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Descendants of Morgan Morgan


5. COL. ZACKQUILL20 MORGAN (MORGAN19, CHARLES18, JOHN17, WILLIAM16, THOMAS15, ROWLAND14, THOMAS13, JOHN12, IEUAN AP LLEWELYN AP11, LLEWELYN AP10, MORGAN AP9 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN AP8 IVOR, IFOR AP7 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN LLEIA AP6 IVOR, IVOR AP5 LLEWELYN, LLEWELYN AP4 IVOR, IVOR AP3 BLEDRI, BLEDRI2, CADIFOR1 FAWR)131,132,133,134,135,136,137,138 was born Sep 08, 1735 in Bunker Hill, Berkeley, Virginia, USA; 81 years139,140, and died Jan 01, 1795 in Pricketts Fort, Marion, Virginia, USA141. He married (1) NANCY ANN PAXTON142,143,144 1759 in Rockbridge County, VA145,146, daughter of EDWARD PAXTON and MARGARET COLLINS. She was born 1740 in Fayette, Pennsylvania147, and died 1762 in District of West, Augusta County, VA. He married (2) DRUSILLA SPRINGER148,149 Oct 05, 1765 in District of West, Augusta County, Virginia150, daughter of DENNIS SPRINGER and ANN PRICKETT. She was born May 09, 1745 in Evesham, Burlington, NJ151, and died Aft. Aug 1796 in Morgantown, Monongalia, VA152.

Notes for C
OL. ZACKQUILL MORGAN:
7th child of Col. Morgan Morgan, born in Frederick County, Virginia about 1735.
Name sometimes spelled: "Zacquill".
Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Marion County
"Zacquill Morgan, (Colonel), brother of David -- Came from eastern panhandle, 1766, and built a log cabin which became Fort Morgan, and around which "grew up" Morgan's Town (Morgantown). Was chosen county lieutenant of Monongalia County, February 17, 1777. Was said to have been with Gen. Gates at the battle of Saratoga. Born, 1735, died January 1, 1795, buried at Prickett Cemetery at Pricketts Fort. Married (1) Nancy Paxton, died in 1762/64, married (2) September 5, 1765, Drusilla Springer, born 1745. Children by first wife: Nancy ("Ann"), married 1774 John Pierpont, born 1714, died 1796; Temperence, born 1760, died May 28, 1849, married July 20, 1777, James Cochran, born 1751, died November 13, 1850; Catherine, married (1) Jacob Scott, died 1808, married (2) James Tibbs.
Children by second wife: Levi, born June 26, 1766, died in Ky.; Morgan("Spy Mod"), born November 7, 1767, died 1852, married 1824, Susannah Martin; Charles, born October 28, 1769, died before 1802; James, born September 25, 1770, died May 24, 1855, married 1796, Dorothy Prickett, born 1777, died 1853; Uriah, born July 22, 1774, died 1851, in Tyler County; Zadoc, born July 24, 1776, died young; Horatio, born April 9, 1778, died March 9, 1867; David, born may 15, 1780, died before 1802; Zacquill, born August 7, 1782, died in War of 1812, Married April 7, 1805, Elizabeth Maderia; Sarah, born February 11, 1784, married September 14, 1818, James Cleland; Hannah, born September 9, 1786, died May 27, 1860, married January 2, 1810, David Barker; Drusilla, born October 10, 1788, married April 24, 1810, Jacob Swisher; Rachel, born June 29, 1790, died unmarried."
(RE: Now and Long Ago, p. 390)
Zackquill Morgan House and Morgan Cabin (On Rt. 26, 3.5 Mi. W of Rt. 11) The cabin was reconstructed in 1976 as a Berkeley County and West Virginia, USA State bicentennial project. Some logs from the original cabin, built in 1731-34 on part of Morgan's 1,000 acre King's Patent, were used for the reconstruction. The cabin was sided in 1994 to protect the logs. The cabin is open to the public weekends May through October. Nearby is the stone and log house built in 1761 by Zackquill Morgan, who later left the area and founded Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.
Col. Zackquill Morgan was a resident of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, in 1771, when he and his brother Morgan Morgan, Jr. sold their land grant farm on Braddock's Road near Fort Necessity, Pennsylvania, USA, and he afterwards moved to Monongalia County, Virginia (now West Virginia).
"About 1767 or 1768, first permanent settlement at Morgantown was made by Zackwell Morgan and others on land for which they received patents several years later (1781) from a commission appointed to adjust claims to un-plotted lands." In October 1785, Zackquill Morgan became distinguished as the founder of Morgantown, West Virginia, USA. The Virginia General Assembly passed an act which read: "Be it enacted by the General Assembly that 50 acres of land, the property of Zackquill Morgan, lying in the county of Monongalia, shall be -- laid out in lots of half an acre each, with convenient streets, which shall be -- established as a town by the name of Morgan's Town." Consequently, lots at "Morgan's Town" were sold at public auction, and each purchaser was required to build upon his respective lot, within an allotted time, a house "eighteen feet square, with a brick or stone chimney."
Zackquill Morgan served as a soldier in the French and Indian War, and with distinction as an officer in the War of the Revolution. Served in the capacity of County Lieutenant with the title of Colonel.
"The final attack in Monongalia occurred in the Dunkard Valley near Balcksville in 1791."
During the Revolution, he commanded a regiment of Virginia Minutemen, and was with General Gates at the Battle of Saratoga in October 1777. He served throughout the war, and afterwards returned to civilian life as the proprietor of an ordinary tavern. Prior to the Revolution, his blockhouse had been located in Morgantown, on the northwest corner of Main and Walnut Streets.
He died January 1, 1795, in Monongalia (Marion) County, West Virginia, USA, at the old Morgan homestead that was occupied by his granddaughter, Drusilla Morgan. He was buried in the Prickett Cemetery at the site of the old Prickett Fort in Marion County, at the junction of Prickett's Creek with the Monongahela River. He married (1) certa 1759, Nancy Paxton, who died shortly after the birth of the third child; and married (2) September 5, 1765, Drucella Springer, daughter of Dennis Springer, grand-daughter of Jacob Springer and great-grand-daughter of Byron (Baron) Carol Christopher Springer, who resided in Wilmington, Delaware about the year 1775. She was a sister to Col. Zadock Springer of Pennsylvania, probably living near Uniontown, Pennsylvania, USA. Zadock Springer was a brother of Dorothy Springer who married Jacob Prickett, and was the mother of Drusilla Prickett, the wife of Morgan Morgan, the son of David, and nephew of Zackquill.

RE: "The Prickett Family of Georgia and Alabama," p. 248:
One of the most historical spots in West Virginia is in Winfield District in Marion County near the mouth of Prickett's Creek on which Prickett's Fort was built in 1773 or 1774. The Fort was built by Jacob Prickett, Sr. and three of his sons, Josiah, Jacob, Jr. and Isaiah, who came from New Jersey to then Northern Virginia which is now Marion County, West Virginia. Near the site of the Fort is Prickett's Cemetery in which Jacob Prickett, Sr., Jacob Prickett, Jr., Josiah Prickett and Isaiah Prickett, all of whom were Revolutionary War soldiers and also Charity Taylor, wife of Josiah Prickett, are buried. It is said that Charity was the first white woman to cross the Allegheny Mountains coming west. Also buried in the cemetery is Colonial Zackquill Morgan who also fought in the Revolutionary War. A monument was erected for the Prickett's Fort site. Isaiah Prickett was killed and scalped by the Indians. This happened at a point near the present corporate limits of the City of Fairmont in 1774. The other three sons of Jacob Prickett, Sr. -- Isaac, John and James -- went and settled near Cincinnati, Ohio, and their descendants scattered through the West. (From the Prickett booklet owned by Mrs. Esther Prickett, wife of the late Lloyd Garrison Prickett, of 559 College Street, Shreveport, LA, on March 14, 1963). e-mail from Mary Prickett Knox (marylou@satx.rr.com)

RE: "West Virginians in the Revolution," by Russ B. Johnson, Genealogical Publishing Co, Baltimore, MD, 1977, pp. 203-204.
Colonel Zackquill Morgan, Born in 1735, and came from the Eastern Panhandle in 1766-68 with his brother, David, to settle in the Monongahela Valley. His stout log cabin became Fort Morgan and the nucleus around which grew up Morgan's Town, now Morgantown. He died January 1, 1795.
He was made county lieutenant of Monongalia County, February 17, 1777, and was the military and civil leader of the community. After the Revolution he laid out the town of Morgantown which was established by act of the Virginia Legislature in 1785. He maintained an Inn. His home on University Avenue, north of Fayette Street, stood until torn down a few years ago to make way for a filling station. In this house his granddaughter Drusilla Morgan was born in 1814 and died in 1904.
Colonel Morgan was married twice; first to Nancy Paxton, to whom three children were born: Ann Nancy, who Married John Pierpont, and who was grandmother of Francis H. Pierpont, one of the leading spirits in the organization of West Virginia and who was the war-time governor of the Restored State of Virginia; Temperance, who married James Cochran; Catherine, who married Jacob Scott. Morgan's second wife was Drusilla Springer, and they had eleven children: Levi, Uriah, James, Zodac, Morgan "Mod", Zackquill, Hannah, Sally, Rachel, Drusilla, and Horatio.

RE: "Founder of Morgantown", Chapter X III, Colonel Zackquill Morgan.
In a previous chapter mention was made of the very peculiar and unusual name, "Zackquill," which Colonel Morgan Morgan bestowed upon next to his youngest child. The name admits of various spellings, and as one would expect, is found in various forms when used by those who spelled by sound, never having known the correct spelling. Col. Morgan, himself, spelled it "Zackquill," as used at the heading of this chapter. Other spellings encountered are: Zacquil, Zacquill, Zackquil, Zacquillian, Zacqell, and Zackvill. His own signature to deeds and official papers is "Zack--ll," which showed he spelled his name with a "k" and a double "ll."
Col. Zackquill Morgan was born in Berkeley County, about 1735, some four or five years after his father moved from Delaware. His younger brother Morgan was born March 20, 1737, and as Zackquill was next oldest the date of his birth is fairly well established as noted above. His first wife was Nance Paxton, date of marriage is not known, nor is it known where she lived. They had three children all daughters: Nancy Ann who married John Pierpont, Temperance, 1761, and married John Cochran, and Catherine who married Jacob Scott. The date of the marriage of Zackquill and Nancy may be approximated for the date of birth of the second child.
Nancy died about 1763 or 1764, for on October 5, 1765, Zackquill married Drusilla Springer, a sister to Col. Zadock Springer of Pennsylvania, probably living near Uniontown, Pennsylvania, USA. Zadock Springer was a brother of Dorothy Springer who married Jacob Prickett, and was the mother of Drusilla Prickett, the wife of Morgan Morgan, he son of David, and nephew of Zackquill. By his second wife he had eleven children, as follows: Levi, born June 26, 1766; Morgan "Spy Mod", born November 7, 1767; James, born November 24, 1771; Uriah, born July 22, 1774; Zadock, born July 24, 1776; Horatio, born April 9, 1778; Capt. Zackquill, born August 1, 1782; Sarah, born February 11, 1784; Hannah, born December 9, 1786; Drusilla, born October 1788; Rachel, born June 29, 1790.
Zackquill was the owner of several tracts of land; two in Virginia (both being parts of his father's original 1000 acre patent), one in Pennsylvania, and at least one in what is now West Virginia. His first purchase, made in May 1, 1761, was for 200 acres of the western end of his father's farm. He lived on this for some time but it is not known for how long, for the purchase was made about the time of the birth of his second child. He sold it February 6, 1768 to Robert Rutherford for 300 Lbs. At the date of sale the boundary description begins as follows: "Beginning at a Walnut corner of the original patent, near the spring and the said Zackquill Morgans late dwelling house...." The spring referred to is now found at the side of the roadway while the log portion attached to the present stone building occupies a near position to the spring, and just above it, may be the late "dwelling house."
Less than three months prior to the sale of the above tract, on November 14, 1767, Zackquill purchased a 100 acre tract from his brother Henry. The west corner of this tract was just across the road from the dwelling house on the first tract. He held possession of this until April 10, 1773, when he sold it to Absolam Chenowerth. How long he lived on this tract, if at all is not known, for it is found that he and his brother Morgan Morgan came into possession of a land grant in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, USA, on April 3, 1769, and that Zackquill was living on it July 1, 1771, when they sold it, details of which will be recorded later. Thus he was living in Pennsylvania for almost two years before selling his last possession in his home county. He came in possession of the farm at Morgantown April 29, 1781, eight years after he sold his Virginia property and ten years after selling his Pennsylvania property. However, it is stated in the survey that he made settlement at Morgantown in 1772, although he did not get patent of the land until April 7, 1784. The movements of Zackquill are shrouded in uncertainty and mystery which have lead to considerable controversy which will be considered briefly.
No mention of Zackquill is found in Berkeley County other than a party to land transactions. But neither is there mention of his brother Charles, who, says David his brother, married and lived there until the time of his death shortly prior to the beginning of the Revolution. Whether or not he stayed in Berkeley all the time until his appearance in the Monongahela Valley, is not known. The Springer family had founded Wilmington, Delaware, at an early date, and no doubt Col. Morgan Morgan was well acquainted with them, as Springers are found buried at St. James Cemetery where Morgan Morgan was a church warden. Then, too, Wilmington was less than a dozen miles from Morgan's residence at Christiana. Springers settled at Pittsburgh before the revolution and it may have been that Zackquill followed them to that locality after the death of his first wife and married Drusilla Springer while there. If so, he must have returned to Virginia where he was living as late as 1766 or 1767.
The first historical mention of Zackquill Morgan as a settler and land owner comes under date of 1766. George Morgan(not related to our family) was an Indian agent for the territory embracing Western Virginia and Pennsylvania. In 1777, he held an investigation at Pittsburgh to determine whether the whites had unlawfully taken possession of the Indian's lands and made settlement thereon. The following account is copied verbatim from the Calender of Virginia State Papers by William Palmer, p. 277-281:
March 10, 1777. The Depositions of the Following Persons taken at the House of Mr. John Ormsby in Pittsburgh, ect. -- agreeable to Notice given to Col. George Morgan, Agent, for the Indian Co. before James Wood and Charles Simms, pursuant to a resolution of the Honble and Convention of Virginia appointing them Commissioners for collecting Evidence on behalf of the Commonwealth of Virginia against several person pretending to claim lands within the territory and Limits thereof under Deeds or Purchase from Indians.
Colonel William Crawford, Deposeth and said that Zachel Morgan (a still different spelling), James Chew, and Jacob Prickett, came out in that year (1766) and was informed by them, that they had settled up the Monongalia, and that he has since seen Zachel Morgans plantation which is on the South side of the line run by Mason and Dixon, and he believes that to be the first settlement he made in this Country, and always understood the befored mentioned Persons lived in this Neighborhood -- but that he himself was never within the Limits of the Indian Claim, until the year 1771, or about that time -- the Deponent being asked by Mr. Morgan, if he knew or even heard of any settlements besides these before mentioned being made in the Indian Claim, prior to the treaty of Fort Stanwix. Answers that he understood James Booth settled there before that time, but does not know of any other -- Being further asked if these settlements were not made contrary to order of Government? Answers, that all the settlements made to the westward of the Allegheny Mountains at that time, were contrary to the Orders of Government.
It may be true, as Crawford stated, that Col. Zackquill came to the site of Morgantown in 1766, but if he did, he did not remain long, for 1771, he was living in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, USA., as the following deed recorder's Office at Fayette County, PA clearly shows:
"Know all men by the presents, that I, Zackquill Morgan of Bedford County in the province of Pennsylvania and Morgan Morgan of Frederick County in Virginia for and in consideration of the sum of one hundred and eight pounds lawful money in Pennsylvania, to us hand paid by Samuel Perry of Cumberland County and province aforesaid the receipt whereof we do hereby acknowledge have bargain, see and deliver unto the said Samuel Perry his heirs, exetres, admrs and assigns all ower wright title and intrest, property clames and demand of in and to certain tract of land where Col. G. Washington was defeated and commonly none by the name of the Grate meadowes and survad aplycation No. 135 dated Ap'l 3, 1769. Ordered in the name of Morgan Morgan with all and singular the improvements made thereon as cleared lands and houses and every appurtenances there belonging, to have and to hold the bargned primises and every part thereof unto the said Samuel Perry and his heirs excrs, adms and assigners shall and will warrant and defend the said tract of land from all and every person and persons whatsoever, laying aney trust clame there unto the Honorable the propiarter and in witness where unto we have set ouer hands and seals this first of July One Thousand seven hundred and seventy one.
Witnes Present Zack'll Morgan. Seal; Thos. Jones Morgan. seal; John Davis; Sign'd sealed and delivered August 28, 1771, in the presence of us Issac Whenery. David Morgan. When the Clerk of Court forwarded us a copy of the above document, he stated that grants for land in what is now known as Fayette County, Pennsylvania, were for many years in dispute between Virginia and Pennsylvania. That the first applications for land grants were the Pennsylvania Land Office the 3rd of April, 1769, and since this application was numbered 135, the Morgans were alert. He further states: "You see, he applied as a citizen of Pennsylvania, and this territory was at that time in Bedford County. The line of descent by counties was as follows: Chester, 1682; Lancaster from the original territory, 1729; Cumberland from Lancaster in 1750; Bedford from Cumberland in 1771, just prior to making of this agreement; Westmoreland from Bedford in 1773; and Fayette from Westmoreland in 1783."
We applied to the Department of Interior Affairs of Pennsylvania, at Harrisburg, for information along this line, and their reply was somewhat puzzling: "The tracts of land containing 301 acres, called "Big Meadows," located in Fayette County, was surveyed by Morgan Morgan on application NO. 145, dated April 3, 1769, and was assigned by him to William McCall and a patent issued to said McCall on a warrant accept, dated March 16, 1807. This patent is recorded in Patent Book "P" Vol. 59, Page 374; and the survey in Survey Book "C" Volume 139, Page 111."
Another paragraph states: "On October 28, 1746, two warrants were issued in the name of Evan Morgan for land in Lancaster County. On which no return was made. The name of Zackquill Morgan does not appear on our records."
This Evan Morgan may have been the brother of Zackquill but there is no way of telling since there were other Morgans by that name living in that section of Pennsylvania, as well as Morgans named David and Morgan who were not related to our line.
This has all lead to a discussion as to whether Zackquill and his brother Morgan owned the site of Fort Washington where George Washington met his first defeat in Battle. "The Meadows," the ownership of which is described below are two large meadows, a circumscribed treeless valley on the western slope of Laural Hill Mountain near the head of Great Meadows Creek, a tributary of the Youghiogheny River, and is now Wharton Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, USA, Camp 8 of Braddock's march was in this meadow. It is 18 miles from the "Great Crossing," 13 miles from Gist's Plantation and fort; 4 miles from the foot of Laural Hill; 51 miles from Cumberland and 10 miles from Uniontown."
The above description is from Washington's Journal. The plat of the Mount Washington farm purchased by Washington, on which is located Ft. Necessity, is shown herewith just as it appeared in his journal. From this it will be noted that the Morgan and Zackquill farm adjoin it on the west, and that Braddock's Road also ran through the Morgan farm. Braddock's Road -- U. S. Highway No. 40 -- and anyone driving from Cumberland to Uniontown passes through the farm owned by the Morgans.
It has been contended by some that Zackquill at one time owned the farm at Great Meadows, or Big Meadows, where Fort Necessity stood and in this connection a quotation from Ellis' History of Fayett County is given -- the only authentic history we have of this county -- in which he says: "In 1767 General Washington acquired a claim to a tract of 234 acres called Mount Washington and situated on Big Meadows Run, including Ft. Washington. It was confirmed to him by Pennsylvania, and surveyed on Warrant No. 3383 for Lawerence Harrison, in right of William Brooks, and was patented to George Washington and devised by his will to be sold by his executors, who sole it to Andres Parks, of Baltimore, who sold it to General Thomas Measons, whose administrators sold it to Joseph Haston in 1816......

Morgan, Zackquill (Colonel), born in 1735 and came from the Eastern Panhandle in 1766-68 with his brother, David, to settle in the Monongahela Valley. His stout log cabin became Fort Morgan and the nucleus around which grew up Morgan's Town, now Morgantown. He died January 1, 1795.
He was made county lieutenant of Monongalia County, February 17, 1777, and was the military and civil leader of the community. After the Revolution he laid out the town of Morgantown which was established by act of the Virginia Legislature in 1785. He maintained an inn. His home on University Avenue, north of Fayette Street, stood until torn down a few years ago to make way for a filling station. In this house his granddaughter, Drusilla Morgan, born in 1814, died in 1904.
Colonel Morgan was married twice: first to Nancy Paxton, to whom three children were born: Ann Nancy, who married John Pierpont, and who was grandmother of Francis H. Pierpont, one of the leading spirits in the organization of West Virginia and who was the war-time governor of the Restored State of Virginia; Temperance, who married James Cochran; Catherine, who married Jacob Scott. Morgan's second wife was Drusilla Springer, and they had eleven children: Levi, Uriah, James, Zodac, Morgan ("Mod"), Zackquill, Hannah, Sally, Rachel, Drusilla, and Horatio.
RE: West Virginians in the Revolution by Ross B. Johnston, pages 203-204.

"Col. Zackquill Morgan was born in 1735 and came from the eastern panhandle (Berkley County, West Virginia, USA) in 1766-1768 with his brother, David, to settle in the Monongahela Valley. His stout log cabin became Fort Morgan and the nucleus around which grew Morgan's Town, now Morgantown, West Virginia. He died January 1, 1795 and is buried in the Prickett Cemetery at the site of the old Prickett Fort in Marion County, West Virginia, USA.
"Zackquill was made county lieutenant of Monongalia County, West Virginia, USA, February 17, 1777 and was the military and civil leader of the community. After the Revolution he laid out the town of Morgantown which was established by act of the Virginia Legislature in 1785. He maintained an inn. His home was on University Avenue, north of Fayette Street, until torn down to make way for a filling station."
RE: Early History of Monongalia County

"Monongalia County was one of the first three counties, along with Ohio and Youghiogheny counties, formed within the state. It was created by an act of the Virginia General Assembly in October 1776 from parts of the District of West Augusta (Virginia). It was named in honor of the Monongahela River, named by the Algonquin (Delaware) Indians. The river's name means river of crumbling banks or high banks fall down. When the bill creating the county was being prepared the spelling was changed to Monongalia. It is not known if the spelling was changed on purpose or was an error.
"Monongalia County is known as the mother county for northern West Virginia. Eighteen of West Virginia's 55 counties and parts of three Pennsylvania Counties (Green, Fayette and Washington counties) were created in whole or in part form Monongalia County. This latter territory was lost to Pennsylvania following the extension of the Mason-Dixon line in 1781.
"The first organizational meeting in the county took place at the home of Jonathan Coburn on December 8, 1776. The first county seat was located at the home of Theophilus Phillips, two miles from the present site of Geneva, Pennsylvania. After the Mason-Dixon line made his home a part of Pennsylvania, the county seat was moved to the home of Zackquill Morgan in 1782, in present day Morgantown.
"Morgantown, the county seat, was originally settled by Thomas Decker, who led a group of settlers to Decker's Creek, in the present site of Morgantown, during the fall of 1758. The settlement was destroyed the following spring by a party of Delaware and Mingo Indians. All but one of the original settlers, including Thomas Decker, were killed or captured in the attack.
"There is conflicting accounts concerning who arrived in the county next. Some accounts suggest the David Morgan arrived at the current site of Morgantown in 1768 and gave his settlement right to Zackquill (or Zackwell) Morgan. Other accounts suggest that Bruce Worley and his brother, Nathan, arrived before them, in 1766. Most historians cite the sworn deposition of Colonel William Crawford and credit Zackquill Morgan as the next settler in the county. Colonel Crawford indicated that Zackquill Morgan, James Chew, and Jacob Prickett moved into the area in 1766, and that he had visited the Morgan farm, near Decker's Creek.
"Colonel Zackquill Morgan, son of Morgan Morgan, received a legal certificate for 400 acres of land in the Morgantown area in 1781. In October 1785, at Colonel Morgan's request, the Virginia General Assembly specified that 50 acres of his land was to be laid out in lots, and a town, named Morgantown, established on the site. Purchasers of the lots were to build upon them within four years, but because of Indian hostilities the four year time limit was later extended an additional five years. In 1793, the Pittsburgh Gazette began delivering its paper to Morgantown and opened a road to it. The opening of the road helped the town began to grow, especially during the early 1800's as many pioneers heading west stopped in Morgantown for supplies. The city was incorporated on February 3, 1858.
"In 1790, when the first national census was taken, Monongalia County had the sixth largest population (4,768) of the nine counties that were then in existence and fell within the current boundaries of West Virginia. Berkeley County had the largest population 19,713), Randolph County had the smallest population (951), and there were a total of 55,873 people living within the present state's boundaries at that time.
"West Virginia University, the state's land grant university, was established in Morgantown in 1867.
RE: http://polsci.wvu.edu/wv/Monongalia/monhistory.html

Indians: The final attack in Monongalia occurred in the Dunkard Valley near Blacksville in 1791.

"At the beginning of the Revolution, (Col. Alexander) McKee (British deputy Indian Agent) remained loyal to England, and was secretly commissioned a Lieutenant-Colonel by Gov. Dunmore, and ordered to recruit a battalion of Royalists in the Monongahela Valley. His attempt to do this was discovered and reported to Gen. Hand at Fort Pitt, and to the Continental Congress, by Col Zackwell Morgan, who with five hundred militiamen, mostly men of the Marion County area, captured more than two hundred of his (McKee's) recruits (Tories) and placed them under military arrest.
"These enemies of the Revolution were examined (tried) by Col. Morgan and others, in the presence of Gen. Hand, at Kerns, Minor's and Pricketts forts; some were punished by public whippings and public reprimand, and others by the confiscation of their lands, while those (Tories) found in service in Col. William Crawford's regiment, were hanged.
"McKee was able to escape arrest for a time, but, when openly accused by Col. Morgan, was later placed under parole, and in August, 1777, was confined at Pittsburgh for a short time, when an effort was made to send him east of the mountains for trial. This ordeal he managed to evade, when, on March 28, 1778, he escaped to Detroit and the British army, accompanied by Matthew Elliot and Simon Girty.
"He was made a captain in the British Indian department, and later became a deputy agent. His salary was large, and he enjoyed considerable honor and authority, and planned and led numerous raids against the frontier settlers.
"After the Revolution he was elevated to colonel, and was known to have encouraged the Indians to raid among the American patriots. Certainly, he aided the forces opposing Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timbers, which occurred within sight of his residence and trading-post, on the Maumee River. After the British evacuated Detroit, McKee settled at Malden, Ontario, and here he died of lockjaw, January 14, 1799.
"McKees Rocks (Pittsburgh), named for the Tory colonel, now occupies the site of McKee's farm, which McKee, fearing to face Zackwell Morgan in a court of military law, abandoned in 1778."
RE: Now and Long Ago, pp. 614-615.

Zackquill's Stone House in Berkeley Cunty. In 1768 Zackquill sold his 200 acre farm and house to Robert Rutherford for L300 (BCDB 12, p. 156).
RE: Berkeley Journal, Issue 24, 1998, p. 101.

Col. Zackquill Morgan was the first County Lieutenant of Monongalia County, Virginia, formed in 1766, and, as such, was in charge of the

More About C
OL. ZACKQUILL MORGAN:
Burial: Jan 1795, Prickett's Fort Cemetery at the site of the old Prickett Fort in Marion County, at the junction of Prickett's Creek with the Monongahela River
Census 1850: Eastern District, Monongalia, VA; Roll M432-961; Page 256
Daughter of the American: Centennial Edition, Part 2, Page 2077 Cty Lt VA
Military service: Feb 17, 1777, Cty Lt VA, Revolutionary War, Commanded a regiment of Virginia Minutemen, and was with General Gates at the Battle of Saratoga in October 1777
Occupation: Owner of Tavern
Residence: Berkeley County, West Virginia, USA; Founder of Morgantown, West Virginia
SAR: PIN 354359; 484948; 344346; 145741 PA 10489153

Notes for N
ANCY ANN PAXTON:
See the book: Now and Long Ago by Glenn D. Lough
Nancy Paxton who's parents according to book were Edward/Edmund Paxton and Margaret Collins: her only known sibling was Reuben Paxton who was the 2nd husband of Anne Morgan who married 1st Nathaniel Thompson, they removed to South Carolina?


More About N
ANCY ANN PAXTON:
Fact 1: 1795, Buried Pricketts Cem at Prickett Fort154

More About Z
ACKQUILL MORGAN and NANCY PAXTON:
Marriage: 1759, Rockbridge County, VA154,155

Notes for D
RUSILLA SPRINGER:
E-Mail: RE: Springer Fortune.
As for the Springer fortune, it is mentioned in French Morgan's book that an out of court settlement was agreed upon (according to Washington papers, May 10, 1923) by the city of Wilmington to the heirs of Carl Springer in the amount of $500,000,000.
Supposedly the Descendents of Drusilla "Springer" and Zackquill Morgan were entitled to part of this, but I don't know what the final outcome was. I am afraid French Morgan's book is hard to find, there is a copy in the Marion county historical society, I was lucky and found my copy through a genforum awhile back. Ed Morgan cnemorgan@aol.com





More About D
RUSILLA SPRINGER:
Burial: Prickett's Fort Cemetery at the site of the old Prickett Fort in Marion County, at the junction of Prickett's Creek with the Monongahela River

More About Z
ACKQUILL MORGAN and DRUSILLA SPRINGER:
Marriage: Oct 05, 1765, District of West, Augusta County, Virginia156
     
Child of Z
ACKQUILL MORGAN and NANCY PAXTON is:
23. i.   TEMPERENCE21 MORGAN, b. 1760, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. May 28, 1849, Harrison, VA.
     
Children of ZACKQUILL MORGAN and DRUSILLA SPRINGER are:
24. ii.   NANCY ANNE21 MORGAN, b. 1759, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. 1816, West, Augusta, Virginia, USA.
25. iii.   CATHERINE JENNNIE MORGAN, b. 1763, Morgantown, Monongalia, Virginia; d. WFT Est. 1814-1858.
26. iv.   LEVI MORGAN, b. Jun 26, 1766, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. Sep 1825, an early blizzard (found in large hollow tree said to be one of his favorite places to camp near Salt River while hunting.) He was 59. Louisville, Kentucky;.
27. v.   MORGAN MORGAN, b. Nov 07, 1767, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. Aug 20, 1852, Pine Grove, Wetzel County, VA.
28. vi.   JAMES MORGAN, b. Oct 25, 1769, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. May 24, 1855, Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI.
29. vii.   URIAH MORGAN, b. Jul 22, 1774, Morgantown, Monongalia, Virginia, USA; d. 1851, Tyler, Virginia, USA; Adopted child.
  viii.   ZADOCK MORGAN157, b. Jul 24, 1776, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. Jul 19, 1834, Greene, Indiana; m. MARY POLLY HODGEN, Mar 03, 1809, Jefferson, Kentucky.
  Notes for ZADOCK MORGAN:
8th child of Col. Zackquill Morgan, founder of Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.

A record giving the date of birth of the children of Col. Zackquill is extant, but since an error is noted in the case of his brother James, these dates may not be trusted and a question mark is used.
One reference says that Zadock died young and left no family.


  More About ZADOCK MORGAN and MARY HODGEN:
Marriage: Mar 03, 1809, Jefferson, Kentucky

  ix.   HORATIO MORGAN, b. Apr 09, 1778, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. Mar 09, 1867, Morgantown, Monongalia, West Virginia, USA.
  Notes for HORATIO MORGAN:
9th child of Col. Zackquill Morgan, founder of Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.

Never Married.
He spent most, if not all, of his life in Monongalia County, and probably died at Morgantown. He was not married. His name is found frequently in Morgantown history where he was a land owner, engaged in business, and help settle his father's estate. He was engaged somewhat, along with his brothers Levi and Morgan, in protecting the border from Indian raids, for we find at least one mention of him making an expedition into the Indian country along with his brothers.
George A. Dunnington, in his History of Marion County, published at Fairmont, in 1880, makes one mention of Horatio.
"The vindictive passions of the white settlers once aroused, they would forget for the moment they were civilized men, and the bare sight of an Indian, whether friendly or otherwise, would arouse their spirit of revenge in their heart, and they would be lead to commit acts which in their thoughtful moments they regretted. A striking incident of this kind occurred in which Horatio Morgan, of Prickett's Fort, was the principal actor.
"While hunting one day he unexpectedly came upon an Indian seated near a fire on the river bank. Concealing himself behind a tree, Morgan watched the scene for some moments. Over the fire was suspended a pot in which an Indian boy was stirring a mixture of herbs and water. The first mentioned savage -- an old man -- sat upon a log with his head bowed in his hands, evidently very sick, and the boy was boiling the gruel to relieve his suffering, which appeared to be intense. Not a considerate thought for the pitiable condition of the old Indian seemed to enter the mind of Morgan, but raised hiss gun, after watching the scene awhile, he fired. The ball went crashing through the brain of the sick man, and he was forever freed from his sufferings. The boy, frightened by this sudden evidence that an enemy was at hand, took to the woods and made his escape.
"Horatio was overcome with remorse the moment after he fired the shot, and would have given the world to have been able to recall it. So stricken with shame was he at the cowardly advantage he had taken of the Indian, that it was not until years afterwards that he related the circumstances; and then it was with a feeling of deep regret at what he had so thoughtlessly done.
Dunnington further says that about the year 1791, "A small company of settlers, including Horatio and Levi Morgan, Jacob and John Hays, and several others made an expedition from here (Fairmont) to an Indian town on Sunfish Creek, in Ohio, for the purpose of destroying it. Arriving there they found the village deserted by the warriors, and the only remaining inhabitants a few women and children and old men.
"They stole up to the outskirts of the town, where they could obtain a good view of the situation. Observing an old man sitting quietly smoking a pipe in the door of his wigwam, Levi Morgan told the rest of the party to watch him exhibit his extraordinary marksmanship, and taking steady aim at the center of the old man's forehead, fired. The ball did not vary a hairs breath from the spot, and the old Indian rolled over dead. This was the signal for the attack and the men plundered the village and returned home, bringing with them several prisoners."


30. x.   CAPT. ZACKQUILL MORGAN, JR., b. Aug 01, 1782, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. Aug 24, 1814, Lost his life in the War of 1812 in the retreat from Washington, D. C..
31. xi.   SARAH MORGAN, b. Feb 11, 1784, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. May 27, 1868, Taylor, West Virginia, USA.
32. xii.   HANNAH MORGAN, b. Dec 09, 1786, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. May 27, 1860, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA.
33. xiii.   DRUSILLA MORGAN, b. Oct 09, 1788, Morgantown, Monongalia, VA; d. Jan 15, 1879, Marion, West Virginia, USA.
  xiv.   RACHEL MORGAN, b. Jun 29, 1790, Monongalia, VA158; d. Jan 1864, West Virginia, USA, Died, Had a fit and fell into a fire..
  Notes for RACHEL MORGAN:
14th and youngest child of Col. Zackquill Morgan, founder of Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.

Never Married.


  More About RACHEL MORGAN:
Census 1850: Marion, VA
Census 1860: Marion, VA



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