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Descendants of Nicholas Marsolet, Sieur de Saint-Aignan




Generation No. 1


1. NICHOLAS4 MARSOLET, SIEUR DE SAINT-AIGNAN (NICHOLAS3, NICHOLAS2, ETIENNE1) was born Abt. 1601 in Saint-Aignan-sur-Ry, Rouen, France, and died May 15, 1677 in Quebec. He married MARIE LEBARBIER March 19, 1636/37 in Rouen, France, daughter of HENRI LEBARBIER and MARIE LE VILLAIN. She was born May 20, 1619 in Rouen, France, and died February 21, 1687/88 in Quebec.

Notes for N
ICHOLAS MARSOLET, SIEUR DE SAINT-AIGNAN:

Notes for NICHOLAS MARSOLET:
[McCurdie Family.FTW]

Nicholas Marsolet, born in Rouen, France c 1600-1601, was only 7 or 8 when he arrived in Nouvelle France with Champlian's 4th voyage in 1608. An orphan deemed to have aptitude with language, he was chosen by his Jesuit warders to live with the Indians so to eventually become the interpreter/go-between for the French government. He was entrusted to the Indian Chief Iroquet to live among the Algonquins in exchange for the young brave, Savignan. In 1611, during his 6th voyage, Champlain met Marsolet dressed in Indian costume and already very familiar with the Algonquin language. His Indian friends took pride in thier protege. During the next 18 years, he shared the life of the Algonquins and perfected their language.
Over the years, he adopted 3 Indian girls. When the English came to seize Quebec in 1629, he wanted to place them in safety by taking them to the citadel. He managed to get them in past the enemy guards, for which Champlain, accused him of complicity with the English enemy, which was false as he admitted later. Marsolet never wanted to teach others the language despite the Jesuit demands. Upon the death of Champlain in 1636 and after 23 years living with them, he left the Indians. The next year, he married Marie, 17. He was 35. They settled at Bellchasse and raised 11 children. Marie, the first, married Mathieu d'Amours. Nicholas never farmed. He was a pilot on the St Lawrenc and dealt in the fur trade, partnered with Lotbiniere, d'Amours brother-in-law.


NICOLAS MARSOLET

Source: Mathieu D'Amours, Sieur de Chaufour and his descendants by Albert d'Amours, C.J.M Volume 1 1651 to 1800 English version 1977

      Nicolas Marsolet was, born a Huguenot, at Rouen around 1600 came to Canada when he was quite young. In 1608, Nicolas and Etienne Brule accompanied Champlain's fourth voyage as deckhands. They were both selected by the Company of the Cents Associes to become interpreters for the Indians, to live with them to learn their language. Nicolas was 7 or 8 at the departure. Etienne seems to have been older, perhaps 12. Champlain comments of their presence on this voyage in his "Memoires."
      In 1610, Marsolet is entrusted to the Indian Chief Iroquet to live among the Alglonquins. Champlain accepts a young Algonquin in exchange named Savignan. Etienne was entrusted to the Hurons in 1611. In 1611, on his sixth voyage, Champlain met some 300 Algonquins; the young Marsolet was with them dressed in an Indian costume and already very familiar with the Algonquin language.
      The Indians were proud of their protégé and had confidence in him. There also admired him, because he was a white man who accepted to live with them and like them. Champlain was also proud of the influence and progress of the young interpreter.
      During the next 18 years, Marsolet shared the life of the Algonquins, learned to speak their language perfectly and learned their ways of living and hunting. His influence among the Indians and the French for whom he served as ambassador was considerable.
      He adopted three little Indian girls. When the English came to take Quebec in 1629, he wanted to place them in safety by taking them to the citadel of Quebec. He was able to elude the English guards and enter the city. Champlain, not understanding how he was able to cross the enemy lines, accused him of complicity with the English, which was false, he admitted later.
      Reaching his majority in 1622, Marsolet received the estate of St. Aignan (Gentilly) as a reward for his services, as estate measuring one and one half leagues by two leagues (varies through time between 2.4 to 4.6 statute miles 3.9 to 7.4 km). This estate was at least 11.5 square miles and may have been a large as 63.4 square miles.
      Marsolet developed had the respect of both the Indians and the French, but he never agree to teach others what he knew in spite of the demands of the missionaries.
      Involved with the trading by both the Indians and the French, he soon realized that the rich profits of the fur trade were going to increase the treasury of France without helping the colonial residents. He established the "Compagnie des habitants" to fight against the abusive monopoly of the "Cents Associes," but without success. But with his friend, Louis Theandre Chartier de Lotbineire, he formed a trading company by which Lotbiniere became wealthy.
      When Champlain died in 1635, Marsolet decided to leave the Algonquins after having lived among them for 23 years. On this occasion, he was granted the estate of Bellchasse.
      The following year, Nicolas marries Marie Le Barbier age 17, he 35. The newlyweds settled at Bellechasse to raise a family of eleven children. Marie was the first and who married Mathieu d'Amours in 1652.
      In 1644, Nicolas acquired the "Marsolet Prairies." which included the "hauteurs Ste. Genevieve," and where he part of his youth among the Algonquins.
      In 1669, he sold St. Aignan to Michel Pelletier. In 1672, in agreement with his friend, M. de Lotbiniere, he obtained a concession on the Chene River adjacent to the Lotbiniers's estate. Previously, he had sold his house and part of Bellechasse to aone Captain Berthier, from the Regiment of Carignan. Nicholas and wife setted at "Praries Marsolet."
      He never farmed. His interests took him to the river. He was a pilot on the St. Lawrence and dealt extensively in the fur trade, which took him to Tadoussas where he was known and respected and called 'little king of Tadoussac.'
      He died in 1677 at age 76. His widow remarried four years later to Denis Lemaitre Lamorille.



The Marsolet -
text by Hélène-Andrée Bizier
      The MARSOLET Family The history of the MARSOLET family dates back to the very beginnings of New France. Nicolas MARSOLET, son of Rouen citizens Nicolas MARSOLET and Marguerite de Planes, was born in 1600 or 1601, perhaps in the village of Saint-Aignan-sur-Ry. He later adopted this region as a surname when he became Nicolas MARSOLET Sieur de Saint-Aignan.
      Samuel de Champlain recruited Nicolas around 1613, at the same time as Étienne Brûlé and Pierre Raye. Still a child when he arrived in New France, he learned Algonquian and Montagnais and served as an interpreter for Champlain and the missionaries. He had a love for life in the woods, adopting the customs and lifestyles of various tribes.
      Such an attitude scandalized the few colonists and saddened the founder of Québec who, in 1629, had very good reason to complain about MARSOLET and Brûlé, who openly sided with the Kirke brothers. MARSOLET would later say that he had no choice, but Champlain believed otherwise, accusing him of being a traitor to the King and forsaking his country for his own personal gain. In 1629, Champlain met Brûlé and MARSOLET in Tadoussac as he was leaving for Europe aboard an English ship: "They told me they had been taken by force, which is inconceivable." He assured them that their error would never be pardoned. "You were raised as young boys here, and yet you now sell out those who put bread in your mouths. Do you really think you deserve the esteem of the nation?" According to Father Archange Godbout, Nicolas MARSOLET returned to France of his own accord or otherwise, in 1632 or 1633, before Champlain came back to see to the future of the colony. MARSOLET had good reason not to wish to meet the founder of Québec since, in addition to being accused of treason; MARSOLET had prevented Champlain from bringing his adoptive daughters, two American Indian girls named Espérance and Charité, with him to France. He also refused to pass on his knowledge of the native languages to any of the French, except to Father Charles Lalement.
      While in France, MARSOLET lived in Rouen, in the parish of Saint-Sauveur. Setting aside the attire of a coureur des bois, he took on that of his deceased father. On November 9, 1635, it was as a "bourgeois citizen of Rouen" that he entered into a transaction with his uncle François Heugier, husband of Marie MARSOLET. A month later, on December 25, Champlain died in Québec, rekindling Marsolet's desire to return to New France. In 1636 and 1637, still working with businessmen and recruiters for New France, he prepared for his return to North America. On March 19, 1637, he promised to marry Marie le Barbier, age 18, daughter of Henry le Barbier and Marie le Villain; unfortunately the date of their wedding is not known. The following March 28, while the couple was still living in Rouen, MARSOLET received the Bellechasse seigneury from the Company of New France. Nicolas and Marie then settled in Québec, and on October 6, 1637, they took possession of the seigneury of the "fine stream for hunting", an event attended by Monsieur de Montmagny. In November, MARSOLET was a witness at the marriage of his interpreter colleague Olivier le Tardif to Louise Couillard-proof that his reputation had been restored.       While it's quite possible that MARSOLET returned to the life of the coureur des bois, he began to accumulate land, but would show little interest in cultivating it. In November 1640, he obtained the land owned by René Mahou on Sainte-Geneviève hill in Québec. From 1644 to 1672, he obtained even more land: the Arbre de la Croix (Prairies MARSOLET) seigneury, a few arpents located in the Cap-de-la-Madeleine seigneury and in what would later become the Gentilly seigneury. Even the acquisition of the MARSOLET fief and land in Lotbinière and Québec would not win over this man from Normandy, who, in 1646, after having been a clerk for the Company of One Hundred Associates, a merchant and a coureur des bois, became the captain of a barque.      
      Marie le Barbier had ten children-two boys and eight girls, two of whom were named Marie and two Louise. Despite the series of pregnancies from 1638 to 1655, Marie managed to get herself to Rouen in 1661, for it was in this city, in the parish of Saint-Vincent, that the youngest MARSOLET child, Marie, was baptized.
      The MARSOLET daughters would marry and become the ancestors of several extensive families: the Damours, the Lemires and the Guyons (Dion). The sons, Joseph and Jean, did not pass on their father's name. The name MARSOLET (Marsolais or Marcellais) took an unusual detour. On October 20, 1653, Louise MARSOLET, who was baptized in Québec in May of 1640, married carpenter Jean LeMire, born in Rouen in 1626. Several of their 16 children adopted their mother's family name as a surname and propagated it throughout the regions of Trois-Rivières and Montréal.
      Nicolas MARSOLET died on May 15, 1677 and was buried the following day. On May 8, 1681, his 62-year-old widow remarried with Denis LeMaître, tailor, who was approximately the same age. Twice a widow, Marie died in February, 1688.
Hélène-Andrée Bizier


Notes for NICHOLAS MARSOLET:
[McCurdie Family.FTW]

Nicholas Marsolet, born in Rouen, France c 1600-1601, was only 7 or 8 when he arrived in Nouvelle France with Champlian's 4th voyage in 1608. An orphan deemed to have aptitude with language, he was chosen by his Jesuit warders to live with the Indians so to eventually become the interpreter/go-between for the French government. He was entrusted to the Indian Chief Iroquet to live among the Algonquins in exchange for the young brave, Savignan. In 1611, during his 6th voyage, Champlain met Marsolet dressed in Indian costume and already very familiar with the Algonquin language. His Indian friends took pride in thier protege. During the next 18 years, he shared the life of the Algonquins and perfected their language.
Over the years, he adopted 3 Indian girls. When the English came to seize Quebec in 1629, he wanted to place them in safety by taking them to the citadel. He managed to get them in past the enemy guards, for which Champlain, accused him of complicity with the English enemy, which was false as he admitted later. Marsolet never wanted to teach others the language despite the Jesuit demands. Upon the death of Champlain in 1636 and after 23 years living with them, he left the Indians. The next year, he married Marie, 17. He was 35. They settled at Bellchasse and raised 11 children. Marie, the first, married Mathieu d'Amours. Nicholas never farmed. He was a pilot on the St Lawrenc and dealt in the fur trade, partnered with Lotbiniere, d'Amours brother-in-law.































Notes for M
ARIE LEBARBIER:
Ancestral File #: FJWL-F2
_UID: 10577E34763CD511A0BE00E0293D52B85FF1
     
Child of N
ICHOLAS MARSOLET and MARIE LEBARBIER is:
2. i.   MARIE MARGARITE5 MASOLET, b. February 22, 1637/38, Quebec; d. November 24, 1711, Hôtel-Dieu de Montreal, Canada.


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