Big changes have come to Genealogy.com — all content is now read-only, and member subscriptions and the Shop have been discontinued.
 
Learn more


Home Page |Surname List |Index of Individuals |InterneTree |Sources


View Tree for Thomas De Che ReiThomas De Che Rei (b. Abt. 1378)

Thomas De Che Rei4789, 4790, 4791 was born Abt. 1378 in France4792, 4793, 4794, died in England4795, 4796, 4797.

 Includes NotesNotes for Thomas De Che Rei:
[cherry.ged]

GIVN Thomas De Che
SURN Rei
REFN: 540
Other possible spellings of last name: DeCherie, de Cherie.
According to "The Roots of the Cherry Tree" by Marjorie Loomis Cherry
(1955), Thomascame from France to England with his son, Jean de
Cherie, about 1407.
According to "A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry
of Great Britian and Ireland", By John Burke and Sir John Bernard Burke,
Esq. of the Middle Temple, Barrister at Law, London, Henry Colburn,
Publisher, Greeat Malborough Street, MDCCCXLVII.:
"The family of Cherry, formerly os Shottesbrooke, ormore properly, as
of old, Cherrie, of which there are several branches remaining, is of
Norman origin, being, it is said, descended on the male side from the De
Cheries, Seigneurs de Branvel, Villamara, Beuaval, and Villencourt, &c,
in Normandy, and on the female, from the Bretons, both families
recognized inall the earlier "Recherches," or Visitations, as of the
noblesse of Normandy.
"A branch of the Cheries at an early period embraced the Huguenot
doctrine, and in consequence of the religious persecutions carried on
against that party, migrated and settled in England, where they
afterwords became possessed of considerable estates. The estates and
manors of Shottesbroode, White Walthams, Smewins, Winsors, and Bray, in
Berkshire, formed part of their possession: at the latter place a school
was founded by one of the family, and endowed with lands for the
education of twenty poor boys.
"Of this family was Francis Cherry, celebrated by Hearne, the
antiquary, (whose father was a domestic servaant to the Cherrys, and who
was himsself brought up and educated at their expense,) as 'the most
accomplished gentleman of his day.' A fine portrait of him hangs in the
picture gallery of the Bedleian Library in Oxford. His father, William
was killed by the horses running away with his chariot, and overturning
it at the moment when he had projected his head, whereby it was at once
severed from the body...
"Francis Cherry consealed many celebrated Royalists at Shottesbrooke,
and at White Waltham (another of his houses), the very learned Charles
Leslie, whom he sent (without success) to convert 'The Pretender'."[cherry1.ged]

GIVN Thomas De Che
SURN Rei
REFN: 540
Other possible spellings of last name: DeCherie, de Cherie.
According to "The Roots of the Cherry Tree" by Marjorie Loomis Cherry
(1955), Thomascame from France to England with his son, Jean de
Cherie, about 1407.
According to "A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry
of Great Britian and Ireland", By John Burke and Sir John Bernard Burke,
Esq. of the Middle Temple, Barrister at Law, London, Henry Colburn,
Publisher, Greeat Malborough Street, MDCCCXLVII.:
"The family of Cherry, formerly os Shottesbrooke, ormore properly, as
of old, Cherrie, of which there are several branches remaining, is of
Norman origin, being, it is said, descended on the male side from the De
Cheries, Seigneurs de Branvel, Villamara, Beuaval, and Villencourt, &c,
in Normandy, and on the female, from the Bretons, both families
recognized inall the earlier "Recherches," or Visitations, as of the
noblesse of Normandy.
"A branch of the Cheries at an early period embraced the Huguenot
doctrine, and in consequence of the religious persecutions carried on
against that party, migrated and settled in England, where they
afterwords became possessed of considerable estates. The estates and
manors of Shottesbroode, White Walthams, Smewins, Winsors, and Bray, in
Berkshire, formed part of their possession: at the latter place a school
was founded by one of the family, and endowed with lands for the
education of twenty poor boys.
"Of this family was Francis Cherry, celebrated by Hearne, the
antiquary, (whose father was a domestic servaant to the Cherrys, and who
was himsself brought up and educated at their expense,) as 'the most
accomplished gentleman of his day.' A fine portrait of him hangs in the
picture gallery of the Bedleian Library in Oxford. His father, William
was killed by the horses running away with his chariot, and overturning
it at the moment when he had projected his head, whereby it was at once
severed from the body...
"Francis Cherry consealed many celebrated Royalists at Shottesbrooke,
and at White Waltham (another of his houses), the very learned Charles
Leslie, whom he sent (without success) to convert 'The Pretender'."[cherry1.FTW]

GIVN Thomas De Che
SURN Rei
REFN: 540
Other possible spellings of last name: DeCherie, de Cherie.
According to "The Roots of the Cherry Tree" by Marjorie Loomis Cherry
(1955), Thomascame from France to England with his son, Jean de
Cherie, about 1407.
According to "A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry
of Great Britian and Ireland", By John Burke and Sir John Bernard Burke,
Esq. of the Middle Temple, Barrister at Law, London, Henry Colburn,
Publisher, Greeat Malborough Street, MDCCCXLVII.:
"The family of Cherry, formerly os Shottesbrooke, ormore properly, as
of old, Cherrie, of which there are several branches remaining, is of
Norman origin, being, it is said, descended on the male side from the De
Cheries, Seigneurs de Branvel, Villamara, Beuaval, and Villencourt, &c,
in Normandy, and on the female, from the Bretons, both families
recognized inall the earlier "Recherches," or Visitations, as of the
noblesse of Normandy.
"A branch of the Cheries at an early period embraced the Huguenot
doctrine, and in consequence of the religious persecutions carried on
against that party, migrated and settled in England, where they
afterwords became possessed of considerable estates. The estates and
manors of Shottesbroode, White Walthams, Smewins, Winsors, and Bray, in
Berkshire, formed part of their possession: at the latter place a school
was founded by one of the family, and endowed with lands for the
education of twenty poor boys.
"Of this family was Francis Cherry, celebrated by Hearne, the
antiquary, (whose father was a domestic servaant to the Cherrys, and who
was himsself brought up and educated at their expense,) as 'the most
accomplished gentleman of his day.' A fine portrait of him hangs in the
picture gallery of the Bedleian Library in Oxford. His father, William
was killed by the horses running away with his chariot, and overturning
it at the moment when he had projected his head, whereby it was at once
severed from the body...
"Francis Cherry consealed many celebrated Royalists at Shottesbrooke,
and at White Waltham (another of his houses), the very learned Charles
Leslie, whom he sent (without success) to convert 'The Pretender'."

 Includes NotesMarriage Notes for Thomas De Che Rei and <Unnamed>:
[cherry.ged]

REFN5419[cherry1.ged]

REFN5419[cherry1.FTW]

REFN5419

Children of Thomas De Che Rei are:
  1. +John Jean de Che Rei, b. Abt. 1400, France4798, 4799, 4800, d., England4801, 4802, 4803.
Created with Family Tree Maker


Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com