Starting Sept. 5, 2014, Genealogy.com will be making a big change. GenForum message boards, Family Tree Maker homepages, and the most popular articles will be preserved in a read-only format, while several other features will no longer be available, including member subscriptions and the Shop.
 
Learn more


Home Page |Surname List |Index of Individuals |InterneTree |Sources


View Tree for Princess Of Egypt Scota Tephi NectaebusPrincess Of Egypt Scota Tephi Nectaebus (d. date unknown)

Princess Of Egypt Scota Tephi Nectaebus (daughter of Nectanebus) was born in Egypt, and died date unknown in Clahane Townland, Annagh Troughanacmy, Eire. She married Melesius Milespane Of Galicia Gallamh, son of Bile.

 Includes NotesNotes for Princess Of Egypt Scota Tephi Nectaebus:

Scota
Irish history records the story about Scota, the daughter of Pharaoh of Egypt who arrived in the southern part of Ireland between 4,000 and 3,500 years ago. She took on the trade route, sailing in search of the new world. She travelled to Spain from the Delta, by means of an Egyptian ship. She settled in the country of Kerry (south-western part of Ireland) and married Milesius and gave him eight sons.

The Scots claim descent from an Egyptian princess named Scota. According to the historian Eusebius she married a Scythian who was a prince of the Gaels. 'Scota' is an archetypal name bestowed upon women of her line. Originally it was probably 'Sacathach' or 'Scythian', a title given to the Egyptian princess as a gesture of acceptance by her husband's people.

A descendant of the Egyptan princess carrying this archetypal name married Eber, one of the Sons of Mil (descendants of 'Black Mil', also a descendant of the Egyptian princess). A Jewish princess named Tea Tephi married Eber's brother Eremon. The two brothers invaded the Tuatha de Danaan, the Faery folk of Ireland. Eber's wife died during the battle that preceded their victorious battle of Tailtinn. After Eber and Eremon defeated the Danaan, they divided Ireland between them.

The Gaels of Ireland, who sailed from the north of Spain, are proven to be genetically related to the Basque people of that region, which suggests that integration took place there. The Basques claim to be descended from Paleolithic inhabitants of Europe. While they speak an ancient Euskaric language (closely related to those of the Faery) they have many Caucasian characteristics. Black African genes also have been found in Gaels. While they do not prove the Scota legend, they certainly support it.
Irish history records the story about Scota, the daughter of Pharaoh of Egypt who arrived in the southern part of Ireland between 4,000 and 3,500 years ago. She took on the trade route, sailing in search of the new world. She travelled to Spain from the Delta, by means of an Egyptian ship. She settled in the country of Kerry (south-western part of Ireland) and married Milesius and gave him eight sons.

Milesius, an invader from Spain, came to Ireland to conquest the ancient tribes and to take the kingdoms from Tuatha-De-Danaans. MacCuill, Mac Ceacht and Mac Greine fought in a long bloody battle about three miles from Tralee. Not only did the Danaan princes die in the battle of Tralee but also Scota the warrior Queen of the invaders was also killed. It seems that her sons Heremon and Heber were the only surviors of Milesius ruling family and that they divided the country between them. One took the north and the other the south. Then they inevitably quarrelled and Heber was slain.

Scota is buried on the sloped mountains in view of Tralee Bay at a place called Glenscoheen (Scota's Glenn). Irish archaeologists have not yet carried out any investigation on the site, which consists of woodland and natural rocks. The Ordnance Survey of Ireland has shown the actual location of the burial of Scota.
The grave of Scota still remains, and has been pointed out from age to age by unlettered country folk, who knew nothing about written records and whose orally transmitted knowledge is their tithe of evidence to the great events of long past ages. The grave lies between Slieve Mis and the sea at Glenscoheen, in the townland of Clahane, in the parish of Annagh and the borony of Troughanacmy.

Fas the wife of Un also died in Kerry in the valley of Gleann Faisi, now called Glenafaish. Donn and his companions were shipwrecked in Kenmare Bay (Inver Sceine); and still Irish speaking people will show you a range of rocks which they call Teach-Dhoinn or Donn's house.






Children of Princess Of Egypt Scota Tephi Nectaebus and Melesius Milespane Of Galicia Gallamh are:
  1. +Prince Eirhe Ahmon MacMelesius, b., 1700 BC Eire, d. date unknown.
Created with Family Tree Maker


Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com