a careful examination they satisfied themselves that bruin was still there in defiance of the smoke. So Jackson proposed to take a torch and crawl into the hole and force him out, for they were determined to have him at all hazards. He accordingly prepared himself and managed by a considerable effort to force himself in. He soon succeeded by the help of his torch in finding the bear, which, contrary to his expectations, was quiet dead from his shot. On making this discovery and satisfying himself that there was no mistake, he called out to Lowman at the mouth of the hole to come and assist him in dragging out the carcass.

 

Lowman crept in and managed to get hold of the body, and pulled while Jackson pushed. The bear was a very large one, and in that contracted place was quite difficult to manage. The mouth of the cave being small, the great difficulty was, however. to get him through it. Indeed the thing seemed impossible, although the animal had entered with ease while alive. After many efforts it finally stuck fast, and became wedged so tight that they could not move it either way.

 

The efforts of Lowman at the entrance of the hole had stirred up the remains of the leaves fired in the early part of the day, and the fire not being extinguished, a dense smoke soon penetrated the cave, notwithstanding the fact that the bear was fast in the mouth. Jackson being on the inside was like to suffocate, and Lowman being partly in was in little better condition. In this alarming state of affairs while Jackson was begging and praying with the little breath he had yet remaining. Lowman was making almost superhuman efforts to rescue him. Lowman, by thrusting his hands between the bear and the rocks, he made a slight opening. Then laying himself on his back, with both feet against the rocks, he took a long and steady pull for life, and finally, to the great joy of his friend inside, brought out the bear, and saved him from suffocation. Mr. Lowman above mentioned was long a most worthy citizen of the vicinity of Hillsboro.

 

From "History of Clinton County, Ohio, 1882, Jefferson Township":

 

"Early settlements - The first cabin built in the township was on the farm now owned by John Holaday, by Samuel Jackson, about the year 1812. He had emigrated from Tennessee in the year 1800 and settled in the eastern part of what is now Highland Co, on Rocky Fork. His principal occupation was hunting, and during one year (1801) he killed two panthers and a large number of deer and bears. His hunting grounds were the Brush Creek and Sun Fish hills. About the year 1818 he moved to the southwestern part of the township, and there settled on lands now owned by Alfred Daugherty and known as the "Lyons farm". He soon after moved back to Tennessee and from there to Cass Co, Texas where he was living at the beginning of the late Civil War since which time the writer has been unable to learn anything from him.”

 

"Clinton Co, Ohio" By Professor Edwin P. West.

 

“Samuel Jackson built the first cabin in Jefferson Township, in 1812. He was a famous hunter in his day, and was characterized as a second Daniel Boone. He is as a typical frontiersman and finally found his way to Cass Co, Texas where he died a quarter of a century ago, at the age of one hundred years.”

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Samuel Jackson:

General Notes:

Samuel Jackson was born Aug. 10, 1778, in Surry Co, North Carolina . He was eldest son and third child born to Jacob and Ann (Beals) Jackson. He was about eighteen years old when his parents moved from Westfield to TN in 1797. There is no information on Samuel Jackson t this time. There was a marriage recorded in Green Co for one Samuel Jackson and Susannah Bent on Nov. 26, 1812, and may have been the Samuel we are researching.

 

 

 

Several articles have been written on the history of Clinton and Highland Counties in OH. One mentions one Samuel Jackson who came to Jefferson Co around 1800-01. He was a great hunter and frontiersman. Professor Edwin West stated that he was the brother of Jacob and John Jackson, early settlers of Wayne Co, OH. The Samuel Jackson living in Stokes Co,North Carolina married Hannah Gibson, lived and died in Stokes Co and is believed by many Jackson researchers to be the brother of Jacob and John Jackson, and if he is a brother, then Samuel the hunter would not be a brother.

 

 

 

Samuel the hunter is said to have built the first cabin in Jefferson Township in 1812. Samuel, son of Jacob at that time, would have been thirty-four years of age, and he is possibly the son but not the brother of Jacob Jackson.

 

 

 

Since we have been unable to find any information on Samuel, son of Jacob and Ann, the following articles found on Samuel the hunter is used here.

 

 

 

The following was taken from "Highland Pioneer Sketches and Family Genealogies" by Elsie Johnson Ayres, Hillsboro, OH:

 

"Samuel Jackson and his brothers, Jacob and John, Quakers from North Carolina, settled on Rocky Fork as early as 1801. They were the sons of Samuel Jackson Sr., native of Ireland. Samuel Jackson the immigrant, was a direct descendant of Ralph Jackson who was burned at the stake as a martyr in Stratford, England, in 1556.

 

 

 

The brothers remained in a crude log cabin for a few years after their arrival. They were all good hunters who had served as Indian spies. They made enough money to live or the equivalent, by selling pelts. Samuel Jackson remained in the cabin after both his brothers had cleared land of their own. He was a rugged individual who remained in the woods for weeks at a time. His favorite region to hunt was the Brushcreek and Sunfish Hills. In 1801, during the hunting season in the Sunfish Hills, Samuel Jackson killed two panthers, a number of huge bears, deer, and other animals. In 1812, he moved to Clinton Co, where he erected the first cabin in what is now Jefferson Township. In 1818 he moved to Cass Co, Texas, and lived to be over one hundred years of age."

 

 

From "A History of Highland Co, Ohio"

 

"In the fall of 1809, as Samuel Jackson was passing along a trace down the banks of Sunfish Creek, about three miles east of Sinking Springs, he saw a large bear crossing the path before him. The bear, not seeing him, went into a hole in the rocks while yet in sight, near the creek. Jackson determined to have him out but knew that he could not effect his purpose alone. He therefore went to the nearest cabin, which happened to be John Lowman's, for assistance. John immediately returned with him to the den of the bear. They took a chunk of fire with them. When they reached the place, they first filled the hole with dry branches, which they set on fire. After this, they stationed themselves thirty of forty yards distant, rifles in hand. The smoke soon entered the hole and forced the bruin out. As he emerged Jackson fired and wounded him. The bear then retreated to another hole close to the first.

 

The entrance of this was just large enough for him to pass through, but increased in size further in. The hunters again filled the mouth with leaves and fired them. But after waiting for upwards of an hour for the reappearance of the bear, and neither seeing nor hearing him, they concluded to go home and wait till evening. When evening came they returned to the den or cave in the rocks, and after a careful examination they satisfied themselves that bruin was still there in defiance of the smoke. So Jackson proposed to take a torch and crawl into the hole and force him out, for they were determined to have him at all hazards. He accordingly prepared himself and managed by a considerable effort to force himself in. He soon succeeded by the help of his torch in finding the bear, which, contrary to his expectations, was quiet dead from his shot. On making this discovery and satisfying himself that there was no mistake, he called out to Lowman at the mouth of the hole to come and assist him in dragging out the carcass.

 

Lowman crept in and managed to get hold of the body, and pulled while Jackson pushed. The bear was a very large one, and in that contracted place was quite difficult to manage. The mouth of the cave being small, the great difficulty was, however. to get him through it. Indeed the thing seemed impossible, although the animal had entered with ease while alive. After many efforts it finally stuck fast, and became wedged so tight that they could not move it either way.

 

The efforts of Lowman at the entrance of the hole had stirred up the remains of the leaves fired in the early part of the day, and the fire not being extinguished, a dense smoke soon penetrated the cave, notwithstanding the fact that the bear was fast in the mouth. Jackson being on the inside was like to suffocate, and Lowman being partly in was in little better condition. In this alarming state of affairs while Jackson was begging and praying with the little breath he had yet remaining. Lowman was making almost superhuman efforts to rescue him. Lowman, by thrusting his hands between the bear and the rocks, he made a slight opening. Then laying himself on his back, with both feet against the rocks, he took a long and steady pull for life, and finally, to the great joy of his friend inside, brought out the bear, and saved him from suffocation. Mr. Lowman above mentioned was long a most worthy citizen of the vicinity of Hillsboro.

 

From "History of Clinton County, Ohio, 1882, Jefferson Township":

 

"Early settlements - The first cabin built in the township was on the farm now owned by John Holaday, by Samuel Jackson, about the year 1812. He had emigrated from Tennessee in the year 1800 and settled in the eastern part of what is now Highland Co, on Rocky Fork. His principal occupation was hunting, and during one year (1801) he killed two panthers and a large number of deer and bears. His hunting grounds were the Brush Creek and Sun Fish hills. About the year 1818 he moved to the southwestern part of the township, and there settled on lands now owned by Alfred Daugherty and known as the "Lyons farm". He soon after moved back to Tennessee and from there to Cass Co, Texas where he was living at the beginning of the late Civil War since which time the writer has been unable to learn anything from him.”

 

"Clinton Co, Ohio" By Professor Edwin P. West.

 

“Samuel Jackson built the first cabin in Jefferson Township, in 1812. He was a famous hunter in his day, and was characterized as a second Daniel Boone. He is as a typical frontiersman and finally found his way to Cass Co, Texas where he died a quarter of a century ago, at the age of one hundred years.”

 

 

Page 15 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:23 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Samuel Jackson:

General Notes:

Samuel Jackson was born Aug. 10, 1778, in Surry Co, North Carolina . He was eldest son and third child born to Jacob and Ann (Beals) Jackson. He was about eighteen years old when his parents moved from Westfield to TN in 1797. There is no information on Samuel Jackson t this time. There was a marriage recorded in Green Co for one Samuel Jackson and Susannah Bent on Nov. 26, 1812, and may have been the Samuel we are researching.

 

 

 

Several articles have been written on the history of Clinton and Highland Counties in OH. One mentions one Samuel Jackson who came to Jefferson Co around 1800-01. He was a great hunter and frontiersman. Professor Edwin West stated that he was the brother of Jacob and John Jackson, early settlers of Wayne Co, OH. The Samuel Jackson living in Stokes Co,North Carolina married Hannah Gibson, lived and died in Stokes Co and is believed by many Jackson researchers to be the brother of Jacob and John Jackson, and if he is a brother, then Samuel the hunter would not be a brother.

 

 

 

Samuel the hunter is said to have built the first cabin in Jefferson Township in 1812. Samuel, son of Jacob at that time, would have been thirty-four years of age, and he is possibly the son but not the brother of Jacob Jackson.

 

 

 

Since we have been unable to find any information on Samuel, son of Jacob and Ann, the following articles found on Samuel the hunter is used here.

 

 

 

The following was taken from "Highland Pioneer Sketches and Family Genealogies" by Elsie Johnson Ayres, Hillsboro, OH:

 

"Samuel Jackson and his brothers, Jacob and John, Quakers from North Carolina, settled on Rocky Fork as early as 1801. They were the sons of Samuel Jackson Sr., native of Ireland. Samuel Jackson the immigrant, was a direct descendant of Ralph Jackson who was burned at the stake as a martyr in Stratford, England, in 1556.

 

 

 

The brothers remained in a crude log cabin for a few years after their arrival. They were all good hunters who had served as Indian spies. They made enough money to live or the equivalent, by selling pelts. Samuel Jackson remained in the cabin after both his brothers had cleared land of their own. He was a rugged individual who remained in the woods for weeks at a time. His favorite region to hunt was the Brushcreek and Sunfish Hills. In 1801, during the hunting season in the Sunfish Hills, Samuel Jackson killed two panthers, a number of huge bears, deer, and other animals. In 1812, he moved to Clinton Co, where he erected the first cabin in what is now Jefferson Township. In 1818 he moved to Cass Co, Texas, and lived to be over one hundred years of age."

 

 

From "A History of Highland Co, Ohio"

 

"In the fall of 1809, as Samuel Jackson was passing along a trace down the banks of Sunfish Creek, about three miles east of Sinking Springs, he saw a large bear crossing the path before him. The bear, not seeing him, went into a hole in the rocks while yet in sight, near the creek. Jackson determined to have him out but knew that he could not effect his purpose alone. He therefore went to the nearest cabin, which happened to be John Lowman's, for assistance. John immediately returned with him to the den of the bear. They took a chunk of fire with them. When they reached the place, they first filled the hole with dry branches, which they set on fire. After this, they stationed themselves thirty of forty yards distant, rifles in hand. The smoke soon entered the hole and forced the bruin out. As he emerged Jackson fired and wounded him. The bear then retreated to another hole close to the first.

 

The entrance of this was just large enough for him to pass through, but increased in size further in. The hunters again filled the mouth with leaves and fired them. But after waiting for upwards of an hour for the reappearance of the bear, and neither seeing nor hearing him, they concluded to go home and wait till evening. When evening came they returned to the den or cave in the rocks, and after a careful examination they satisfied themselves that bruin was still there in defiance of the smoke. So Jackson proposed to take a torch and crawl into the hole and force him out, for they were determined to have him at all hazards. He accordingly prepared himself and managed by a considerable effort to force himself in. He soon succeeded by the help of his torch in finding the bear, which, contrary to his expectations, was quiet dead from his shot. On making this discovery and satisfying himself that there was no mistake, he called out to Lowman at the mouth of the hole to come and assist him in dragging out the carcass.

 

Lowman crept in and managed to get hold of the body, and pulled while Jackson pushed. The bear was a very large one, and in that contracted place was quite difficult to manage. The mouth of the cave being small, the great difficulty was, however. to get him through it. Indeed the thing seemed impossible, although the animal had entered with ease while alive. After many efforts it finally stuck fast, and became wedged so tight that they could not move it either way.

 

The efforts of Lowman at the entrance of the hole had stirred up the remains of the leaves fired in the early part of the day, and the fire not being extinguished, a dense smoke soon penetrated the cave, notwithstanding the fact that the bear was fast in the mouth. Jackson being on the inside was like to suffocate, and Lowman being partly in was in little better condition. In this alarming state of affairs while Jackson was begging and praying with the little breath he had yet remaining. Lowman was making almost superhuman efforts to rescue him. Lowman, by thrusting his hands between the bear and the rocks, he made a slight opening. Then laying himself on his back, with both feet against the rocks, he took a long and steady pull for life, and finally, to the great joy of his friend inside, brought out the bear, and saved him from suffocation. Mr. Lowman above mentioned was long a most worthy citizen of the vicinity of Hillsboro.

 

From "History of Clinton County, Ohio, 1882, Jefferson Township":

 

"Early settlements - The first cabin built in the township was on the farm now owned by John Holaday, by Samuel Jackson, about the year 1812. He had emigrated from Tennessee in the year 1800 and settled in the eastern part of what is now Highland Co, on Rocky Fork. His principal occupation was hunting, and during one year (1801) he killed two panthers and a large number of deer and bears. His hunting grounds were the Brush Creek and Sun Fish hills. About the year 1818 he moved to the southwestern part of the township, and there settled on lands now owned by Alfred Daugherty and known as the "Lyons farm". He soon after moved back to Tennessee and from there to Cass Co, Texas where he was living at the beginning of the late Civil War since which time the writer has been unable to learn anything from him.”

 

"Clinton Co, Ohio" By Professor Edwin P. West.

 

“Samuel Jackson built the first cabin in Jefferson Township, in 1812. He was a famous hunter in his day, and was characterized as a second Daniel Boone. He is as a typical frontiersman and finally found his way to Cass Co, Texas where he died a quarter of a century ago, at the age of one hundred years.”

 

 

iv.

Mary Jackson[19] was born on 28 Feb 1782 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[19]. She married Thomas Macklin on 10 Nov 1804 in Tennessee, USA[6]. She died on Unknown.

v.

Ann Jackson[19] was born on 25 Apr 1784 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[19]. She died on Unknown.

23. vi.

Jesse Jackson[19] was born on 16 Oct 1786 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He married Ann Hoggatt on 06 Apr 1814 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[19]. He died on 08 Aug 1844 in Clinton, Ohio, USA.

24. vii.

Lydia Jackson[19] was born on 11 Oct 1788 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[20]. She married Joseph Thornburgh Jr. on 06 Feb 1812 in Highland, Ohio, USA (Fairfield MM)[19]. She died on 27 Feb 1870 in Highland, Ohio, USA[20].

25. viii.

Curtis Jackson[19] was born on 01 Jan 1793 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[19]. He married Lydia Sumner on 18 Nov 1815 in Highland, Ohio, USA[19]. He died on 03 Apr 1850 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[19].

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Generation 3 (con't)
26. ix.

Josiah Jackson[19] was born on 09 Aug 1795 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[19]. He married Ruth Hiatt on 18 Oct 1823 in Highland, Ohio, USA[19]. He died on 16 Jul 1848 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[19].

5.

Curtis Isaac Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[3] was born in 1751 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA[3]. He died on 25 Sep 1829 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[8].

Notes for Curtis Isaac Jackson:

General Notes:

Curtis Jackson was born1751 in Chester Co., PA and died before Sep 1829. He and three of his brothers were among the charter members of the Westfield MM in Surry Co., North Carolina . Deeds recorded in Surry Co., show that Curtis received aNorth Carolina grant for two hundred acres located on both sides of Tom's Creek portion of the Yadkin River, adjoining land of Lewis Conners and Thomas Evans. He received a one hundred acre tract granted from the state on 18 May 1789. This was on the waters of Big Creek of Dan River. This land was adjoining Samuel Jackson, his brother. He purchased fifty five acres of land from Joseph Jessup on 31 Jan 1794 and sold the same tract to Nathan Beals on 11 Nov 1800. In 1808 he moved with his family to Guilford Co.,North Carolina and transferred his membership from the Westfield MM to Deep Creek MM.

 

Hello Jo,

 

I was looking at your family tree maker home page in conjunction with

the LDS website (www.familytreemaker.com) searching for clues that might

point to Craft Jackson being a son of Curtis Isaac Jackson and Ruth

Beales.

 

First let me repeat that I have found a will dated and proved in 1826

for Craft Jackson of Guilford County in which he named his wife Nancy

and two sons Joel and William. He also indicated that he had several

daughters but did not name them. The executors of his will were Nathan

Mendenhall and John Bailes.

 

If Craft Jackson was indeed the son of Curtis Jackson, then John Bales,

son of Susannah Jackson would be Craft's first cousin. Note you spell

the name "John Beales" but give the same date of birth as LDS. It is

possible, tho certainly not proven, that the John Bailes named co-executor

of the will of Craft Jackson was this John Bales/Beales, son of Susannah

Jackson. Although this is speculation, it is nevertheless interesting.

You cite "Dale" (dri@radiks.net) as your source for this John Beales.

 

On your web page you indicate that Susannah Jackson Beales and her husband

Daniel Beales left North Carolina in 1799, but some of the children like

John Bales and Daniel Bales might have been old enough to stay behind in

Guilford County, N. C. if they so chose.

 

More in a moment,

 

Steve Jackson

(jsteve@ucar.edu)

 

 

Ruth Beales daughter of Bowater Beales and Sarah Ann Cook[3] was born on 17 Jun 1757 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[21]. She died about 1819 in North Carolina, USA[3].

Page 17 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:23 PM
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Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Ruth Beales:

General Notes:

Ruth Beales was born 17 Jun 1757 and died abt 1819 in North Carolina

 

The witnesses at her marriage to Curtis Jackson at New Garden MM were: Strangeman Stanley, Michal Huff, Caleb Sumner, Joseph Hiatt, Thomas Cook, Thomas Jessup, Phebe Sumner, Hannah Hiatt, Miriam Carr, Kezia Mills, Mary Cook and Elizabeth Mills.

 

 

Curtis Isaac Jackson and Ruth Beales were married on 25 Nov 1775 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

27. i.

Phoebe Jackson[3] was born on 15 Nov 1776 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Timothy Jessup on 10 Apr 1799 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[22]. She died on Unknown.

ii.

Catherine Jackson[23] was born on 19 Sep 1778 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[23]. She married Bob Matthew on 13 Feb 1799 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on Unknown.

iii.

Sarah Jackson[3] was born on 16 Aug 1780 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on Unknown. She married King Fisher on Unknown.

28. iv.

Bowater Jackson[3] was born on 01 Apr 1783 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Jennie Mace on 10 Apr 1810 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died in Dec 1846[24].

29. v.

Jacob Jackson[3] was born on 22 Jan 1785 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Susanna Gaines on 08 Jun 1809 in Patrick, Virginia, USA. He died on 06 Jul 1831 in Dallas, Alabama, USA[3].

30. vi.

Beulah Jackson[3] was born in 1787 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Caleb Garrett about 1804[6]. She died in 1820 in Washington, Indiana, USA[3].

31. vii.

Susanna Jackson[3, 5] was born on 10 Apr 1789 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Timothy H. Jessup on 30 Apr 1806 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA (Westfield MM,)[3, 22]. She died on 10 Apr 1873 in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[3].

viii.

Nathan Jackson[3] was born in 1791 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Susan Potter on 23 Nov 1816[21]. He died in 1826 in Dallas, Alabama, USA[3].

Notes for Nathan Jackson:

General Notes:

Nathan Jackson was the third son of Curtis and Ruth Beales Jackson. He grew up on his father's farm in Surry Co., North Carolina . He moved to Dallas Co., AL where two of his brothers and one sister, Phoebe (wife of Timothy Jessup) were living. He died shortly after his move to AL.

 

WILL OF Nathan Jackson:

 

In the name of God Amen: I, Nathan Jackson of Dallas in the state of Alabama, do make an ordain this to be my last will and Testament.

 

First: I will that all my just debts be paid

 

Second: I will that after the payment of all my just debts that my property of every kind and nature be kept together and to go to my loving wife Susan during her natural life for her herself and the maintenance of my children, and after her death to be equally divided between all of my children or their heirs.

 

Third: I appoint my brother Bowater Jackson Executor of this my last will and testament. In witness, whereof I have here unto set my hand and seal this 14th day of Oct., 1825.

 

Witnessed by John Tabb, Jonathan T. Sims and William A. Jones.

 

 

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Nathan Jackson:

General Notes:

Nathan Jackson was the third son of Curtis and Ruth Beales Jackson. He grew up on his father's farm in Surry Co., North Carolina . He moved to Dallas Co., AL where two of his brothers and one sister, Phoebe (wife of Timothy Jessup) were living. He died shortly after his move to AL.

 

WILL OF Nathan Jackson:

 

In the name of God Amen: I, Nathan Jackson of Dallas in the state of Alabama, do make an ordain this to be my last will and Testament.

 

First: I will that all my just debts be paid

 

Second: I will that after the payment of all my just debts that my property of every kind and nature be kept together and to go to my loving wife Susan during her natural life for her herself and the maintenance of my children, and after her death to be equally divided between all of my children or their heirs.

 

Third: I appoint my brother Bowater Jackson Executor of this my last will and testament. In witness, whereof I have here unto set my hand and seal this 14th day of Oct., 1825.

 

Witnessed by John Tabb, Jonathan T. Sims and William A. Jones.

 

 

 

 

32. ix.

Thomas Jackson[3] was born in 1793 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Cynthia Charles on 22 Sep 1818 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died after 1865 in Miami, Kansas, USA[3].

33. x.

Edith Jackson[3] was born in 1795 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Risdon Charles on 22 Jul 1810 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on Unknown.

34. xi.

Ruth Jackson[3] was born in 1798 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Jesse Berryman Farabee on 10 Jul 1818 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[8]. She died on 01 Feb 1863 in Commerce, Jackson, Georgia, USA[3].

35. xii.

Curtis Jackson Jr.[3] was born in 1798 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Rebecca Smith on 07 Apr 1820 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on Unknown in Miami, Kansas, USA[3].

Elizabeth Shaw[3] was born on Unknown.

Curtis Isaac Jackson and Elizabeth Shaw were married on Unknown. They had the following children:

i.

Mary Jackson[3] was born in 1821 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on Unknown.

ii.

Lurena Jackson[3] was born in 1823 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married James Lloyd on 24 Aug 1852 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on Unknown.

6.

John Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[3] was born in 1753 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA[3]. He died on 10 Aug 1810 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[3].

Notes for John Jackson:

General Notes:

John Jackson was born 1753 in PA an died 10 Aug 1810 in Clinton Co., OH. After their marriage, John and Phoebe Beales Jackson moved to Surry Co., North Carolina . He had received aNorth Carolina land grant on Chinquepin Creek which was located near Tom's Creek and the newly formed Quaker Meeting House at Westfield. When Stokes Co. was formed, this land was just over the line in the newly formed Stokes Co. There are several deeds for John Jackson at Dobson, North Carolina , county seat of Surry Co., North Carolina , where he bought and sold land and was a witness to many deeds and wills.

 

They became members of the Westfield Quaker Meeting 3 Mar 1792, where they were members for several years. This was a few years before he moved to Greene Co., TN. It is recorded in the MM records that John Jackson was disowned from the Meeting for "going to law with a member of our society, also for not complying with his contracts, and for a breach of trust in that of taking a travelers horse in order to take care of him and trading the horse away without the leave of the said traveler, and when he (the traveler) returned have him no true information nor made him any satisfaction for said horse.' John is not mentioned again in any Quaker records after his disownment except as the father of his children or as Phoebe's husband.

 

John and his family left Westfield,North Carolina in 1799 and moved to Green Co., TN. Nine of their eleven children were born inNorth Carolina and two children were born after the move to Green Co., TN.

 

"History of Clinton County, Wayne Township" By James H. Terrell

John Jackson came to Ohio in the year 1802, directly from TN. After his marriage, he had lived for some time in Surry Co,North Carolina and afterward for some years in East Tennessee, Jefferson Co, not far from Knoxville. He came to the point of his location in the spring of 1803, with his wife Phoebe and ten children. They settled on the Middle Branch of Lose Creek, on one of the Ransdale's surveys, No, 1,027, about one mile a little north of west from where the counties of Highland and Fayette have a corner in the east line of Clinton OH.

His cabin stood west of where the Urbana road is now located, upon a high piece of rolling land covered with a heavy growth of large oak trees, and near a large spring, about two hundred and fifty yards nearly southwest of the present well-known residence of James Morris. His cabin disappeared long ago, but the indications of the ground plainly show the place where they at one time stood.

They were built in the wild green woods, remote from any road or path except the one which he opened for himself and family in coming to their location. with no human habitation near, if a deserted indian wigwam on the creek, half a mile away is not regarded as an exception.

The barn said to have been built by him was, until lately, and perhaps still is, in use for the purpose for which it was erected. The fields which he cleared and brought Into cultivation are now, with the exception of a few acres, cleared on the Daily farm, all merged in the home farm of Mr. James Morris.

This favored spot was, at this date, in the midst of a solitary wilderness of great extent, peopled by Indians and abounding in wild deer, bears and wolves.

At the date of Mr. Jackson's settlement, the whole number of families within the boundaries of what is now Clinton Co did not exceed ten, the true count being, it is believed, only eight, or at most nine. In our count, Isaac Miller and Joseph McKibben are excluded, though residing within the limits referred to as early as 1802, neither having a family at the time.

Mr. Jackson's nearest neighbor on the north of Clinton Co side of the line, which now divides the counties of Highland and Fayette from Clinton, was, not a doubt of it, Morgan van Meter, at the site of what was afterward Morgantown, now deserted, seven miles away.

Three miles below van Meter, on the east fork of the Little Maimi, near where Farmer's Station, on the Marietta Railroad, now is. Joseph McKibben and Isaac Miller, young men and single were keeping "bach" in a cabin, ten miles from Jackson's improvement. At about the same distance, in a course a little west of North, on the Hinkson Prairie. in what is now Wilson Township. Amos Wilson and James Mills lived in the same dooryard, yet each In his own dwelling. On the other or south side of the same line, a few settlers, not more than half a dozen in all, had settled here and there, with wide intervals between them, in the fall of 1802.

These settlers were Bowater Beals, James Haworth, John Walters, and Nathaniel Pope, and the next year, Evan Evans and James Smith, the nearest of whom to Mr. Jackson was at least three miles distant. James Haworth, a native of PA, was a brother of George Haworth, who settled on Todd's Fork, near where the Meeting house is in 1803.

Mr. Jackson seems to have been a man of industry and economy. At the time of his death, he was, for that day, quite well supplied with domestic animals, the tools and implements for farming, household and kitchen furniture and the machinery for carding, spinning, weaving, etc. The inventory of his personal estate, as estimated by Absalom Reed, Joseph Grice and Thomas Draper, the appraisers, amounted to $423.

He made his will Aug. 2, 1810, during his last sickness. It was drawn by his brother Jacob, and was attested by Jacob Jackson and Enon Williams, father in-law of the late Robert Wray. The execution of it was committed to his wife Phoebe and to Curtis Beals, whom he called "my nephew". It was probated Oct. 16, 1810, being the first will admitted to probate in Clinton Co, OH.

Mr. Jackson had a large family; six daughters and four sons lived to mature age and were married. His family was not well suited for the rugged work of opening a farm in the wild woods. They eventually moved to what is now Wayne Township, Clinton Co., OH. At the date of their settlement the total number of families within the boundaries of what is now Clinton Co., did not exceed ten. John Jackson was known as a 'squatter" from 1803 until he bought his land in 1809, He died one year after buying his land. Both he and Phoebe are buried in the old graveyard in the Hoskins neighborhood near a Friends Meeting House (now gone). The cabin he built for his family stood on a high piece of rolling land covered with a heavy growth of large oak trees. It was near a large spring. This cabin disappeared long ago, but the indications of the ground plainly show the place where they once lived. They built in the wild green woods, remote from any road or path except the one which he opened for himself and family in coming to their location, with no human habitation near, other than a deserted Indian wigwam on the creek, a half mile from their cabin. Once, Phoebe was followed in the woods by a panther, which threatened to attack her. She climbed a tree and had to remain there until the panther left. At the time of his death, John Jackson was very well supplied with domestic animals, tools and implements for farming, household and kitchen furniture and machinery for carding,spinning, weaving, etc. The inventory of his personal estate amounted to $423.

 

Last Will & Testament of John Jackson

I, JOHN JACKSON of Clinton Co. and State of Ohio, being of a perfect mind and body, calling to mind the uncertainty of time, and knowing that all men are once to die, I do make, constitute, and ordain this to be my last will and testament, in manner and form as followth.

It is my desire, that my body be discretely buried at the discresions of my executors hereafter named, and touching my worldly estate, which kindly God hath been pleased to bless me with. I dispose of In the following manner, and finally, it is my desire, that my just debts and funeral expenses be first paid,

Item I - I give and bequeath unto my daughter HANNAH BRANSCOM, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having already had what I intended her to have.

Item II - I give and bequeath unto my daughter, SARAH CHAINEY, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having had what I intended her to have.

Item III - I give and bequeath unto my daughter CHARITY FOSTER, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having had what I intended her to have.

Item IV - I give and bequeath unto my daughter, ELIZABETH ROOKS, five shillings if demanded, she having had her part also,

Item V - I give and bequeath all the rest of my whole estate, real and personal, to my beloved wife, PHOEBE JACKSON, to be wholly at her disposal, during her Widowhood, for her support in raising and taking care of children. But in case she should marry again, it is my will that she have a third part of my personal estate, except the farming tools.

Item VI - I give unto my sons URIAH JACKSON, WILLIAM JACKSON, AMER JACKSON, and JESSE JACKSON, all my farming tools, to be equally divided between them, and lastly, all the rest of my estate, I give and bequeath unto my above married daughters, and my two youngest daughters, KEZIAH, and MARY JACKSON, to be equally divided between them at the expiration of my wife's widowhood.

I do make, constitute and ordain my Beloved Wife and NEPHEW CURTIS BALES to be executors to this my last will and testament, I do also revoke and disallow of all other wills heretofore made by me. To satisfying and confirming this only, and alone, to my last, will and testament, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal, this second day of the eight month, in the year of our Lord, one thousand, eight hundred, and ten.

Signed sealed and acknowledged in the presents of JACOB JACKSON and EMMION WILLIAMS

JOHN JACKSON x mark

Recorded the 1st day of Nov. 1810, Jesse Hughes, Clinton, Co Oct. 16, 1810 the last will and testament of JOHN JACKSON was proved by the two subscribing witnesses thereto, and the court order letters testamentary issue ABSALOM REED, JOSEPH GRICE, and THOMAS DRAPER are appointed to appraise the personal estate of the said JOHN JACKSON deceased.

 

 

Page 19 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:24 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for John Jackson:

General Notes:

John Jackson was born 1753 in PA an died 10 Aug 1810 in Clinton Co., OH. After their marriage, John and Phoebe Beales Jackson moved to Surry Co., North Carolina . He had received aNorth Carolina land grant on Chinquepin Creek which was located near Tom's Creek and the newly formed Quaker Meeting House at Westfield. When Stokes Co. was formed, this land was just over the line in the newly formed Stokes Co. There are several deeds for John Jackson at Dobson, North Carolina , county seat of Surry Co., North Carolina , where he bought and sold land and was a witness to many deeds and wills.

 

They became members of the Westfield Quaker Meeting 3 Mar 1792, where they were members for several years. This was a few years before he moved to Greene Co., TN. It is recorded in the MM records that John Jackson was disowned from the Meeting for "going to law with a member of our society, also for not complying with his contracts, and for a breach of trust in that of taking a travelers horse in order to take care of him and trading the horse away without the leave of the said traveler, and when he (the traveler) returned have him no true information nor made him any satisfaction for said horse.' John is not mentioned again in any Quaker records after his disownment except as the father of his children or as Phoebe's husband.

 

John and his family left Westfield,North Carolina in 1799 and moved to Green Co., TN. Nine of their eleven children were born inNorth Carolina and two children were born after the move to Green Co., TN.

 

"History of Clinton County, Wayne Township" By James H. Terrell

John Jackson came to Ohio in the year 1802, directly from TN. After his marriage, he had lived for some time in Surry Co,North Carolina and afterward for some years in East Tennessee, Jefferson Co, not far from Knoxville. He came to the point of his location in the spring of 1803, with his wife Phoebe and ten children. They settled on the Middle Branch of Lose Creek, on one of the Ransdale's surveys, No, 1,027, about one mile a little north of west from where the counties of Highland and Fayette have a corner in the east line of Clinton OH.

His cabin stood west of where the Urbana road is now located, upon a high piece of rolling land covered with a heavy growth of large oak trees, and near a large spring, about two hundred and fifty yards nearly southwest of the present well-known residence of James Morris. His cabin disappeared long ago, but the indications of the ground plainly show the place where they at one time stood.

They were built in the wild green woods, remote from any road or path except the one which he opened for himself and family in coming to their location. with no human habitation near, if a deserted indian wigwam on the creek, half a mile away is not regarded as an exception.

The barn said to have been built by him was, until lately, and perhaps still is, in use for the purpose for which it was erected. The fields which he cleared and brought Into cultivation are now, with the exception of a few acres, cleared on the Daily farm, all merged in the home farm of Mr. James Morris.

This favored spot was, at this date, in the midst of a solitary wilderness of great extent, peopled by Indians and abounding in wild deer, bears and wolves.

At the date of Mr. Jackson's settlement, the whole number of families within the boundaries of what is now Clinton Co did not exceed ten, the true count being, it is believed, only eight, or at most nine. In our count, Isaac Miller and Joseph McKibben are excluded, though residing within the limits referred to as early as 1802, neither having a family at the time.

Mr. Jackson's nearest neighbor on the north of Clinton Co side of the line, which now divides the counties of Highland and Fayette from Clinton, was, not a doubt of it, Morgan van Meter, at the site of what was afterward Morgantown, now deserted, seven miles away.

Three miles below van Meter, on the east fork of the Little Maimi, near where Farmer's Station, on the Marietta Railroad, now is. Joseph McKibben and Isaac Miller, young men and single were keeping "bach" in a cabin, ten miles from Jackson's improvement. At about the same distance, in a course a little west of North, on the Hinkson Prairie. in what is now Wilson Township. Amos Wilson and James Mills lived in the same dooryard, yet each In his own dwelling. On the other or south side of the same line, a few settlers, not more than half a dozen in all, had settled here and there, with wide intervals between them, in the fall of 1802.

These settlers were Bowater Beals, James Haworth, John Walters, and Nathaniel Pope, and the next year, Evan Evans and James Smith, the nearest of whom to Mr. Jackson was at least three miles distant. James Haworth, a native of PA, was a brother of George Haworth, who settled on Todd's Fork, near where the Meeting house is in 1803.

Mr. Jackson seems to have been a man of industry and economy. At the time of his death, he was, for that day, quite well supplied with domestic animals, the tools and implements for farming, household and kitchen furniture and the machinery for carding, spinning, weaving, etc. The inventory of his personal estate, as estimated by Absalom Reed, Joseph Grice and Thomas Draper, the appraisers, amounted to $423.

He made his will Aug. 2, 1810, during his last sickness. It was drawn by his brother Jacob, and was attested by Jacob Jackson and Enon Williams, father in-law of the late Robert Wray. The execution of it was committed to his wife Phoebe and to Curtis Beals, whom he called "my nephew". It was probated Oct. 16, 1810, being the first will admitted to probate in Clinton Co, OH.

Mr. Jackson had a large family; six daughters and four sons lived to mature age and were married. His family was not well suited for the rugged work of opening a farm in the wild woods. They eventually moved to what is now Wayne Township, Clinton Co., OH. At the date of their settlement the total number of families within the boundaries of what is now Clinton Co., did not exceed ten. John Jackson was known as a 'squatter" from 1803 until he bought his land in 1809, He died one year after buying his land. Both he and Phoebe are buried in the old graveyard in the Hoskins neighborhood near a Friends Meeting House (now gone). The cabin he built for his family stood on a high piece of rolling land covered with a heavy growth of large oak trees. It was near a large spring. This cabin disappeared long ago, but the indications of the ground plainly show the place where they once lived. They built in the wild green woods, remote from any road or path except the one which he opened for himself and family in coming to their location, with no human habitation near, other than a deserted Indian wigwam on the creek, a half mile from their cabin. Once, Phoebe was followed in the woods by a panther, which threatened to attack her. She climbed a tree and had to remain there until the panther left. At the time of his death, John Jackson was very well supplied with domestic animals, tools and implements for farming, household and kitchen furniture and machinery for carding,spinning, weaving, etc. The inventory of his personal estate amounted to $423.

 

Last Will & Testament of John Jackson

I, JOHN JACKSON of Clinton Co. and State of Ohio, being of a perfect mind and body, calling to mind the uncertainty of time, and knowing that all men are once to die, I do make, constitute, and ordain this to be my last will and testament, in manner and form as followth.

It is my desire, that my body be discretely buried at the discresions of my executors hereafter named, and touching my worldly estate, which kindly God hath been pleased to bless me with. I dispose of In the following manner, and finally, it is my desire, that my just debts and funeral expenses be first paid,

Item I - I give and bequeath unto my daughter HANNAH BRANSCOM, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having already had what I intended her to have.

Item II - I give and bequeath unto my daughter, SARAH CHAINEY, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having had what I intended her to have.

Item III - I give and bequeath unto my daughter CHARITY FOSTER, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having had what I intended her to have.

Item IV - I give and bequeath unto my daughter, ELIZABETH ROOKS, five shillings if demanded, she having had her part also,

Item V - I give and bequeath all the rest of my whole estate, real and personal, to my beloved wife, PHOEBE JACKSON, to be wholly at her disposal, during her Widowhood, for her support in raising and taking care of children. But in case she should marry again, it is my will that she have a third part of my personal estate, except the farming tools.

Item VI - I give unto my sons URIAH JACKSON, WILLIAM JACKSON, AMER JACKSON, and JESSE JACKSON, all my farming tools, to be equally divided between them, and lastly, all the rest of my estate, I give and bequeath unto my above married daughters, and my two youngest daughters, KEZIAH, and MARY JACKSON, to be equally divided between them at the expiration of my wife's widowhood.

I do make, constitute and ordain my Beloved Wife and NEPHEW CURTIS BALES to be executors to this my last will and testament, I do also revoke and disallow of all other wills heretofore made by me. To satisfying and confirming this only, and alone, to my last, will and testament, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal, this second day of the eight month, in the year of our Lord, one thousand, eight hundred, and ten.

Signed sealed and acknowledged in the presents of JACOB JACKSON and EMMION WILLIAMS

JOHN JACKSON x mark

Recorded the 1st day of Nov. 1810, Jesse Hughes, Clinton, Co Oct. 16, 1810 the last will and testament of JOHN JACKSON was proved by the two subscribing witnesses thereto, and the court order letters testamentary issue ABSALOM REED, JOSEPH GRICE, and THOMAS DRAPER are appointed to appraise the personal estate of the said JOHN JACKSON deceased.

 

 

Page 20 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:24 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for John Jackson:

General Notes:

John Jackson was born 1753 in PA an died 10 Aug 1810 in Clinton Co., OH. After their marriage, John and Phoebe Beales Jackson moved to Surry Co., North Carolina . He had received aNorth Carolina land grant on Chinquepin Creek which was located near Tom's Creek and the newly formed Quaker Meeting House at Westfield. When Stokes Co. was formed, this land was just over the line in the newly formed Stokes Co. There are several deeds for John Jackson at Dobson, North Carolina , county seat of Surry Co., North Carolina , where he bought and sold land and was a witness to many deeds and wills.

 

They became members of the Westfield Quaker Meeting 3 Mar 1792, where they were members for several years. This was a few years before he moved to Greene Co., TN. It is recorded in the MM records that John Jackson was disowned from the Meeting for "going to law with a member of our society, also for not complying with his contracts, and for a breach of trust in that of taking a travelers horse in order to take care of him and trading the horse away without the leave of the said traveler, and when he (the traveler) returned have him no true information nor made him any satisfaction for said horse.' John is not mentioned again in any Quaker records after his disownment except as the father of his children or as Phoebe's husband.

 

John and his family left Westfield,North Carolina in 1799 and moved to Green Co., TN. Nine of their eleven children were born inNorth Carolina and two children were born after the move to Green Co., TN.

 

"History of Clinton County, Wayne Township" By James H. Terrell

John Jackson came to Ohio in the year 1802, directly from TN. After his marriage, he had lived for some time in Surry Co,North Carolina and afterward for some years in East Tennessee, Jefferson Co, not far from Knoxville. He came to the point of his location in the spring of 1803, with his wife Phoebe and ten children. They settled on the Middle Branch of Lose Creek, on one of the Ransdale's surveys, No, 1,027, about one mile a little north of west from where the counties of Highland and Fayette have a corner in the east line of Clinton OH.

His cabin stood west of where the Urbana road is now located, upon a high piece of rolling land covered with a heavy growth of large oak trees, and near a large spring, about two hundred and fifty yards nearly southwest of the present well-known residence of James Morris. His cabin disappeared long ago, but the indications of the ground plainly show the place where they at one time stood.

They were built in the wild green woods, remote from any road or path except the one which he opened for himself and family in coming to their location. with no human habitation near, if a deserted indian wigwam on the creek, half a mile away is not regarded as an exception.

The barn said to have been built by him was, until lately, and perhaps still is, in use for the purpose for which it was erected. The fields which he cleared and brought Into cultivation are now, with the exception of a few acres, cleared on the Daily farm, all merged in the home farm of Mr. James Morris.

This favored spot was, at this date, in the midst of a solitary wilderness of great extent, peopled by Indians and abounding in wild deer, bears and wolves.

At the date of Mr. Jackson's settlement, the whole number of families within the boundaries of what is now Clinton Co did not exceed ten, the true count being, it is believed, only eight, or at most nine. In our count, Isaac Miller and Joseph McKibben are excluded, though residing within the limits referred to as early as 1802, neither having a family at the time.

Mr. Jackson's nearest neighbor on the north of Clinton Co side of the line, which now divides the counties of Highland and Fayette from Clinton, was, not a doubt of it, Morgan van Meter, at the site of what was afterward Morgantown, now deserted, seven miles away.

Three miles below van Meter, on the east fork of the Little Maimi, near where Farmer's Station, on the Marietta Railroad, now is. Joseph McKibben and Isaac Miller, young men and single were keeping "bach" in a cabin, ten miles from Jackson's improvement. At about the same distance, in a course a little west of North, on the Hinkson Prairie. in what is now Wilson Township. Amos Wilson and James Mills lived in the same dooryard, yet each In his own dwelling. On the other or south side of the same line, a few settlers, not more than half a dozen in all, had settled here and there, with wide intervals between them, in the fall of 1802.

These settlers were Bowater Beals, James Haworth, John Walters, and Nathaniel Pope, and the next year, Evan Evans and James Smith, the nearest of whom to Mr. Jackson was at least three miles distant. James Haworth, a native of PA, was a brother of George Haworth, who settled on Todd's Fork, near where the Meeting house is in 1803.

Mr. Jackson seems to have been a man of industry and economy. At the time of his death, he was, for that day, quite well supplied with domestic animals, the tools and implements for farming, household and kitchen furniture and the machinery for carding, spinning, weaving, etc. The inventory of his personal estate, as estimated by Absalom Reed, Joseph Grice and Thomas Draper, the appraisers, amounted to $423.

He made his will Aug. 2, 1810, during his last sickness. It was drawn by his brother Jacob, and was attested by Jacob Jackson and Enon Williams, father in-law of the late Robert Wray. The execution of it was committed to his wife Phoebe and to Curtis Beals, whom he called "my nephew". It was probated Oct. 16, 1810, being the first will admitted to probate in Clinton Co, OH.

Mr. Jackson had a large family; six daughters and four sons lived to mature age and were married. His family was not well suited for the rugged work of opening a farm in the wild woods. They eventually moved to what is now Wayne Township, Clinton Co., OH. At the date of their settlement the total number of families within the boundaries of what is now Clinton Co., did not exceed ten. John Jackson was known as a 'squatter" from 1803 until he bought his land in 1809, He died one year after buying his land. Both he and Phoebe are buried in the old graveyard in the Hoskins neighborhood near a Friends Meeting House (now gone). The cabin he built for his family stood on a high piece of rolling land covered with a heavy growth of large oak trees. It was near a large spring. This cabin disappeared long ago, but the indications of the ground plainly show the place where they once lived. They built in the wild green woods, remote from any road or path except the one which he opened for himself and family in coming to their location, with no human habitation near, other than a deserted Indian wigwam on the creek, a half mile from their cabin. Once, Phoebe was followed in the woods by a panther, which threatened to attack her. She climbed a tree and had to remain there until the panther left. At the time of his death, John Jackson was very well supplied with domestic animals, tools and implements for farming, household and kitchen furniture and machinery for carding,spinning, weaving, etc. The inventory of his personal estate amounted to $423.

 

Last Will & Testament of John Jackson

I, JOHN JACKSON of Clinton Co. and State of Ohio, being of a perfect mind and body, calling to mind the uncertainty of time, and knowing that all men are once to die, I do make, constitute, and ordain this to be my last will and testament, in manner and form as followth.

It is my desire, that my body be discretely buried at the discresions of my executors hereafter named, and touching my worldly estate, which kindly God hath been pleased to bless me with. I dispose of In the following manner, and finally, it is my desire, that my just debts and funeral expenses be first paid,

Item I - I give and bequeath unto my daughter HANNAH BRANSCOM, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having already had what I intended her to have.

Item II - I give and bequeath unto my daughter, SARAH CHAINEY, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having had what I intended her to have.

Item III - I give and bequeath unto my daughter CHARITY FOSTER, the sum of five shillings if demanded, she having had what I intended her to have.

Item IV - I give and bequeath unto my daughter, ELIZABETH ROOKS, five shillings if demanded, she having had her part also,

Item V - I give and bequeath all the rest of my whole estate, real and personal, to my beloved wife, PHOEBE JACKSON, to be wholly at her disposal, during her Widowhood, for her support in raising and taking care of children. But in case she should marry again, it is my will that she have a third part of my personal estate, except the farming tools.

Item VI - I give unto my sons URIAH JACKSON, WILLIAM JACKSON, AMER JACKSON, and JESSE JACKSON, all my farming tools, to be equally divided between them, and lastly, all the rest of my estate, I give and bequeath unto my above married daughters, and my two youngest daughters, KEZIAH, and MARY JACKSON, to be equally divided between them at the expiration of my wife's widowhood.

I do make, constitute and ordain my Beloved Wife and NEPHEW CURTIS BALES to be executors to this my last will and testament, I do also revoke and disallow of all other wills heretofore made by me. To satisfying and confirming this only, and alone, to my last, will and testament, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal, this second day of the eight month, in the year of our Lord, one thousand, eight hundred, and ten.

Signed sealed and acknowledged in the presents of JACOB JACKSON and EMMION WILLIAMS

JOHN JACKSON x mark

Recorded the 1st day of Nov. 1810, Jesse Hughes, Clinton, Co Oct. 16, 1810 the last will and testament of JOHN JACKSON was proved by the two subscribing witnesses thereto, and the court order letters testamentary issue ABSALOM REED, JOSEPH GRICE, and THOMAS DRAPER are appointed to appraise the personal estate of the said JOHN JACKSON deceased.

 

 

Page 21 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:24 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Phebe Beales daughter of Bowater Beales and Sarah Ann Cook[3] was born on 23 Mar 1759 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[21]. She died after 1830 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[3].

Notes for Phebe Beales:

General Notes:

Phebe Beales was born 23 Mar 1759 and died after 1830 in Clinton Co., OH

 

 

John Jackson and Phebe Beales were married on 10 Nov 1779 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

36. i.

Hannah Jackson[3] was born on 14 Aug 1781 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married David Branson on 29 Dec 1799 in Tennessee, USA[3]. She died after 1850 in Grant, Indiana, USA[3].

ii.

Nathan Jackson[3] was born on 08 Sep 1782 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 13 Nov 1806 in Ohio, USA[3].

37. iii.

Sarah Jackson[3] was born on 09 Aug 1784 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Edward Chaney on 13 Nov 1806 in Highland, Ohio, USA[3]. She died after 1850[3].

iv.

Uriah Jackson[3] was born about 1787 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 22 Jul 1815 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[3].

38. v.

Charity Jackson[3] was born on 31 Oct 1788 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Basil Foster Jr. on 29 Dec 1810 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[3]. She died on 19 Aug 1860 in Marion, Indiana, USA[3].

39. vi.

Elizabeth Jackson[3] was born on 08 Mar 1790 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Joseph Rooks on 19 Apr 1807 in Highland, Ohio, USA[3]. She died on 17 Aug 1880 in Grundy, Missouri, USA[3].

vii.

Keziah Jackson[3] was born on 16 Mar 1792 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married John Allen Jr. on 12 Mar 1811 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[3]. She died on 10 Oct 1816[3].

40. viii.

William Jackson[3] was born on 26 Dec 1794 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Rebecca Pearson on 04 May 1820 in Tennessee, USA[19]. He died on 16 Dec 1869 in Wilson, Clinton, Ohio, USA[3].

41. ix.

Amer Jackson[3] was born on 16 Apr 1796 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 28 Sep 1848 in Grassy Run, Greene, Ohio USA[3]. He married Jane Greer on Unknown.

x.

Mary Jackson[3] was born on 15 Feb 1799 in Tennessee, USA[3]. She married Isham Gallimore on 04 May 1820[3]. She died before Mar 1822[3].

42. xi.

Jesse Jackson[3] was born on 11 Jan 1801 in Greene, Tennessee, USA[3]. He married Phoebe Sinclair on 18 Jan 1821 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[3]. He died in Mar 1865 in Starke, Indiana, USA[25].

7.

Susanna Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[6] was born in 1755 in Probably in Chester, Pennsylvania[6]. She died on 09 Aug 1840 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[6].

Notes for Susanna Jackson:

General Notes:

Susannah Jackson was the fourth child and first daughter of Samuel and Catherine Plankinhorn Jackson. She would have been about the age of ten when her parents moved to North Carolina , settling in Rowan Co.

 

 

Stephen Jackson, jsteve@ucar.edu writes the following in an email to me:

 

On your web page you show that Curtis Jackson's sister Susannah Jackson

married Daniel Beales, and that couple had 11 children. In the LDS

database I found records of 12 children:

 

Daniel Beales & Susannah Jackson

children:

(a) John Bales Aug. 24, 1780

(b) Daniel Bales 1784

(c) Catharine Bales 1787

(d) Sarah Beals May 5, 1778

(e) Phebe Beals Apr. 11 1786

(f) Ann Beals Dec. 1, 1787

(g) Susannah Beals Dec 12, 1796

(h) Katherine Beals Feb. 28, 1790

(i) Rachel Beales Apr. 24, 1794

(j) Curtis Beales Apr. 29, 1779

(k) Bowater Beales Jun. 17, 1781

(l) Jacob Beales Jul. 5, 1783

(m) Elizabeth Beales Jul. 27, 1785

 

Most of those children were listed as being born in the New Garden Friends

Membership. This list includes all the children you list plus Daniel Bales,

who you do not have. I believe that Catharine/Katherine are the same.

 

Susannah Jackson was the fourth child and the first daughter of Samuel and Catherine Plankinh orn Jackson. She was born ca. 1751(54?), probably in Chester Co, PA. She would have been around the age of ten when her parents moved to North Carolina, settling in Rowan County. Her marriage is recorded in the New Garden MM in Guilford Co, NC as being married to Daniel Beals at Westfield MM on Apr. 5, 1775. Daniel Beals was born Feb.15, 1753 in Rowan Co, (now Guilford) NC. He was the son of Thomas Beals and Sarah Antrim.

There is no record of Daniel purchasing land in Surry Co. There is a deed recorded in Stoke s Co, NC, Page 1, vol. 1, dated July 11, 1744, which was a Grant No. 1967 to Andon Hartness for 310 acres on the waters of Muddy Creek, and states that it was part of a 500 acre grant to Daniel Beals. The land was located on the Moravian Road and joined the land of John S. Walton (This land would be in south west Stokes Co, where the Muddy Creek runs into the little Yadkin river, and would be only a few miles south east of Westfield.)

Susannah and Daniel were the parents of ten children, all of them were born in North Carolina .

After their long stay in Stokes Co, they moved with their children to Ohio in 1799, settling in Clinton and Highland Counties and from then on they moved about every year. The Beal' s family history records that they were living on Salt Creek near Adelphus, OH in 1801, and t hey moved to Lee's Creek in Highland Co, OH in the fall of 1802. In 1803 they were in Mt. Pleasants MM, in Virginia, and in 1804 they were Miami MM in Ohio.They were back in Mt. Pleasants, VA in 1808, and from there to Fairfield MM in 1809.

In Nov. 1812, Daniel was dismissed from Fairfield for disunity. Susannah was a charter member of Clark Creek MM in Highland Co, OH on Dec.24,1812. She was a charter member of Newberry MM in Clinton Co, OH on Dec.2, 1816. She was received at Cherry Grove MM, Randolph Co, IN onOct.12, 1826, and she was received at White River MM in Jan. of 1834. Daniel had requested membership at Cherry Grove MM but was denied.

Susannah died on Aug. 9, 1840 at the age of 89. Daniel died in Randolph Co, IN, year unknown . After the death of their daughter Sarah,(wife of Jesse Hiatt) they took her three weeks old son, Eli Hiatt into their home and raised him. They also raised Matilda Beals a niece or daughter of Jacob and Beulah (Hiatt) Beals. Matilda married John Hockett Aug. 18,1827 at Cherry Grove, IN.

 

 

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Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Susanna Jackson:

General Notes:

Susannah Jackson was the fourth child and first daughter of Samuel and Catherine Plankinhorn Jackson. She would have been about the age of ten when her parents moved to North Carolina , settling in Rowan Co.

 

 

Stephen Jackson, jsteve@ucar.edu writes the following in an email to me:

 

On your web page you show that Curtis Jackson's sister Susannah Jackson

married Daniel Beales, and that couple had 11 children. In the LDS

database I found records of 12 children:

 

Daniel Beales & Susannah Jackson

children:

(a) John Bales Aug. 24, 1780

(b) Daniel Bales 1784

(c) Catharine Bales 1787

(d) Sarah Beals May 5, 1778

(e) Phebe Beals Apr. 11 1786

(f) Ann Beals Dec. 1, 1787

(g) Susannah Beals Dec 12, 1796

(h) Katherine Beals Feb. 28, 1790

(i) Rachel Beales Apr. 24, 1794

(j) Curtis Beales Apr. 29, 1779

(k) Bowater Beales Jun. 17, 1781

(l) Jacob Beales Jul. 5, 1783

(m) Elizabeth Beales Jul. 27, 1785

 

Most of those children were listed as being born in the New Garden Friends

Membership. This list includes all the children you list plus Daniel Bales,

who you do not have. I believe that Catharine/Katherine are the same.

 

Susannah Jackson was the fourth child and the first daughter of Samuel and Catherine Plankinh orn Jackson. She was born ca. 1751(54?), probably in Chester Co, PA. She would have been around the age of ten when her parents moved to North Carolina, settling in Rowan County. Her marriage is recorded in the New Garden MM in Guilford Co, NC as being married to Daniel Beals at Westfield MM on Apr. 5, 1775. Daniel Beals was born Feb.15, 1753 in Rowan Co, (now Guilford) NC. He was the son of Thomas Beals and Sarah Antrim.

There is no record of Daniel purchasing land in Surry Co. There is a deed recorded in Stoke s Co, NC, Page 1, vol. 1, dated July 11, 1744, which was a Grant No. 1967 to Andon Hartness for 310 acres on the waters of Muddy Creek, and states that it was part of a 500 acre grant to Daniel Beals. The land was located on the Moravian Road and joined the land of John S. Walton (This land would be in south west Stokes Co, where the Muddy Creek runs into the little Yadkin river, and would be only a few miles south east of Westfield.)

Susannah and Daniel were the parents of ten children, all of them were born in North Carolina .

After their long stay in Stokes Co, they moved with their children to Ohio in 1799, settling in Clinton and Highland Counties and from then on they moved about every year. The Beal' s family history records that they were living on Salt Creek near Adelphus, OH in 1801, and t hey moved to Lee's Creek in Highland Co, OH in the fall of 1802. In 1803 they were in Mt. Pleasants MM, in Virginia, and in 1804 they were Miami MM in Ohio.They were back in Mt. Pleasants, VA in 1808, and from there to Fairfield MM in 1809.

In Nov. 1812, Daniel was dismissed from Fairfield for disunity. Susannah was a charter member of Clark Creek MM in Highland Co, OH on Dec.24,1812. She was a charter member of Newberry MM in Clinton Co, OH on Dec.2, 1816. She was received at Cherry Grove MM, Randolph Co, IN onOct.12, 1826, and she was received at White River MM in Jan. of 1834. Daniel had requested membership at Cherry Grove MM but was denied.

Susannah died on Aug. 9, 1840 at the age of 89. Daniel died in Randolph Co, IN, year unknown . After the death of their daughter Sarah,(wife of Jesse Hiatt) they took her three weeks old son, Eli Hiatt into their home and raised him. They also raised Matilda Beals a niece or daughter of Jacob and Beulah (Hiatt) Beals. Matilda married John Hockett Aug. 18,1827 at Cherry Grove, IN.

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Susanna Jackson:

General Notes:

Susannah Jackson was the fourth child and first daughter of Samuel and Catherine Plankinhorn Jackson. She would have been about the age of ten when her parents moved to North Carolina , settling in Rowan Co.

 

 

Stephen Jackson, jsteve@ucar.edu writes the following in an email to me:

 

On your web page you show that Curtis Jackson's sister Susannah Jackson

married Daniel Beales, and that couple had 11 children. In the LDS

database I found records of 12 children:

 

Daniel Beales & Susannah Jackson

children:

(a) John Bales Aug. 24, 1780

(b) Daniel Bales 1784

(c) Catharine Bales 1787

(d) Sarah Beals May 5, 1778

(e) Phebe Beals Apr. 11 1786

(f) Ann Beals Dec. 1, 1787

(g) Susannah Beals Dec 12, 1796

(h) Katherine Beals Feb. 28, 1790

(i) Rachel Beales Apr. 24, 1794

(j) Curtis Beales Apr. 29, 1779

(k) Bowater Beales Jun. 17, 1781

(l) Jacob Beales Jul. 5, 1783

(m) Elizabeth Beales Jul. 27, 1785

 

Most of those children were listed as being born in the New Garden Friends

Membership. This list includes all the children you list plus Daniel Bales,

who you do not have. I believe that Catharine/Katherine are the same.

 

Susannah Jackson was the fourth child and the first daughter of Samuel and Catherine Plankinh orn Jackson. She was born ca. 1751(54?), probably in Chester Co, PA. She would have been around the age of ten when her parents moved to North Carolina, settling in Rowan County. Her marriage is recorded in the New Garden MM in Guilford Co, NC as being married to Daniel Beals at Westfield MM on Apr. 5, 1775. Daniel Beals was born Feb.15, 1753 in Rowan Co, (now Guilford) NC. He was the son of Thomas Beals and Sarah Antrim.

There is no record of Daniel purchasing land in Surry Co. There is a deed recorded in Stoke s Co, NC, Page 1, vol. 1, dated July 11, 1744, which was a Grant No. 1967 to Andon Hartness for 310 acres on the waters of Muddy Creek, and states that it was part of a 500 acre grant to Daniel Beals. The land was located on the Moravian Road and joined the land of John S. Walton (This land would be in south west Stokes Co, where the Muddy Creek runs into the little Yadkin river, and would be only a few miles south east of Westfield.)

Susannah and Daniel were the parents of ten children, all of them were born in North Carolina .

After their long stay in Stokes Co, they moved with their children to Ohio in 1799, settling in Clinton and Highland Counties and from then on they moved about every year. The Beal' s family history records that they were living on Salt Creek near Adelphus, OH in 1801, and t hey moved to Lee's Creek in Highland Co, OH in the fall of 1802. In 1803 they were in Mt. Pleasants MM, in Virginia, and in 1804 they were Miami MM in Ohio.They were back in Mt. Pleasants, VA in 1808, and from there to Fairfield MM in 1809.

In Nov. 1812, Daniel was dismissed from Fairfield for disunity. Susannah was a charter member of Clark Creek MM in Highland Co, OH on Dec.24,1812. She was a charter member of Newberry MM in Clinton Co, OH on Dec.2, 1816. She was received at Cherry Grove MM, Randolph Co, IN onOct.12, 1826, and she was received at White River MM in Jan. of 1834. Daniel had requested membership at Cherry Grove MM but was denied.

Susannah died on Aug. 9, 1840 at the age of 89. Daniel died in Randolph Co, IN, year unknown . After the death of their daughter Sarah,(wife of Jesse Hiatt) they took her three weeks old son, Eli Hiatt into their home and raised him. They also raised Matilda Beals a niece or daughter of Jacob and Beulah (Hiatt) Beals. Matilda married John Hockett Aug. 18,1827 at Cherry Grove, IN.

 

 

Daniel Beales son of Thomas Beales and Sarah Esther Antrim[6] was born on 15 Feb 1753 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[9]. He died after 1834 in White River, Randolph, Indiana, USA[6].

Notes for Daniel Beales:

General Notes:

Daniel Beales was born 15 Feb 1753 in Rowan Co.,North Carolina (currently Guilford Co.) and died after 1834 in White River Township, Randolph Co., IN. There is no record of Daniel purchasing land in Surry Co.,NC, however there is a deed recorded in Stokes Co. North Carolina , page 1, Vol. 1, dated 11 Jul 1744, which was a Grant No 1967 to Andon Hartness for 310 acres on the waters of Muddy Creek, and states that it was a part of a 500 acre grant to Daniel Beales. The land was located on the Moravian Road and joined the land of John S,. Walton (This land would be in southwest Stokes Co., where the Muddy Creek runs into the little Yadkin River, and would be only a few miles southeast of Westfield, North Carolina .

 

After their long stay in Stokes Co., North Carolina , Daniel and Susannah moved with their children to Ohio in 1799, settling in Clinton and Highland Counties and from then on they moved every year. The Beales family history records that they were living on Salt Creek near Adelphus, OH in 1801 and they moved to Lee's Creek in Highland Co., OH in the fall of 1802. In 1803 they were in Mt. Pleasant MM, in VA and in 1804 they were at the Miami MM in OH. They were back in Mt Pleasants, VA in 1808 and from there they went to Fairfield MM in 1809.

 

In Nov 1812, Daniel was dismissed from Fairfield MM for disunity. Susannah was a charter member of Clark Creek MM in Highland Co., OH on 24 Dec 18121. She was a charter member of Newberry MM in Clinton Co., OH on 2 Dec 1816. She was received at Cherry Grove MM, Randolph CO., IN on 12 Oct 1826 and she was received at White River MM in Jan of 1834. Daniel had requested membership at Cherry Grove MM but was denied.

 

After the death of their daughter, Sarah, wife of Jesse Hiatt, they took her three weeks old son, Eli Hiatt into their home and raised him. They also raised Matilda Beales, a niece or daughter of Jacob and Beulah Hiatt Beales.

 

 

Daniel Beales and Susanna Jackson were married on 05 Apr 1775 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[9]. They had the following children:

i.

Phebe Beales[6] was born on 11 Apr 1776 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[6]. She died on 21 Apr 1776[6].

43. ii.

Sarah Beales[6, 26] was born on 15 May 1777 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[27]. She married Jesse Hiatt on 04 Aug 1800 in Washington, Ohio, USA[6]. She died in Nov 1801 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[28].

44. iii.

Curtis Beales[6] was born on 28 Apr 1779 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[27]. He married Hannah Evans on 30 Jul 1801 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[29]. He died on 08 Aug 1840 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[6].

iv.

Bowater Beales[25] was born on 17 Jun 1781 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[25]. He married Elizabeth Marshall on 13 Feb 1820 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[25]. He died on Unknown.

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45. v.

Jacob Beales[6] was born on 05 Jul 1783 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[6]. He married Mary Margaret Thornburgh on 16 Sep 1807 in Miami, Fairfield,, Highland, Ohio USA[6]. He died on 19 Oct 1855 in Henry, Iowa, USA[27].

46. vi.

Elizabeth Beales[6] was born on 27 Jul 1785 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[6]. She married John Thornburgh on 29 Jun 1808 in Fairfield, Ohio, USA[30]. She died on 09 Mar 1845 in Highland, Ohio, USA[6].

47. vii.

Ann Beales[6] was born on 01 Dec 1787[31]. She married Jacob Beales on 08 Mar 1810 in Highland, Ohio, USA[6]. She died on Unknown.

48. viii.

Katherine Beales[6, 20] was born on 28 Mar 1790 in Jefferson, Tennessee, USA[6]. She married Daniel Beales on 24 Jan 1807 in Highland, Ohio, USA[6]. She died on 08 Dec 1874 in Wayne, Indiana, USA[6].

49. ix.

Rachel Beales[6] was born on 24 Apr 1794[6]. She married Joseph Thornburgh on 12 Dec 1811 in Lower East Fork MM in OH[30]. She died on 12 Apr 1860[6].

50. x.

Susanna Beales[6] was born on 12 Dec 1796[32]. She married John Thornburgh on 21 Sep 1815 in Clinton, Ohio, USA[30, 32]. She died on 04 Apr 1882 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[32].

xi.

Daniel Beales was born in 1784 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA.

8.

Samuel Jackson Jr.-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[10] was born on 23 Jan 1758 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA[10, 11]. He died on 06 Jun 1834 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6].

Notes for Samuel Jackson Jr.:

General Notes:

Samuel Jackson, Jr. was disowned from the Westfield Friends Church due to marrying "out of unity." He enlisted and served at various times in 1780 and 1781 as a private under Captain William David in Col. Smith's Regiment. He was captured by the Tories during this time, but soon released and discharged after the surrender of Cornwallis. He was granted a pension of $20.00 per year on his application which was executed in Stokes, North Carolina on 15 Mar 1833.

 

The early census records use the names Samuel Jackson, Sr. and Samuel Jackson, Jr, and Samuel Jr., gave almost the same information in his request for pension that Jacob Jackson gave on his "Testimony." He stated he was born in Chester Co., PA and that his parents moved to Rowan Co.,North Carolina when he was around 12 years old.

 

When his parents, Samuel and Catherine Jackson moved to Tom's Creek, their land was in Surry Co., but when Stokes County was formed in 1789, the line was drawn at Westfield and Samuel Jackson, Sr. found his land had been divided by the county line. Samuel Jackson, Jr.'s land was in Stokes Co. North Carolina .

 

 

On the 15th day of March and AD, 1832, personally appeared in open court before the Justice of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, for the County of Stokes:

 

Samuel Jackson, a resident ofNorth Carolina and the county of Stokes, aged about 74 years, who being first duly sworn in according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of an act of Congress passed 7 Jun 1832. That he entered the service of the US under the following named officers, and served at known stations. He states first that he was born in the year 1758 in the state of PA a few miles from the City of Philadelphia, on the Delaware River. That he has no record of his age, that when quite young he moved with his parents to that part of County Rowan in the state ofNorth Carolina that is now called Davidson Co. He states that when he was first called into service he lived in the county of Surry and that aforesaid was on Dan River now in Stokes Co. At other times in County of Rowan, that since the Revolutionary War he has lived in the county of Stokes, and lives there now. That he first served in a Company commanded by Captain Joseph Cloud of the county of Stokes, then Surry, in the year of 1780 for a term of four months. Then he volunteered and was put in service and appointed to guard Tory prisoners, at Old Town in Bethabara. That afterwards in the year of 1780, and the second place he served under Captain Gaines, father of General Gains, and he said that he was employed in guarding British soldiers taken prisoners at the Battle of Kings Mountain, and served for one month. Afterwards in the same and succeeding years he was engaged and sent on several scouting parties. In all for a term of one month under different officers, whose names he cannot now remember. That when engaged in the service mentioned the assignment ot which his company was attached was commanded part of the time by Col. William Sheppard and Major Joseph Winston. He recollects while on duty at Old Town a private soldier shot a Sgt. Smith for which offense he was merely whipped. Afterwards, I think, in the year 1782, in the county of Rowan, about the time the British marched south toward the Battleground of Guilford, he volunteered his services in a company of militia commanded by Captain William Davis. In which company was chiefly called out to hunt Tories and obtain them. He was taken prisoner by the Tories and after being confined a while was released, and services and complacement lasted about one month. Shortly after this, in the same year of 1782, he entered service again in a company commanded by Captain Lapp and Lieutenant Bodenhamer and marched toward Wilmington,North Carolina and while on the march, they helped to scatter Tories at "Rafts Swamp" and from there he marched to the mouth of the Neuse River where they made an attack, which was occupied by a British garrison, and then marched toward Georgetown, SC and back. They lay in the backwoods until the news assured them that Cornwallis had been taken. He was then marched home and discharged. He recollects that at "Rafts Swamp" there were 200 men of Guilford that were shot. He states he has no documentary evidence of his service and knows no person who can testify to his service except the testimony of Jacob Idol. He also states that in his neighborhood he is known to Charles Banner and Jacob Carson who can testify of his transactions for his service as a soldier of the Revolution. Sworn and submitted this day and year aforesaid - Samuel Jackson - (his mark)

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Samuel Jackson Jr.:

General Notes:

Samuel Jackson, Jr. was disowned from the Westfield Friends Church due to marrying "out of unity." He enlisted and served at various times in 1780 and 1781 as a private under Captain William David in Col. Smith's Regiment. He was captured by the Tories during this time, but soon released and discharged after the surrender of Cornwallis. He was granted a pension of $20.00 per year on his application which was executed in Stokes, North Carolina on 15 Mar 1833.

 

The early census records use the names Samuel Jackson, Sr. and Samuel Jackson, Jr, and Samuel Jr., gave almost the same information in his request for pension that Jacob Jackson gave on his "Testimony." He stated he was born in Chester Co., PA and that his parents moved to Rowan Co.,North Carolina when he was around 12 years old.

 

When his parents, Samuel and Catherine Jackson moved to Tom's Creek, their land was in Surry Co., but when Stokes County was formed in 1789, the line was drawn at Westfield and Samuel Jackson, Sr. found his land had been divided by the county line. Samuel Jackson, Jr.'s land was in Stokes Co. North Carolina .

 

 

On the 15th day of March and AD, 1832, personally appeared in open court before the Justice of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, for the County of Stokes:

 

Samuel Jackson, a resident ofNorth Carolina and the county of Stokes, aged about 74 years, who being first duly sworn in according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of an act of Congress passed 7 Jun 1832. That he entered the service of the US under the following named officers, and served at known stations. He states first that he was born in the year 1758 in the state of PA a few miles from the City of Philadelphia, on the Delaware River. That he has no record of his age, that when quite young he moved with his parents to that part of County Rowan in the state ofNorth Carolina that is now called Davidson Co. He states that when he was first called into service he lived in the county of Surry and that aforesaid was on Dan River now in Stokes Co. At other times in County of Rowan, that since the Revolutionary War he has lived in the county of Stokes, and lives there now. That he first served in a Company commanded by Captain Joseph Cloud of the county of Stokes, then Surry, in the year of 1780 for a term of four months. Then he volunteered and was put in service and appointed to guard Tory prisoners, at Old Town in Bethabara. That afterwards in the year of 1780, and the second place he served under Captain Gaines, father of General Gains, and he said that he was employed in guarding British soldiers taken prisoners at the Battle of Kings Mountain, and served for one month. Afterwards in the same and succeeding years he was engaged and sent on several scouting parties. In all for a term of one month under different officers, whose names he cannot now remember. That when engaged in the service mentioned the assignment ot which his company was attached was commanded part of the time by Col. William Sheppard and Major Joseph Winston. He recollects while on duty at Old Town a private soldier shot a Sgt. Smith for which offense he was merely whipped. Afterwards, I think, in the year 1782, in the county of Rowan, about the time the British marched south toward the Battleground of Guilford, he volunteered his services in a company of militia commanded by Captain William Davis. In which company was chiefly called out to hunt Tories and obtain them. He was taken prisoner by the Tories and after being confined a while was released, and services and complacement lasted about one month. Shortly after this, in the same year of 1782, he entered service again in a company commanded by Captain Lapp and Lieutenant Bodenhamer and marched toward Wilmington,North Carolina and while on the march, they helped to scatter Tories at "Rafts Swamp" and from there he marched to the mouth of the Neuse River where they made an attack, which was occupied by a British garrison, and then marched toward Georgetown, SC and back. They lay in the backwoods until the news assured them that Cornwallis had been taken. He was then marched home and discharged. He recollects that at "Rafts Swamp" there were 200 men of Guilford that were shot. He states he has no documentary evidence of his service and knows no person who can testify to his service except the testimony of Jacob Idol. He also states that in his neighborhood he is known to Charles Banner and Jacob Carson who can testify of his transactions for his service as a soldier of the Revolution. Sworn and submitted this day and year aforesaid - Samuel Jackson - (his mark)

 

 

Hannah Gibson daughter of Valentine Gibson and Frances Nancy Garrett[6] was born on 09 Oct 1764 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[10]. She died in Dec 1841 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[10].

Notes for Hannah Gibson:

General Notes:

Hannah Gibson was born 9 Oct 1764 in Surry Co.,North Carolina and died Dec 1841 in Stokes Co.,North Carolina Hannah Gibson Jackson's will was probated Dec 1841. Before her death she had applied for a widow's pension with her brother, William Gibson and two life long friends, Martha Pierce and Mary Pierce Roark testifying that she had remained unmarried since Samuel's death and that she was known in the community for her honesty and truth. Information on Samuel and Hannah can be found in the Revolutionary War Records, Claim # W 5004, filed in the Archives in Raleigh, North Carolina .

 

Lucille Jackson Vernon listed Valentine Gibson as the father of Hannah; however, Woods Welborn, wwellborn@earthlink.net shared the following information with me. I must say this new theory bears much weight.

 

"It appears that Hannah and William Gibson may have been the children of William Gibson, Sr.., who was probably a close relative of Valentine Gibson, but those relationships remain to be proven. Theoretically, either William, Sr. or Valentine Sr., could have been Hannah's father. It is interesting that William Gibson, Hannah's brother, stated that his sister and Samuel Jackson were married at the home of his father's neighbor, Elisha Pierce. Elisha's home appears to have been near the property of William Gibson, Sr.,

 

I found the following on Stokes County Gen. Site - http://cgi.rootsweb.com/~genbbs/genbbs.cgi/USA/NC/Stokes/11396 - this post was from James Austin.

 

I am looking for information on William N. GIBSON (b.BEF 1760 and d. 1831,

Stokes Co., North Carolina ). William N. GIBSON of Germanton is different from the William

GIBSON who is the son of Valentine GIBSON. Valentine and his sons lived

in another district of Stokes County.

 

William N. GIBSON lived in Stokes County near Germanton from about 1795

to his death in 1831. He was a very well educated man, probably a doctor,

and possessed medical texts, literature, and European historical texts

at the time of his death. He had a son, Jeremiah GIBSON, a merchant in

Germanton (b. 30 July 1769; d. 17 Nov. 1848); a son named William GIBSON,

Jr. (b. abt. 1772; d. 1840); possibly a son named Obediah GIBSON (b. abt.

1780); and possibly a son named Robert B. GIBSON. (The William N. Gibson

of Germanton is not the same William Gibson of Stokes Co. who is the son

of Valentine Gibson. Valentine and his sons lived in a district other than

Germanton.) William Gibson, Jr. had the following children: Mary Naomi

GIBSON (m. Benjamin SANDERS), Jeremiah Lee GIBSON (m. Elizabeth Naomi GREEN),

Penina GIBSON (m. Richard SULIVAN), William Green GIBSON, Elbert Lewis

GIBSON, Eunice GIBSON (m. Shadrach MORRIS Jr.), Adaline GIBSON (m. Mr.

LETTRELL), Nancy GIBSON (m. Ebenezer PICKET), and Levi GIBSON. William

GIBSON, Jr. and many of his married children move to St. Clair County,

Alabama in about 1832.

 

My questions about William N. Gibson are these: Who was the first wife

of William N. Gibson of Germanton? His second wife was Eliza C. Geren (m.

29 June 1826 in Guilford Co.,NC). Was William N. Gibson related in any

way to the other Gibson families in Stokes County, especially Valentine

Gibson? Where did William N. Gibson come from prior to Stokes County? Where

did William N. Gibson go to medical school? Philadelphia? Or Great Britain

(Edinburgh, Dublin, or London)?

 

 

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Notes for Hannah Gibson:

General Notes:

Hannah Gibson was born 9 Oct 1764 in Surry Co.,North Carolina and died Dec 1841 in Stokes Co.,North Carolina Hannah Gibson Jackson's will was probated Dec 1841. Before her death she had applied for a widow's pension with her brother, William Gibson and two life long friends, Martha Pierce and Mary Pierce Roark testifying that she had remained unmarried since Samuel's death and that she was known in the community for her honesty and truth. Information on Samuel and Hannah can be found in the Revolutionary War Records, Claim # W 5004, filed in the Archives in Raleigh, North Carolina .

 

Lucille Jackson Vernon listed Valentine Gibson as the father of Hannah; however, Woods Welborn, wwellborn@earthlink.net shared the following information with me. I must say this new theory bears much weight.

 

"It appears that Hannah and William Gibson may have been the children of William Gibson, Sr.., who was probably a close relative of Valentine Gibson, but those relationships remain to be proven. Theoretically, either William, Sr. or Valentine Sr., could have been Hannah's father. It is interesting that William Gibson, Hannah's brother, stated that his sister and Samuel Jackson were married at the home of his father's neighbor, Elisha Pierce. Elisha's home appears to have been near the property of William Gibson, Sr.,

 

I found the following on Stokes County Gen. Site - http://cgi.rootsweb.com/~genbbs/genbbs.cgi/USA/NC/Stokes/11396 - this post was from James Austin.

 

I am looking for information on William N. GIBSON (b.BEF 1760 and d. 1831,

Stokes Co., North Carolina ). William N. GIBSON of Germanton is different from the William

GIBSON who is the son of Valentine GIBSON. Valentine and his sons lived

in another district of Stokes County.

 

William N. GIBSON lived in Stokes County near Germanton from about 1795

to his death in 1831. He was a very well educated man, probably a doctor,

and possessed medical texts, literature, and European historical texts

at the time of his death. He had a son, Jeremiah GIBSON, a merchant in

Germanton (b. 30 July 1769; d. 17 Nov. 1848); a son named William GIBSON,

Jr. (b. abt. 1772; d. 1840); possibly a son named Obediah GIBSON (b. abt.

1780); and possibly a son named Robert B. GIBSON. (The William N. Gibson

of Germanton is not the same William Gibson of Stokes Co. who is the son

of Valentine Gibson. Valentine and his sons lived in a district other than

Germanton.) William Gibson, Jr. had the following children: Mary Naomi

GIBSON (m. Benjamin SANDERS), Jeremiah Lee GIBSON (m. Elizabeth Naomi GREEN),

Penina GIBSON (m. Richard SULIVAN), William Green GIBSON, Elbert Lewis

GIBSON, Eunice GIBSON (m. Shadrach MORRIS Jr.), Adaline GIBSON (m. Mr.

LETTRELL), Nancy GIBSON (m. Ebenezer PICKET), and Levi GIBSON. William

GIBSON, Jr. and many of his married children move to St. Clair County,

Alabama in about 1832.

 

My questions about William N. Gibson are these: Who was the first wife

of William N. Gibson of Germanton? His second wife was Eliza C. Geren (m.

29 June 1826 in Guilford Co.,NC). Was William N. Gibson related in any

way to the other Gibson families in Stokes County, especially Valentine

Gibson? Where did William N. Gibson come from prior to Stokes County? Where

did William N. Gibson go to medical school? Philadelphia? Or Great Britain

(Edinburgh, Dublin, or London)?

 

 

Samuel Jackson Jr. and Hannah Gibson were married on 23 Jan 1782 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[10]. They had the following children:

51. i.

Jehu Jackson[10] was born on 01 Feb 1783 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[10]. He married Lucy Wright on 10 Nov 1811 in Montgomery, Ohio, USA[10]. He died in 1847 in Dayton, Cass, Missouri, USA[10].

52. ii.

James Hiram Jackson[10] was born on 01 Mar 1785 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[10]. He married Rosey Hargrove on 12 Jan 1810 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[33]. He died on 08 Dec 1853 in Wells, Indiana, USA[10].

53. iii.

Isaac Jackson[34] was born in 1787 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[34]. He married Nancy Sizemore on 10 Dec 1808 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[34]. He died in 1835 in Delaware, Indiana, USA[34].

54. iv.

Samuel Jackson III[34] was born on 14 Mar 1789 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[34]. He died on 30 Mar 1848 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[35]. He married Jemima Cox on Unknown.

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55. v.

Sarah Jackson[6] was born in 1793 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[34]. She married Isaac Myers on 18 Apr 1820 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[36]. She died in 1851 in Probably Hamilton, Indiana USA[37].

56. vi.

John Jackson[6] was born in 1793 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[34]. He married Nancy King on 02 Jul 1819 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He died on 19 Aug 1854 in Laclede, Missouri, USA[6].

vii.

William Jackson[6] was born in 1795 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He died on Unknown.

57. viii.

Amer Jackson[6] was born in 1797 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He died after 1850 in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[6].

58. ix.

Hiram W. Jackson[6] was born on 28 Oct 1801 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[34]. He married Nancy Malcolm about 1826 in North Carolina, USA[38]. He died on 09 Nov 1875 in Macoupin, Illinois, USA[34].

59. x.

Joseph Jackson[6] was born on 23 Aug 1804 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He married Phoebe Cox on 06 Sep 1827 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[6]. He died on 25 Mar 1858 in Louisa, Iowa, USA[6].

9.

Joseph Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[3] was born on 27 Dec 1761 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 22 Oct 1815 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

Notes for Joseph Jackson:

General Notes:

Joseph was a very prosperous farmer and at his death he owned several hundred acres of land in Surry, Stokes and other counties in North Carolina . He also owned land in Grayson Co., VA. Deed recorded in Surry Co.,North Carolina show that he bought his first land from Edward Lovell, 400 acres on both sides of Tom's Creek for 600 pounds, the deed was witnessed by John Jackson and Bowater Sumners. In January of 1794 he sold 55 acres of this land to his brother, Jehu Jackson. Other deeds show 150 acres bought in 1796 from John Burris on the branch of Tom's Creek, Yadkin River, adjoining Bryans Branch. This was witnessed by John Jackson and William Tanzey. He bought 53 acres from Joseph Haiti on the waters of Tom's Creek in 1799. He received two North Carolina grants, one in 1791 fro 150 acres and one in 1802 for 100 acres, both on the banks of Tom's Creek.

 

Following is his Last Will and Testament, dated 1815, Surry Co.,North Carolina

 

Whereas I, Joseph Jackson, of the County of Surry and the State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory do therefore leave this as my last will and testament.

 

First, that I be decently buried and all my just debts paid.

 

Secondly, I will and bequeath to my beloved wife during her widowhood the plantation on which she now lives with all the household furniture; also the plantation on the big creek of Dan river; also I leave to her eight cows and two horses and at the end of her widowhood, I will the land on the big creek to be equally divided between my two sons, Zadock and Joel, and the land whereon I live to belong to my son Caleb and Zadock and Joel to make it equal in value to theirs at the time when he is of age. I also leave to my son, Eli the land I bought of Jonathan Harold in Grayson Co., VA, also the tract of land lying on Davies Creek in Stokes, North Carolina .

 

I also leave to my son, Amer Jackson, the tract of land I bought of Purnal Blizzard in Grayson Co., VA and also the tract of land lying on the west fork of Tom's Creek where I formerly lived.

 

It is also my will that the rest of my sons provide for and decently clothe and victual my son, John and each one to be an equal part as they come of age.

 

It is also my will that my three daughters, Abigail, Rachel and Betsy have each a hundred dollars worth of property or equal to their sisters who are married.

 

I also appoint and empower my trusty brother, William Jackson and my trusty son, Eli Jackson, my true and lawful Executors. Signed 22 Sep 1815.

 

 

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Notes for Joseph Jackson:

General Notes:

Joseph was a very prosperous farmer and at his death he owned several hundred acres of land in Surry, Stokes and other counties in North Carolina . He also owned land in Grayson Co., VA. Deed recorded in Surry Co.,North Carolina show that he bought his first land from Edward Lovell, 400 acres on both sides of Tom's Creek for 600 pounds, the deed was witnessed by John Jackson and Bowater Sumners. In January of 1794 he sold 55 acres of this land to his brother, Jehu Jackson. Other deeds show 150 acres bought in 1796 from John Burris on the branch of Tom's Creek, Yadkin River, adjoining Bryans Branch. This was witnessed by John Jackson and William Tanzey. He bought 53 acres from Joseph Haiti on the waters of Tom's Creek in 1799. He received two North Carolina grants, one in 1791 fro 150 acres and one in 1802 for 100 acres, both on the banks of Tom's Creek.

 

Following is his Last Will and Testament, dated 1815, Surry Co.,North Carolina

 

Whereas I, Joseph Jackson, of the County of Surry and the State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory do therefore leave this as my last will and testament.

 

First, that I be decently buried and all my just debts paid.

 

Secondly, I will and bequeath to my beloved wife during her widowhood the plantation on which she now lives with all the household furniture; also the plantation on the big creek of Dan river; also I leave to her eight cows and two horses and at the end of her widowhood, I will the land on the big creek to be equally divided between my two sons, Zadock and Joel, and the land whereon I live to belong to my son Caleb and Zadock and Joel to make it equal in value to theirs at the time when he is of age. I also leave to my son, Eli the land I bought of Jonathan Harold in Grayson Co., VA, also the tract of land lying on Davies Creek in Stokes, North Carolina .

 

I also leave to my son, Amer Jackson, the tract of land I bought of Purnal Blizzard in Grayson Co., VA and also the tract of land lying on the west fork of Tom's Creek where I formerly lived.

 

It is also my will that the rest of my sons provide for and decently clothe and victual my son, John and each one to be an equal part as they come of age.

 

It is also my will that my three daughters, Abigail, Rachel and Betsy have each a hundred dollars worth of property or equal to their sisters who are married.

 

I also appoint and empower my trusty brother, William Jackson and my trusty son, Eli Jackson, my true and lawful Executors. Signed 22 Sep 1815.

 

 

15.

Sarah Jessup daughter of Joseph Jessup and Priscilla Jackson[4] was born on 20 Aug 1764 in Carteret, North Carolina, USA[4]. She died on 20 Jan 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[4].

Notes for Sarah Jessup:

General Notes:

Sarah Jessup was born 20 Aug 1764 in Carteret Co.,North Carolina and died 20 Jan 1818 in Surry Co., North Carolina

 

She had come with her family to the Westfield community in Surry Co. and married Joseph Jackson in the Westfield Friends MM>

 

 

Joseph Jackson and Sarah Jessup were married on 21 Apr 1787 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

i.

Mary Jackson[4] was born in 1788 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Abner Jessup on 16 Aug 1809 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She died on 21 Mar 1840[5].

60. ii.

Priscilla Jackson[3] was born in 1790 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Absolem Sumner on 09 Aug 1811 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on 27 Nov 1833 in Highland, Ohio, USA[3].

61. iii.

Eli Jackson[6] was born in 1792 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He married Cornelia Cook on 17 Feb 1824[6]. He died on 23 Dec 1834 in Marion, Indiana, USA[39].

62. iv.

Alsa Abigail Jackson[6] was born in 1794 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. She married Jacob Carson on 09 Aug 1811 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[40]. She died on 04 Aug 1872 in Holt, Missouri, USA[6].

63. v.

Rachel Jackson[6] was born on 21 Jan 1796 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Joseph Jessup on 02 Nov 1816 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on 18 Mar 1875 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[3].

64. vi.

Amer Jackson[6] was born in 1797 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He married Sarah Sally Hill about 1837 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. He died in 1870 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6].

65. vii.

Zadock L. Jackson[3] was born on 28 Nov 1804 in North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Isabella Hughey on 11 Oct 1828 in Highland, Ohio, USA[39]. He died on 25 Jun 1890 in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[42].

viii.

Caleb Jackson[3] was born in 1805 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Mary Polly Simmons on 17 Apr 1846 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on Unknown.

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66. ix.

Joel Jackson[3] was born in 1806 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Rebecca Jessup on 23 Jan 1838 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 09 Aug 1849.

x.

Elizabeth Betsy Jackson[3] was born in 1807 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on Unknown.

xi.

John Jackson[3] was born in 1809 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on Unknown. He married Martha (or Ruth) Oglesby on Unknown.

Notes for John Jackson:

General Notes:

Source Lucille Jackson:

Joseph had requested in his will that his older sons decently clothe and provide for John until he became of age, and then he was to share equally with the other boys in property.

Each of Samuel and Catherine's eight sons had a son named John, so there were many John Jackson's living in the area at that time. I (Lucille Vernon) am unable to distinguish just which John was the son of Joseph and Sarah. It is assumed that he would be the John Jackson who in 1827, sold one hundred acres of land to his brother Amor Jackson, with his brother Joel Jackson as a Witness. He may also be the John who purchased 446 acres of land in Westfield in 1832.

..............................................

Source Lucille Jackson:

Marriage records of Surry Co 1779-1826, show a marriage between one John Jackson and Martha Oglesby on Apr. 26, 1830. This would be about the right date for John, son of Joseph, son of Samuel and Catherine, to have been married. In the Guilford College, I found the notes that Mr. Luther Byrd had made when he was researching some of the families of Westfield. He thought that John, son of Joseph, son of Samuel and Catherine, was the one that had gone to Morgan Co, IN and someone had lined through it and written "No" there. This is the John that married Nancy Spargur. Now if one John did go to Morgan Co, IN, it was probably John, son of Joseph as that is where his brother Zadock and his uncle Jehu Jackson and family lived. The John that married Nancy Spargur was the son of William and Mary Jessup Jackson.

 

 

 

 

10.

Elizabeth Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[3] was born on 12 May 1763 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died before 1808 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

Charles Simmons son of Peter Simmons II and Elizabeth Kincannon[3] was born about 1760 in Brunswick, Virginia, USA[43]. He died in 1845 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[43].

Notes for Charles Simmons:

General Notes:

Charles Simmons came with his parents to Surry Co.,North Carolina where he became a member of the Westfield Friends MM in 1781, after his marriage to Elizabeth Jackson. The Surry Co. Register of Deeds, Vol. 1 shows that he bought 100 acres of land on the Rutledge Creek on 15 Mar 1790 from Ratcliff Boone, from a 200 acre grant to Boone on 3 Nov 1784. Charles became the guardian of Peter Simmons, son of his brother, at the time of his brothers death in 1798 and he remained his guardian until 1810.

 

 

Charles Simmons and Elizabeth Jackson were married on 08 Mar 1786 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

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i.

Charles Simmons Jr.[41] was born on Unknown. He died on Unknown.

67. ii.

Jehu Simmons[20] was born about 1787 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[20]. He married Elizabeth Hammons on 21 Jan 1811 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[20]. He died after 1870 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[44].

iii.

Stephen Simmons[20] was born about 1788 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[20]. He died on Unknown.

iv.

Amer Simmons[20] was born about 1791 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[20]. He died on Unknown.

v.

Samuel Simmons[20] was born about 1793 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[20]. He died on Unknown.

vi.

Nathan Simmons[20] was born about 1800 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[20]. He died on Unknown.

11.

Jehu Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[3] was born on 04 Jul 1765 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 06 Jul 1844[3].

Notes for Jehu Jackson:

General Notes:

Jehu Jackson bought his first property on 24 Jul 1787 from his brother-in-law Daniel Beales, husband of his sister, Susannah Jackson. This land was located on Tom's Creek, and contained 160 acres. Another deed dated 7 Dec 1801 shows that Jehu paid 150 pounds ofNorth Carolina currency for one hundred acres on the fork of Tom's Creek. He bought it from his brother, Jacob Jackson, who was living in Green Co., TN at the time. On 25 May 1804, he bought another tract of land from Samuel Parker for 40 Pounds. This land was on the Meadows Branch and contained 149 acres of land. Jehu lived most of his life there on Tom's Creek, where he grew up as a boy, married and raised his children. When he was sixty-five years old, he went to Hendricks Co., IN with his family and several other members of the Westfield MM. He received his Certificate from Westfield MM on 11 Oct 1828 and was received into Fairfield MM on 6 Dec 1828 with his daughters Ann and Louisa and his wife, Hope. He lived in Hendricks Co., IN until his death on 6 Jul 1844 at the age of 79.

 

 

Hope Jessup daughter of Timothy Jessup and Hannah Pratt[3] was born on 09 Mar 1770 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on 30 Jun 1838 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[45].

Notes for Hope Jessup:

General Notes:

Hope Jessup was born 9 Mar 1770 in Guilford Co., North Carolina

 

 

Jehu Jackson and Hope Jessup were married on 22 Mar 1788 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

68. i.

Elihu Jackson[3] was born on 26 Jan 1791 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[20]. He married Priscilla Jessup on 22 Feb 1815 in Surry, North Carolina, USA (Westfield MM)[3, 22]. He died on 15 Sep 1835 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[3].

69. ii.

Micael Jackson[4] was born in 1793 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[45]. She married Joel Jessup on 12 Jun 1813 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[22]. She died in 1852 in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[45].

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70. iii.

Hannah Jackson[3, 46] was born in 1795 in North Carolina, USA[41]. She married Levi Cook on 12 Sep 1815 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[46]. She died on Unknown.

71. iv.

Lurainey Jackson[47] was born in 1797 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[47]. She married Johan Daniel Pfaff on 23 Oct 1817 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[20]. She died in 1882 in Sigourney, Keokuk, Iowa, USA[47].

72. v.

Martin Jackson[20] was born in 1798 in North Carolina, USA[41]. He married Edith Cook on 29 Aug 1826 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[20]. He died on Unknown.

73. vi.

Iredell Jackson[20] was born on 13 Nov 1800 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[20]. He married Ursula Cook on 26 Aug 1830[20]. He died on 01 May 1889 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[20].

vii.

Mary Jackson[20] was born in 1803 in North Carolina, USA. She married Joseph Moon on 31 Oct 1823[20]. She died on Unknown.

74. viii.

Louisa Jackson[3] was born in 1805 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. She married Basil Jessup on 12 Sep 1828. She died on Unknown.

75. ix.

Ann Jackson[20] was born in 1810 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[20]. She married Ishmael Raines on 01 Jan 1830 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[20]. She died on Unknown.

12.

William Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[3] was born on 15 May 1767 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 20 Sep 1841 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

Notes for William Jackson:

General Notes:

William Jackson's parents had moved toNorth Carolina from Chester Co., PA around 1760 and settled in Rowan, North Carolina . That part of Rowan later became Davidson Co. North Carolina . They moved from there to Tom's Creek in Surry Co.North Carolina about 1773. William spent his entire life in the Westfield area. there are several deeds recorded in the Dobson Courthouse in Surry Co., North Carolina , where he had purchased and sold land. His first deed was recorded on 4 Apr 1790 for a 200 acre tract on both sides of Rutledge Creek. William and his father, Samuel, were given a joint tract of 100 acres on Rutledge Creek as a grant from the state ofNorth Carolina on 8o Jan 1795. He and his father were to receive 50 acres each. This may be the same 50 acres that William bought from heirs after Samuel's death. He also bought a 200 acre tract of land from his father on 2 Feb 1803.

 

Last Will and Testament of William Jackson, Surry Co.North Carolina 1854. In the name of God, Amen.

 

Know all men by these present that I, William Jackson, State of North Carolina and of Surry County,being of sound mind although weak in body, and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs so as to prevent any dispute after my death, do hereby will and decree the following disposition of my worldly property to be as follows:

 

First: That I bequeath to my wife, Lucy Pike Jackson should she outlive me, twenty-five acres of land lying on the south end of the tract where I now live but to extend no further than where the land is now cleared and to include the house with sufficient timer only for the support of said twenty-five acres and fire wood for the term of her natural life or widowhood and at her death or marriage whichever should happen first the said land to be sold and the proceeds divided amongst my heirs. Also a bed and furniture for the same, one oven and skillet, three plates, two knives and forks, two cups and saucers, two chairs, one cotton wheel and one sow and two sheep.

 

Secondly: I will and bequeath to my daughter Edith Jackson Puckett or her heirs that tract of land upon which Henry Marsh now lives adjoining the Hollow Spring, consisting of ninety-two acres.

 

Thirdly: I will and bequeath that Job Jackson, Elijah Jackson and John Jackson, my sons, shall be paid the sum of one dollar each.

 

Fourthly: To John and Mary Jackson and their heirs the sum of one dollar only, that being all that I would have given to their father, Jasen, had he been alive.

 

Fifth: To Martha Matthews Jackson, daughter of Newel Jackson deceased, one bed stead, bed and furniture.

 

Sixthly: That after my death the remainder of the tract upon which I live, say one hundred acres, is thereby to be sold and the proceeds to be divided equally between Job, Elijah and John Jackson or their heirs.

 

And Lastly: I will and desire my executor hereafter named to dispose of all my other property both real and personal not herein named and after applying the proceeds in payment of all my just debts and burial expenses, any balance that may remain to be equally divided amongst all my said heirs.

 

And Finally: I give to my wife, one chest for clothes, and I hereby will and appoint Stanton Taylor to be my only executor and will and desire him to fulfill the terms and conditions of this my last will and testament and hereby revoke and repeal all former wills if such there be and declare this to be my will and testament in witness whereof I have herewith set my hand and seal the twentieth day of September, one thousand, eight hundred and fifty-one. Signed by William Jackson

 

 

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Notes for William Jackson:

General Notes:

William Jackson's parents had moved toNorth Carolina from Chester Co., PA around 1760 and settled in Rowan, North Carolina . That part of Rowan later became Davidson Co. North Carolina . They moved from there to Tom's Creek in Surry Co.North Carolina about 1773. William spent his entire life in the Westfield area. there are several deeds recorded in the Dobson Courthouse in Surry Co., North Carolina , where he had purchased and sold land. His first deed was recorded on 4 Apr 1790 for a 200 acre tract on both sides of Rutledge Creek. William and his father, Samuel, were given a joint tract of 100 acres on Rutledge Creek as a grant from the state ofNorth Carolina on 8o Jan 1795. He and his father were to receive 50 acres each. This may be the same 50 acres that William bought from heirs after Samuel's death. He also bought a 200 acre tract of land from his father on 2 Feb 1803.

 

Last Will and Testament of William Jackson, Surry Co.North Carolina 1854. In the name of God, Amen.

 

Know all men by these present that I, William Jackson, State of North Carolina and of Surry County,being of sound mind although weak in body, and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs so as to prevent any dispute after my death, do hereby will and decree the following disposition of my worldly property to be as follows:

 

First: That I bequeath to my wife, Lucy Pike Jackson should she outlive me, twenty-five acres of land lying on the south end of the tract where I now live but to extend no further than where the land is now cleared and to include the house with sufficient timer only for the support of said twenty-five acres and fire wood for the term of her natural life or widowhood and at her death or marriage whichever should happen first the said land to be sold and the proceeds divided amongst my heirs. Also a bed and furniture for the same, one oven and skillet, three plates, two knives and forks, two cups and saucers, two chairs, one cotton wheel and one sow and two sheep.

 

Secondly: I will and bequeath to my daughter Edith Jackson Puckett or her heirs that tract of land upon which Henry Marsh now lives adjoining the Hollow Spring, consisting of ninety-two acres.

 

Thirdly: I will and bequeath that Job Jackson, Elijah Jackson and John Jackson, my sons, shall be paid the sum of one dollar each.

 

Fourthly: To John and Mary Jackson and their heirs the sum of one dollar only, that being all that I would have given to their father, Jasen, had he been alive.

 

Fifth: To Martha Matthews Jackson, daughter of Newel Jackson deceased, one bed stead, bed and furniture.

 

Sixthly: That after my death the remainder of the tract upon which I live, say one hundred acres, is thereby to be sold and the proceeds to be divided equally between Job, Elijah and John Jackson or their heirs.

 

And Lastly: I will and desire my executor hereafter named to dispose of all my other property both real and personal not herein named and after applying the proceeds in payment of all my just debts and burial expenses, any balance that may remain to be equally divided amongst all my said heirs.

 

And Finally: I give to my wife, one chest for clothes, and I hereby will and appoint Stanton Taylor to be my only executor and will and desire him to fulfill the terms and conditions of this my last will and testament and hereby revoke and repeal all former wills if such there be and declare this to be my will and testament in witness whereof I have herewith set my hand and seal the twentieth day of September, one thousand, eight hundred and fifty-one. Signed by William Jackson

 

 

16.

Mary Jessup daughter of Joseph Jessup and Priscilla Jackson[3] was born on 11 Jan 1766 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died before 1837[15].

William Jackson and Mary Jessup were married on 10 Sep 1790 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

76. i.

Edith Jackson[3] was born in 1794 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Zachariah Puckett on 26 Jul 1817 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. She died on Unknown.

77. ii.

Job Jackson[3] was born on 20 Dec 1796 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Lydia Puckett on 11 Apr 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died in 1854 in Grant, Indiana, USA[49].

78. iii.

Elijah Jackson[3] was born on 08 May 1798 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Anna Puckett on 13 Oct 1816 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. He died on 27 Jun 1863 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[20].

79. iv.

Jason Jackson[3] was born about 1800[41]. He died in Jan 1835. He married Probably Sarah Sparger on Unknown.

80. v.

Newel Jackson[3] was born about 1802 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. He married Sarah Sally Martin on 23 Aug 1832 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. He died on 28 Oct 1833 in North Carolina, USA[3].

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Generation 3 (con't)
81. vi.

John Jackson[3] was born in 1805 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Nancy W. Sparger on 29 Dec 1825 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. He died on Unknown.

Lucy Pike daughter of William Pike Sr. and Nelly Harvey[3] was born in 1809[50]. She died on Unknown.

William Jackson and Lucy Pike were married on 12 Aug 1837[3]. They had no children.

13.

Amer Jackson-3 (Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[12] was born on 09 Jun 1769 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[12]. He died in Aug 1843 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12].

Notes for Amer Jackson:

General Notes:

 

 

When Stokes County was formed from Surry Co., property of Amer Jackson lay in the new county of Stokes, near Westfield, North Carolina . His will was probated Sep 1843 in Stokes, North Carolina - Book 7, page 259.

 

Amer named fifteen children in his will.

 

"The Last Will and Testament of Amer Jackson"

 

In the name of God,Amen

 

I, Amer Jackson of the County of Stokes and State ofNorth Carolina being of sound mind and Memory but considering the uncertainty of earthly existence do make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First: That my executor hereinafter named shall provide for my body a decent burial suitable to the wishes of my friends and relatives; pay all my funeral expenses together with my just debts howsoever and whosoever owing out of the moneys that may first come into his hands as a part of parcel of my estate.

 

I give and devise to my wife, Elizabeth all the tract of land on which I now live during her natural life or widowhood also six head of cattle of her choice, two head of horses, one named Mack, now seven years old, the other a colt now one year old, which colt I devise to my son Allison after he become full twenty-one years old.

 

I also bequeath to my beloved wife one yoke of steer, ten heads of hogs of her choice, all my household furniture to have and to hold said property and dispose of the same as she think proper (the above named colt excepted)

 

I bequeath to my son Reid, one tract of land lying in the County of Surry called the Burch tract containing one hundred and sixty acres be the same more or less, joining the lands that he now lives on together with the sum of ten dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Iredell, one dollar.

 

I bequeath to my son John one tract of land lying in the county of Surry on which he now lives to be laid out by meters and bounds on the west end of said tract of land beginning at a spring near the race tract running north and south as far as said tract of land extends and containing the number of acres west of said line.

 

I bequeath to my son William one dollar.

 

I bequeath to my son Armstead five dollars

 

I bequeath to my daughter Luckey Susan, wife of James Gordon one hundred dollars.

 

I bequeath to my daughter, Lockey, wife of Aaron Tilley, fifty dollars.

 

I bequeath to my daughter, Louisa, wife of Allen Hicklin, fifty dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Allison my Beasly tract of land lying in this county on the Meadow Branch together with the lot I bought of Whitlock, joining thereon my Vought tract of fifty acres not joining thereto. Also the sum of one hundred dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Samuel, the tract of land on which I now live, after the death of my wife or at the expiration of her widowhood, consisting of some three or four different tracts of land all joining.

 

I bequeath to my son, Jacob, my mill tract of land lying in the county of Surry together with the mill and improvements belonging thereto, to be kept in repair by my executor out of any money, that may come into his hands belonging to my estate and the profits thereof to go to use of my wife and youngest children until my said son, Jacob, arrives to the age of twenty-one years.

 

I bequeath to my youngest son, Jacob, the east end of the tract of land lying in the county of Surry off of which my son, John, is to have his land containing all the tract of the line to be run laying of my son, John's tract.

 

I bequeath to my loving wife all the grain and provisions that may be on the tract of land on which I now live at my death. Also the profits of all the land bequeathed to my children yet under age of twenty-one until they arrive at the age of twenty-one to have and dispose of as she may think proper.

 

My will and desire is that all the residue of my estate shall be sold and the debts owing to me all collected and if there should be any surplus over and above the payment of debts, expenses and legacies, that said surplus shall be equally divided between my four daughters, Leathy Ann, City (Kitty), Mary and Camilla, share and share alike. (Catherine's nickname was City or Kitty)

 

And Lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my trusty friend and son in law James Gordon my lawful executor to all intents and purposes to execute this my last will and testament according to the true intent and meaning of the same, hereby revoking and declaring utterly void all other wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

 

In witness hereof I, the said Amer Jackson, do hereunto set my hand and seal this 15th day of April A>D> 1843 - (signed by Amer Jackson - witnessed by E. W. Carson and Reuben Vaughn)

.............................................................................................

Following research came from Russ Stewart of Stonington, Connecticut - he is one of those family researchers interested in preserving our history correctly. I appreciate his input on Amer's family and have subscribed to it:

 

In both 1820 and 1830, it is uncertain as to who the mother was, of sons of Amer, allegedly born those years. In the first instance it is the supposed y.o.b. of John Henry, who appears to have been born ¡°between wives¡± so to speak.

 

Violet is not on the 1820 Census and had not given birth to a child for 11 years at the time J.H. was born. Censuses, (1850 & 1870) gave ages for Allisons birth several years later than those appearing in web gen postings of the family, placing it well after (2 or 3 years) the marriage of Amer & Eliz. Watson, and encouraging the belief that John Henry's y.o.b. was also probably a few years later than the 1820 commonly given, and that it most likely falls in this two year gap after the marriage and before Allison's birth.

 

The 1850,1870 & 1880 censuses varyingly report his age as 28, 50, & 59 respectively; none stretching so far as the almost 4 years necessary to place his birth later than the Amer & Eliz. marriage (Nov 1823). On the 1870 Census, John Henry is in Mt. Airy. On the same census page, farming and heading heir own households are Dalton Forkner and Samuel Forkner. I have made no attempt to discover if these are cousins, and kin of Violet.

 

Three of Amer' four (known) sons by Violet left the state. Only William remained in North Carolina.

 

I do not believe that Elizabeth Watson was a widow. I believe her maiden name would have been given on Leatha' death certificate.

 

The last four of Amer¡¯s children, three daughters who would remain unmarried and Jacob, the last child, were all the progeny of the wife of Amer at the time he died.

 

*Other than that the births of Samuel and Leatha came,hard on the heels of one another, I know of nothing that suggests the death of any wife ca 1829-1830. Census ages for Amer's last wife are all over the map, so to speak .(¨40, 52 and 66 in !850 &1870 respectively

 

I am aware that at least several descendants of Jacob have been holding, on the strength of the families' oral history, that the last of Amer's children, had as mother, an Elizabeth Shippley, said to have come from Virginia. Though his widow 's bp was given as No. Carolina on the 1870 Census, - at which time she was head of house and had only her three unmarried daughters with her, to answer the census taker's question. No such surname as Ship(p)l(e)y appear on either the 1830 or 1830 North Carolina Federal Censuses.

 

*I am nevertheless myself listing Samuel, the 3 youngest and unmarried sisters, and Jacob as family of "Amer & unknown wife #3," taking advantage of the " Gen'l Notes for such 'wife' to explain that it is alleged to have been said Eliz. S. They may in fact be the younger children of Elizabeth Watson, but it was the difficulty in reconciling the ages given for Amer's wife in the 1850 - 1870 censuses with the 30 - 40 age category of is wife on the 1830 Census, that really induced me to "create" a third family.

 

There is an equally good chance that Samuel was the last child of Elizabeth Watson, who may even have died in childbirth. Since Samuel was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil Was (1861-'65) without issue.

 

It appears that all of Amer's children after his marriage to Elizabeth Watson remained close after his death, regardless of whether they shared the same mother. The Jacksons shared the same neighborhood, in Quaker Gap, Stokes Co., and at times, the same household, as Leatha's husband and in-laws, the Pierces.

1850: Samuel* & Allison* shared the same residence.

 

1860: Elizabeth Jackson 52 (occupation farmer[ lists value of her property]), Samuel,* her 4 youngest children (three unmarried daughters and last child, Jacob) are living with Presley Pierce, daughter Lethy's (var sps) bro- in-law; One of the 3 Pierce housholds listed on the census page (Iredell & Wm Pierce).

 

Next Pg.(Hsehlds): Jacob Pierce; George & Leathia (Jackson) Pierce + Susan ¨¡ 9; Allison* Jackson w. wife & 3 children.

 

Since Samuel was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil War (1861-'65) without issue.

 

1870: Elizabeth 66 is on this (now next door to Presley), & with the same 3 unmarried daughters who have been with her since Amer's death. These 3 are living together on the 1880 Census , but there is no Elizabeth suggesting that she expired between the 2 censuses.

Jacob Jackson & fam are next door to above.

Alison*[sic] Jackson fam is next door to above.

William Pierce 74, wife(?) 60 + 32 y.o. male & 29 y.o. fem

Iredell Pierce 50 & wife 49 next door to above

George Pierce 40 and Letha 37 (2 ¡°drs away¡¯) + Jacob Pierce & his wife & ¡°Wm. A¡± their son??

Presley Pierce 39 & wife Sarah

 

1880: George Pierce 55 & wife Leathy (Jackson) [var sp]

Presley Pierce 50 & wife and mother-in-law Jessup

Jacob Jackson 38 wife, 3 sis incl °Camily,¡± and 8 children incl one named Camily E

 

Neither Amer Jackson nor Alexander Watson show-up on the 1840 Census although both were alive (Amer¡¯s will and Alexander¡¯s estate in a court case in 1847 [see below]). This seems odd in Amer¡¯s case, because it seems that he would still be maintaining his own household with a wife and seven or eight minor children.

 

 

 

 

Page 34 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:26 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Amer Jackson:

General Notes:

 

 

When Stokes County was formed from Surry Co., property of Amer Jackson lay in the new county of Stokes, near Westfield, North Carolina . His will was probated Sep 1843 in Stokes, North Carolina - Book 7, page 259.

 

Amer named fifteen children in his will.

 

"The Last Will and Testament of Amer Jackson"

 

In the name of God,Amen

 

I, Amer Jackson of the County of Stokes and State ofNorth Carolina being of sound mind and Memory but considering the uncertainty of earthly existence do make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First: That my executor hereinafter named shall provide for my body a decent burial suitable to the wishes of my friends and relatives; pay all my funeral expenses together with my just debts howsoever and whosoever owing out of the moneys that may first come into his hands as a part of parcel of my estate.

 

I give and devise to my wife, Elizabeth all the tract of land on which I now live during her natural life or widowhood also six head of cattle of her choice, two head of horses, one named Mack, now seven years old, the other a colt now one year old, which colt I devise to my son Allison after he become full twenty-one years old.

 

I also bequeath to my beloved wife one yoke of steer, ten heads of hogs of her choice, all my household furniture to have and to hold said property and dispose of the same as she think proper (the above named colt excepted)

 

I bequeath to my son Reid, one tract of land lying in the County of Surry called the Burch tract containing one hundred and sixty acres be the same more or less, joining the lands that he now lives on together with the sum of ten dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Iredell, one dollar.

 

I bequeath to my son John one tract of land lying in the county of Surry on which he now lives to be laid out by meters and bounds on the west end of said tract of land beginning at a spring near the race tract running north and south as far as said tract of land extends and containing the number of acres west of said line.

 

I bequeath to my son William one dollar.

 

I bequeath to my son Armstead five dollars

 

I bequeath to my daughter Luckey Susan, wife of James Gordon one hundred dollars.

 

I bequeath to my daughter, Lockey, wife of Aaron Tilley, fifty dollars.

 

I bequeath to my daughter, Louisa, wife of Allen Hicklin, fifty dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Allison my Beasly tract of land lying in this county on the Meadow Branch together with the lot I bought of Whitlock, joining thereon my Vought tract of fifty acres not joining thereto. Also the sum of one hundred dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Samuel, the tract of land on which I now live, after the death of my wife or at the expiration of her widowhood, consisting of some three or four different tracts of land all joining.

 

I bequeath to my son, Jacob, my mill tract of land lying in the county of Surry together with the mill and improvements belonging thereto, to be kept in repair by my executor out of any money, that may come into his hands belonging to my estate and the profits thereof to go to use of my wife and youngest children until my said son, Jacob, arrives to the age of twenty-one years.

 

I bequeath to my youngest son, Jacob, the east end of the tract of land lying in the county of Surry off of which my son, John, is to have his land containing all the tract of the line to be run laying of my son, John's tract.

 

I bequeath to my loving wife all the grain and provisions that may be on the tract of land on which I now live at my death. Also the profits of all the land bequeathed to my children yet under age of twenty-one until they arrive at the age of twenty-one to have and dispose of as she may think proper.

 

My will and desire is that all the residue of my estate shall be sold and the debts owing to me all collected and if there should be any surplus over and above the payment of debts, expenses and legacies, that said surplus shall be equally divided between my four daughters, Leathy Ann, City (Kitty), Mary and Camilla, share and share alike. (Catherine's nickname was City or Kitty)

 

And Lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my trusty friend and son in law James Gordon my lawful executor to all intents and purposes to execute this my last will and testament according to the true intent and meaning of the same, hereby revoking and declaring utterly void all other wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

 

In witness hereof I, the said Amer Jackson, do hereunto set my hand and seal this 15th day of April A>D> 1843 - (signed by Amer Jackson - witnessed by E. W. Carson and Reuben Vaughn)

.............................................................................................

Following research came from Russ Stewart of Stonington, Connecticut - he is one of those family researchers interested in preserving our history correctly. I appreciate his input on Amer's family and have subscribed to it:

 

In both 1820 and 1830, it is uncertain as to who the mother was, of sons of Amer, allegedly born those years. In the first instance it is the supposed y.o.b. of John Henry, who appears to have been born ¡°between wives¡± so to speak.

 

Violet is not on the 1820 Census and had not given birth to a child for 11 years at the time J.H. was born. Censuses, (1850 & 1870) gave ages for Allisons birth several years later than those appearing in web gen postings of the family, placing it well after (2 or 3 years) the marriage of Amer & Eliz. Watson, and encouraging the belief that John Henry's y.o.b. was also probably a few years later than the 1820 commonly given, and that it most likely falls in this two year gap after the marriage and before Allison's birth.

 

The 1850,1870 & 1880 censuses varyingly report his age as 28, 50, & 59 respectively; none stretching so far as the almost 4 years necessary to place his birth later than the Amer & Eliz. marriage (Nov 1823). On the 1870 Census, John Henry is in Mt. Airy. On the same census page, farming and heading heir own households are Dalton Forkner and Samuel Forkner. I have made no attempt to discover if these are cousins, and kin of Violet.

 

Three of Amer' four (known) sons by Violet left the state. Only William remained in North Carolina.

 

I do not believe that Elizabeth Watson was a widow. I believe her maiden name would have been given on Leatha' death certificate.

 

The last four of Amer¡¯s children, three daughters who would remain unmarried and Jacob, the last child, were all the progeny of the wife of Amer at the time he died.

 

*Other than that the births of Samuel and Leatha came,hard on the heels of one another, I know of nothing that suggests the death of any wife ca 1829-1830. Census ages for Amer's last wife are all over the map, so to speak .(¨40, 52 and 66 in !850 &1870 respectively

 

I am aware that at least several descendants of Jacob have been holding, on the strength of the families' oral history, that the last of Amer's children, had as mother, an Elizabeth Shippley, said to have come from Virginia. Though his widow 's bp was given as No. Carolina on the 1870 Census, - at which time she was head of house and had only her three unmarried daughters with her, to answer the census taker's question. No such surname as Ship(p)l(e)y appear on either the 1830 or 1830 North Carolina Federal Censuses.

 

*I am nevertheless myself listing Samuel, the 3 youngest and unmarried sisters, and Jacob as family of "Amer & unknown wife #3," taking advantage of the " Gen'l Notes for such 'wife' to explain that it is alleged to have been said Eliz. S. They may in fact be the younger children of Elizabeth Watson, but it was the difficulty in reconciling the ages given for Amer's wife in the 1850 - 1870 censuses with the 30 - 40 age category of is wife on the 1830 Census, that really induced me to "create" a third family.

 

There is an equally good chance that Samuel was the last child of Elizabeth Watson, who may even have died in childbirth. Since Samuel was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil Was (1861-'65) without issue.

 

It appears that all of Amer's children after his marriage to Elizabeth Watson remained close after his death, regardless of whether they shared the same mother. The Jacksons shared the same neighborhood, in Quaker Gap, Stokes Co., and at times, the same household, as Leatha's husband and in-laws, the Pierces.

1850: Samuel* & Allison* shared the same residence.

 

1860: Elizabeth Jackson 52 (occupation farmer[ lists value of her property]), Samuel,* her 4 youngest children (three unmarried daughters and last child, Jacob) are living with Presley Pierce, daughter Lethy's (var sps) bro- in-law; One of the 3 Pierce housholds listed on the census page (Iredell & Wm Pierce).

 

Next Pg.(Hsehlds): Jacob Pierce; George & Leathia (Jackson) Pierce + Susan ¨¡ 9; Allison* Jackson w. wife & 3 children.

 

Since Samuel was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil War (1861-'65) without issue.

 

1870: Elizabeth 66 is on this (now next door to Presley), & with the same 3 unmarried daughters who have been with her since Amer's death. These 3 are living together on the 1880 Census , but there is no Elizabeth suggesting that she expired between the 2 censuses.

Jacob Jackson & fam are next door to above.

Alison*[sic] Jackson fam is next door to above.

William Pierce 74, wife(?) 60 + 32 y.o. male & 29 y.o. fem

Iredell Pierce 50 & wife 49 next door to above

George Pierce 40 and Letha 37 (2 ¡°drs away¡¯) + Jacob Pierce & his wife & ¡°Wm. A¡± their son??

Presley Pierce 39 & wife Sarah

 

1880: George Pierce 55 & wife Leathy (Jackson) [var sp]

Presley Pierce 50 & wife and mother-in-law Jessup

Jacob Jackson 38 wife, 3 sis incl °Camily,¡± and 8 children incl one named Camily E

 

Neither Amer Jackson nor Alexander Watson show-up on the 1840 Census although both were alive (Amer¡¯s will and Alexander¡¯s estate in a court case in 1847 [see below]). This seems odd in Amer¡¯s case, because it seems that he would still be maintaining his own household with a wife and seven or eight minor children.

 

 

 

 

Page 35 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:26 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Amer Jackson:

General Notes:

 

 

When Stokes County was formed from Surry Co., property of Amer Jackson lay in the new county of Stokes, near Westfield, North Carolina . His will was probated Sep 1843 in Stokes, North Carolina - Book 7, page 259.

 

Amer named fifteen children in his will.

 

"The Last Will and Testament of Amer Jackson"

 

In the name of God,Amen

 

I, Amer Jackson of the County of Stokes and State ofNorth Carolina being of sound mind and Memory but considering the uncertainty of earthly existence do make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First: That my executor hereinafter named shall provide for my body a decent burial suitable to the wishes of my friends and relatives; pay all my funeral expenses together with my just debts howsoever and whosoever owing out of the moneys that may first come into his hands as a part of parcel of my estate.

 

I give and devise to my wife, Elizabeth all the tract of land on which I now live during her natural life or widowhood also six head of cattle of her choice, two head of horses, one named Mack, now seven years old, the other a colt now one year old, which colt I devise to my son Allison after he become full twenty-one years old.

 

I also bequeath to my beloved wife one yoke of steer, ten heads of hogs of her choice, all my household furniture to have and to hold said property and dispose of the same as she think proper (the above named colt excepted)

 

I bequeath to my son Reid, one tract of land lying in the County of Surry called the Burch tract containing one hundred and sixty acres be the same more or less, joining the lands that he now lives on together with the sum of ten dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Iredell, one dollar.

 

I bequeath to my son John one tract of land lying in the county of Surry on which he now lives to be laid out by meters and bounds on the west end of said tract of land beginning at a spring near the race tract running north and south as far as said tract of land extends and containing the number of acres west of said line.

 

I bequeath to my son William one dollar.

 

I bequeath to my son Armstead five dollars

 

I bequeath to my daughter Luckey Susan, wife of James Gordon one hundred dollars.

 

I bequeath to my daughter, Lockey, wife of Aaron Tilley, fifty dollars.

 

I bequeath to my daughter, Louisa, wife of Allen Hicklin, fifty dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Allison my Beasly tract of land lying in this county on the Meadow Branch together with the lot I bought of Whitlock, joining thereon my Vought tract of fifty acres not joining thereto. Also the sum of one hundred dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Samuel, the tract of land on which I now live, after the death of my wife or at the expiration of her widowhood, consisting of some three or four different tracts of land all joining.

 

I bequeath to my son, Jacob, my mill tract of land lying in the county of Surry together with the mill and improvements belonging thereto, to be kept in repair by my executor out of any money, that may come into his hands belonging to my estate and the profits thereof to go to use of my wife and youngest children until my said son, Jacob, arrives to the age of twenty-one years.

 

I bequeath to my youngest son, Jacob, the east end of the tract of land lying in the county of Surry off of which my son, John, is to have his land containing all the tract of the line to be run laying of my son, John's tract.

 

I bequeath to my loving wife all the grain and provisions that may be on the tract of land on which I now live at my death. Also the profits of all the land bequeathed to my children yet under age of twenty-one until they arrive at the age of twenty-one to have and dispose of as she may think proper.

 

My will and desire is that all the residue of my estate shall be sold and the debts owing to me all collected and if there should be any surplus over and above the payment of debts, expenses and legacies, that said surplus shall be equally divided between my four daughters, Leathy Ann, City (Kitty), Mary and Camilla, share and share alike. (Catherine's nickname was City or Kitty)

 

And Lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my trusty friend and son in law James Gordon my lawful executor to all intents and purposes to execute this my last will and testament according to the true intent and meaning of the same, hereby revoking and declaring utterly void all other wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

 

In witness hereof I, the said Amer Jackson, do hereunto set my hand and seal this 15th day of April A>D> 1843 - (signed by Amer Jackson - witnessed by E. W. Carson and Reuben Vaughn)

.............................................................................................

Following research came from Russ Stewart of Stonington, Connecticut - he is one of those family researchers interested in preserving our history correctly. I appreciate his input on Amer's family and have subscribed to it:

 

In both 1820 and 1830, it is uncertain as to who the mother was, of sons of Amer, allegedly born those years. In the first instance it is the supposed y.o.b. of John Henry, who appears to have been born ¡°between wives¡± so to speak.

 

Violet is not on the 1820 Census and had not given birth to a child for 11 years at the time J.H. was born. Censuses, (1850 & 1870) gave ages for Allisons birth several years later than those appearing in web gen postings of the family, placing it well after (2 or 3 years) the marriage of Amer & Eliz. Watson, and encouraging the belief that John Henry's y.o.b. was also probably a few years later than the 1820 commonly given, and that it most likely falls in this two year gap after the marriage and before Allison's birth.

 

The 1850,1870 & 1880 censuses varyingly report his age as 28, 50, & 59 respectively; none stretching so far as the almost 4 years necessary to place his birth later than the Amer & Eliz. marriage (Nov 1823). On the 1870 Census, John Henry is in Mt. Airy. On the same census page, farming and heading heir own households are Dalton Forkner and Samuel Forkner. I have made no attempt to discover if these are cousins, and kin of Violet.

 

Three of Amer' four (known) sons by Violet left the state. Only William remained in North Carolina.

 

I do not believe that Elizabeth Watson was a widow. I believe her maiden name would have been given on Leatha' death certificate.

 

The last four of Amer¡¯s children, three daughters who would remain unmarried and Jacob, the last child, were all the progeny of the wife of Amer at the time he died.

 

*Other than that the births of Samuel and Leatha came,hard on the heels of one another, I know of nothing that suggests the death of any wife ca 1829-1830. Census ages for Amer's last wife are all over the map, so to speak .(¨40, 52 and 66 in !850 &1870 respectively

 

I am aware that at least several descendants of Jacob have been holding, on the strength of the families' oral history, that the last of Amer's children, had as mother, an Elizabeth Shippley, said to have come from Virginia. Though his widow 's bp was given as No. Carolina on the 1870 Census, - at which time she was head of house and had only her three unmarried daughters with her, to answer the census taker's question. No such surname as Ship(p)l(e)y appear on either the 1830 or 1830 North Carolina Federal Censuses.

 

*I am nevertheless myself listing Samuel, the 3 youngest and unmarried sisters, and Jacob as family of "Amer & unknown wife #3," taking advantage of the " Gen'l Notes for such 'wife' to explain that it is alleged to have been said Eliz. S. They may in fact be the younger children of Elizabeth Watson, but it was the difficulty in reconciling the ages given for Amer's wife in the 1850 - 1870 censuses with the 30 - 40 age category of is wife on the 1830 Census, that really induced me to "create" a third family.

 

There is an equally good chance that Samuel was the last child of Elizabeth Watson, who may even have died in childbirth. Since Samuel was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil Was (1861-'65) without issue.

 

It appears that all of Amer's children after his marriage to Elizabeth Watson remained close after his death, regardless of whether they shared the same mother. The Jacksons shared the same neighborhood, in Quaker Gap, Stokes Co., and at times, the same household, as Leatha's husband and in-laws, the Pierces.

1850: Samuel* & Allison* shared the same residence.

 

1860: Elizabeth Jackson 52 (occupation farmer[ lists value of her property]), Samuel,* her 4 youngest children (three unmarried daughters and last child, Jacob) are living with Presley Pierce, daughter Lethy's (var sps) bro- in-law; One of the 3 Pierce housholds listed on the census page (Iredell & Wm Pierce).

 

Next Pg.(Hsehlds): Jacob Pierce; George & Leathia (Jackson) Pierce + Susan ¨¡ 9; Allison* Jackson w. wife & 3 children.

 

Since Samuel was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil War (1861-'65) without issue.

 

1870: Elizabeth 66 is on this (now next door to Presley), & with the same 3 unmarried daughters who have been with her since Amer's death. These 3 are living together on the 1880 Census , but there is no Elizabeth suggesting that she expired between the 2 censuses.

Jacob Jackson & fam are next door to above.

Alison*[sic] Jackson fam is next door to above.

William Pierce 74, wife(?) 60 + 32 y.o. male & 29 y.o. fem

Iredell Pierce 50 & wife 49 next door to above

George Pierce 40 and Letha 37 (2 ¡°drs away¡¯) + Jacob Pierce & his wife & ¡°Wm. A¡± their son??

Presley Pierce 39 & wife Sarah

 

1880: George Pierce 55 & wife Leathy (Jackson) [var sp]

Presley Pierce 50 & wife and mother-in-law Jessup

Jacob Jackson 38 wife, 3 sis incl °Camily,¡± and 8 children incl one named Camily E

 

Neither Amer Jackson nor Alexander Watson show-up on the 1840 Census although both were alive (Amer¡¯s will and Alexander¡¯s estate in a court case in 1847 [see below]). This seems odd in Amer¡¯s case, because it seems that he would still be maintaining his own household with a wife and seven or eight minor children.

 

 

 

 

Page 36 of 199 Sunday, March 21, 2010 2:11:26 PM
Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Amer Jackson:

General Notes:

 

 

When Stokes County was formed from Surry Co., property of Amer Jackson lay in the new county of Stokes, near Westfield, North Carolina . His will was probated Sep 1843 in Stokes, North Carolina - Book 7, page 259.

 

Amer named fifteen children in his will.

 

"The Last Will and Testament of Amer Jackson"

 

In the name of God,Amen

 

I, Amer Jackson of the County of Stokes and State ofNorth Carolina being of sound mind and Memory but considering the uncertainty of earthly existence do make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

 

First: That my executor hereinafter named shall provide for my body a decent burial suitable to the wishes of my friends and relatives; pay all my funeral expenses together with my just debts howsoever and whosoever owing out of the moneys that may first come into his hands as a part of parcel of my estate.

 

I give and devise to my wife, Elizabeth all the tract of land on which I now live during her natural life or widowhood also six head of cattle of her choice, two head of horses, one named Mack, now seven years old, the other a colt now one year old, which colt I devise to my son Allison after he become full twenty-one years old.

 

I also bequeath to my beloved wife one yoke of steer, ten heads of hogs of her choice, all my household furniture to have and to hold said property and dispose of the same as she think proper (the above named colt excepted)

 

I bequeath to my son Reid, one tract of land lying in the County of Surry called the Burch tract containing one hundred and sixty acres be the same more or less, joining the lands that he now lives on together with the sum of ten dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Iredell, one dollar.

 

I bequeath to my son John one tract of land lying in the county of Surry on which he now lives to be laid out by meters and bounds on the west end of said tract of land beginning at a spring near the race tract running north and south as far as said tract of land extends and containing the number of acres west of said line.

 

I bequeath to my son William one dollar.

 

I bequeath to my son Armstead five dollars

 

I bequeath to my daughter Luckey Susan, wife of James Gordon one hundred dollars.

 

I bequeath to my daughter, Lockey, wife of Aaron Tilley, fifty dollars.

 

I bequeath to my daughter, Louisa, wife of Allen Hicklin, fifty dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Allison my Beasly tract of land lying in this county on the Meadow Branch together with the lot I bought of Whitlock, joining thereon my Vought tract of fifty acres not joining thereto. Also the sum of one hundred dollars.

 

I bequeath to my son, Samuel, the tract of land on which I now live, after the death of my wife or at the expiration of her widowhood, consisting of some three or four different tracts of land all joining.

 

I bequeath to my son, Jacob, my mill tract of land lying in the county of Surry together with the mill and improvements belonging thereto, to be kept in repair by my executor out of any money, that may come into his hands belonging to my estate and the profits thereof to go to use of my wife and youngest children until my said son, Jacob, arrives to the age of twenty-one years.

 

I bequeath to my youngest son, Jacob, the east end of the tract of land lying in the county of Surry off of which my son, John, is to have his land containing all the tract of the line to be run laying of my son, John's tract.

 

I bequeath to my loving wife all the grain and provisions that may be on the tract of land on which I now live at my death. Also the profits of all the land bequeathed to my children yet under age of twenty-one until they arrive at the age of twenty-one to have and dispose of as she may think proper.

 

My will and desire is that all the residue of my estate shall be sold and the debts owing to me all collected and if there should be any surplus over and above the payment of debts, expenses and legacies, that said surplus shall be equally divided between my four daughters, Leathy Ann, City (Kitty), Mary and Camilla, share and share alike. (Catherine's nickname was City or Kitty)

 

And Lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my trusty friend and son in law James Gordon my lawful executor to all intents and purposes to execute this my last will and testament according to the true intent and meaning of the same, hereby revoking and declaring utterly void all other wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

 

In witness hereof I, the said Amer Jackson, do hereunto set my hand and seal this 15th day of April A>D> 1843 - (signed by Amer Jackson - witnessed by E. W. Carson and Reuben Vaughn)

.............................................................................................

Following research came from Russ Stewart of Stonington, Connecticut - he is one of those family researchers interested in preserving our history correctly. I appreciate his input on Amer's family and have subscribed to it:

 

In both 1820 and 1830, it is uncertain as to who the mother was, of sons of Amer, allegedly born those years. In the first instance it is the supposed y.o.b. of John Henry, who appears to have been born ¡°between wives¡± so to speak.

 

Violet is not on the 1820 Census and had not given birth to a child for 11 years at the time J.H. was born. Censuses, (1850 & 1870) gave ages for Allisons birth several years later than those appearing in web gen postings of the family, placing it well after (2 or 3 years) the marriage of Amer & Eliz. Watson, and encouraging the belief that John Henry's y.o.b. was also probably a few years later than the 1820 commonly given, and that it most likely falls in this two year gap after the marriage and before Allison's birth.

 

The 1850,1870 & 1880 censuses varyingly report his age as 28, 50, & 59 respectively; none stretching so far as the almost 4 years necessary to place his birth later than the Amer & Eliz. marriage (Nov 1823). On the 1870 Census, John Henry is in Mt. Airy. On the same census page, farming and heading heir own households are Dalton Forkner and Samuel Forkner. I have made no attempt to discover if these are cousins, and kin of Violet.

 

Three of Amer' four (known) sons by Violet left the state. Only William remained in North Carolina.

 

I do not believe that Elizabeth Watson was a widow. I believe her maiden name would have been given on Leatha' death certificate.

 

The last four of Amer¡¯s children, three daughters who would remain unmarried and Jacob, the last child, were all the progeny of the wife of Amer at the time he died.

 

*Other than that the births of Samuel and Leatha came,hard on the heels of one another, I know of nothing that suggests the death of any wife ca 1829-1830. Census ages for Amer's last wife are all over the map, so to speak .(¨40, 52 and 66 in !850 &1870 respectively

 

I am aware that at least several descendants of Jacob have been holding, on the strength of the families' oral history, that the last of Amer's children, had as mother, an Elizabeth Shippley, said to have come from Virginia. Though his widow 's bp was given as No. Carolina on the 1870 Census, - at which time she was head of house and had only her three unmarried daughters with her, to answer the census taker's question. No such surname as Ship(p)l(e)y appear on either the 1830 or 1830 North Carolina Federal Censuses.

 

*I am nevertheless myself listing Samuel, the 3 youngest and unmarried sisters, and Jacob as family of "Amer & unknown wife #3," taking advantage of the " Gen'l Notes for such 'wife' to explain that it is alleged to have been said Eliz. S. They may in fact be the younger children of Elizabeth Watson, but it was the difficulty in reconciling the ages given for Amer's wife in the 1850 - 1870 censuses with the 30 - 40 age category of is wife on the 1830 Census, that really induced me to "create" a third family.

 

There is an equally good chance that Samuel was the last child of Elizabeth Watson, who may even have died in childbirth. Since Samuel was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil Was (1861-'65) without issue.

 

It appears that all of Amer's children after his marriage to Elizabeth Watson remained close after his death, regardless of whether they shared the same mother. The Jacksons shared the same neighborhood, in Quaker Gap, Stokes Co., and at times, the same household, as Leatha's husband and in-laws, the Pierces.

1850: Samuel* & Allison* shared the same residence.

 

1860: Elizabeth Jackson 52 (occupation farmer[ lists value of her property]), Samuel,* her 4 youngest children (three unmarried daughters and last child, Jacob) are living with Presley Pierce, daughter Lethy's (var sps) bro- in-law; One of the 3 Pierce housholds listed on the census page (Iredell & Wm Pierce).

 

Next Pg.(Hsehlds): Jacob Pierce; George & Leathia (Jackson) Pierce + Susan ¨¡ 9; Allison* Jackson w. wife & 3 children.

 

Since Samuel was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil War (1861-'65) without issue.

 

1870: Elizabeth 66 is on this (now next door to Presley), & with the same 3 unmarried daughters who have been with her since Amer's death. These 3 are living together on the 1880 Census , but there is no Elizabeth suggesting that she expired between the 2 censuses.

Jacob Jackson & fam are next door to above.

Alison*[sic] Jackson fam is next door to above.

William Pierce 74, wife(?) 60 + 32 y.o. male & 29 y.o. fem

Iredell Pierce 50 & wife 49 next door to above

George Pierce 40 and Letha 37 (2 ¡°drs away¡¯) + Jacob Pierce & his wife & ¡°Wm. A¡± their son??

Presley Pierce 39 & wife Sarah

 

1880: George Pierce 55 & wife Leathy (Jackson) [var sp]

Presley Pierce 50 & wife and mother-in-law Jessup

Jacob Jackson 38 wife, 3 sis incl °Camily,¡± and 8 children incl one named Camily E

 

Neither Amer Jackson nor Alexander Watson show-up on the 1840 Census although both were alive (Amer¡¯s will and Alexander¡¯s estate in a court case in 1847 [see below]). This seems odd in Amer¡¯s case, because it seems that he would still be maintaining his own household with a wife and seven or eight minor children.

 

 

 

 

Violet Forkner daughter of William Joseph Forkner II and Susanna Wells[12] was born in 1785 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[51]. She died on Unknown in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[51].

Amer Jackson and Violet Forkner were married about 1797[13]. They had the following children:

82. i.

Susanna Jackson[12] was born in 1798 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. She married James Gordon on 16 Sep 1824 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. She died after 1843[52].

83. ii.

Ruel Jackson[12] was born in 1800 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. He married Susanna Whitlock on 31 Jan 1826 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. He died on 23 Sep 1863 in Preston, Hickory, Missouri, USA[53].

84. iii.

Iredell Jackson[12] was born in 1803 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. He married Elizabeth Whitlock on 30 May 1831 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. He died in 1861 in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, USA[52].

85. iv.

William Jackson[12] was born in 1804 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. He married Elizabeth Herrin Celia Gordon on 13 Dec 1834 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. He died about 1874[12].

86. v.

Armistead Jackson[12] was born in 1805 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. He married Phoebe Pope on 10 May 1829 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[41]. He died on 01 Sep 1869 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[41].

vi.

Louisa Eliza Jackson[12] was born in 1807 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. She married Allen Hickland on 23 Jun 1835 in Morgan, Indiana, USA[41]. She died on 23 May 1888[52].

Notes for Louisa Eliza Jackson:

General Notes:

Louisa was left $50.00 in her father's will.

 

 

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Notes for Louisa Eliza Jackson:

General Notes:

Louisa was left $50.00 in her father's will.

 

 

87. vii.

Lockey Jackson[12] was born on 13 Apr 1809 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. She married Aaron Burr Tilley Sr. on 29 Aug 1829 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. She died on 23 May 1888 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[54].

Elizabeth Watson or Shippley daughter of Alexander Watson and Spouse Unknown[12] was born about 1810[55]. She died after 1870[56].

Notes for Elizabeth Watson or Shippley:

General Notes:

1860 Stokes Co.,North Carolina Federal Census shows Elizabeth Watson or Shippley Jackson and five of her children living with Presley and Sarah Pierce.

 

1870 Federal Census of Stokes Co.,North Carolina shows Elizabeth Shippley Jackson as head of household:

 

Elizabeth Jackson 66fw keeping house $900/225 North Carolina can't read/write

Catharine 36fw at home North Carolina can't read/write

Mary 34fw at home North Carolina

Camaline 31fw at home North Carolina

 

There is a debate over whether Elizabeth's name was Shippley or Watson and/or if Amer could have been married three times (based on age spacing of children)

 

Research on this issue below came from Russ Stewart and Sandra Turney

 

This is a little more comprehensive picture of what the censuses have to shed on the question of Amer¡¯s widow¡¯s p.o.b.

 

1850: Allison 25*& Samuel 20* share the same residence.

2 enrties further: Iredell Pearce, wife & 2 children next pg: ¡é

Elizabeth ¨¡ 40, b. N.C. (Head of hse), 3 unmarried dau.s & Jacob Census aug 14 or 16 Presely son of next hse: Wm Pearce [sic],wife & 3 child incl Presley¨¡ 20

next hse: George Pearce (son of Wm), & wife Lethy [sic]

 

1860: Elizabeth Jackson 52 (occupation farmer[? lists value of her pty]), Samuel,* her 4 youngest children (three unmarried daughters and last child, Jacob) are living with Presley Pierce, daughter Lethy's (var sps) bro-in-law in one of the 3 Pierce housholds listed on the census page (Iredell & Wm Pierce).

 

P.o.b.s are listed only if not N.C. Elizabeth's is blank.

 

Next Pg.(Hsehlds): Jacob Pierce; George & Leathia (Jackson) Pierce + Susan ¨¡ 9; Allison* Jackson w. wife & 3 children. Since Sam'l*was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil War (1861-'65) without issue.

 

1870: Elizabeth ¨¡ 66, b. N.C. Head of house, & with the same 3 unmarried daughters with her since Amer's death. These 3 are living together on the 1880 Census , but there is no Elizabeth, on the 1880, suggesting that she expired between the 2 censuses.

 

next hse: Jacob Jackson & fam

next hse: Alison*[sic] Jackson fam is next door to above.

next pg Wm Pierce 74, wife(?) 60 + 32 y.o. male & 29 y.o. fem

next hse: Iredell Pierce 50 & wife 49 next door to above 2 doors away: George Pierce 40 and Letha 37 + Jacob Pierce & his wife & ¡°Wm. A¡± their son??

next hse: Presley Pierce 39 & wife Sarah

 

1880: George Pierce 55 & wife L. Ann 51[sic] [Leathy (Jackson) var sp]

Presley Pierce 50 (sp Prestly) & wife and mother-in-law Jessup

Jacob Jackson 38 wife, 3 sis incl ¡°Camily,¡± and 8 children incl one named Camily E

 

His wife Emily¡¯s parent b. Va.; bp for Jacob¡¯s mother given as ¡°(N.C.)¡± the only person on pg. whose bp is bracketed, which I would take to signify uncertainty or disagreement. (See Camilla in 1910 Census).

 

F.H(?) Pierce 35 w wife and 4 children under 10 mother Lucy.

 

A Jackson 48 w two children 15 & 7 (no wife)

I believe there¡¯s a good chance that it was Jacob¡¯s mother-in-law, not his mother who came from Va. 1900: Katherine (Kitty) b. Sept 1835 1900 Census Gives mother¡¯s p.o.b. as Virginia Mary b. Aug 1837

 

Camilla (hse head) b. Aug 1841 ¡ç May have been source of ¡°Va given as mother¡¯s p.o.b. See 1910 with Camily deceased.1910: Cathor [sic] (Kitty) b. Sept 1835 1910 Census gives mother¡¯s p.o.b. as No. Carolina

 

Mary b. Aug 1837

next hse: Leathie Pearce [sic] widow ¨¡ 81 (sister or half-sister) See in above censuses.

 

Russ received following email from Sandra Turney re oral history as to name and origin of Amer¡¯s widow. 3/19/2010 The information in Lena's [her mother-in-law] booklet was written over 50 years ago. I saw it soon after we were married in 1960 and it had been written many years before that date. I would guess her dad gave her the information in the late 30's or 40's. At the time, Elizabeth's first name was not recorded.[emph added] The notes simply state that Amer Jackson had gone back to Virginia to get his new wife - a Shippley. Her first name was not stated, and there were no other siblings of Jacob Jackson, Sr. listed other than Leatha, Mary, Camilla (Camily, Cam), and Catherine (Kat). There was no mention of Samuel or any other brothers.¡± ¡°Leathia¡± was 81 & living next to Catherine and Mary in the 1910 Census The above leads one to wonder if the 1st name of Shippley (if there ever was one) was picked up off of one ot he 1850-1870 Censuses. If so, it detracts from, rather than supports, the information that Shippley was a third wife, since it increases the likelihood that the Elizbeth is Elizabeth Watson.

 

 

 

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Notes for Elizabeth Watson or Shippley:

General Notes:

1860 Stokes Co.,North Carolina Federal Census shows Elizabeth Watson or Shippley Jackson and five of her children living with Presley and Sarah Pierce.

 

1870 Federal Census of Stokes Co.,North Carolina shows Elizabeth Shippley Jackson as head of household:

 

Elizabeth Jackson 66fw keeping house $900/225 North Carolina can't read/write

Catharine 36fw at home North Carolina can't read/write

Mary 34fw at home North Carolina

Camaline 31fw at home North Carolina

 

There is a debate over whether Elizabeth's name was Shippley or Watson and/or if Amer could have been married three times (based on age spacing of children)

 

Research on this issue below came from Russ Stewart and Sandra Turney

 

This is a little more comprehensive picture of what the censuses have to shed on the question of Amer¡¯s widow¡¯s p.o.b.

 

1850: Allison 25*& Samuel 20* share the same residence.

2 enrties further: Iredell Pearce, wife & 2 children next pg: ¡é

Elizabeth ¨¡ 40, b. N.C. (Head of hse), 3 unmarried dau.s & Jacob Census aug 14 or 16 Presely son of next hse: Wm Pearce [sic],wife & 3 child incl Presley¨¡ 20

next hse: George Pearce (son of Wm), & wife Lethy [sic]

 

1860: Elizabeth Jackson 52 (occupation farmer[? lists value of her pty]), Samuel,* her 4 youngest children (three unmarried daughters and last child, Jacob) are living with Presley Pierce, daughter Lethy's (var sps) bro-in-law in one of the 3 Pierce housholds listed on the census page (Iredell & Wm Pierce).

 

P.o.b.s are listed only if not N.C. Elizabeth's is blank.

 

Next Pg.(Hsehlds): Jacob Pierce; George & Leathia (Jackson) Pierce + Susan ¨¡ 9; Allison* Jackson w. wife & 3 children. Since Sam'l*was apparently unmarried in 1860, and this is the last on which he seems to be listed, there is a good chance he died in the Civil War (1861-'65) without issue.

 

1870: Elizabeth ¨¡ 66, b. N.C. Head of house, & with the same 3 unmarried daughters with her since Amer's death. These 3 are living together on the 1880 Census , but there is no Elizabeth, on the 1880, suggesting that she expired between the 2 censuses.

 

next hse: Jacob Jackson & fam

next hse: Alison*[sic] Jackson fam is next door to above.

next pg Wm Pierce 74, wife(?) 60 + 32 y.o. male & 29 y.o. fem

next hse: Iredell Pierce 50 & wife 49 next door to above 2 doors away: George Pierce 40 and Letha 37 + Jacob Pierce & his wife & ¡°Wm. A¡± their son??

next hse: Presley Pierce 39 & wife Sarah

 

1880: George Pierce 55 & wife L. Ann 51[sic] [Leathy (Jackson) var sp]

Presley Pierce 50 (sp Prestly) & wife and mother-in-law Jessup

Jacob Jackson 38 wife, 3 sis incl ¡°Camily,¡± and 8 children incl one named Camily E

 

His wife Emily¡¯s parent b. Va.; bp for Jacob¡¯s mother given as ¡°(N.C.)¡± the only person on pg. whose bp is bracketed, which I would take to signify uncertainty or disagreement. (See Camilla in 1910 Census).

 

F.H(?) Pierce 35 w wife and 4 children under 10 mother Lucy.

 

A Jackson 48 w two children 15 & 7 (no wife)

I believe there¡¯s a good chance that it was Jacob¡¯s mother-in-law, not his mother who came from Va. 1900: Katherine (Kitty) b. Sept 1835 1900 Census Gives mother¡¯s p.o.b. as Virginia Mary b. Aug 1837

 

Camilla (hse head) b. Aug 1841 ¡ç May have been source of ¡°Va given as mother¡¯s p.o.b. See 1910 with Camily deceased.1910: Cathor [sic] (Kitty) b. Sept 1835 1910 Census gives mother¡¯s p.o.b. as No. Carolina

 

Mary b. Aug 1837

next hse: Leathie Pearce [sic] widow ¨¡ 81 (sister or half-sister) See in above censuses.

 

Russ received following email from Sandra Turney re oral history as to name and origin of Amer¡¯s widow. 3/19/2010 The information in Lena's [her mother-in-law] booklet was written over 50 years ago. I saw it soon after we were married in 1960 and it had been written many years before that date. I would guess her dad gave her the information in the late 30's or 40's. At the time, Elizabeth's first name was not recorded.[emph added] The notes simply state that Amer Jackson had gone back to Virginia to get his new wife - a Shippley. Her first name was not stated, and there were no other siblings of Jacob Jackson, Sr. listed other than Leatha, Mary, Camilla (Camily, Cam), and Catherine (Kat). There was no mention of Samuel or any other brothers.¡± ¡°Leathia¡± was 81 & living next to Catherine and Mary in the 1910 Census The above leads one to wonder if the 1st name of Shippley (if there ever was one) was picked up off of one ot he 1850-1870 Censuses. If so, it detracts from, rather than supports, the information that Shippley was a third wife, since it increases the likelihood that the Elizbeth is Elizabeth Watson.

 

 

 

Amer Jackson and Elizabeth Watson or Shippley were married on 06 Nov 1823 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[57]. They had the following children:

88. i.

John Henry Jackson[12] was born in 1820 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA. He married Eliza Hollingsworth on 30 Oct 1849 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. He died on 09 Sep 1886 in Mount Airy, Surry, North Carolina, USA[12].

89. ii.

Allison Jackson[12] was born about 1822 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[58]. He married Sarah Thrower on 19 Dec 1853 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. He died on Unknown.

iii.

Samuel Jackson[57] was born about 1829 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. He died on Unknown.

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Notes for Samuel Jackson:

General Notes:

It is really not known if Samuel was son by his first wife or second. It is thought by many that his mother was Violette Forkner Jackson and that she probably died at his birth. Amer being left with a house full of small children probably married again quickly.

 

 

90. iv.

Leatha Ann Jackson[12] was born in 1831[12]. She died on Unknown. She married George Pierce on Unknown.

v.

Katherine Kitty Jackson[12] was born in 1833[12]. She died on Unknown.

Notes for Katherine Kitty Jackson:

General Notes:

Katherine (Kitty) Jackson never married. She and two sisters, Mary and Camilla, lived together. In 1900, Thompson Jackson, their nephew and son of their brother, Jacob, was living with them.

 

 

vi.

Mary Jackson[12] was born in 1835[12]. She died on Unknown.

Notes for Mary Jackson:

General Notes:

Mary Jackson never married

 

 

vii.

Camilla Jackson[12] was born in 1840[12]. She died on Unknown.

Notes for Camilla Jackson:

General Notes:

Camilla Jackson never married

 

 

91. viii.

Jacob Andrew Jackson[12] was born in 1842 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[12]. He married Emily Newman Rotenberry on 25 Dec 1861[41]. He died.

14.

Jacob Jessup-3 (Priscilla-2, Aaron-1)[5] was born on 20 Dec 1762 in Carteret or Perquimans, North Carolina USA[5, 14]. He died in 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

Notes for Jacob Jessup:

General Notes:

Jacob Jessup moved to Guilford and Surry Counties with his parents, and he was married sometime before 1787 to Sarah Lee. They were at one time residents of Mount Pleasant Monthly Meeting of Friends in Grayson Co., VA, but they came back to Westfield MM. His death is recorded on an old soapstone marker, which in 1941 was lying on the ground near the eastern edge of the cemetery of the Old Westfield Quaker Meeting. The Surry County records on settlement of estates also contains two records on Jacob Jessup. The first under File 906 shows where Sarah Jessup received her allowance in March 1815, one month after her husband's death, and the other is the final settlement in August 1820, by Levi Jessup, Jacob's son, who was administrator. This is in File 212-A in Surry Co., North Carolina .

 

 

Sarah Lee[5] was born on Unknown. She died on Unknown.

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Jacob Jessup and Sarah Lee were married in 1786 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. They had the following children:

i.

Jacob Jessup Jr.[5] was born on Unknown in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[16]. He died in Feb 1827 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[59].

ii.

Abner Jessup[5] was born on 27 Jan 1787 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[4]. He married Mary Jackson on 16 Aug 1809 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died in 1838 in Ohio, USA[5].

Notes for Abner Jessup:

General Notes:

Abneer Jessup was disowned for marrying out of unity.

 

Abner and Mary Jackson Jessup moved to OH sometime after their marriage, settling in Paint Twp., Highland Co., OH. Just a few years before their arrival, the place they chose to make their home was an unbroken wilderness, devoid of roads or trails, and through the broken and hill country, the new comers were obliged to cut a way for their teams and cattle. Their neighbors within a five mile area were Caleb Sumners, Seman Acers, George Housman, John Davis, Jesse George, Philip Spargus, Peter Weaver and Valentine Rhodes.

 

They moved to New Petersburg Twp. in 1825 where Abner opened a tavern northeast of town, near the Hulitt farm, in a building no long standing. "The History of Ross and Highland Counties, OH" records: "Many a gray-headed man of today smacks his lips at the recollection of Mrs. Jessup's pumpkin pies, which youthful appetite enabled him so fully to appreciate."

 

Before Abner died in 1838, he made his wife Mary and brother-in-law Absolom Sumners executors of his will. He willed all of his property to his brothers and sisters and their heirs. There was no mention of any children.

 

 

iii.

Priscilla Jessup[5] was born on 22 Mar 1788 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[59]. She died before 1814 in North Carolina, USA[14]. She married John Cook on Unknown.

Notes for Priscilla Jessup:

General Notes:

Priscilla Jessup Cook died early in her marriage, leaving one child.

 

 

92. iv.

Edith Jessup[5] was born on 02 Aug 1790 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She married John Cook on 18 Jun 1814 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[5]. She died after 1862 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[59].

93. v.

Levi L Jessup[5] was born on 17 May 1792 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Jemima Unthank on 26 Oct 1817 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[9]. He died on 13 Mar 1866 in Jefferson, Henry, Iowa, USA[59].

94. vi.

Anna Jessup[5] was born on 29 Jun 1793 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[60]. She married Joseph Chandler on 12 Jan 1813 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[59]. She died on 06 Jan 1833 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[60].

vii.

Mary Polly Jessup[5] was born on 10 Jul 1796 in Grayson, Virginia, USA[5]. She died on Unknown in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[5]. She married Thomas Lockhart on Unknown.

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viii.

Joseph Jessup[5] was born on 30 Jul 1798 in probably in Grayson, Virginia USA[61]. He died on Unknown.

95. ix.

John Jessup[5] was born on 28 Sep 1800 in Grayson, Virginia, USA[5]. He married Ruth Hadley on 08 Nov 1823 in Morgan, Indiana, USA[62]. He died in 1851 in Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana, USA[5].

x.

Sarah Jessup[5] was born about 1801 in North Carolina, USA[59]. She married Robert Cooper on 10 Apr 1828 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[5]. She died in 1866 in Kansas, USA[5].

15.

Sarah Jessup-3 (Priscilla-2, Aaron-1)[4] was born on 20 Aug 1764 in Carteret, North Carolina, USA[4]. She died on 20 Jan 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[4].

Notes for Sarah Jessup:

General Notes:

Sarah Jessup was born 20 Aug 1764 in Carteret Co.,North Carolina and died 20 Jan 1818 in Surry Co., North Carolina

 

She had come with her family to the Westfield community in Surry Co. and married Joseph Jackson in the Westfield Friends MM>

 

 

9.

Joseph Jackson son of Samuel Jackson Sr. and Mary Catherine Plankinhorn[3] was born on 27 Dec 1761 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 22 Oct 1815 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

Notes for Joseph Jackson:

General Notes:

Joseph was a very prosperous farmer and at his death he owned several hundred acres of land in Surry, Stokes and other counties in North Carolina . He also owned land in Grayson Co., VA. Deed recorded in Surry Co.,North Carolina show that he bought his first land from Edward Lovell, 400 acres on both sides of Tom's Creek for 600 pounds, the deed was witnessed by John Jackson and Bowater Sumners. In January of 1794 he sold 55 acres of this land to his brother, Jehu Jackson. Other deeds show 150 acres bought in 1796 from John Burris on the branch of Tom's Creek, Yadkin River, adjoining Bryans Branch. This was witnessed by John Jackson and William Tanzey. He bought 53 acres from Joseph Haiti on the waters of Tom's Creek in 1799. He received two North Carolina grants, one in 1791 fro 150 acres and one in 1802 for 100 acres, both on the banks of Tom's Creek.

 

Following is his Last Will and Testament, dated 1815, Surry Co.,North Carolina

 

Whereas I, Joseph Jackson, of the County of Surry and the State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory do therefore leave this as my last will and testament.

 

First, that I be decently buried and all my just debts paid.

 

Secondly, I will and bequeath to my beloved wife during her widowhood the plantation on which she now lives with all the household furniture; also the plantation on the big creek of Dan river; also I leave to her eight cows and two horses and at the end of her widowhood, I will the land on the big creek to be equally divided between my two sons, Zadock and Joel, and the land whereon I live to belong to my son Caleb and Zadock and Joel to make it equal in value to theirs at the time when he is of age. I also leave to my son, Eli the land I bought of Jonathan Harold in Grayson Co., VA, also the tract of land lying on Davies Creek in Stokes, North Carolina .

 

I also leave to my son, Amer Jackson, the tract of land I bought of Purnal Blizzard in Grayson Co., VA and also the tract of land lying on the west fork of Tom's Creek where I formerly lived.

 

It is also my will that the rest of my sons provide for and decently clothe and victual my son, John and each one to be an equal part as they come of age.

 

It is also my will that my three daughters, Abigail, Rachel and Betsy have each a hundred dollars worth of property or equal to their sisters who are married.

 

I also appoint and empower my trusty brother, William Jackson and my trusty son, Eli Jackson, my true and lawful Executors. Signed 22 Sep 1815.

 

 

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Notes for Joseph Jackson:

General Notes:

Joseph was a very prosperous farmer and at his death he owned several hundred acres of land in Surry, Stokes and other counties in North Carolina . He also owned land in Grayson Co., VA. Deed recorded in Surry Co.,North Carolina show that he bought his first land from Edward Lovell, 400 acres on both sides of Tom's Creek for 600 pounds, the deed was witnessed by John Jackson and Bowater Sumners. In January of 1794 he sold 55 acres of this land to his brother, Jehu Jackson. Other deeds show 150 acres bought in 1796 from John Burris on the branch of Tom's Creek, Yadkin River, adjoining Bryans Branch. This was witnessed by John Jackson and William Tanzey. He bought 53 acres from Joseph Haiti on the waters of Tom's Creek in 1799. He received two North Carolina grants, one in 1791 fro 150 acres and one in 1802 for 100 acres, both on the banks of Tom's Creek.

 

Following is his Last Will and Testament, dated 1815, Surry Co.,North Carolina

 

Whereas I, Joseph Jackson, of the County of Surry and the State of North Carolina, being of sound mind and memory do therefore leave this as my last will and testament.

 

First, that I be decently buried and all my just debts paid.

 

Secondly, I will and bequeath to my beloved wife during her widowhood the plantation on which she now lives with all the household furniture; also the plantation on the big creek of Dan river; also I leave to her eight cows and two horses and at the end of her widowhood, I will the land on the big creek to be equally divided between my two sons, Zadock and Joel, and the land whereon I live to belong to my son Caleb and Zadock and Joel to make it equal in value to theirs at the time when he is of age. I also leave to my son, Eli the land I bought of Jonathan Harold in Grayson Co., VA, also the tract of land lying on Davies Creek in Stokes, North Carolina .

 

I also leave to my son, Amer Jackson, the tract of land I bought of Purnal Blizzard in Grayson Co., VA and also the tract of land lying on the west fork of Tom's Creek where I formerly lived.

 

It is also my will that the rest of my sons provide for and decently clothe and victual my son, John and each one to be an equal part as they come of age.

 

It is also my will that my three daughters, Abigail, Rachel and Betsy have each a hundred dollars worth of property or equal to their sisters who are married.

 

I also appoint and empower my trusty brother, William Jackson and my trusty son, Eli Jackson, my true and lawful Executors. Signed 22 Sep 1815.

 

 

Joseph Jackson and Sarah Jessup were married on 21 Apr 1787 in Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

i.

Mary Jackson[4] was born in 1788 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Abner Jessup on 16 Aug 1809 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She died on 21 Mar 1840[5].

60. ii.

Priscilla Jackson[3] was born in 1790 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Absolem Sumner on 09 Aug 1811 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on 27 Nov 1833 in Highland, Ohio, USA[3].

61. iii.

Eli Jackson[6] was born in 1792 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He married Cornelia Cook on 17 Feb 1824[6]. He died on 23 Dec 1834 in Marion, Indiana, USA[39].

62. iv.

Alsa Abigail Jackson[6] was born in 1794 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. She married Jacob Carson on 09 Aug 1811 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[40]. She died on 04 Aug 1872 in Holt, Missouri, USA[6].

63. v.

Rachel Jackson[6] was born on 21 Jan 1796 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Joseph Jessup on 02 Nov 1816 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on 18 Mar 1875 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[3].

64. vi.

Amer Jackson[6] was born in 1797 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6]. He married Sarah Sally Hill about 1837 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. He died in 1870 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[6].

65. vii.

Zadock L. Jackson[3] was born on 28 Nov 1804 in North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Isabella Hughey on 11 Oct 1828 in Highland, Ohio, USA[39]. He died on 25 Jun 1890 in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[42].

viii.

Caleb Jackson[3] was born in 1805 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Mary Polly Simmons on 17 Apr 1846 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on Unknown.

66. ix.

Joel Jackson[3] was born in 1806 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Rebecca Jessup on 23 Jan 1838 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 09 Aug 1849.

x.

Elizabeth Betsy Jackson[3] was born in 1807 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on Unknown.

xi.

John Jackson[3] was born in 1809 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on Unknown. He married Martha (or Ruth) Oglesby on Unknown.

Notes for John Jackson:

General Notes:

Source Lucille Jackson:

Joseph had requested in his will that his older sons decently clothe and provide for John until he became of age, and then he was to share equally with the other boys in property.

Each of Samuel and Catherine's eight sons had a son named John, so there were many John Jackson's living in the area at that time. I (Lucille Vernon) am unable to distinguish just which John was the son of Joseph and Sarah. It is assumed that he would be the John Jackson who in 1827, sold one hundred acres of land to his brother Amor Jackson, with his brother Joel Jackson as a Witness. He may also be the John who purchased 446 acres of land in Westfield in 1832.

..............................................

Source Lucille Jackson:

Marriage records of Surry Co 1779-1826, show a marriage between one John Jackson and Martha Oglesby on Apr. 26, 1830. This would be about the right date for John, son of Joseph, son of Samuel and Catherine, to have been married. In the Guilford College, I found the notes that Mr. Luther Byrd had made when he was researching some of the families of Westfield. He thought that John, son of Joseph, son of Samuel and Catherine, was the one that had gone to Morgan Co, IN and someone had lined through it and written "No" there. This is the John that married Nancy Spargur. Now if one John did go to Morgan Co, IN, it was probably John, son of Joseph as that is where his brother Zadock and his uncle Jehu Jackson and family lived. The John that married Nancy Spargur was the son of William and Mary Jessup Jackson.

 

 

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for John Jackson:

General Notes:

Source Lucille Jackson:

Joseph had requested in his will that his older sons decently clothe and provide for John until he became of age, and then he was to share equally with the other boys in property.

Each of Samuel and Catherine's eight sons had a son named John, so there were many John Jackson's living in the area at that time. I (Lucille Vernon) am unable to distinguish just which John was the son of Joseph and Sarah. It is assumed that he would be the John Jackson who in 1827, sold one hundred acres of land to his brother Amor Jackson, with his brother Joel Jackson as a Witness. He may also be the John who purchased 446 acres of land in Westfield in 1832.

..............................................

Source Lucille Jackson:

Marriage records of Surry Co 1779-1826, show a marriage between one John Jackson and Martha Oglesby on Apr. 26, 1830. This would be about the right date for John, son of Joseph, son of Samuel and Catherine, to have been married. In the Guilford College, I found the notes that Mr. Luther Byrd had made when he was researching some of the families of Westfield. He thought that John, son of Joseph, son of Samuel and Catherine, was the one that had gone to Morgan Co, IN and someone had lined through it and written "No" there. This is the John that married Nancy Spargur. Now if one John did go to Morgan Co, IN, it was probably John, son of Joseph as that is where his brother Zadock and his uncle Jehu Jackson and family lived. The John that married Nancy Spargur was the son of William and Mary Jessup Jackson.

 

 

 

 

16.

Mary Jessup-3 (Priscilla-2, Aaron-1)[3] was born on 11 Jan 1766 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died before 1837[15].

12.

William Jackson son of Samuel Jackson Sr. and Mary Catherine Plankinhorn[3] was born on 15 May 1767 in Rowan, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died on 20 Sep 1841 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3].

Notes for William Jackson:

General Notes:

William Jackson's parents had moved toNorth Carolina from Chester Co., PA around 1760 and settled in Rowan, North Carolina . That part of Rowan later became Davidson Co. North Carolina . They moved from there to Tom's Creek in Surry Co.North Carolina about 1773. William spent his entire life in the Westfield area. there are several deeds recorded in the Dobson Courthouse in Surry Co., North Carolina , where he had purchased and sold land. His first deed was recorded on 4 Apr 1790 for a 200 acre tract on both sides of Rutledge Creek. William and his father, Samuel, were given a joint tract of 100 acres on Rutledge Creek as a grant from the state ofNorth Carolina on 8o Jan 1795. He and his father were to receive 50 acres each. This may be the same 50 acres that William bought from heirs after Samuel's death. He also bought a 200 acre tract of land from his father on 2 Feb 1803.

 

Last Will and Testament of William Jackson, Surry Co.North Carolina 1854. In the name of God, Amen.

 

Know all men by these present that I, William Jackson, State of North Carolina and of Surry County,being of sound mind although weak in body, and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs so as to prevent any dispute after my death, do hereby will and decree the following disposition of my worldly property to be as follows:

 

First: That I bequeath to my wife, Lucy Pike Jackson should she outlive me, twenty-five acres of land lying on the south end of the tract where I now live but to extend no further than where the land is now cleared and to include the house with sufficient timer only for the support of said twenty-five acres and fire wood for the term of her natural life or widowhood and at her death or marriage whichever should happen first the said land to be sold and the proceeds divided amongst my heirs. Also a bed and furniture for the same, one oven and skillet, three plates, two knives and forks, two cups and saucers, two chairs, one cotton wheel and one sow and two sheep.

 

Secondly: I will and bequeath to my daughter Edith Jackson Puckett or her heirs that tract of land upon which Henry Marsh now lives adjoining the Hollow Spring, consisting of ninety-two acres.

 

Thirdly: I will and bequeath that Job Jackson, Elijah Jackson and John Jackson, my sons, shall be paid the sum of one dollar each.

 

Fourthly: To John and Mary Jackson and their heirs the sum of one dollar only, that being all that I would have given to their father, Jasen, had he been alive.

 

Fifth: To Martha Matthews Jackson, daughter of Newel Jackson deceased, one bed stead, bed and furniture.

 

Sixthly: That after my death the remainder of the tract upon which I live, say one hundred acres, is thereby to be sold and the proceeds to be divided equally between Job, Elijah and John Jackson or their heirs.

 

And Lastly: I will and desire my executor hereafter named to dispose of all my other property both real and personal not herein named and after applying the proceeds in payment of all my just debts and burial expenses, any balance that may remain to be equally divided amongst all my said heirs.

 

And Finally: I give to my wife, one chest for clothes, and I hereby will and appoint Stanton Taylor to be my only executor and will and desire him to fulfill the terms and conditions of this my last will and testament and hereby revoke and repeal all former wills if such there be and declare this to be my will and testament in witness whereof I have herewith set my hand and seal the twentieth day of September, one thousand, eight hundred and fifty-one. Signed by William Jackson

 

 

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Notes for William Jackson:

General Notes:

William Jackson's parents had moved toNorth Carolina from Chester Co., PA around 1760 and settled in Rowan, North Carolina . That part of Rowan later became Davidson Co. North Carolina . They moved from there to Tom's Creek in Surry Co.North Carolina about 1773. William spent his entire life in the Westfield area. there are several deeds recorded in the Dobson Courthouse in Surry Co., North Carolina , where he had purchased and sold land. His first deed was recorded on 4 Apr 1790 for a 200 acre tract on both sides of Rutledge Creek. William and his father, Samuel, were given a joint tract of 100 acres on Rutledge Creek as a grant from the state ofNorth Carolina on 8o Jan 1795. He and his father were to receive 50 acres each. This may be the same 50 acres that William bought from heirs after Samuel's death. He also bought a 200 acre tract of land from his father on 2 Feb 1803.

 

Last Will and Testament of William Jackson, Surry Co.North Carolina 1854. In the name of God, Amen.

 

Know all men by these present that I, William Jackson, State of North Carolina and of Surry County,being of sound mind although weak in body, and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs so as to prevent any dispute after my death, do hereby will and decree the following disposition of my worldly property to be as follows:

 

First: That I bequeath to my wife, Lucy Pike Jackson should she outlive me, twenty-five acres of land lying on the south end of the tract where I now live but to extend no further than where the land is now cleared and to include the house with sufficient timer only for the support of said twenty-five acres and fire wood for the term of her natural life or widowhood and at her death or marriage whichever should happen first the said land to be sold and the proceeds divided amongst my heirs. Also a bed and furniture for the same, one oven and skillet, three plates, two knives and forks, two cups and saucers, two chairs, one cotton wheel and one sow and two sheep.

 

Secondly: I will and bequeath to my daughter Edith Jackson Puckett or her heirs that tract of land upon which Henry Marsh now lives adjoining the Hollow Spring, consisting of ninety-two acres.

 

Thirdly: I will and bequeath that Job Jackson, Elijah Jackson and John Jackson, my sons, shall be paid the sum of one dollar each.

 

Fourthly: To John and Mary Jackson and their heirs the sum of one dollar only, that being all that I would have given to their father, Jasen, had he been alive.

 

Fifth: To Martha Matthews Jackson, daughter of Newel Jackson deceased, one bed stead, bed and furniture.

 

Sixthly: That after my death the remainder of the tract upon which I live, say one hundred acres, is thereby to be sold and the proceeds to be divided equally between Job, Elijah and John Jackson or their heirs.

 

And Lastly: I will and desire my executor hereafter named to dispose of all my other property both real and personal not herein named and after applying the proceeds in payment of all my just debts and burial expenses, any balance that may remain to be equally divided amongst all my said heirs.

 

And Finally: I give to my wife, one chest for clothes, and I hereby will and appoint Stanton Taylor to be my only executor and will and desire him to fulfill the terms and conditions of this my last will and testament and hereby revoke and repeal all former wills if such there be and declare this to be my will and testament in witness whereof I have herewith set my hand and seal the twentieth day of September, one thousand, eight hundred and fifty-one. Signed by William Jackson

 

 

William Jackson and Mary Jessup were married on 10 Sep 1790 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

76. i.

Edith Jackson[3] was born in 1794 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Zachariah Puckett on 26 Jul 1817 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. She died on Unknown.

77. ii.

Job Jackson[3] was born on 20 Dec 1796 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Lydia Puckett on 11 Apr 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He died in 1854 in Grant, Indiana, USA[49].

78. iii.

Elijah Jackson[3] was born on 08 May 1798 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Anna Puckett on 13 Oct 1816 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. He died on 27 Jun 1863 in Randolph, Indiana, USA[20].

79. iv.

Jason Jackson[3] was born about 1800[41]. He died in Jan 1835. He married Probably Sarah Sparger on Unknown.

80. v.

Newel Jackson[3] was born about 1802 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[41]. He married Sarah Sally Martin on 23 Aug 1832 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. He died on 28 Oct 1833 in North Carolina, USA[3].

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Generation 3 (con't)
81. vi.

John Jackson[3] was born in 1805 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. He married Nancy W. Sparger on 29 Dec 1825 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. He died on Unknown.

17.

Joseph Jessup Jr.-3 (Priscilla-2, Aaron-1)[5] was born on 22 Mar 1767 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on 09 Sep 1820 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

Notes for Joseph Jessup Jr.:

General Notes:

Joseph Jessup, Jr., was dismissed from the Westfield MM, Surry Co. North Carolina on 8 Feb 1817 for "marrying out of unity." It is very possible his wife, Betty McKinney had passed away and that he remarried. The only record that can be found of Joseph's marriage to Betty McKinney is on 23 Apr 1791 when his marriage is reported to the Westfield MM, Surry Co., North Carolina . His will was probated 1820, Danbury,Stokes Co., North Carolina with his eight children named in the will. Beth Cox Rowe mentions a reference to this from "The Ancestry of Allen Grinnel Cleaver & Martha Irene Jessup, 172 Allied Families" by William Jessup Cleaver. pg. 89.

 

Joseph and Betty McKinney Jessup lived about 5 miles east of Westfield, and their old home was still standing in 1942, an old log building near the home of Samuel N. Jessup.

 

 

Betty McKinney daughter of James McKinney and Mary Bryom Ballard[5] was born in 1772 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[5]. She died on Unknown.

Joseph Jessup Jr. and Betty McKinney were married on 10 Sep 1791 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. They had the following children:

i.

Jonathan Jessup[5] was born in 1792[5]. He died on Unknown.

96. ii.

Thomas Jessup[5] was born on 05 Jul 1794 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Mary Polly Joyce on 27 Mar 1813 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA. He died on 07 Aug 1849 in Springfield, Greene, Missouri, USA[16].

iii.

Hannah Jessup[5] was born in 1795[5]. She married Andrew Burge on 26 Feb 1826 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[61]. She died before 1840 in Patrick, Virginia, USA[63].

97. iv.

Priscilla Jessup[3] was born in 1797[3]. She married Elihu Jackson on 22 Feb 1815 in Surry, North Carolina, USA (Westfield MM)[3, 22]. She died on 21 Nov 1865 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[41].

v.

Jackson Jessup[5] was born in 1799[5]. He died on Unknown.

vi.

Jane Jessup[5] was born in 1803[5]. She died on Unknown.

98. vii.

Mary Jessup[5, 64] was born in 1804 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She married William Pell on 02 Jan 1828 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA. She died before 1888[65].

99. viii.

Caleb Jessup[5] was born in 1814 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[58]. He married Kezziah Cassandre Bingham on 27 May 1833 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on 03 Feb 1874 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[5].

18.

William Jessup-3 (Priscilla-2, Aaron-1)[4, 5] was born on 06 Feb 1769 in Perquimans, North Carolina, USA[4]. He died on 09 Aug 1853 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[3].

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Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for William Jessup:

General Notes:

William and his family migrated to Hendricks Co., IN. The deed for one hundred and sixty acres of land in Hendricks Co., In was signed by President John Quincy Adams. This deed is still in the family and is a treasured relic, which is very much cherished.

 

 

Mary Polly Lee[3, 5] was born in 1770[3]. She died in 1851[3].

Notes for Mary Polly Lee:

General Notes:

Mary Polly Lee was born 1770 and died 1851. Names of parents and place of birth not known.

 

 

William Jessup and Mary Polly Lee were married in 1789 in North Carolina, USA[3]. They had the following children:

100. i.

William Lee Jessup[5] was born on Unknown. He married Esther Hiatt Kellum on 06 Apr 1832 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[66]. He died on 05 Sep 1835 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[5].

ii.

Hezekiah Jessup[67] was born on 08 Aug 1794[67]. He died on Unknown.

101. iii.

Solomon Jessup[67] was born on 29 Apr 1796 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[67]. He married Hannah Gordon about 1830 in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[68]. He died on 22 Jan 1884 in Gentry, Missouri, USA[68].

102. iv.

Enoch Jessup[67] was born on 17 Mar 1797 in North Carolina, USA[67]. He died on Unknown. He married Unknown Spouse on Unknown.

103. v.

Jonathan Jessup[67] was born on 27 Aug 1799 in North Carolina, USA[67]. He married Esther Hunt in 1821[67]. He died on 14 Sep 1873 in Bridgeport, Saginaw, Michigan, USA[67].

104. vi.

Delilah Jessup[5, 40] was born in 1800 in North Carolina, USA[59]. She married Caleb Carson on 09 Sep 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[59]. She died on Unknown.

105. vii.

Alfred Jessup[5] was born on 04 Feb 1810 in North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Betsy Jessup on 07 Apr 1832 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[66]. He died on 06 Jan 1865 in Hendricks, Indiana, USA[5].

19.

Caleb Jessup-3 (Priscilla-2, Aaron-1)[17] was born on 20 Oct 1778 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[17]. He died on 26 Sep 1843 in Greene, Indiana, USA[16].

Notes for Caleb Jessup:

General Notes:

Caleb Jessup was a native of Surry Co., North Carolina , He migrated to Greene Co., IN in 1818, engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was married three times and was the father of eighteen children. He held to the tenets of the Friends or Quaker Church and was noted for his strong anti-slavery views, kindness of heart and nobility of soul. Few, if any of the early settlers of Greene Co., IN were better known or more highly respected. Beth Cox Rowe mentions as REF: "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, IN, From the Earliest Times to the Present." Goodspeed Bros. & Co. Publishers, 1884. - page 362

 

Caleb Jessup & Margaret Huey

 

1850 IN Greene Eel River 6

Margaret 46 NC no occup

Pauline 17 IN

Elijah 14 IN

Layfaette 12 IN male

Nancy 10 IN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Pauline 1833

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Elijah 1836 m Harriett H Wood 1-12-1857 Owen IN

1860 IN Owen Franklin 19

Elijah 23 IN farmer

Harriett 23 IN

Nancy 20 IN sister

Charles 2 IN

 

1870 IN Owen Franklin 9

Elijah 35 IN farmer

Harriett 35 IN

Charles 12 IN

William 8 IN

Emma 3 IN

 

1880 IN Owne Franklin 9

Elijah 45 IN NC KY farmer

Harriett 45 IN KY KY

Charles G 22 IN farm labor

William 18 IN farm labor

Emma 13 IN

Harry 9 IN

 

1900 KS Phillips Long Island 2

Elijah 3-1835 65 m 43 IN NC KY farmer

Harriett 12-1835 64 4-3 IN KY KY

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

 

Layfaette 12 IN

 

1850 in mothers hh

 

1860 IN Owen Jefferson 13

Layfaette 24 IN farmer

Lydia 21 IN

 

1870 IN Greene Eel River 1

Lafayette 32 IN farmer

Lydia 31 IN

Marie 9 IN

James 4 IN

 

1880 IN Greene Highland 3

Lafayette 43 IN PA PA farmer

Hannah E 34 OH OH OH

James H 13 IN

William L 4 IN

 

1900 IN Greene Jefferson 15

Layfaette 12-1836 63 m24 IN NC NC farmer

Anna 1-1844 56 m 24 1-1 OH PA PA

William 5-1876 24 m1 IN

Hossie 12-1876 23 m1 0-0 IA IN IN

 

 

 

 

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Notes for Caleb Jessup:

General Notes:

Caleb Jessup was a native of Surry Co., North Carolina , He migrated to Greene Co., IN in 1818, engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was married three times and was the father of eighteen children. He held to the tenets of the Friends or Quaker Church and was noted for his strong anti-slavery views, kindness of heart and nobility of soul. Few, if any of the early settlers of Greene Co., IN were better known or more highly respected. Beth Cox Rowe mentions as REF: "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, IN, From the Earliest Times to the Present." Goodspeed Bros. & Co. Publishers, 1884. - page 362

 

Caleb Jessup & Margaret Huey

 

1850 IN Greene Eel River 6

Margaret 46 NC no occup

Pauline 17 IN

Elijah 14 IN

Layfaette 12 IN male

Nancy 10 IN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Pauline 1833

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Elijah 1836 m Harriett H Wood 1-12-1857 Owen IN

1860 IN Owen Franklin 19

Elijah 23 IN farmer

Harriett 23 IN

Nancy 20 IN sister

Charles 2 IN

 

1870 IN Owen Franklin 9

Elijah 35 IN farmer

Harriett 35 IN

Charles 12 IN

William 8 IN

Emma 3 IN

 

1880 IN Owne Franklin 9

Elijah 45 IN NC KY farmer

Harriett 45 IN KY KY

Charles G 22 IN farm labor

William 18 IN farm labor

Emma 13 IN

Harry 9 IN

 

1900 KS Phillips Long Island 2

Elijah 3-1835 65 m 43 IN NC KY farmer

Harriett 12-1835 64 4-3 IN KY KY

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

 

Layfaette 12 IN

 

1850 in mothers hh

 

1860 IN Owen Jefferson 13

Layfaette 24 IN farmer

Lydia 21 IN

 

1870 IN Greene Eel River 1

Lafayette 32 IN farmer

Lydia 31 IN

Marie 9 IN

James 4 IN

 

1880 IN Greene Highland 3

Lafayette 43 IN PA PA farmer

Hannah E 34 OH OH OH

James H 13 IN

William L 4 IN

 

1900 IN Greene Jefferson 15

Layfaette 12-1836 63 m24 IN NC NC farmer

Anna 1-1844 56 m 24 1-1 OH PA PA

William 5-1876 24 m1 IN

Hossie 12-1876 23 m1 0-0 IA IN IN

 

 

 

 

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Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Caleb Jessup:

General Notes:

Caleb Jessup was a native of Surry Co., North Carolina , He migrated to Greene Co., IN in 1818, engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was married three times and was the father of eighteen children. He held to the tenets of the Friends or Quaker Church and was noted for his strong anti-slavery views, kindness of heart and nobility of soul. Few, if any of the early settlers of Greene Co., IN were better known or more highly respected. Beth Cox Rowe mentions as REF: "History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, IN, From the Earliest Times to the Present." Goodspeed Bros. & Co. Publishers, 1884. - page 362

 

Caleb Jessup & Margaret Huey

 

1850 IN Greene Eel River 6

Margaret 46 NC no occup

Pauline 17 IN

Elijah 14 IN

Layfaette 12 IN male

Nancy 10 IN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Pauline 1833

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Elijah 1836 m Harriett H Wood 1-12-1857 Owen IN

1860 IN Owen Franklin 19

Elijah 23 IN farmer

Harriett 23 IN

Nancy 20 IN sister

Charles 2 IN

 

1870 IN Owen Franklin 9

Elijah 35 IN farmer

Harriett 35 IN

Charles 12 IN

William 8 IN

Emma 3 IN

 

1880 IN Owne Franklin 9

Elijah 45 IN NC KY farmer

Harriett 45 IN KY KY

Charles G 22 IN farm labor

William 18 IN farm labor

Emma 13 IN

Harry 9 IN

 

1900 KS Phillips Long Island 2

Elijah 3-1835 65 m 43 IN NC KY farmer

Harriett 12-1835 64 4-3 IN KY KY

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

 

Layfaette 12 IN

 

1850 in mothers hh

 

1860 IN Owen Jefferson 13

Layfaette 24 IN farmer

Lydia 21 IN

 

1870 IN Greene Eel River 1

Lafayette 32 IN farmer

Lydia 31 IN

Marie 9 IN

James 4 IN

 

1880 IN Greene Highland 3

Lafayette 43 IN PA PA farmer

Hannah E 34 OH OH OH

James H 13 IN

William L 4 IN

 

1900 IN Greene Jefferson 15

Layfaette 12-1836 63 m24 IN NC NC farmer

Anna 1-1844 56 m 24 1-1 OH PA PA

William 5-1876 24 m1 IN

Hossie 12-1876 23 m1 0-0 IA IN IN

 

 

 

 

Nancy Elizabeth Clark[17] was born on Unknown. She died before 1803[69].

Notes for Nancy Elizabeth Clark:

General Notes:

It is probable that Nancy Clark died at the birth of her child, Jane Jinson Jessup, born Mar 15, 1802

 

 

Caleb Jessup and Nancy Elizabeth Clark were married on 10 Dec 1798 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[17]. They had the following children:

106. i.

Susannna Jessup[17] was born on 17 Feb 1800[17]. She married Alexander Watson on 21 Mar 1817[17]. She died on Unknown.

107. ii.

Jane Jinson Jessup[17] was born on 15 Mar 1802 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[70]. She married Harbard Sanders on 20 Apr 1823 in Greene, Indiana, USA[71]. She died on 01 Jun 1845 in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[70].

Mary Rachel Clark[17] was born on Unknown. She died before 1836[72].

Caleb Jessup and Mary Rachel Clark were married on 10 Apr 1803 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[17]. They had the following children:

i.

Iredell Jessup[17] was born on 26 Jan 1806[17]. He died on Unknown in Memphis, Shelby, Tennessee, USA.

Notes for Iredell Jessup:

General Notes:

Iredell Jessup lost his life in a steamboat explosion on the Mississippi River near Memphis, TN>

 

 

ii.

Greenville Jessup[17] was born on 24 Sep 1807 in North Carolina, USA[17]. He died on Unknown in Memphis, Shelby, Tennessee, USA[59].

Notes for Greenville Jessup:

General Notes:

Greenville Jessup was killed with his brother, Iredell, in a steamboat accident on the Mississippi River near Memphis, TN>

 

 

iii.

Olive Jessup[5] was born on 01 May 1808[17]. She died on Unknown. She married Ira Danely on Unknown.

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Generation 3 (con't)
108. iv.

James Jessup[17] was born on 10 Aug 1809[17]. He died in 1876 in Missouri, USA[17]. He married Elizabeth Ann Newsom on Unknown.

109. v.

Franklin Jessup[17] was born on 01 Jan 1811 in North Carolina, USA[17]. He died in 1854[17]. He married Mary Elizabeth Sanders on Unknown.

vi.

Ferdinand Jessup[17] was born in 1812[17]. He died on Unknown.

110. vii.

Mary Ann Jessup[17] was born on 01 Nov 1813 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[17]. She married John Westley Sanders Jr. on 25 Mar 1833. She died on 14 Dec 1880 in Worthington, Greene, Indiana, USA[17].

111. viii.

Verlin Jessup[17] was born on 25 Jun 1814 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[17]. He married Charlotte Owen on 24 Jun 1841 in Green, Grant, Indiana, USA[59]. He died on 14 Oct 1878 in Green, Grant, Indiana, USA[17].

112. ix.

Sarah Jane Jessup[17] was born on 15 Apr 1818 in North Carolina, USA[17]. She married Elijah Gordon on 03 Mar 1839 in Greene, Indiana, USA[73]. She died after 1857[74].

Margaret Huey[5] was born about 1804[75]. She died on Unknown.

Caleb Jessup and Margaret Huey were married on 24 Jul 1824 in Macoupin, Illinois, USA[76]. They had the following children:

113. i.

Elijah Jessup[5] was born on Unknown in Green, Grant, Indiana, USA[59]. He died in 1903[5]. He married Harriett Wood on Unknown.

ii.

Nancy E. Jessup[5] was born on Unknown in Green, Grant, Indiana, USA. She married George W. Hicks on 16 Jul 1860[59]. She died on Unknown.

114. iii.

Lafayette Jessup[5] was born on 13 Dec 1836 in Green, Grant, Indiana, USA[5]. He married Lydia Heaton in 1857 in Greene, Indiana, USA[59]. He died on 23 Aug 1908 in Oblong, Crawford, Illinois, USA[77].

iv.

Malinda Jessup[17] was born in 1838 in Greene, Indiana, USA[17]. She married John Osborne on 30 Dec 1849 in Greene, Indiana, USA[71]. She died on Unknown.

v.

Paulina Jessup[5] was born in 1840 in Green, Grant, Indiana, USA[5]. She died on Unknown. She married Calvin Dyer on Unknown.

vi.

Philander Jessup[5] was born in 1844 in Green, Grant, Indiana, USA[5]. He died on Unknown.

20.

Elijah Jessup-3 (Priscilla-2, Aaron-1)[5] was born on 31 Mar 1781 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on Unknown in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[16].

Notes for Elijah Jessup:

General Notes:

Elijah Jessup moved with his father and mother to Surry Co., North Carolina about 1786. He lived many years in the home occupied in recent times by Reid Christian in Westfield, North Carolina (across the county line in Stokes Co., North Carolina .) Elijah married sisters, daughter of Bartlett Smith who lived at the top of the mountain in the Bell Spur section of Patrick Co., VA, where he owned a large property. Elijah's brother Eli, married Pensey Jennie Smith, sister to Nancy and Rebecca.

 

 

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)

Notes for Elijah Jessup:

General Notes:

Elijah Jessup moved with his father and mother to Surry Co., North Carolina about 1786. He lived many years in the home occupied in recent times by Reid Christian in Westfield, North Carolina (across the county line in Stokes Co., North Carolina .) Elijah married sisters, daughter of Bartlett Smith who lived at the top of the mountain in the Bell Spur section of Patrick Co., VA, where he owned a large property. Elijah's brother Eli, married Pensey Jennie Smith, sister to Nancy and Rebecca.

 

 

Nancy Smith daughter of Bartlett Smith[5] was born about 1798[78]. She died on Unknown.

Elijah Jessup and Nancy Smith were married on 18 Apr 1816 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. They had the following children:

115. i.

Rebecca Jessup[3] was born in 1817 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She married Joel Jackson on 23 Jan 1838 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[3]. She died on Unknown.

116. ii.

Sarah Sally Jessup[5] was born on 23 Dec 1818 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She married Hiram Jessup on 14 Feb 1837 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She died on 21 Feb 1896 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

117. iii.

William S. Jessup[5] was born on 24 Nov 1821 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Elizabeth Cook on 22 Dec 1845 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on 08 Sep 1890 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

118. iv.

Covie Eletha Jessup[79] was born about 1824[80]. She married Leonard Henderson Bingman on 02 Apr 1845 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[79]. She died on Unknown.

119. v.

John Jessup[5] was born about 1827 in North Carolina, USA[59]. He married Leah Hall in 1847. He died on Unknown.

120. vi.

Ira Jessup[5] was born about 1830 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[59]. He died on Unknown. He married Unknown Spouse on Unknown.

121. vii.

Meshack Jessup[5] was born on 08 Mar 1833 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Sarah Ann Dearmin on 13 Apr 1854 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He died on 06 Nov 1906 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5].

122. viii.

Eliza Jessup[5] was born on 01 Apr 1836 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She married Elijah Eli Cook on 01 Mar 1855 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She died in Jan 1901[5].

123. ix.

Elizabeth Jessup[5] was born about 1839[59]. She married William Shepherd Jessup on 24 Jan 1864 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She died in 1872[81].

Rebecca Smith daughter of Bartlett Smith[5] was born before 1781[78]. She died before 1816.

Elijah Jessup and Rebecca Smith were married on 15 Dec 1801 in Patrick, Virginia, USA[5]. They had the following children:

124. i.

Ambrose Pea Jessup[82] was born on 14 Feb 1805 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[82]. He married Nancy Addison Owens about 1830. He died in 1878[82].

125. ii.

Martin Jessup[82] was born in 1807 in Westfield, Surry, North Carolina, USA[82]. He married Mary Polly Pell on 19 Dec 1829 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[82]. He died on Unknown.

126. iii.

George Washington Jessup[5] was born in 1810 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. He married Malinda Jane Fitzgerald on 19 Nov 1831 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[48]. He died on Unknown.

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Descendants of Aaron Jackson
Generation 3 (con't)
iv.

Mahala Jessup[5] was born in 1812 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[5]. She married John C. Flippin on 01 Feb 1831[5]. She died on Unknown.

v.

Malinda Jessup[59] was born in 1814 in Stokes, North Carolina, USA[59]. She died on Unknown.

Generation 4
21.

Rachel Jackson-4 (Jacob-3, Samuel-2, Aaron-1)[19] was born on 15 Jul 1775 in Guilford, North Carolina, USA[19]. She died on 23 Sep 1846 in Highland, Ohio, USA[20].

Enoch Graham[20] was born on Unknown. He died in 1807 in Tennessee, USA[20].

Notes for Enoch Graham:

General Notes:

Enoch Graham died 1807 in TN

 

 

Enoch Graham and Rachel Jackson were married in 1799[6]. They had the following children:

i.

Mary Graham[6] was born on Unknown. She married Ira Grace Hunt on 28 Apr 1815 in Highland, Ohio, USA[6].