Big changes have come to Genealogy.com — all content is now read-only, and member subscriptions and the Shop have been discontinued.
 
Learn more


[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]

Descendants of Morgan Morgan

Generation No. 2


2. ANNE20 MORGAN (MORGAN19, CHARLES18, JOHN17, WILLIAM16, THOMAS15, ROWLAND14, THOMAS13, JOHN12, IEUAN AP LLEWELYN AP11, LLEWELYN AP10, MORGAN AP9 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN AP8 IVOR, IFOR AP7 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN LLEIA AP6 IVOR, IVOR AP5 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN AP4 IVOR, IVOR AP3 BLEDRI, BLEDRI2, CADIFOR1 FAWR)71,72,73,74 was born 1716 in Christiana, New Castle, Delaware, USA, and died Bef. Mar 01, 1763 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA. She married (1) RUBEN PAXTON75 in Frederick County, Virginia, son of EDWARD PAXTON and MARGARET COLLINS. He was born 1711 in Christianna, New Castle, Delaware, USA76, and died WFT Est. 1733-180577. She married (2) NATHANIEL THOMAS78 1738 in Orange, Frederick County, Virginia. He was born 1718 in Christiana, New Castle County, Delaware78, and died Bef. Mar 01, 1763 in Date of probate of his will. Who was murdered.. She married (3) NATHANIEL THOMPSON79 173879. He was born WFT Est. 1689-171879, and died WFT Est. 1743-180379.

Notes for A
NNE MORGAN:
2nd child of Col. Morgan Morgan, born certa 1716, Christiana, Delaware, only daughter, married (1) Nathaniel Thomas, who was murdered by the Tories before March 1, 1763 (date of probate), and had six children, and married (2) Reuben Paxton moved to South Carolina when her brother Henry and Charles' families moved.


Notes for R
UBEN PAXTON:
Reuben Paxton who was the 2nd husband of Anne Morgan who married 1st Nathaniel Thompson, they removed to South Carolina? According to Now and Long Ago by Glenn D. Lough, the parents were Edward/Edmund Paxton and Margaret Collins, his only known sibling was Nancy Ann Paxton who married Zackquill Morgan, born September 8, 1735.


More About R
UBEN PAXTON and ANNE MORGAN:
Marriage: Frederick County, Virginia

Notes for N
ATHANIEL THOMAS:
The Will of Nathaniel Thomas was probated on March 1, 1763. He makes bequest to Ann, daughter of Morgan ap Morgan, to his sons Isaac and Jonathan, and to his daughters Catherine Emery, Rachal, Elizabeth and Mary Thomas. The executors named are Robert Harper and Thomas Hart. Witnesses Mary Magnus, Perrygren MackNess, William McKee and John Smith.

The pertinent part of the will is as follows:
"In the name of God, amen; the 13th day of October, 1760, I, Nathaniel Thomas of the county of Frederick... Item (The First) I give and bequeath unto Ann Morgan, daughter of Morgan Morgan of the county of Frederick the sum of ten pounds to be paid her by my executors hereafter named. Whither said Ann Morgan lived with me for many years past and sometimes pretended to be my wife and by whom I suppose to have begotten sundry sons and daughters, which said sum of ten pounds I devise may be paid her the said Ann, upon her passing to my executors a legal sufficient acquittance against any further right to any of my real or personal estate, and upon her the said Ann's refusing to pass sufficient and legal acquittance my will and desire is that my said executors so defend my said estate from her, the said Ann, as long as law or legality will permit or allow them..."
The second item provides that after sale of personal property and real estate, the entire proceeds shall be divided among his children, supposedly the "sundry sons and daughters" of Ann. "To son Isaac Thomas seven pounds; to daughter Catherine Emery five pounds; to daughter Rachel Thomas twenty-five pounds, and that the balance shall be divided between Elizabeth Thomas, Mary Thomas and son Jonathan Thomas, provided that they shall be living at the time of death."

"Nathaniel Thomas, 850 acres. This land is described as being 'at the head of the South Branch of Opeckon,' and lies along the eastern foot of Little North Mountain. In 1747 Nathaniel Thomas sold 200 acres of this land to Nathaniel Cartmell, 'Beginning at Joist Hite's corner,' and 'adjoining Cartmell's other land.' Martin Carmell, William Glover, and Joseph Lupton were the witnesses.
"The Will of Nathaniel Thomas was probated March 1, 1763. He makes bequests to Ann, daughter of Morgan ap Morgan, to his sons Isaac and Jonathan, and to his daughters Catherine Emery, Rachel, Elizabeth, Mary Thomas. The executors named are Robert Harper and Thomas Hart. Witnesses, Mary Magnus, Perrygren MackNess, William McKee, and John Smith."
RE: Hopewell Friends History 1734-1934, Frederick County, Virginia, Page 18.


More About N
ATHANIEL THOMAS:
Probate: Mar 01, 1763, Will Probate date80

More About N
ATHANIEL THOMAS and ANNE MORGAN:
Marriage: 1738, Orange, Frederick County, Virginia

More About N
ATHANIEL THOMPSON and ANNE MORGAN:
Marriage: 173881
     
Children of A
NNE MORGAN and NATHANIEL THOMAS are:
7. i.   ISAAC21 THOMAS, b. Feb 06, 1736/37, Virginia, USA.
8. ii.   CATHERINE EMERY THOMAS, b. 1738.
  iii.   RACHEL THOMAS, b. 1740.
  iv.   ELIZABETH THOMAS, b. 1742.
  v.   MARY THOMAS, b. 1744.
  vi.   JONATHAN THOMAS, b. 1746.
     
Children of ANNE MORGAN and NATHANIEL THOMPSON are:
  vii.   CATHERINE21 THOMPSON81, b. Abt. 174081; d. WFT Est. 1741-183481.
  viii.   RACHEL THOMPSON81, b. Abt. 174081; d. WFT Est. 1741-183481.
  ix.   ELIZABETH THOMPSON81, b. Abt. 174081; d. WFT Est. 1741-183481.
  x.   MARY THOMPSON81, b. Abt. 174081; d. WFT Est. 1741-183481.
  xi.   JONATHAN THOMPSON81, b. Abt. 174081; d. WFT Est. 1741-183081.
  xii.   ISAAC THOMPSON81, b. Feb 06, 1735/3681; d. WFT Est. 1737-182681.


3. CAPTAIN DAVID20 MORGAN (MORGAN19, CHARLES18, JOHN17, WILLIAM16, THOMAS15, ROWLAND14, THOMAS13, JOHN12, IEUAN AP LLEWELYN AP11, LLEWELYN AP10, MORGAN AP9 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN AP8 IVOR, IFOR AP7 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN LLEIA AP6 IVOR, IVOR AP5 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN AP4 IVOR, IVOR AP3 BLEDRI, BLEDRI2, CADIFOR1 FAWR)82,83,84,85,86,87,88,89,90,91 was born May 12, 1721 in Christiana, New Castle, Delaware, USA92,93,94,95, and died May 09, 1813 in Monongalia, Virginia, USA96. He married SARAH STEVENS97,98,99 Dec 20, 1745 in Frederick County, Virginia or Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA100,101,102, daughter of JOHN STEVENS. She was born Oct 07, 1726 in Swedeland, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and died May 15, 1799 in Rivesville, Monongalia (Marion) County, Virginia103.

Notes for C
APTAIN DAVID MORGAN:
3rd child of Col. Morgan Morgan.
      David Morgan, called the "Indian Fighter," was born in Delaware, May 12, 1721, died May 19, 1813, married about 1745, Sarah Stephens, a Quaker lady of Pennsylvania and settled on a farm near Winchester, Frederick County, Maryland, and later to Monongalia County, Virginia.

      David had a knowledge of surveying and he was appointed one of the Commissioners on the part of the Colony of Virginia to assist Col. Washington in 1746, to locate the establish the northern boundary of the Fairfax estate, which was to be the boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania. This historical monument was erected at the north branch of the Potomac, known as the Fairfax Stone, was the consummation of their labors. Afterwards he assisted Washington in taking up those fine tracts of land on the Monongahela and Ohio Rivers, known to this day as "Washington Bottoms." The knowledge of the country obtained by this employment induced him, probably, later to became a resident of this section himself when it was about to be opened for settlement. This may all be "romance and it may be fact; nevertheless, it is good family tradition, and in the absence of anything to the contrary, we will resume it to be the truth until something to the contrary is shown.
      Historians have caused themselves no end of trouble in trying to determine just when David and Zackquill Morgan settled in the Monongahela Valley, and as usual, are all wrong. "In the year 1768, the place which had been occupied for a while by Thomas Decker and his unfortunate associates, and where Morgantown is now situated, was settled by a party of immigrants, one of which was David Morgan, who became so conspicuous for personal prowess, and for the daring, yet deliberate courage displayed by him, during the subsequent hostilities with the Indians." RE: Chronicles of Border Warfare by Alexander Scott Withers, McClain Printing, Copyright 1895, reprinted 2001.
      Some authorities say that David and Zackquill came together to the site of Morgantown, and that a short time later they separated, David moving his family a few miles further up the river in the vicinity of where Riversville is now located. Others state that David first moved to the mouth of Redstone Creek, Pennsylvania, in 1769, remaining two years, and then moved to Monongahela, where he spent the rest of his life, about six miles north of Fairmont.
      It will be noticed that the situation here is identical with that in the case of Colonel Morgan Morgan's settlement at Bunker Hill. And as is generally the case, the tendency is to place the date too early. Fortunately, there are facts that determine exactly when David located here, but they are not found where the average historian would come at them. David's son, Evan Morgan, saw service during the Revolution, and when he applied for a pension in 1833, he stated: "I was born on Town Creek, now in Allegany County, Maryland, in 1753; that while an infant my father moved from Town Creek to Frederick County, Virginia, and in 1773 removed to Monongalia County." And that is definite. It will be noted later that Zackquill also lived for a time in Pennsylvania.

"David Morgan and Nicholas Woods constructed cabins about five miles south of present-day Fairmont in 1772."
RE: Early History of Marion County, Marion County's European Pioneers and Settlers by Dr. Robert Jay Digler, Institute of Public Affairs and Professor of Political Science, West Virginia University.

"Morgan, David -- Served as a private in Maj. William Haymond's Company of Virginia Militia, was a son of Col. Morgan Morgan, and was born May 12, 1721, in Christiana, Del. Came to present Berkeley County with his father, and later to Monongalia County. Died May 19, 1813, is buried near Rivesville. Married ca. 1743, Sarah Stephens (Stevens), of Pennsylvania, born 1726, died May 12, 1799. Children: Morgan, b. December 20, 1746, d. 1829, m. about 1768, Mary Drusilla Prickett, b. March 1, 1751, d. 1817; James, b. April 5, 1748, went to Illinois, m. in 1786, Margaret Jolliffe, b. 1770; Elizabeth, b. 1755, m. Abraham Lowe, d. 1798; Evan, b. 1754, d. 1850, m. (1) Mrs. Woodfin, (2) Camilla Hartley, b. August 28, 1765, d. June 2, 1838; Zackwell, b. September 8, 1758, d. 1834/35, m. Sina (Lina) West, b. October 1, 1777, d. April 1849; Stephen, b. October 17, 1761, d. 1849, m. Sarah Summerville; Sarah, b. 1765, d. 1791, m. Elijah Burris (Burrows); Catherine, b. January 16, 1769, d. April 30, 1848, m. about 1789/90, Maj. John West, b. July 18, 1770, d. November 18, 1831."
RE: Now and Long Ago, Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Marion County, p. 391.

When this book was written, the "border" was between Virginia and Ohio. Here is the story of the incident from Wither's book:
"In the neighborhood of Prickett's Fort, the inhabitants were early alarmed, by circumstances which induced a belief that Indians were near, and they accordingly entered that garrison. It was soon evident that their fears were groundless, but as the season was fast approaching when the savages might be expected to commence depredations, they determined on remaining in the fort, of a night, and yet prosecute the business of their farms as usual during the day. Among those who wee at this time in the fort was David Morgan, then upwards of sixty years of age. Early in April, being himself unwell, he sent his two children - Stephen, a youth of sixteen and Sarah, a girl of fourteen - to feed the cattle at his farm, about a mile off. The children, thinking to remain all day and spend the time in preparing ground for watermelons, unknown to their father took with them some bread and meat. Having fed the stock, Stephen set himself to work, and while he was engaged in grubbling, his sister would remove the brush, and otherwise aid him in the labor of clearing the ground; occasionally going to the house to wet some linen which she had spread out to bleach. Morgan, after the children had been gone some time, betook himself to bed, and son falling asleep, dreamed the he saw Stephen and Sarah walking about the fort yard, scalped. Aroused from slumber by the harrowing spectacle presented to his sleeping view, he inquired if the children had returned, and upon learning they had not, he set out to see what detained them, taking with him his gun. As he approached the house, still impressed with the horrible fear that he should find his dream realized, he ascended an eminence, from which he could distinctly see over his plantation, and descrying from thence the objects of his anxious solitude, he proceeded directly to them, and seated himself on an old log, near at hand. He had been here but a few minutes, before he saw two Indians come out from the house and make toward the children. Fearing to alarm them too much, and thus deprive them of the power of exerting themselves ably to make an escape, he appraised them in a careless manner of their danger, and told them to run towards the fort -- himself still maintaining his seat on the log. The Indians then raised a hideous yell and ran in pursuit; but the old gentleman showing himself at that instant, caused them to forbear the chase, and shelter themselves behind trees. He then endeavored to effect an escape, by flight, and the Indians followed after him. Age and consequent infirmity rendered him unable long to continue out of their reach; and aware that they were gaining considerably on him, he wheeled to shoot. Both instantly sprang behind trees, and Morgan seeking shelter in the same manner, got behind a sugar, which was so small as to leave part of his body exposed. Looking around, he saw a large oak about twenty yards farther, and he made to it. Just as he reached it, the foremost Indian sought security behind the sugar sapling, which he had found insufficient for his protection. The Indian, sensible that it would not shelter him, threw himself down by the side of a log which lay at the rot of the sapling. But this did not afford him sufficient cover, and Morgan, seeing him exposed to a shot, fired at him. The ball took effect, and the savage, rolling himself over on his back stabbed himself twice in the beast.
Having thus succeeded in killing on of his pursuers, Morgan again took to flight, and the remaining Indian after him. It was now that trees could afford him no security. His gun was unloaded, and his pursuer could approach him safely. The unequal race was continued about sixty yards, when looking over his shoulder, he saw the savage within a few paces of him, and with his gun raised. Morgan sprang to one side, and the ball whizzed harmlessly by him. The odds were not now great, and both advanced to closer combat, sensible of the prize for which they had to contend, and each determined to deal death to his adversary. Morgan aimed a blow with his gun; but the Indian hurled a tomahawk at him, which cutting the little finger of his left hand entirely off, and injuring the one next to it very much, knocked the gun out of his grasp, and they closed. Being a good wrestler, Morgan succeeded in throwing the Indian; but soon found himself overturned, and the savage upon him, feeling for his knife and sending forth a most horrific yell, as is their custom when they consider victory as secure. A woman's apron, which he had taken from the house and fastened around him above his knife, so hindered him in getting at it quickly, that Morgan, getting one of his fingers in his mouth, deprived him of the use of that hand, and disconcerted him very much by continuing to grind it between his teeth. At length the Indian got hold of his knife, but so far towards the blade, that Morgan too got a small hold on the extremity of the handle; and as the Indian drew it from the scabbard, Morgan, biting his finger with all his might, and thus causing him somewhat to relax his grasp, drew it through his hand, gashing it most severely.
By this time both had gained their feet, and the Indian, sensible of the great advantage gained over him, endeavored to disengage himself; but Morgan held fast to the finger until he succeeded in hiving him a fatal stab, and felt the almost lifeless body sinking in his arms. He then loosened his hold and departed for the fort.
On his way he met with his daughter, who not being able to keep pace with her brother, had followed his footsteps to the river bank where he had plunged in, and was then making her way to the canoe. Assured thus far of the safety of his children, he accompanied his daughter to the fort and then, in company with a party of the men, returned to his farm, to see if there were any appearance of other Indians being about there. On arriving at the spot where the desperate struggle had been, the wounded Indian was not to be seen; but trailing him by the blood which flowed profusely from his side, they found him concealed in the branches of a fallen tree. He had taken the knife from his body, bound up the wound with the apron, and on their approaching him, accosted them familiarly, with the salutation 'How do broder, how do broder. Alas! Poor fellow! Their brotherhood extended no further than to the gratification of a vengeful feeling. He was tomahawked and scalped; and, as if this would not fill the measure of their vindictive passions, both he and his companion were flayed, their skins tanned and converted into saddle seats, shot pouches, and belts -- A striking instance of the barbarities, which a revengeful spirt will lead its possessors to perpetuate."
RE: Chronicles of Border Warfare by Alexander Scott Withers, McClain Printing, copyright 1895, Reprinted 2001, pp. 275-278.

"A letter to the authorities at Fort Pitt, April 20, 1779; from 'Almon's Remembrancer,' VIII. 274"
'A woman on Cheat River, after killing one Indian and wounding another made her escape. Mr. Sampson's son was taken at his plantation, and another man and a woman of that neighborhood were captured. About April 9, four men sent express from Fort Pitt to Hannastown were found dead and scalped about fifteen miles from the former past on the great road. April 14, near Cavill's mill two skulking Indians were seen, one was killed, the other escaped. April 16, David Maxwell and his wife were found killed and scalped at Brush Run, near Braddock's old road. Their daughter had been captured. The situation is more alarming than it has ever been, the very place the inhabitants have fled for safety has become a dangerous frontier. April 13, (1779), David Morgan of Monongalia County discovered two Indians creeping upon some young people in the field. Morgan had a personal encounter with one whom he finally disabled...'
"One of the most important magazines in America published an account of Morgan's fight with two Indians in May 1779, less than a month after the encounter. This was the 'United States Magazine,' edited by the famous novelist Judge Hugh Henry Breckenridge (May, 1779 issue, pp. 310-212). The article (a letter) is headed 'Remarkable encounter of a white man with two Indians.'....
RE: Now and Long Ago, pp. 512-513.

L. V. McWhorter, of Berlin, West Virginia, USA, writes me: "A few years ago, the descendants of David Morgan erected a monument on the spot where fell one of the Indians. On the day of the unveiling of the monument, there was on exhibition at the spot, a shot-pouch and saddle skirt made from the skins of the Indians. Greenwood S. Morgan, a great-grandson of the Indian slayer, informs me that the shot-pouch is now in the possession of a distant relative, living in Wetzel County, West Virginia, USA. The knife with which the Indian was killed, is owned by Morgan's descendants in Marion County, West Virginia, USA -- R. G. T.
(RE: Chronicles Of Boarder Warfare, Alexander Scott Withers, copyright 1895, Reprinted 2001, pp. 278-279.)

Steven Morgan, was the sheriff of Monongalia County when he made this statement to the Monongalia Gazette, of Morgantown, in October of 1808:
Some historians have asserted that my father killed three Indians in the fight at our homestead in 1779. He was responsible only for the death of two Indians; they were of the Delaware Nation, and about thirty years old. One was very large, weighing about two hundred pounds; the other was short and stocky, weighing about one hundred and eighty pounds. My father (David Morgan) was six feet one inch tall, and at that time weighed one hundred and ninety pounds, about. It has been published that my father tomahawked and skinned the savages. This is not true. He left one Indian alive, but dying, and returned to the fort and to his bed, which he had left less than an hour before, where he remained for the remainder of the day. The oft' made statement that he attempted to escape to the fort by flight is not true. He did not run a single step with the expectation of getting away from the savages. The running he did was done to gain an advantage over the enemy, and this he accomplished. "My father traveled the frontier wilderness from boyhood, form Canada, New York, Pittsburgh, to Kentucky, Tennessee, to South Carolina, and fought the Indians and other enemies of our country as often as became necessary. Before the fight at our homestead, he had fought and killed seven Indians in single handed combat. Others there were, including French and British soldiers, wounded and killed by him as a soldier in battle. He well understood the Indians and their method of warfare, and could speak the languages of the Delaware, Shawnee, and Wyndotte nations. "In his manner of living and defending himself and others, he was no different from his contemporaries. I certainly would not class him an Indian Fighter, no more than I would class Jacob Prickett, Frederick Ice, or Nathaniel Cochran as such. He was a Christian, a patriot, a soldier, a surveyor, and a very good farmer, the profession of which he is most proud, and a loving, and most times, a too indulgent parent." RE: Now and Long Age, pp. 521-522.

David Morgan, born, Christiana, Delaware, May 13, 1721; died in Monongalia County, May 9, 1813. He was a son of Morgan Morgan and Catherine Garrettson or Garrison. With his father, he removed to near Winchester and later established a move in Berkeley County. Then with his brother, Zackquill, he came to the Monongahela Valley about 1766-68 and settled on the Monongahela between Fairmont and Morgantown. He married Sarah Stevenson, a Quakeress, of Pennsylvania, and to them were born the following children: Stephen, Sarah (Burriss), Zackquill, Morgan, James, Jacob, Elizabeth, David, Catherine, and Evan T. Morgan.
At the outbreak of the Revolution, Morgan Morgan, a son, was in command of a company of Virginia militia. When Captain William Haymond's company was formed in Monongalia County, during the Revolution, Morgan Morgan became a lieutenant of it, and his fataher, David, and three other Morgans, David, Evan, and James joined the company as privates.
David was an engineer and aided the commission named by the Governor of Virginia to survey the Mason and Dixon line. He was with George Washington on some of the expeditions in Monongahela region. He is buried near the Morgan Mines, Marion County.
His most celebrated exploit was the hand-to-hand fight in 1779, near his home along the Monongahela River in which he killed two Indians who had attempted to kidnap or kill two of his children.
RE: West Virginians in the Revolution by Russ B. Johnson, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, MD, 1977, p. 201.

Morgan, David, born, Christiana, Delaware, Mary 18, 1721; died in Monongalia County, May 9, 1813. He was a son of Morgan Morgan and Catherine Garretson or Garrison. With his father, he mrmoved to near Winchester and later established a home in Berkeley County. Then with his brother Zackquill, he came to the Monongahela Valley about 1766-68 and settled on the Monongahela between Fairmont and Morgantown. He married Sarah Stevenson, a Quakeress, of Pennsylvania, and to them were born the following children: Stephen; Sarah (Burriss); Zackquill; Morgan; James; Jacob; Elizabeth; David; Catherine; and Evan T. Morgan.
At the outbreak of the Revolution, Morgan Morgan, a son, was in command of a company of Virginia militia. When Captain William Haymond's company was formed in Monongalia County, during the Revolution, Morgan Morgan became a lieutenant of it, and his father, David, and three other Morgans: David, Evan, and James, joined the company as privates.
David was an engineer and aided the commission named by the Governor of Virginia to survey the Mason Dixon line. He was with George Washington on some of his expeditions in the Monongahela region. He is buried near the Morgan Mines, Marion County.
His most celebrated exploit was the hand-to-hand fight in 1779 near his home along the Monongahela River in which he killed two Indians who had attempted to kidnap or kill two of his children.
RE: Ross B. Johnston, West Virginians in the Revolution, Page 201.

Was with the Virginia troops in the French and Indian War and sixty years later became the famous "Indian fighter" of the Monongahela Valley. Was a boy 9 years of age when his parents moved to the valley of Virginia. He married and settled on a farm near Winchester, VA. He was a surveyor and was appointed by Colonial Governor of Virginia to assist Steven Holsten to make surveys and explorations in southwestern Virginia. Afterwards he was appointed one of the commissioners on the part of the Colony of Virginia to assist Colonel Washington in 1746 to locate and establish the northern boundary of the Fairfax extate, which was to be the boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania. That historic monument erected at the head of the north branh of the Potomac, known as the Fairfax Stone, was the consummation of their labors. Moved from Town Creek, MD to Frederick County, VA and in 1773 removed to Monongalia County, West Virginia, USA. He settled on a large farm of well-laying land about a half mile west of the river, and the same distance f from the present village of Rivesville. The Indians were troublesome all during this period, and for mutual protection, the settlers erected a fort in 1774 at the mouth of Pricketts, Creek which was called Pricketts Fort. This was on the opposite side of the river from David's farm and about a mile distant. No records have been found of David having been molested by the Indians until the spring of 1779 when he had his famous encounter with two of them on his farm, which has been recorded by contemporaneous writers.

As recorded in the Lineage Books of the Daughters of the American Revolution, David served as private in Captain Haymond's Co., Virginia Militia; and was Captain of 5th Co., 8th Battalion under Colonel Peter Grub. He possessed a high character for honor, beneficence, morality, and intelligence; was a member of the Episcopal Church, and lived in the highest esteem among the early settlers.

A monument was placed to remember the site where David Morgan fought the two Indians to save his children.

Burial     
Near Rivesville, Monongalia (later Marion) County, West Virginia, USA

David Morgan's log cabin was built in 1745 in present Berkeley County by Col. Morgan Morgan and his sons for son David Morgan who had just married Sarah Stephens, a Quaker. Col. Morgan deeded, on 8 August 1745, 200 acres to his son David Morgan. This was part of his 1,00 acre King's Patent (FCVDB 1, p. 238).
By 1772 David Morgan moved to the Monongahela River area, now Marion Co., West Virginia, USA. He kept his log house and land until 1774 when he and wife Sarah sold to Andrew Boyd of Cumberland, Pennsylvania, USA.
Because of the outbreak of the Dunmore's War which spread terror among the settlers, many forts were built. It was in 1774 that David Morgan and his sons helped build Prickett's Fort at the east side of Prickett's Creek near the Monongahela River. In 1777 Captain William Haymond's company of militia was called into duty and stationed at Prickett's Fort. There were 27 men in the company. David Morgan and three of his sons, Morgan, Evan and James, along with a 2nd James Morgan helped make up the company. His three sons would have been born in Berkeley County then part of Frederick County, Virginia.
RE: Berkeley Journal, Issue 24, 1998, pp. 102-103.



More About C
APTAIN DAVID MORGAN:
AKA (Facts Pg): "The Indian Fighter"104
Baptised: May 28, 1721, St. James Church at Whiteleys (or White Clay Creek), Wilmington, Delaware
Baptism: May 28, 1721, at St. James English Church at Whiteleys (White Clay Creek), Delaware105,106
Burial: May 1813, Morgan Family Cemetery, Rivesville, Marion, VA
Daughter of the American: Volume 52, page 286; Centennial Edition, Part 2, Page 2073, Pvt PS VA107
Fact 1 (2): called the Indian fighter 3rd child of Col. Morgan Morgan108
Military service: 1777, Pvt PS VA, Revolutionary War, Captain William Haymond's Company of Monongalia County Militia, Garrison at Prickett's Fort, April, May and June 1777, Captain, 5th Co., 8th Battalion, under Col. Peter Grubb109
Occupation: Surveyor for George Washington, Farmer
Religion: Church of England
SAR: PiN 591080 Born May 12, 1721, died March 19, 1813
Society of Colonial Wars: Index, Page 334

Notes for S
ARAH STEVENS:
Other sources say: Sarah Stephens, burial 18 May 1799, Bunker Hill, Monongalia County, VA
[SarahMorganv95t0929.ftw]

Facts about this person:

Burial     
Bunker Hill, Berkely County, West Virginia

Religion     
Quaker



More About S
ARAH STEVENS:
Burial: May 18, 1799, Morgan Family Cemetery, Rivesville, Marion, VA
Religion: Quaker

More About D
AVID MORGAN and SARAH STEVENS:
Marriage: Dec 20, 1745, Frederick County, Virginia or Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA110,111,112
     
Children of D
AVID MORGAN and SARAH STEVENS are:
9. i.   CAPT. MORGAN (MOD)21 MORGAN, b. Dec 20, 1746, Bunker Hill, Berkeley, Virginia; d. Oct 31, 1829, White Day Creek, near Catawba, Monongalia, VA, now Fairmont, Marion County Virginia, age 83.
10. ii.   JAMES MORGAN, b. Apr 05, 1748, Frederick, Virginia; d. Mar 01, 1840, Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
11. iii.   EVAN THOMAS MORGAN, b. Mar 01, 1753, Town Creek, Alleghany, Maryland, not far from Berkeley County, VA; d. Mar 18, 1850, Age 100 years and 18 days; a farm where he had spent most of his life, five or six miles east of Morgantown Monongalia, VA.
12. iv.   ELIZABETH MORGAN, b. 1755, Berkeley County, Virginia; d. 1798, Monongalia (Marion), Virginia.
13. v.   ZACKQUILL MORGAN, b. Sep 08, 1758, Frederick County, Virginia; d. Feb 27, 1835, Monongalia, Virginia.
14. vi.   STEPHEN MORGAN, b. Oct 14, 1761, Berkeley County, Virginia; d. Nov 30, 1850, near Fairmont, Marion, Virginia, on the old home farm..
15. vii.   SARAH MORGAN, b. Jul 04, 1765, Martinsburg, Frederick, Virginia (same as Berkeley County, VA); d. 1791, near Morgantown, Monongalia, Virginia.
16. viii.   CATHERINE MORGAN, b. Jan 16, 1769, Bunker Hill, Berkeley, Virginia, USA; d. Apr 30, 1848, Morgantown, Monongalia, West Virginia, USA.


[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]
Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com