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Ancestors of Raymon German Rollins

Generation No. 9


      256. Gregory Rawlings, Sr*~, born Abt. 1594 in St Olave Parish, Southwark, Surrey, England152; died Bef. 03 Jun 1653 in Southwarke Parish, Surry County, VA. He married 257. Jane* Osborne Bef. 1617 in possibly St Olave Parish, Southwark, England.

      257. Jane* Osborne, born in England; died Unknown in probably Surry County, VA. She was the daughter of 514. John Osborne, Sr~.

Notes for Gregory Rawlings, Sr*~:
FROM: RON BOURASSA'S RAWLINGS WEBSITE
http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Park/2693/index.html

It is said that Gregory died young, but I don't see clear evidence either way. He doesn't show up in any records after his father's death except this one in 1669. It is not clear whether he is alive in 1669 or not.

Francis Maryson, Esq. a patent granted to John Rawlings, son of Gregorye Rawlings, deceased, 26 acres of land on Cippoakes Creek... formerly granted John Osborne by patent 26 Apr 1639. and by John Osbourne, son and heir of John Osbourne, assigned to Gregorye Rawlings, deceased, and now same to John Rawlings being hier to his father's estate this 26 acres for transportation to the colony, sd land granted to Gregory Rawlings brother of sd John Rawlings by patent 6 Feb. 1654, by mistake. Should have been John Rawlings as by his father's Will appears 4 July 1662. This patent assigned by John Rawlings 31 July 1662 to Wm. Dowinge to John Burgess, being called Boyer's Point. 21 Nov 1669. Wit. John Rawlings, Rich. Hide. Sighned John Tatem, Eliza Tatem.

Gregory is not mentioned as deceased, but it seems strange that he didn't have to sign this.

EARLY VIRGINIA RAWLINGS IMMIGRANTS
NAME, DATE, AND SPONSOR IDENTIFICATION
GREGORY RAWLINGS, likely before 1634 Gregory, Surry

Surry Co Court records 1652-1684. Pg 191. 1 July 1662. Jno. Rawlings, ye sonne of Gregory Rawlings ackowledges to have received full satisfaction of Mr. Wm. Lee of all his rights and title in his father's estate, and acquits Jno. Rawlings of the account. Wit. John Lookes, John Billings.

This is a little strange, "acquits Jno. Rawlings of the account". Also why isn't Gregory mentioned in this? This may be the smoking gun that indicates Gregory died betw 1653 and 1662. I think it is safe to assume Gregory died between 1662 and 1669.
[]

GRANTEE Rawlins, Gregory. grantee.
DATE 10 June 1653.
NOTE Location: Surry County.
NOTE Description: 476 acres on the south east side of Chipocks Creek bounded viz. on the head of Richard Hides land from a marked tree on a point of the Burshen Swamp.
NOTE Source: Land Office Patents No. 3, 1652-1655, p. 23 (Reel 2).
NOTE Part of the index to the recorded copies of patents for land issued by the Secretary of the Colony serving as the colonial Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia.
OTHER FORMAT Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.
SUBJECT Land titles -- Registration and transfer -- Virginia -- Surry County.
SUBJECT Surry County (Va.) -- History -- 17th century.
SUBJECT Land grants -- Virginia -- Surry County. aat.
ADDED ENTRY Hides, Richard.
[]

From Burkes Peerage

Lineage–
GRYGONIE RAWLINGS, the ancestor of this Virginian family, migrated to that colony in 1626. He appears to have come from the parish of St Olave, Southwark, where the name occurs in the parochial register, and it is surmised that he may have left in order to escape one of the frequent visitations of the plague to which London was then subject. On arriving in the New World, he settled in Southwarke Parish, Surry County, Virginia. His two sons, John and Grigony, and his wife (whose name has not been preserved) probably accompanied him. He d before 3 June, 1653, and by his will devised land on Chipoakes Creek, in Southwarke Parish to his two sons, of whom the younger, Grigony, appears to have d. unm, whilst the elder s,

JOHN RAWLINGS, who was of age before 7 Feb 1654; m Eleanor (surname probably Hix), and d 22 April, 1674, having had issue, with a dau, Elizabeth, a s,

JOHN RAWLINGS, who was a minor at the date of his f's will, 6 Mar. 1673. He m 1677 (contract 14 Sept), Mary, widow of John Collier, and dau of Thomas and Ann Sowerby, of Surry Company, and by her had two sons, 1. JOHN, of whom we treat; and 2. Gregory, who d in Sussex Company, Virginia, leaving by Hannah, his wife, a large family. John Rawlings d 1713 (will proved in that year). His elder s,

JOHN RAWLINGS; m Mary (surname may have been Jones or Etheridge), and had issue,

1a Gregory; b 19 Dec 1742.

2a John, moved to Charlotte County, Virginia, where he died.

3a WILLIAM, of whom we treat.

The third s,

REV. WILLIAM RAWLINGS, of Charlotte County, Virginia, was Capt in John Gillison's Company, 10th Virginia Regt, Col Edward Stevens Command during the Revolutionary War. He m 15 July, 1767, Mary Magdaline, dau of Alexander Roberts, and had a s,

JOHN RAWLINGS, of Charlotte County, Virginia; b 1768-69; m 1 Mar. 1794, Elizabeth, dau of William Terrell, of an old and respectable Virginian family, and had issue,

1a William; m 1818, Martha M, dau of Edward Goode, of Charlotte Company, and had one s, James, who moved to Rockingham Company, North Carolina.

2a JOHN, of whom we treat.

Mr. Rawlings d 1807. His younger s,

JOHN RAWLINGS, of Charlotte Company, Virginia; b 1794-95; m 11 Jan 1820, Elizabeth Ann, dau of Edward Goode, of Charlotte Company, Virginia who was descended from John Goode, who went from Cornwall to Barbados 1643-50, and thence to Virginia 1660; also through his mother, Mary Moseley, from William Moseley, of Rolleston, Staffordshire, who migrated to America in 1649, and from Col Thomas Ligon (see LIGON family), and by her, who d 1859-60, had with other issue,

1a JOHN; b 1824; m Mary Price, of Prince Edward Company, Virginia, niece of Gen Sterling Price, and d 1861, in Fanning Company, Texas, leaving one s, Cabel.

2a WALTER MARIOTT, of whom presently.

1a Minerva; b 1821; m Branch Cheatham, and d 1859-60.

2a Hariet; b 1834; m John Ingram, and moved to Texas, having had issue.

3a Martha Lavinia; b 1846; m A. B Cheatham, of Richmond, Virginia, and d in Stokes Company, N Carolina, 1872, leaving issue.

The second s,

WALTER MARIOTT RAWLINGS; b 31 July 1838; m 31 Oct 1866, Marie Sigourney, dau of Dr William Hamilton Hughart (of Huguenot descent), and Martha Jane Valentine, his wife, and had issue,

1a •WALTER HUGHART, of whom we treat above.

1a •Marie Blanche; b 15 Nov 1867; m 23 Jan 1884, •Edward Everett Morris, of Hertford, N Carolina, and has issue,

1b •David Rawlings MORRIS; b 14 Oct 1890; m 1st, 23 April, 1923, Susan Gion, who dsp 8 Dec 1934. He m 2nd, 28 Mar. 1935, •Elizabeth Ashford McWherter.

2b •Edward Everett MORRIS, of Pasadena, California; b 25 Sept 1895; m 11 Jan 1923, •Jane A. Cook, and has issue, •Richard Cook; b 4 June, 1927.

1b •Blanche Clare; b 12 Sept 1886; m 15 April, 1909, Garrison Farrow, and has issue.

2a •Ellen Goode; b 30 Jan 1869; m 1st, 16 Jan 1889, Watson Winslow, of Hertford, N Carolina (a descendant of John Winslow of The Mayflower), and by him, who d 10 Jan 1921, has had issue, with two other sons who d young,

1b •Hillary Goode WINSLOW; b 23 Oct 1895; m 1 Dec 1917, •Emma G., dau of Edmund L. Pemberton, of Fayetteville, North Carolina, and has issue,

•Hillary Goode; b 23 Feb 1925, and

•Katherine Murchison; b 30 Aug 1920.

2b •Herman Rawlings WINSLOW; b 1 April, 1898; m 16 Feb 1921, Ruth, dau of Robert Spivey, of Perquimans Company, N Carolina, and has issue,

•Watson; b 26 Jan 1922, and

•Ruth Spivey; b 13 Sept 1923.

3b •Walter Frith WINSLOW; b 27 Jan 1903; m June, 1924, •Ruth Ayres, of Plymouth, N Carolina, and has issue,

•Frances Louise; b 13 July, 1928, and

•Ellen Goode; b 19 Dec 1932.

She m 2nd, 4 April, 1931, •Dr Milton Harvey Evans, of Joplin, Missouri.

3a •Martha Valentine; b 25 Mar. 1874; m 6 June, 1894, •William F. Clifton Edwards, of Gates Company, N Carolina, formerly Registrar of Deeds, for Perquimans Company, N Carolina, and has issue,

1b •John Rawlings EDWARDS; b 10 Oct 1896; m 20 June, 1923, •Camilia McMullan, and has issue,

•Pattie Rawlings; b 21 Mar. 1924.

2b •Walter Goodman EDWARDS; b 10 Jan 1902.

1b •Mildred Elizabeth; b 4 Jan 1895; m 18 June, 1924, •Herbert A. Whitley.

Mr. Walter Mariott Rawlings d Feb 1892.

Residence–Hertford, N Carolina.
[]

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/7590/Hyde.htm

"Surry County, Virginia Court Records, 1701-1711, Book VI":

The Last Will & Testamt. of Richd. Hide deced. proved by ye. oaths of John Tyus & Edward Scarborough & a Probate thereof granted to Mary Hide Executx. thereof.
John Tyus, Edward Scarborough, Joseph Collier & Gregory Rawlings or any three of them being first sworn before one of her Majties. Justices of the Peace for this County are nominated & appointed to value & appraise the Estate of Richd. Hide deced: And ordered that Mary Hide Executx. of the Last Will & Testamt. of the said deced. present an Inventry. & the said Appraismt. at the next Court.
Mary Hide appearing in Court & acknowledging a Deed of Gift of several things to Elizth. Smith, Jane Hide & Richard Hide the same is ordered to be recorded.

March 1711
Mary Hide Executx. of the Last Will & Testamt. of Richard Hide deced. presenting an Inventory & Appraisment of the Estate of the said deceased the same are ordered to be recorded.

Source: Wills and Administrations of Surry County, Virginia 1671-1750 by Eliza Davis: Will Probated February 25, 1710
[]

http://www.rootsweb.com/~vasurry/surhist.html

Notes on Surry County, Virginia, History

Surry County, Virginia, was named for the English County of Surrey. County court records begin with 1652, when Surry was formed from the part of James City County that lay southwest of James River. Mr. William Thomas, Mr. William Edwards, and Mr. George Stephens were Surry County's first representatives in the House of Burgesses (the General Assembly) that year.

Samuel Argall, Esquire, "principal Governor of Virginia," set the boundaries of Jamestown by proclamation on 28 March 1619 to include the whole island, with part of the main land lying on the east side of Argall Town adjoining the island, "also the neck of land on the north part, and so to the further part of Archer's Hope; also Hog Island; and from thence to the four mile Tree on the south, usually called by the name of Tappahannock." All settlers within these boundaries were considered members of the corporation and parish of Jamestown.

James City County was one of eight original shires designated in 1634. At that time it extended toward the southwest between Charles City and Isle of Wight (then Warrosquyoake), being terminated later by the boundary with North Carolina. South of the James River it was separated from Isle of Wight county by Lawne's Creek and from Charles City County (later Prince George County) by Upper Chippokes Creek. James City was made the capitol of the colony in 1639 by an Act of the Assembly.

The part of James City County that became Surry County was inhabited by the Quiyoughcohanocks, allies of the Algonquian Powhatan Confederacy, when Jamestown settlers visited in 1607. Early settlers reported that they were entertained very graciously during their first visit. John Rolfe's marriage to Pocohontas in 1614 helped to keep peace between Indians and English settlers for a time. Pocohontas died in England in 1616, however, and by 1622 the Powhatans had decided to rid their lands of the English settlers. On Good Friday, 11 April 1622, Indians living in English settlements all over the small colony rose up and attacked their English hosts, murdering and mutilating them in their homes. At Pace's Pains on the south shore of the James one Indian, a Christian named Chanco , refused to murder Richard Pace, warning him of the impending massacre instead. Three hundred and forty-seven English people were killed then. A list made the following February showed 1,277 people left alive in the colony.

Richard Pace was only one of the settlers on the south shore of James River. In May 1625 The Virginia Company of London listed sixteen settlers in the area that became Surry County. The Virginia Company's development of Virginia did not meet the expectations of the company stockholders or the English government. Sir Francis Wyatt, the last governor under the Virginia Company, became the first crown appointed governor 24 May 1624.

The crown honored patents issued by the Company and granted more lands to encourage settlement. Individuals could acquire one headright by paying the transportation cost of one person into the colony. One headright could be exchanged for fifty acres of Virginia land. Soon headrights were being sold, the system became corrupted, and in 1705 the General Assembly attempted to reform it. The 1705 act explicitly stated that individuals could not claim an individual headright more than once or claim headrights for sailors, and land claimants were required to submit sworn statements verifying their headright lists in county courts.

By 1640 James City County's population south of James River was sufficient to support a new parish, and Lawne's Creek Parish was established. Southwark Parish was separated from James City Parish in 1647, and Surry County was separated from James City County five years later. Soon afterward Arthur Allen built his Jacobean brick house, now known as Bacon's Castle because it was occupied as a fort or "castle" during Bacon's Rebellion in 1676.

Reports to the Bishop of London by the ministers of Lawne's Creek and Southwark parishes in the year 1724 were recorded by Bishop Meade. They were not prosperous parishes. In 1738 Albemarle Parish was created from those parts of Lawne's Creek and Southwark parishes that lay southwest of Blackwater River. The remaining parts of Lawne's Creek and Southwark were united into Southwark Parish. The entire area of Albemarle Parish was incorporated into Sussex County when it was formed from the southwestern end of Surry County in 1754.

References
Surry County Historical Society
Surry County VAGenWeb
Page revised 8 April 2001. © Eve S. Gregory
[]

Surry County, VA

Settlers in "The Teritory of Tappahanna" across from James City, May 1625 - by Pattent
John Dodds 150 Acres
John Burrows 150 planted
Richard Pace 200 planted
Francis Chapman 100
Thomas Gates 100 acres
Mr. John Rolfe 400 planted
Capt. Wm. Powell 200 planted
Capt. Samuell Mathews Divident planted
Capt. John Hurlestons Divident planted
John Baynham 200 planted
Mr. Georg Sandys 300 planted
Wm Ewins 1000 planted
Edward Grindon 150 planted
Capt. Wm. Powell 550 planted
Ensigne Jo: Utie 100
Robert Evers 100

Note: this information is taken from The Records of The Virginia Company of London , ed. Susan Myra Kingsbury, A.M., Ph.D., vol. IV (Washington, 1935) 555.

Page revised 3 June 2001. ©
[]

An Alphabetical List of Surry County Tithables taken 10 June 1668 in Southwarke Parish
compiled by Eve Gregory
from Surry County Deed Book 1652-1672, p. 316

Tho. HUX 2
Joh. RAWLINGS 1

An Alphabetical List of Surry County Tithables taken 7 June 1678 from Sunken Marsh to the upper end of Surry County
compiled by Eve Gregory
from Surry County Deed Book 1671-1684, p. 187

Tho. HUX, Sr. 1
Tho. HUX, Jr. 1
Jno. RAWLINGS 1
[]

http://www.rootsweb.com/~vaschsm/surhist.html

NOTES ON SURRY COUNTY'S HISTORY

Surry County, Virginia, was named for the English County of Surrey. County court records begin with 1652, when Surry was formed from the part of James City County that lay southwest of James River. Mr. William Thomas, Mr. William Edwards, and Mr. George Stephens were Surry County's first representatives in the House of Burgesses (the General Assembly) that year.

Samuel Argall, Esquire, "principal Governor of Virginia," set the boundaries of Jamestown by proclamation on 28 March 1619 to include the whole island, with part of the main land lying on the east side of Argall Town adjoining the island, "also the neck of land on the north part, and so to the further part of Archer's Hope; also Hog Island; and from thence to the four mile Tree on the south, usually called by the name of Tappahannock." All settlers within these boundaries were considered members of the corporation and parish of Jamestown.

James City County was one of eight original shires designated in 1634. At that time it extended toward the southwest between Charles City and Isle of Wight (then Warrosquyoake), being terminated later by the boundary with North Carolina. South of the James River it was separated from Isle of Wight county by Lawne's Creek and from Charles City County (later Prince George County) by Upper Chippokes Creek. James City was made the capitol of the colony in 1639 by an Act of the Assembly.

MAP OF JAMES CITY COUNTY IN 1634

The part of James City County that became Surry County was inhabited by the Quiyoughcohanocks, allies of the Algonquian Powhatan Confederacy, when Jamestown settlers visited in 1607. Early settlers reported that they were entertained very graciously during their first visit. John Rolfe's marriage to Pocohontas in 1614 helped to keep peace between Indians and English settlers for a time. Pocohontas died in England in 1616, however, and by 1622 the Powhatans had decided to rid their lands of the English settlers. On Good Friday, 11 April 1622, Indians living in English settlements all over the small colony rose up and attacked their English hosts, murdering and mutilating them in their homes. At Pace's Pains on the south shore of the James one Indian, a Christian named Chanco , refused to murder Richard Pace, warning him of the impending massacre instead. Three hundred and forty-seven English people were killed then. A list made the following February showed 1,277 people left alive in the colony.

Richard Pace was only one of the settlers on the south shore of James River. In May 1625 The Virginia Company of London listed sixteen settlers in the area that became Surry County. The Virginia Company's development of Virginia did not meet the expectations of the company stockholders or the English government. Sir Francis Wyatt, the last governor under the Virginia Company, became the first crown appointed governor 24 May 1624.

The crown honored patents issued by the Company and granted more lands to encourage settlement. Individuals could acquire one headright by paying the transportation cost of one person into the colony. One headright could be exchanged for fifty acres of Virginia land. Soon headrights were being sold, the system became corrupted, and in 1705 the General Assembly attempted to reform it. The 1705 act explicitly stated that individuals could not claim an individual headright more than once or claim headrights for sailors, and land claimants were required to submit sworn statements verifying their headright lists in county courts.

By 1640 James City County's population south of James River was sufficient to support a new parish, and Lawne's Creek Parish was established. Southwark Parish was separated from James City Parish in 1647, and Surry County was separated from James City County five years later. Soon afterward Arthur Allen built his Jacobean brick house, now known as Bacon's Castle because it was occupied as a fort or "castle" during Bacon's Rebellion in 1676.

Reports to the Bishop of London by the ministers of Lawne's Creek and Southwark parishes in the year 1724 were recorded by Bishop Meade. They were not prosperous parishes. In 1738 Albemarle Parish was created from those parts of Lawne's Creek and Southwark parishes that lay southwest of Blackwater River. The remaining parts of Lawne's Creek and Southwark were united into Southwark Parish. The entire area of Albemarle Parish was incorporated into Sussex County when it was formed from the southwestern end of Surry County in 1754.
\

Settlers in "The Teritory of Tappahanna" across from James City, May 1625 - by Pattent

John Dodds 150 Acres
John Burrows 150 planted
Richard Pace 200 planted
Francis Chapman 100
Thomas Gates 100 acres
Mr. John Rolfe 400 planted
Capt. Wm. Powell 200 planted
Capt. Samuell Mathews Divident planted
Capt. John Hurlestons Divident planted
John Baynham 200 planted
Mr. Georg Sandys 300 planted
Wm Ewins 1000 planted
Edward Grindon 150 planted
Capt. Wm. Powell 550 planted
Ensigne Jo: Utie 100
Robert Evers 100

Note: this information is taken from The Records of The Virginia Company of London , ed. Susan Myra Kingsbury, A.M., Ph.D., vol. IV (Washington, 1935) 555.

Page revised 3 June 2001. © Surry County, Virginia, Historical Society and Museums, Inc.



More About Gregory Rawlings, Sr*~:
AKA (Facts Pg): Grygonie Rawlings, Sr*~
Census: 1640, Surry County, VA
Immigrant Ancestor: 1626, England, Hertfordshire, to VA
Land Grant: 10 Jun 1653, Granted land in Surry Co., BA 10 Jun 1653.
Migration: 1626, England to Virginia, but, records of him do not begin until 1652.153
Residence: of Surrey or Hertfordshire, England

Notes for Jane* Osborne:
1759 ROWAN COUNTY, NC, TAX ROLL

Alexr. OSBORN & Negroes Tom, Will & Dinah
Metthew OSBORN
Sam's. OSBORN
John OSBORN
William OSBORN
Ephrim OSBORN
Jospeh OSBORN
Caleb OSBORN
|||

Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 6

The first record we have of this family is that Capt. Thomas HARRIS and Thomas OSBORNE settled in Virginia in 1611 on lands that are now located in Henrico County. Captain HARRIS in the long Indian Wars of 1622 was second in command to Thomas OSBORNE. He was a member of the House of Burgesses in 1623, 1637, 1647. He m. Adria OSBORNE, and from this marriage descended Maj. Robert HARRIS of “The Forks” who m. a widow, Mrs. Mary (CLAIBORNE) RICE, youngest dau. of Col. William CLAIBORNE, the first Secretary of the Virginia Colony.

More About Jane* Osborne:
Immigrant Ancestor: England to Virginia
Migration: England to Virginia
Surname Variant 1: Possibly Lee; surname not certain.
Surname Variant 2: Jane Lee; possibly related to Ann Lee Sowerby

More About Gregory Rawlings and Jane* Osborne:
Marriage: Bef. 1617, possibly St Olave Parish, Southwark, England
     
Children of Gregory Rawlings and Jane* Osborne are:
  128 i.   John* Rawlings I, born Abt. 1617 in St Olave Parish, Southwark, England; died 22 Apr 1674 in Southwarke Parish, Surry County, VA; married Eleanor~ Abt. 1641 in Virginia.
  ii.   Gregory Rawlings, Jr, born Abt. 1619; died Bet. 1662 - 1669 in Surry County, VA.
  Notes for Gregory Rawlings, Jr:
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/7590/Hyde.htm

June 10, 1653 Gregory Rawlings, Jr. 426 acres on the east side of Upper Chippokes Creek bounded on the head of Richard Hide's land from a marked tree on a part of the Burchen Swamp, running south-southeast along Wm. Symonds' marked trees. (Nugent, p. 238).
(Laura's note: unfortunately I do not have the source for this entry.


  More About Gregory Rawlings, Jr:
AKA (Facts Pg): Grygonie Rawlings, Jr
Individual Note: possibly died unmarried

  iii.   Unknown Rawlings, born Abt. 1621; died Unknown; married John Osborne; died Unknown.


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