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Descendants of Patrick Jackson


      55. Karl Earnest10 Jackson (Susan Civility9, William McBride8, Carter7, Josiah6, Francis5, Williams4, Ralph R.3, Ralph R.2, Patrick1) was born May 09, 1878 in Alexander City, AL, and died October 06, 1979 in Hamilton, TX 76531. He married Ludie Strain 1906, daughter of William Strain and Arddee Stone. She was born January 29, 1888 in Shelby Co., AL Columbiana, AL, and died September 15, 1977 in Hamilton County, TX.

Notes for Karl Earnest Jackson:
Place of Death - Hamilton Hospital. Hour 1:21 p.m., Age at death, 101 years 4 months and 25 days
Religion Methodist. Services info. Clergy, Rev. Robert Lindsey, at Riley Funeral Home.Casket closed durng service and opened at end for viewing. Paull bearers: Lee Parish, Ollie Olson, ed Taylor, Malford Jakson, Farrow Jackson, Hubert Jackson.

Registered Voter in Hamilton County, tX 1937
Jackson, K. E., War Vetran, Hamilton, Voting Precinct No. 22...Hamilton
Newspaper article believed to be from a Hamilton, Texas paper dated around 1970 and written by J. Evans

Karl E. Jackson, 509 E. Henry, was 92 years of age May 9. He is tall and straight and very articulate in his speech. He has a contagious sense of humor and pursues his two hobbies - tending his garden and fishing - vigorously.
Karl Jackson is also one of less than 40 remaining veterans of the Spanish-American War.
His keen, sharp mind recalls incidents of the war as if they happened yesterday.
Jackson was born in Alexander City, Ala., in 1878, the son of a farmer. At 18 he was working in a steel mill in Birmingham.
"I was standing on the cormer waiting for a street car to pass so I could get on to work when a soldier stepped off the car, walked straight toward me and asked if I knew anybody who wanted to volunteer for the Army and go to the Philippines. I told him I'd volunteer if they'd send me to the Philippines, otherwise I wouldn't. He promised me I'd get to go.
"I had a brother working in a bar down the street, so I took my lunch box down and asked him to keep it until I got back. I went back after it 16 years later, but my brother didn't know what happened to the box... said he probably ate whatever was in it.
They told me I would have to have my parents' permission to join and gave me some papers to take home. It was 40 miles back home, so I just walked around the corner and signed the papers myself."
The recruiter gave Jackson a meal ticket and put him up in a hotel in Atlanta until the soldier could get ten men to enlist, then they'd all be sworn in at once.
"One of the men who came in, named Duncan, couldn't read or write. I wrote a real good hand, so they told me to teach Duncan enough to write his name so he could sign the enlistment papers. I did, and Duncan and I were pretty close friends for a long time.
"After we were sworn in, we were put on a train for Ft. Slocum at David's Island, New York. It took 2 1/2 days to make the trip and they gave me $10 to feed the men on.
"After we got to New York, I wrote my parentes I'd enlisted in the army... I don't think they liked it very much, but there wasn't anything they could do about it then.
"At Ft. Slocum we were to have basic training. One morning another fellow and I didn't answer reveille and the doctor came to the bed to see what was wrong. He told them to take us to the "pest house." We didn't know what that was, but we found out. It was a two room building at the rear of the hospital. We had small pox.
"We stayed in one room and a volunteer male nurse stayed in the other. for 92 days we didn't have a stitch of clothing. They burned everything we'd been issued.
"All we had to eat was half cooked eggs and a dose of castor oil three times a day. Also the nurse would ladle up a grease-like substance and pour it over us every day... I think this was to prevent pox marks.
"After several weeks we noticed that the supply truck would back up to the hospital across from us and unload supplies. We also timed the guard walking the post on our building, then worked the door loose so we could make a dash over and get some food and return before he saw us. We got the canned food alright, and tore the cans open with an old piece of a knife.
"Guess what we had...prunes!
"The prunes didnt go too well with that castor oil, but it was the first food we'd had in about 80 days, so we ate a whole can of them.
After leaving quarantine, Jackson went to New York City where he boarded the transport Sumner.
Sixty days later they arrived at Manila. They got to the Philippines on the same day as the Queen of England's birthday and the shore guns were firing a salute.
"Being a bunch of country boys, we didn't know what was going on and thought we'd never get ashore.
Jackson and Duncan were assigned as train guards when they arrived in the Philippines to protect the train crew and passengers from the insurgents.
"We lived in bamboo buldings with no bathing facilities. It was 110 degrees in the shade and we were wearing those old wool unifirms, so Duncan and I would go down to a small stream in some real tall grass every morning and bathe before we left on the train.
"We'd been doing this about eight months, and I had to make the train trip one morning by myself. Duncan kidded me as he took his towel and headed for the stream to take a bath.
" That was the last time we saw Duncan alive. The insurgents ambushed him, took him 10 miles up through the jungle and decapitated his body and laid it on the track for the train to run over. The engineer discovered the body before the train got to it, and they brought Duncan back.
"After this incident, out Regimental Commander, Col. John H. Page, called the men together and ordered us to burn every hut and kill every native in the area. While we were working our way through the jungle a bullet hit the buckle of the ammunition belt on the man next to me. It did not hurt the man but tore his belt. We saw the insurgent running and then fired at him. We continued on and later found him trying to hide under a large... My buddy ran his bayonnet through the man. I don't think I could've done that... but the guy hadn't shot my ammunition belt off either.
"We didn't have much food because the army just couldn't get it to us. There was alot of dysentery, and a man next to me in the hospital died. Somehow, they got ours names mixed up and reported to my outfit that I had died.
"About a month later I was released", Jackson chuckled, "and you should have seen the looks on the men's faces when I walked back into the company. They couldn't put me on duty, however, because I was dead, so I had a pretty good life before they got the thing straightened out. Fortunately, the news hadn't got back to my family.


Taken from The Birmingham News; Monday, August 17, 1970
Written by Leonard Stern

One of the last survivors (there are now only 41) of the Spanish-American War, Karl E. Jackson is an Alabama native who is well known for his vivid accounts of life in the Army.
At 92, is described as tall, straight and very articulate in his speech. He was born in Alexander City and at 18 was working in a steel mill in Birmingham before he joined the Army.
Jackson says "I was standing on the corner waiting for a street car to pass so I could get on to work when a soldier stepped off the car, walked straight toward me and asked if I knew anybody who wanted to volunteer for the Army and go to the Philippines. I told him I'd volunteer if they'd send me to the Philippines, otherwise I wouldn't. He promised me I'd get to go."
"They told me at the recruiting station I would have to have my parents' permission to join and gave me some papers to take home. It was 40 miles back home, so I just walked around the cormer and signed the papers myself."
Jackson's strangest tale has to do with the time he was reported to have "died" while in a Philippine hospital.
"There was a lot of dysentery, and a man next to me in the hospital died. Somehow they got our manes mixed up and reported to my outfit that I had died. About a month later I was released" Jackson chuckled, "and you should have seen the looks on the men's faces when I walked back into the company. They couldn't put me on duty, however, because I was "dead." I had a pretty good life until they got the thing straightened out."
Some of Jackson's stories aren't so light-hearted and relate the horrors of guerrilla warfare during the American occupation the the islands.
" That was the last time we saw Duncan alive. The insurgents ambushed him, took him 10 miles up through the jungle and decapitated his body and laid it on the track for the train to run over. After this incident, our regimental commander,Col. John H. Page, ordered us to burn every hut and kill every native in the area.
Jackson was discharged in 1903 and three years later married Ludie Strain of Wilsonville. They settled in Hamilton, Texas, and had three sons. "A few weeks ago I saw a report where there were 41 of us left," Jackson said, referring to the number of Spanish-American War vets left in the United States, "but some of those men are getting pretty old."

More About Karl Ernest Jackson and Ludie Strain:
Marriage: 1906


More About Karl Earnest Jackson:
Burial: October 08, 1979, I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Hamilton County, Texas
Social Security Number: 512 20 8439

Notes for Ludie Strain:
Regular Service in Chapel: - Family request tht only minister, pallbearers, and famly and funeral director be present at graveside. Cause of death, Senility, Heart Failure. Services at Riley Funeral Chapel, Rev. Geo. Sullivan, Hamilton, tX. Place of death, Hamilton Hosptial at 5:30 a.m. Pallbearers: Hubert Jackson, Bayor Jackson, Malcom Jackson, Ed Taylor.

More About Ludie Strain:
Burial: Unknown, I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Hamilton County, Texas
     
Children of Karl Jackson and Ludie Strain are:
  99 i.   Malcom Kearney11 Jackson, born 1908; died 2000. He married (1) Winnie Private; born Private. He married (2) Gail Carmine Private; born Private. He married (3) Isla Private; born Private.
  Notes for Malcom Kearney Jackson:
Lived at Route 1, Hamilton, Texas..

  100 ii.   Weldon Otis Jackson, born 1909; died 1932.
  101 iii.   Boyer Bert Jackson, born Private. He married Louise Blythe Private; born Private.


      56. Paul Albertus10 Jackson (Susan Civility9, William McBride8, Carter7, Josiah6, Francis5, Williams4, Ralph R.3, Ralph R.2, Patrick1) was born November 08, 1882, and died February 1965 in Texas. He married Ethel Leon Arnett. She was born 1881, and died 1946.
     
Children of Paul Jackson and Ethel Arnett are:
  102 i.   William Melford11 Jackson, born 1905; died 1992. He married Allice Kate Hellums Private; born Private.
  103 ii.   Edward Leon Jackson, born 1907; died 1971. He married Marie Louise Chambliss; born 1907; died 1984.
  104 iii.   James Farrar Jackson, born 1913; died 2000. He married (1) Pearl Watson Osborne Private; born Private. He married (2) Mable Jewell Foster; born 1914; died 1979.
  105 iv.   Marguerite Gerildine Jackson, born Private. She married William Michael Bilnoski Private; born Private.
  106 v.   Fred Raymon Jackson, born Private. He married Julia Ester Brown Private; born Private.


      57. Era Susan10 Jackson (Susan Civility9, William McBride8, Carter7, Josiah6, Francis5, Williams4, Ralph R.3, Ralph R.2, Patrick1) was born January 21, 1886 in Sylacauga, AL or Shelby Co., AL, and died January 09, 1938 in Kingdom, Shelby Co., AL. She married William Bryant Crumpton 1902 in Married by Sam S. Crumpton, son of Isaac Crumpton and Margaret Spradley. He was born April 28, 1878, and died December 09, 1959.

Notes for Era Susan Jackson:
Obituary sent to me by Shelby County Historical Society, Inc. Era Susan Jackson was daughter of John Ephriam Jackson and Susan Civility Jackson. Era Susan Jackson's photo is in the book Heritage of Coosa County, Alabama on page 96.

Obituary
Mrs. Era Susan Jackson Crumpton of Kingdom community died in a Birmingham hospital Sunday of burns she received at her home Saturday morning. Mrs. Crumpton wa standing before an open fire when her clothing became ignited. She was rushed to the hospital immediately and lingered till Sunday morning. Mrs. Crumpton was one of the most useful women of her community and had many friends.

Funeral services were held at Wilsonville Monday. Surviving are her husband, W. B. Crumpton; three daughters, Mrs. Talmadge Blackerby, and Mrs. Bernard Lee, Bessemer; Mrs. Frank Moon, Columbiana; three sons, Floyd and Milton Crumpton, Birmingham and Lawrence crumpton, Columbiana.




More About Era Susan Jackson:
Burial: Unknown, Wilsonville Cemetery, Wilsonville, AL

Notes for William Bryant Crumpton:
Samuel Silas Savannah Sylvester Smith Crumpton (1865-1923) was an ordained elder in the Primitive Baptist Church in Shelby Co, AL.

Samuel was William Bryant "Bun" Crumpton's Uncle and he married Era Susan Jackson (dau of John E. and Susan C.) and William Bryant "Bun" Crumpton in November 25,1902 in Shelby Co, AL.

"Bun" Crumpton joined the church in 1914.

Information about Samuel from the book THE DAYS OF OUR YEARS by Alva riska Crumpton given to me by Dan Crumpton
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
page 270-271
"August 2, 1914. The Primitive Baptist Church of Christ at Mt. Olive met at Waxahatchee Creek according to appointment at 10 A.M. First, organized conference. Opened the door for the reception of members when Sister Daisy E. Creig, Brother C. M. Farris and Brother W. B. Crumpton came forward and told Christian experience as we believe and was received and baptized with the two who joined the day before. Then conference adjourned." [William Bryant "Bun" Crumpton was 36 years old].

page 1-2
Samuel had a crippled right shoulder and hand. He was thrown from a "go cart" (a two wheeled vehicle) when he was a young man and sustained the injured shoulder. He was never able to do manual labor after that. His brothers told their father that if he would send Sam to school to get an education they would be glad for him to go and they would stay at home and do the farming. The father agreed and Sam attended the public schools. He never attended high school, but he did teach some high school subjects in the elementary school. He taught at Sterretts, Four Mile, Wright, Mt. Era, Camp Branch and Thorsby. All schools were in Shelby Co, AL except Thorsby which was in Chilton Co, AL.

He sustained the crippled hand on a scythe blade. He carried the blade to a blacksmith shop to have it sharpened. The blade fitted into a cradle for cutting oats and wheat. On his way home he attempted to cross the creek on a footlog. He fell from the log into the creek and fell on the blade. All the tendons in his wrist and hand were severed. He came very near bleeding to death. He managed to get to his house and his mother held some cloths tightly on the wound until the doctor arrived. After the accident, he held his pencil between his thumb and little finger. It was awkward at first, but he learned to write well.



More About William Bryant Crumpton:
Burial: Unknown, Wilsonville Cem, Wilsonville, AL
     
Children of Era Jackson and William Crumpton are:
  107 i.   Carrie Junita11 Crumpton, born Private.
  108 ii.   Leland Winnie Crumpton, born March 05, 1904; died April 05, 1998. She married (1) Claiborne Lee; died Unknown. She married (2) William Lee Gardner Private; born Private.
  109 iii.   Eddie Leona Crumpton, born Private. She married Talmage Blackerby Private; born October 24, 1901; died March 1984.
  Notes for Talmage Blackerby:
Address of Last residence, Anniston, Calhoun County, AL

  More About Talmage Blackerby:
Social Security Number: Bef. 1950, 418-05-4133 in Alabama

  110 iv.   Floyd Andrew Crumpton, born Private.
  111 v.   Farris Leonard Crumpton, born November 05, 1910; died November 28, 1932.
  Notes for Farris Leonard Crumpton:
On his tombstone.....He has gone to the mansion of rest. Farris died as a result of being locked in a freezer.


  112 vi.   Jessie Milton Crumpton, born Private. He married Mary Aseree Mooney Private; born Private.
  113 vii.   Ollie Sue Crumpton, born Private. She married Frank Moon Private; born Private.
  114 viii.   William Lawrence Crumpton, born March 15, 1920 in Kingdom, Columbiana; died April 16, 1980. He married Edith Mae Mooney Private; born Private.
  More About William Lawrence Crumpton:
Burial: Unknown, O.J. Mooney Private Cem. Weogufka, AL



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