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Ancestors of Margaret May Harvey


      24. Robert~ Reid, born Abt. 1780 in Bellelesson, County Down, Ireland226,226,227,227; died 1839 in Grey Abbey, County Down, Ireland228. He was the son of 48. Unknown Generations Robertson To Reid. He married 25. Jane~ Findlay228.

      25. Jane~ Findlay, born in Ireland; died 1845 in Grey Abbey, County Down, Ireland228. She was the daughter of 50. Unknown Generations Findlay.

Notes for Robert~ Reid:
ROBERT REID

Robert Reid is said to have lived at Antrim (?Antrim is a city and county of Northern Ireland?), Bellelesson and Grey Abbey, County Down. He moved to north of Ireland because of religious disputes in Scotland. Robert, a councilor, came to County Down from Bellelesson County. Robert was later a shoemaker, sober and industrious.

The Reid family came from the north central highlands of Scotland (Loch Lomond, Blair Atholl). They were relocated to northern Ireland by the King of England as part of the so-called "Highland Clearances." They were taken to the Isle of Skye and then to County Down where they were placed under Lord Montgomery's authority.

The Reid name comes from Reed which in turn came from the original leader of the clan who had a red beard. The Reeds were part of the Robertson Clan. ---"A Reid Family"
[]

The Robertsons descend from Crinan, Lord of Atholl and hereditary lay Abbot of Dunkeld. From Crinan sprang the royal house of Duncan I, King of Scots, whoxse third son, Helmare, was the ancestor of the Earls of Atholl. The Robertsons are the Clan Donnachaidh, from Duncan, 5th in descent from Conan of Glenrochie, the younger son of Henry, Earl of Atholl. Duncan (Donnchadt Reamhar) supported Robert the Bruce, and his clan fought at Bannockburn.

Duncan fell into the hands of the English and he died in 1355. His son, Robert, gave the Robertson line their name.

Robert was the grandson of Donnchadh Reambar (Duncan the Stout). 1509 the barony of Robertson was those of Struan. There was a large network of landed Robertsons. The first recorded Robertson was in 1371. This surname meant "the line of Duncan."
The Clan Donnachaidh (Robertson)---http://pages.hotbot.com/family/grieveO/table.html
[]

LETTER FROM ROBERT REID TO HIS SON ROBERT FINDLAY REID, SR

Envelope:
Packett Josephine
Abraham Bell & Co Owners
No 33 Pine St
New York

Robert Reid Jr
Harrisburg
Sarah Reid

Mr Robert Reid
<?>
Second Street Harrisburg
Philadelphia
<?>
[has a New York postmark]

Letter:

Grey Abbey, March 10th, 1830

Dear Robt.

I received yours of October 2 six weeks after it left you. You make a very handsom apology for your neglect of writing but we were pleased to find that we were not entirely forgot. All the people that has friends in America gets letters often by we do, but I hope you will for the future throw your indolence aside.

The letter before the last raised all our expectations high; the last destroyed all our hopes, yet we will not blame you for it. You seem to be very tender. I doubt the change of climate does not agree with you. We send this by the Josephine for N. York. I expect to send you another by hand as there is one for Baltimore to sail in the course of this month in which A. Benert and family will take their pasage, and his son in law Dan Muckelboy [Muckelroy?]. He has got good encouragment to go to Philadelphia as a gardner. I will send by him three or four newspapers to let you know how matters go on here. We have had wonderful doings here which has made an uncommon noise over the three kingdoms & you will have it in America too I supose.

The cause is a split that has taken place in the Synod of Ulster. Them that has drawn off calls themselfs remonstrants of whom Mr. Montgomery of Belfast is a leading man & our Mr. Watson has declared for the remonstrants & for that reason was declared unfit to preach for the Orthodox part of the congregation. The principal performers were G. Patton, Doctor Orr, J. McKonkey, & J. Purse. They broke open the meeting house, put a padlock on the door, and would not let Mr. Watson preach but had a minister from the Synod who was guarded by the police. Next Sunday Mr. Watson was taken prisoner by Mr. Montgomery's order & the riot act redd and alowed half an hour to disperse. Mr. Watson was taken the folowing Sunday by the police and ordered to attend the sessions the Tuesday folowing. He did so and had Montgomery the Attorney to plead his cause. He told Mr. Montgomery that he had both acted
tyranically & unjustifiably so to prevent a suit he gave up the possession of the house to Mr. Watson and to the congregation for ever, but you will hear all when you see the papers.

Your mother is well pleased to hear that you have turned religious. Your brother & sisters are well. Margret is winding on the machine for Mr. Patterson. Mary is working now and then with me at the shoes, and Eliza is at school. A. Semple sends his compliments to you. For trade all sorts is nearly at a stand. A great number of weavers and others in Belfast is suported by publick charity and no prospect of it geting better. You hint that you intend to change your way of life. If you have I hope it will be for your good. You will let us know all in your next, also the name of your choise.

Your mother nor myself cannot boast of good hedth but we keep foot for so far. I expect a letter from you as soon as possible. We remain Dear Robert your affectionate father & mother Robt. and Jane Reid.

Your brother has got a son & has called it for you. ---courtesy of Jean Reid
[]

SYNOD OF ULSTER

* Non-subscribing Presbyterians form the remonstrant synod of Ulster (25 May 1830)
http://www.chirl.com/1800/1830.html

County Down

Civil Parish - Grey Abbey
Church of Ireland - Grey Abbey 1807
Presbyterian - Grey Abbey
Grey Abbey *
Other - None

* indicates Secession Presbyterian Churches. There was a Presbyterian schism from 1746 until 1840 when both branches were united.

Greyabbey... Grey Abbey monastery was founded in 1193 by Affreca, daughter of Godred, Norse ... Left:
Trinity Presbyterian Church, Greyabbey- Two thoughts come to mind: 1. In ... http://home.att.net
[]

ANCESTRY.COM

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards c
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Newtownards Priory Graveyard
O.S.12 Grid Ref. 582681
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Reid Here lieth the body of John Reid, Grayabbey, who departed this life 11 Oct 1804 aged 86 years. Here lieth the body of Jane Reid alias Warnock, wife to John Reid of Grayabbey, who departed this life 10 Jul 1765 aged 33 years. Also three of her children, to wit, two Williams and Samuel Reids. Also Eliza Reid who departed this life 11 Jun 1811 aged 15 yrs. Also Jane Hall, wife to the above John Reid, who departed this life 05 Dec 1828 aged 81 years. Also Robert Reid, late of Grayabbey, who departed this life 03 Feb 1831 aged 55 years. Also Mary Ann McConkey who died 07 Jul 1852 aged 12 years. Also John McConkey who died 28 Aug 1862 aged 13 years.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards c
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Newtownards Priory Graveyard
O.S.12 Grid Ref. 582681
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Reid Erected by Elizabeth Reid in memory of her father William Reid, late of Greyabbey, who departed this life 01 Apr 1800 aged 52 years. Also her mother Mary Reid alias Hanna who departed this life 28 Jun 1826 aged 75 years. Also 5 of their children. Likewise the said Elizabeth Reid died 10 Oct 1850 aged 60 years.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards c
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Newtownards Priory Graveyard
O.S.12 Grid Ref. 582681
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Reid Here lyeth ye body of John Reid who departed this life 28 Feb 1778 aged 96 years. Also his wife Isabel Reid, and lieth on the south side; who departed this life 18 May 1775 aged 83 years. Also here lieth the body of James Reid, late of Ballymurphy, who departed this life 02 Feb 1797 aged 82 years. He was son to the above John Reid.

THE SCOTCH-IRISH OR THE SCOT IN NORTH BRITAIN, NORTH IRELAND, AND NORTH AMERICA
CHAPTER XXXIII THE SCOTTISH PLANTATION OF DOWN AND ANTRIM
page 486

COLONISTS from North Britain had already possessed themselves of large portions of Down and Antrim, the two counties lying nearest to Scotland, some years before the inception of King James's "Great Plantation." The history of these early settlers in county Down has been preserved to some extent in the recently published Montgomery Manuscripts and Hamilton Manuscripts, which both come very close to being contemporary records of the periods of which they treat; and in the Macdonnells of Antrim the Rev. George Hill gives a great deal of information about the Scottish colonization of that county. The most important parts of these manuscripts are reprinted as appendices to this volume. The main points of the story may be outlined in a few paragraphs.

At the beginning of the seventeenth century, the north half of county Down, known as the Upper Clannaboye country, was ruled by one of the cadets of the great O'Neill family, who bore the name, Con McNeale McBryan Feartagh O'Neill, and lived in the old mansion house of Castlereagh, two or three miles distant from Carrickfergus Castle (now Belfast). Toward the end of the year 1602, Con happened to be entertaining some relatives in his halls of Castlereagh, when his wine gave out. A fresh supply, which he had ordered from Spain, had been brought as far as Belfast, but was detained on its arrival there by the queen's exciseman, until Con should pay a lately imposed duty, concerning which he neither knew nor understood anything. The old chieftain's blood arose, and he ordered some of his retainers to proceed to Belfast and bring the wine by force. There his servants had an encounter with some English soldiers, and in the melee one of the soldiers was killed. O'Neill was therefore accused of "levying war against the queen," and lodged in Carrickfergus Castle. Sir Arthur Chichester proposed to hang him, as an example, and for a time it looked as if Con's praiseworthy desire to supply his relatives and friends with a proper amount of "drink" would result in the host's losing his head.

In this extremity, Con's wife communicated with a friend in Scotland, one Hugh Montgomery, who was the Laird of Braidstone, in Ayrshire. He had been looking for an eligible "settlement" in the north of Ireland, and kept himself posted as to what went on there through relatives who traded to Ireland from the port of Irvine. In consideration of the cession to himself of one-half of Con's lands in county Down, he now agreed with the latter's wife to assist the prisoner to escape, and entrusted the carrying out of the enterprise to his relative, Thomas Montgomery, who was the owner of a sloop which sometimes traded with Carrickfergus. The latter accordingly began by making love to the daughter of the keeper of Carrickfergus Castle. Being admitted to the castle, Thomas managed to so ingratiate himself with the prison guards, and to supply them so generously with drink, that it was not difficult for him to obtain their consent for the admission to Con's quarters of a large cheese which had been sent by the latter's wife, ostensibly for the purpose of replenishing the prisoner's larder. This cheese was hollowed out, and contained a long rope, by means of which, when night came, Con managed to escape from the castle. Letting himself out of his window, he found Thomas Montgomery's sloop in waiting, and within a few hours he was carried across the Irish channel to Braidstone and safety.

There Con entered into an agreement with Hugh Montgomery, by which he ceded to that gentleman half his tands in Clannaboye, on condition that the latter should obtain for him a free pardon from King James, and get him permission to kiss the king's hand. This Montgomery proceeded to do, but, finding his own influence at Court not sufficient, he was obliged to have recourse to a brother Scot, whose word had more weight with the king. This man was James Hamilton, who had been employed by James I. as his political agent in Dublin. With his assistance, Con received a free pardon, was admitted to the king's presence, and permitted to return to his house of Castlereagh. During the negotiations at Court, it had become necessary for Con to increase his promised recompense to Montgomery by making it sufficiently large to satisfy James Hamilton also. So, when the patent was finally issued under the Great Seal, April 16, 1605, "on the humble petition of Conn McNeale McBryan Feartagh O'Neale and of Hugh Montgomery, Esq., and of James Hamilton, Esq.," it granted to the said James Hamilton all the lands in the Upper Clannaboye and the Great Ards which had been possessed by Con, or by his father, Bryan Feartagh O'Neale, in his lifetime. Hamilton had previously entered into an agreement with Montgomery and O'Neill as to what portion he should retain and what portion Montgomery should receive. He reconveyed to O'Neill one-third of the estate; and that third as well, in the course of a few years, was run through with and dissipated by the convivial and generous Con.

Both Hamilton and Montgomery, as soon as their patents were passed by the Irish Council, crossed into Scotland to call upon their whole kith and kin to aid them in the plantation of their vast estates. Both were Ayrshire men, from the northern division of the county. Hamilton was of the family of Hamilton of Dunlop, while Montgomery was of the great Ayrshire family of that name, sprung from a collateral branch of the noble house of Eglinton, and sixth Laird of Braidstone, near Beith. The king had granted Con's land to Hamilton on the express condition that he should "plant" it with Scottish and English colonists. Hamilton seems to have received the hearty support of his own family, for four of his five brothers aided his enterprise and shared his prosperity. From them are descended numerous families in Ulster, and at least two Irish noble families.

Hamilton founded the towns of Bangor and Killyleagh, in county Down, and there is no doubt that he did "plant" the land which he had acquired with Scottish tenants, the most of them evidently from the same counties in Scotland--Ayr, Renfrew, Wigtown, Dumfries, and Kirkcudbright--as the men who followed Montgomery. The names of some of those who held farms from the Hamilton estates in 1681 and 1688 appear on rent-rolls of those years as follows (Hamilton Manuscripts, pp. 108-111, 125-131), the majority of these residing in and near the towns of Bangor and Killyleagh:

John Adair, Thomas Aiken, Widow Alexander, William Alexander, Robert Allan, Andrew Anderson, James Anderson, James Anderson's widow, Robert Anderson, James Aniston, William Armstrong, David Aul, James Aule, Alexander Baillie, Alexander Baily, Edward Baily, James Bailie, John Baily, Esq., William Barclay, James Beatty,--- Beatty's executors, William Beers, James Biglam, James Black, James Blackwood, John Blackwood, John Bleakly, Sr., James Blakely, John Blakely, Jr., James Blany, David Boid, Widow Boid, William Bole, David Boyd, John Bredfoot, Thomas Bradin, Thomas Bradly, Gilbert Brakenrig, Thomas Bradley, Alexander Browne, George Browne, James Browne, Widow Browne, Samuel Browne, William Brown, George Byers, James Byers, Widow Byers, William Byers, John Camlin, John Campbell, Michael Campbell, Robert Campbell, Widow Campbell, James Carmuheall
(Carmichael?), M. Carr, Henry Carse, James Caul, James Chambers, Andrew Clarke, James Clarke, John Cleland, Patrick Cleland, Widow Cleland, John Clugston, Widow Cochran, Richard Coney, Thomas Cooper, Widow Cooper, John Corey, Joseph Corsby, Thomas Costbes, Thomas Coulter, A. Cowden, William Cow-den, Widow Cowey, William Crafford, James Cringle, Hugh Criswill, James Criswill, St., William Criswell, Robert Cudbert, John Cumin, Robert Cunningham, Widow Danison, John Davison, John Daziell, John Delop, Andrew Dixon, Jalnes Dixon, John Doblin, Alexander Dobby, William Donnelson, Widow Dowy, David Duffe, David Duggan, Widow Duggan, James Dunlap, John Dunlap, George Dunn, John Espy, John Fairiss, Captain Fairly, Hugh Fairly, William Fairly, Alexander Ferguson, Hugh Ferguson, Thomas Ferguson, ANDREW FINLAY, HANS FINLAY, JOHN FINLAY, ROBERT FINLAY, Nathaniel Forgy, George Forman, George Forrest, James Forrest, Nathaniel Forsythe, William Fullerton, John Gamble, William Gastle, John Gay, Hugh Gervin, Alexander Gibony, John Gibbon, Widow Gibson, WilIiam Gibson, John Gilmore, John Gilpatrick, James Gordon, John Gowdy, schoolmaster, William Gowdy, Widow Greer, Widow Gregg, Hugh Hamil, Esq., Alexander Hamilton, Archibald Hamilton, Arthur Hamilton, Captain Gawen Hamilton, Lieut. Gawin Hamilton, Hugh Hamilton, James Hamilton, John Hamilton, Patrick Hamilton, Robert Hamilton, Robert Hamilton, tailor, Robert Hamilton, merchant, Widow Hamilton, William Hamilton, William Hamilton, Esq., Thomas Hamington, Patrick Hannah, Lodk. Harper, John Harris, Widow Hawthorne, John Hay, John Henderson, John Henry, James Heron, Widow Heron, David Heslip, John Francis Hewart, James Hewitt, William Hewitt, William Hillhouse, William Hogg, ---- Holhouse, John Hollan, David Holland, William Holliday, William Hollyday,---How, Gilbert How, John Hui, John Hunter, Alexander Hutchison, Henry Inch, John Ireland, James Irwin, John Irwin, St., Robert Irwin, John Jackson, John Jenkin, George Johnston, John Johnston, William Johnson,

Edmond Kelly, James Kelly, William Kelton, David Kennedy, George Kennedy, Doctor Hugh Kennedy, James Kennedy, John Kennedy, Andrew Kernochan, Robert Kindsay, Widow Laggan, Widow Laughlin, Widow Lead, Archibald Lenox, Widow Lenox, James Lenzy, John Leslie's executor, Samuel Lewes, James Lindsay, John Lindsay, Elizabeth Lockert, John Lockert, Richard Lockart, Robert Loggan, John Long, Robert Long, Widow Lowdan, James Lowdon, John Lowdon, John Lowdon, Jr., Thomas Lowry, John Luke, James Luthersdale, Janet Lyon, Alexander McAmt, John McBride, Andrew McCaldon, Andrew McCalla, Joseph McCan, John McCardy, James McCarly, Thomas McCarly, Widow McCarly, Alexander McCartney, William McClurgh, W. James McCo, Janet McComb, Caghtry McConnell, James McConnell, John McConnell, William McCormick, Adam McCrea, Matthew McCrea, Robert McCreery, Robert McCrery, James McCullam's widow, Thomas McCullen, Widow McCullin, James McDowell, John McDowell, Patrick McDowell, Widow McDowell, John McDoran, Andrew McFerran, Thomas McFerran, Archibald McGibbon, John McGill, Revd. Jackson McGuire, Widow McIlduffe, Thomas McIlrath, John McHoll, Alexander McKee, John McKee, Thomas McKee, Ninian McKelvy, Thomas McKelvy, Widow McKelvy, Joseph McKitrick, John McLaughlin, Alice Mc-Mehan, James McMechan, John McMechan, Patrick McMechan,Widow Mc-Mechan, William McMechan, William McMorlan, Eneas McMullen, Hugh McMullan, James McMunce, James McMurray, James McNaght, John McNarry, John McNeily, James McNily, Alexander McRobins, Alexander McTeer, James McWilliam, James Macumson, John Mahaule, George Mally, John Malley, -- Mant, John Matthew Marshall, Matthew Marshall, Finlay Martin, Joseph Martin, William Martin, John Mathy, Alexander Maxwell, George Maxwell, James Maxwell, Robert Maxwell, Philip Mayers, Josias Milton, James Mitchell, Robert Mitchell, David Montgomery, Hugh Montgomery, Nathaniel Montgomery, William Montgomery, Widow Montgomery, John Moorhead, William Moorhead, Widow Moorhead, Arcibald Moore, Captain Moore, Hugh Moore, James Moore, Jane Moore, John Moore, Robert Moore, Widow Moore, James Morell, Captain Morrow, David Morrow, Samuel Mossman, Widow Murray, Mrs. Neill, Widow Nelson, John Nesbit, Thomas Nesbitt, George Newell, Hugh Nicholson, James Oghterson, Thomas Oliver, Patrick Orr, Tomas Orr, Janet Paradine, Alexander Parker, Gawin Patterson, John Patterson, Robert Patterson, William Patterson, James Peticrue, John Petticrew, William Petticrew, Widow Petticrew, JOHN PATTON, George Pollock, Thomas Pottinger, Randulph Price, Esq., Widow Purdy, ---- Ramsey's heirs, Hugh Rea, James Rea, Widow Rea, ALEXANDER READ, JOHN READ, Mrs. Richison, Mrs. Ritchison, Alexander Ritchy, Archibald Richy, Widow Ritchy, George Ringland, Alexander Robb, John Robb, John Robinson, George Ross, James Ross, Esq., John Ross, Robert Ross, William Rowan, Gawen Russell, William Russell, Hugh Savage, James Savage, Esq., John Savage, Esq., John Scott, Margaret Scott, Widow Scott, John Shannon, John Shaw, William Shaw, Esq., Widow Shearer, James Sim, Gilbert Simpson, Robert Simpson, Widow Simpson, Mr. Sloan,---Sloane, James Sloan, James Sloans, James Smith, John Smith, Robert Smith, Alexander Spittle, James Spotswood, James Stanus, James Steele, James Steel, Jr., Robert Sterlin, Hans Stevenson, James Stevenson, John Stevenson, Alexander Stewart,John Stewart, William Stewart, JamesSumers, John Sumers, WidowSumers, John Swadlin, John Swaline'sexecutors, John Syers, NinianTate, Thomas Taylor, Thomas Tailor, James Thompson, John Thompson, Robert Thompson, Widow Thompson, [p.490]John Throw, Robert Tod, -- Trail, Mrs. Trail, Patrick Vance, George Wallace, Hugh Wallace, Thomas Wallace, William Wallace, Widow Wallace, Archibald Wardlaw, Widow Wardon, John Warnock, Robert Warnock, Widow Warnock, John Watson, Valentine Watson, George Watt, John Watt, William Watt, Edward Weaver, St. John Webb, David Welsh, James Whitla, Widow Whitla, David White, Hugh White, Widow White, Captain Williamson, Widow Williamson, Hugh Wilson, Widow Wilson, Alexander Wily, John Wily, Jr., Adam Woods, Andrew Woods, Widow Woods, James Worrell, Samuel Wright, John Wyly, Sr., William Young.

To Hamilton fell the western portion of North Down, to Montgomery the eastern, and both seem to have added to their estates when Con O'Neill was forced to sell the third which he had reserved for himself.

In the Montgomery Manuscripts is preserved a careful account of how Hugh Montgomery "planted" his estate, the country around Newtown and Donaghadee, known as the "Great Ards." Montgomery belonged to a family having numerous connections throughout North Ayrshire and Renfrewshire, and to them he turned for assistance. His principal supporters were his kinsman, Thomas Montgomery, who had done the successful wooing at Carrickfergus; his brother-in-law, John Shaw, younger son of the Laird of Wester Greenock; and Colonel David Boyd, of the noble house of Kilmarnock. With their help, Montgomery seems to have persuaded many others of high and low degree to try their fortunes with him in Ireland.

The names of the emigrants are intensely Scottish. They began to cross in May, 1606. Persons of substance generally took out letters of denization soon after they came to Ireland, and sometimes before leaving Scotland. The following received such letters of denization in 1617 (Calendar of Patent Rolls, James I., pp. 326, 339), the majority of them having settled on Sir Hugh Montgomery's estates probably ten years prior to that date:

Gilbert Adare of Ardehine, Andrew Agnewe of Carnie, Thomas Agnew, Gray Abbey, John Aickin of Donoghdie, Patrick Allen of Ballydonane, David Anderson of Castle Canvarie, John Barkley of Ballyrolly, David Boyde of Glasroche, Thomas Boyde of Crownerston, Robert Boyle of Drumfad, Nynnan Bracklie Newton of Donoghdie, William Caderwood of Ballyfrenzeis, James Cathcart of Ballirogane, James Cowper of Ballichosta, Michael Craig of the Redene, William Crawford of Cuningburn, Claud Conyngham of Donoghdie, David Cunyngham of Drumfad, Hugh Cunyngham of Castlespick, John Cuningham of Rinchrivie, William Cuninghame of Donoghdie, Charles Domelston of Proveston, John Fraser of Donoghdie, John Harper of Ballyhay, John Harper of Donoghdie, Robert Harper of Provostoun, THOMAS HARVIE of Newton, Thomas Kelso of Ballyhacamore, David Kennedy of Gortivillan, Walter Logane of Logane, Uthred McDowgall of Ballimaconnell, David McIlveyne of Ballelogan, James McMakene of Donoghdie, John Martin of Dunnevilly, James Maxwell of Gransho, John Maxwell of Ballihalbert, Hugh Montgomery of Granshaghe, John Montgomery of Ballymacrosse, John Montgomery of the Redene, Matthew Montgomery of Donoghdie, Patrick Montgomerie of Ballycreboy, Robert Montgomery of Donoghdie, William Montgomery of Donoghdie, Hector Moore of Donan, John Moore of Donoghdie, Quintene Moore of Aughneill, William Moore of Milntowne, William Moore, preacher at Newton, John Mowlen of Mowlen, Patr., Thomas Nevin of Ballicopl, John Peacocke of Ballidonan, Andrew Sempil1 of Ballygrenie, Alexander Speire of Grayabbey, Patrick Shaw of Balliwalter, William Shaw of Ballykilconan, John Thompson of Blackabbey, James Williamson of Clay, Allen Wilson of Newton, Robert Wilson of Newtowne, John Wyly of Ballyhay, William Wymis of Newtowne.2

The success of the settlements made by Hamilton and Montgomery was immediate; for four years after the foundation of the colony--in 1610--Montgomery alone was able to bring before "the king's muster-master a thousand able fighting men to serve, when out of them a militia should be raised."3 Four years later we have again specific information of the progress of the Scottish colonies under Hamilton and Montgomery. It is contained in a letter from the earl of Abercorn to John Murray, King James's Secretary of State. He writes: "They have about 2000 habile Scottis men weill armit heir, rady for his Majestie's service as thai sall be commandit. . . Sir Hew Montgomery is in building ane fyin houese at the Newton, quhairof ane quarter is almost compleit, an Sir James hes buildit at Killilarche ane very stronge castill, the lyke is not in the northe." This muster of 2000 men able to bear arms of course represented an emigration of at least 10,000 souls.

Meantime, across the river Lagan, in county Antrim, a "plantation" had been made which, although not at first peculiarly Scottish, was soon to become so. During almost the whole of James's reign probably the most powerful man in Ireland was Sir Arthur Chichester, who in 1604 became lord deputy, an office which he held until 1616.

In 1603, Chichester obtained a grant of "the Castle of Bealfaste or Belfast, with the appurtenants and hereditaments, spiritual and temporal, situate in the Lower Clandeboye"; while in the years immediately succeeding he acquired the lands along the north shore of what was then called Carrickfergus Bay almost to Lough Larne. Belfast is in reality, from its very foundation; not an Irish, but an English and Scottish town. The survey of 1611 tells us how this settlement was progressing: "The town of Belfast is plotted out in a good forme, wherein are many famelyes of English, Scotch, and some Manksmen already inhabitinge, and ane inn with very good lodg-inge, which is a great cornforte to the travellers in these partes." The settlement commissioners passed along the north shore of Belfast Lough, finding everywhere houses springing up, and in every part of the lord deputy's lands "many English famelies, some Scottes, and dyvers cyvill Irish planted." At Carrickfergus the commissioners found a pier and town-wall being built, and all through South Antrim--in Island Magee, at Tem-plepatrick at Massereene, and along the shores of Lough Neagh to Toome --settlements of English and Scots, and houses and "bawns" being erected.* * Benn's History of Belfast, pp. 674-76.

The Rev. John Dubourdieu, in his Stalistical Account of Antrim, written in 1812, states:

The earliest English settlers of whom anything is known here, were those who came over to Carrickfergus on the first invasion, in the reign of Henry II.; but what attended their descendants, if they left any, we are ignorant of; their number was small, and as they were soldiers, probably few survived. But from that time there were many arrivals in the different reigns, until the numerous colonies came in the reigns of Queen Elizabeth and of James I. Those who settled about Carrickfergus were in the latter reign, and brought from Devonshire by Sir Arthur Chichester. Their descendants retained some of the customs of their ancestors, within the memory of persons still [1812] alive; amongst these was the Devonshire mode of conveying grain in the straw and hay, in bundles on the backs of horses, instead of carriages .... The load or bundles of hay were called trusses, and hay is there still computed by that name. The narrow causeways and immense divisional ditches are also supposed to have had a Devonshire origin. Another part of this colony settled in the district of Malone, or Milone, adjoining to Belfast, where their descendants are still to be distinguished by their looks and manners, but particularly by the air of comfort about their dwellings, and a fondness for gardens and orchards. Near Belfast was likewise a colony of Lancashire and Cheshire men, settled there, as it is said, by Sir Moyses Hill; but from Malone to Lisburn, and thence over the greatest part of the barony of Massereene, and the south part of the barony of Antrim, but especially towards the west, the country is mostly occupied by the descendants of English settiers, and some Welsh, who came over in the reign of Elizabeth in great numbers, and also in the beginning of that of James I.; with the different great families that at different times obtained grants of lands here. Upper Massereene was colonized by the Seymours, Lords Conway, and Sir George Rawdon; part of Lower Massereene also; the remainder, and part of the Barony of Antrim by the Skeffingtons, Langfords, and Nortons, which last came in the reign of Elizabeth.

While South Antrim was thus "planted" mainly by English settlers, the northern half of the county was opened up for settlement, without the violent transference of land from Celt to Saxon which was carried out in other parts of Ulster.


>>>>>CONTINUED AT NOTES FOR JANE FINDLAY, WIFE OF ROBERT REID>>>>>


More About Robert~ Reid:
Burial: 1839, Grey Abbey, County Down, Ireland
Ethnicity: 1780, Reid and Montgomery229,230
Map: British Isles231
Migration 1: Bellelesson County, Ireland, to County Down, Ireland232
Migration 2: Scotland to Northern Ireland232
Occupation: councellor, shoemaker232

  Notes for Jane~ Findlay:
SUPERIOR KIND OF WOMAN

"A fair haired contender of Scotch descent. Well informed and a superior kind of woman." ---"A Reid Family"
[]

>>>>>CONTINUED FROM NOTES FOR ROBERT REID, HUSBAND OF JANE FINDLAY>>>>>

THE SCOTCH-IRISH OR THE SCOT IN NORTH BRITAIN, NORTH IRELAND, AND NORTH AMERICA
CHAPTER XXXIII THE SCOTTISH PLANTATION OF DOWN AND ANTRIM

The northeast corner of Ireland had been long held by the Macdonnells, a clan which also peopled the island of Jura, and Cantyre on the mainland of Scotland. We have already seen, from Marshal Bagnal's description of Antrim, that this clan had acquired a foothold in the Route and the Glens some years before the settlement of Montgomery and Hamilton in county Down.

The story has been told at length by the Rev. George Hill in his Macdonnells of Antrim. In a scarce work entitled The Government of Ireland under Sir John Perrott, Knight, etc. (London, 1626, p. 136), the author states that about 1584, "the Deputy received intelligence of the approach of a thousand Scottish islanders, called Redshanks, being of the septs or families of the Cambiles [Campbells', Macconnells [Macdonnells], and Mag-alanes, drawne to invade Ulster by Surleboy,4 one of that nation, who had [p.493 ]usurped, and by power and strong hand, possessed himself of the Mac-quilies' [McQuillans'], and other men's lands in Ulster, called the Glinnes and the Route; meaning to hold that by force, which he had gotten without right, by violence, fraud, and injury."\

Some of the details of the conquest of Antrim by the Macdonnells may be learned from the following notes on the Scottish settlement of North Antrim, taken from the MacAdam manuscripts. These notes were made by James Bell, who lived near Ballymoney, county Antrim, about 1850, where he formed a large collection of Irish antiquities, a catalogue of which is given in the MacAdam manuscripts, and many of which may be seen in the Town Hall at Ballymoney. Mr. Bell writes:

The town of Ballymoney is said to be of considerable antiquity, but as no written records of its origin are now known to exist, and very few traditional accounts of its early history are preserved by the inhabitants. little is now known on the subject beyond the recollection of the present generation, who would appear not to be descended from the original or earliest inhabitants, but from strangers, and therefore all the early records and traditions are lost. A battle is said to have been in Ballymoney, at a very early period, between the inhabitants and strangers; and the tradition says that the inhabitants were defeated with great slaughter, the survivors flying to the county of Derry and the Glens of Antrim. The town was burnt down, so that, according to this account, "one might walk on the walls from the head to the foot of the town." The probability is that these strangers were from Scotland, and the reasons for such a supposition are--the Irish langu. age was never remembered to have been spoken or even understood in the town or neighborhood, neither are the names of the inhabitants Irish, but almost all Scotch; and the proprietors of the town and formerly of all the lands in the neighborhood, the Earls of Antrim, are of known Scotch descent.

It has always been admitted that the parts of Scotland opposite to Ulster were invaded or colonized from ireland, and that a constant intercourse, either of friendship, trade, or war, has ever since existed between the two nations, which may in the end have led to the final settlement of the Scotch in that part of the country. A manuscript still in existence, shows that the Scottish clan of MacDonnell, who by an intermarriage, got footing in Ireland, established themselves, by the powerful support they received from Cantyre and the Western Isles, in a tract of country forty miles in length. The people of those days generally followed the fortunes of their chiefs. The greater part of the native Irish who survived these bloody scenes transplanted themselves elsewhere, while the Scots remained possessors of the field; hence the old traditions, language, and customs of the country were gradually lost. In proof of the Scottish origin of the present inhabitants, a short extract is here given from the manuscript above alluded to:--

"About the year 1508, Coll MacDonnell came with a parcel of men from Cantyre to Ireland to assist Tyrconnel against great O'Neill, with whom he was then at war.

"In passing through the Root of the county of Antrim, he was civilly received and hospitably entertained by MacQuillan, who was the lord and master of the Root.

"At that time there was a war between MacQuillan and the men beyond the river Bann; for the custom of this people was to rob from every one, and the strongest party carried it, be it right or wrong.

"On the day when MacDonnelI was taking his departure, MacQuillan, who was not equal in war to his savage neighbors, called together his militia, or Galloglaghs, to revenge his affronts over the Bann, and MacDonnel1, thinking it uncivil not to offer his services that day to MacQuillan, after having been so kindly treated, offered his service in the field.

"MacQuillan was right well pleased with the offer, and, with the Highlanders, went against the enemy; and where there wasa cow taken from MacQuillan's people before, there were two restored back; after which Mac-Quillan and MacDonnell returned with a great prey, and without the loss of a man.

"Winter then drawing nigh, MacQuillan invited MacDonnell to stay with him at his castle until the spring, and to quarter his men up and down the Root. This MacDonnell gladly accepted, and in the meantime seduced Mac-Quillan's daughter and privately married her, on which ground the Scots afterwards founded their claim to MacQuillan's territories.

"The men were quartered two and two through the Root; that is to say, one of MacQuillan's Galloglaghs and a Highlander in every tenant's house. It so happened that the Galloglagh, according to custom, was entitled to a mether of milk as a privilege. This the Highlanders considered an affront, and at length one of them asked his host--'Why do you not give me milk as you give the other?' The Galloglagh immediately made answer--'Would you, a Highland beggar as you are, compare yourself to me or any of Mac-Quillan's Galloglaghs?' A combat ensued, which ended in the death of the Galloglagh. MacQuillan's Galloglaghs immediately assembled to demand satisfaction, and in a council which was held it was agreed that each Gallo-glagh should kill his comrade Highlander by night, and their lord and master with them; but Coll MacDonnell's wife discovered the plot and told it to her husband, so the Highlanders fled in the night time and escaped to Raghery. From this beginning the MacDonnells and MacQuillans entered on a war, and continued to worry each other half a century, till the English power became so superior in Ireland that both parties made an appeal to James I., who had just then ascended the throne of England. James favored his Scotch countrymen, the MacDonnells, to whom he made over by patent four great baronies, including along with other lands, all poor MacQuillan's possessions. However, to save some appearance of justice, he gave to Mac-Quillan a grant of the great Barony of Inisowen, the old territory of O'Dogherty, and sent to him an account of the whole decision by Sir John [Arthur] Chichester.

"MacQuillan was extremely mortified at his ill-success, and very disconsolate at the difficulties which attended the transporting of his poor people over the river Bann and the Lough Foyle, which lay between him and his new territory. The crafty Englishman, taking advantage of his situation, by an offer of some lands which lay nearer his old dominions, persuaded him to cede his title to the Barony of Inisowen; and thus the Chichesters, who afterwards obtained the title of Earls of Donegal, became possessed of this great estate, and honest MacQuillan settled himself on one far inferior.

"One story more [says the MS.] of MacQuillan. The estate he got in exchange for the Barony of Inisowen was called Clanreaghurkie, which was far inadequate to support the old hospitality of the MacQuillans. Bury Oge MacQuillan sold this land to one of Chichester's relations, and having got [the value of] his new granted estate in one bag, was very generous and hospitable as long as the bag lasted; and so was worthy MacQuillan soon exhausted."

These facts may in some measure account for the total absence of everything ancient, or truly Irish, within the town or in the neighborhood of Ballymoney, and indeed in the greater part of the Root of county Antrim.

According to tradition, the ground now occupied by the town of Bally-money comprised two distinct but very small villages; and as the origin of all villages and even towns arose from their connection with some great house or castle, we have evidence of this in the names still attached to the town-parks, those at the north end being called the Castlebarr fields and those at the south end the Castle Crofts. No vestige of either of these castles now remains, nor are they remembered by any person living; neither is there any account or tradition existing with regard to Castlebarre; but the castle at the south end of Ballymoney is said to have been built or inhabited by a person called Stewart. This account is probable, as the person who was agent to the Earl of Antrim about the year 1641 was named Archibald Stewart, and belonged originally to Ballintoy. The last inhabitant of the castle is said to have been a Captain Butler ....

A house of worship for Presbyterians stood at an early period on the site of the present meeting-house of the first Presbyterian congregation, but no records are known to show the date of its erection.5

The chief of the Scoto-Irishmen in Antrim at the beginning of the seventeenth century was Randall Macdonnell. After Tyrone's rebellion, he resolved to throw in his lot with the Government, and turn loyal subject. He persevered in this course, notwithstanding many trials to his loyalty, and as reward he received a grant of the northern half of county Antrim, from Larne to Portrush, and the honor of knighthood. He set himself ardently to the improvement of his lands, "letting out to the natives on the coast, and also to the Scottish settlers, such arable portions of his lands as had been depopulated by the war, for terms varying from 21 to 301 years." These leases seem to have been largely taken advantage of by the Scottish settlers, who allowed the natives to keep the "Glynnes" or Glens--that district so much visited now for its splendid coast scenery--and themselves took possession of the rich land along the river Bann, from Lough Neagh to the town of Coleraine near its mouth. So Macdonnell and his property prospered; and in 1620, when King James raised him to the dignity of Earl of Antrim, the patent conferring the honor, after enumerating the faithful services which Macdonnell had rendered to the Crown, specially mentioned "the fact of his having strenuously exerted himself in settling British subjects on his estates." Thus county Antrim, from north to south, became nearly as Scottish as the portion of county Down north of the Mourne mountains.

NOTES TO CHAPTER XXXIII

1. See Appendix S (The Montgomery Manuscripts and The Hamilton Manuscripts).
2. Additional names are printed in five numbers of Thomas Allen Glenn's American Genealogist for 1899, vol. i..
3. The muster-master was an officer commissioned in each district to discover the number of able-bodied. men therein, together with the available arms possessed by them. He was further required carefully to enroll the men and arms in a book, to be consulted when troops might be needed for active service. From this statement of the author it is evident that a large number of settlers had come with Sir Hugh Montgomery to the Ards during the first four years of his colonization. It is to be regretted that no list of these original settlers can now be found. Among them were several named Orr, who appear to have originally settled in the townlands of BalIyblack and Ballykeel, and were the progenitors of a very numerous connection of this surname throughout the Ards. The earliest recorded deaths in this connection, after their settlement in the Ards, were those of James Orr of Ballyblack, who died in the year 1627, and Janet McClement, his wife, who died in 1636. The descendants, male and female, of this worthy couple were very numerous, and as their intermarriages have been carefully recorded, we have thus fortunately a sort of index to the names of many other families of Scottish settlers in the Ards and Castlereagh. Their descendants in the male line intermarried with the families of Dunlop, Gray, Kennedy, Coulter, Todd, M'Birney, M'Cullough, Campbell, Boyd, Jackson, Walker, Rodgers, Stevenson, Malcomson, King, Ferguson, M'Quoid, Cregg, Bart, M'Munn, Bryson, Johnson, Smith, Carson, M'Kinstry, Busby, M'Kce, Shannon, M'Garock, Hamilton, Cally, Chalmers, RED, M'Roberts, Creighton, M'Whirter, M'Kibben, Cleland, Abernethy, REID, Agnew, Wilson, Irvine, Lindsay, M'Creary, Porter, Hanna, Taylor, Smyth, Carson, Wallace, Gamble, Miller, Catherwood, Malcolm, M'Cleary, Pollok, Lamont, Frame, Stewart, Minnis, Moorehead, M'Caw, Clark, Patterson, Neilson, Maxwell, Harris, Corbet, Milling, Carr, Winter, Patty, Cumming, M'Connell, M'Gowan.

Nearly an equal number of Orrs married wives of their own surname. These numerous descendants, bearing the surname of Orr, resided in Ballyblack, Clontinacally, Killinether, Ballygowan, Ballykeel, MunIough, Bally-been, Castleaverie, Conlig, Lisleen, Bangor, Gortgrib, Granshaw, Killaghey, Gilnahirk, Ballyalloly, Ballyknockan, Ballycloughan, Tullyhubbert, Moneyrea, Newtownards, Ballymisca, Dundonald, Magherascouse, Castlereagh, Bootin, Lisdoonan, GREYABBEY, Ballyrea, Ballyhay, Ballywilliam, Saintfield, Ballymacarrett, Craigantlet, Braniel. The greatest number of the name lived in Ballykeel, Clontinacally, and Ballygowan. The descendants in the female line from James Orr and Janet M'Clement of Ballyblack inter-married with the families of Riddle of Comber, Thomson of Newtownards, Moore of Drummon, Orr of Lisleen, Orr of Ballykeel, Murdock of Comber, Irvine of Crossnacreevy, M'Creary of Bangor, Hanna of Conlig, Orr of Bangor, Orr of Ballygowan, M'Munn of Lis-leen, Barr of Lisleen, Davidson of Clontinacally, Jamieson of Killaghey, Martin of Killy-nure, Martin of Gilnahirk, Matthews of ---, Watson of Carryduff, Shaw of Clontinacally, Todd of Ballykeel, Jennings of ---, Davidson of ---, M'Kibbin of Knocknasham, M'Cormick of Ballybeen, M'Cullock of Ballyhanwood, M'Kee of Lisleen, Patterson of Moneyrea, Dunwoody of Madyroe, Barr uf Bangor, M'Gee of Todstown, Burgess of Mady-roe, M'Kinning of Lisnasharock, Gerrit of Ballyknockan, Pettigrew of Ballyknockan, M'Coughry of Ballyknockan, Yates of ---, Shaw of ---, Stevenson of Ballyrush, .M'Kib-bin of Haw, Piper of Comber, Blakely of Madyroe, Orr of Ballyknockan, Stewart of Clon-tinacally, Hamilton of Ballykeel, Dunbar of Slatady, Orr of Ballygowan, Malcolm of Bootan, Porter of Ballyristle, M'Connell of Ballyhenry, Kennedy of Comber, Malcolm of Moat, Orr of Ballykeel, Martin of Ballycloughan, REID of Ballygowan, Lewis of ---, Orr of Clontinacally, Orr of Florida, M'Creary of ---, Miller of Conlig, Lowry of Bally-macashan, Harris of Ballymelady, Orr of BaIlyknockan, M'Quoid of Donaghadee, Appleton of Conlig, M'Burney of ---, Hanna of Clontinacally, Johnson of Rathfriland, Orr of Bally-keel, Stewart of Clontinacally and Malone, Patterson of Moneyrea and Lisbane, Black of Gortgrib, Hill of Gilnahirk, Murdock of Gortgrif, Kilpatrick of ---., Gregg of ---, Huddlestone of Moneyrea, M'Culloch of Moneyrea, Steel of Maghrescouse, Erskine of Woodlburn, Campbell of ---, White of ---, Clark of Clontinacally, M'Fadden of Clon-tinacally, Hunter of Clontinacally and Ravarra, Orr of Castlereagh, M'Kean of ---, M'Kittrick of Lisleen, Frame of Munlough, Garret of Ballyknockan, Kennedy of Tullygirvan, Orr of Munlough, Dickson of Tullygirvan, M'Clure of Clontinacally, Porter of Beech-hill, Dinwoody of Carrickmadyroe, Strain of Newtownards, Burns of Cahard, Kennedy of Tullygirvan. M'Calla of Lisdoonan, M'Bratney of Raferey, Harrison of HoIywood, Piper of Moneyrea, MacWilliam of Ednaslate, Patterson of Tonachmore, Wright of Craigantlet, Boden of Craigantlet, Henderson of Ballyhaskin, Morrow of Belfast, M'Quoid of BranieI, M'Lean of Ballykeel, Neilson of Ravara, Crawford of Carrickmadyroe, M'Gown of Cross-nacreevy, Orr of Ballybee (MSS. Genealogy of the Family of James Orr of Ballyblack, drawn up from inscriptions on tombstones, by the late Gawin Orr of Castlereagh).--Rev. George Hill, Montegomery Manuscripts, p. 66.
4. Surly Boy (Charles the Yellow) was the Gaelic or Irish name of the chief of the Macdonnells.
5. Ulster Journal of Archeology, new series, vol. iii., pp. 148-152.

CHAPTER XXXIV THE GREAT PLANTATION OF ULSTER
page 498

AT the beginning of James I.'s time, although Elizabeth had waged fierce and devastating wars against the Ulster chiefs during most of her long reign, English authority was scarcely recognized in the North of Ireland. It was represented by the commanders of the ten districts into which Ulster was divided, but their rule was little more than a military one, and scarce extended beyond the buildings which composed their military posts; and by the bishops of the Episcopal Church, who had probably even fewer followers in spiritual things than the district governors had in temporal. The country still enjoyed its native laws and customs--still obeyed its native chiefs. There were no towns in Ireland to play the part which the English and Scottish burghs had done in the Middle Ages, to be the homes of free institutions, the centres from which civilization might spread. Belfast scarcely existed even in name, and Derry and Carrickfergus consisted but of small collections of houses round the English forts. The whole country, like the Scottish Highlands, was inhabited by clansmen, obeying tribal laws and usages, and living in some measure on agriculture, but mainly on the produce of their herds and flocks. The land was held by the chiefs nominally for the clans, but really for their own benefit.

The plantations in county Down and county Antrim, thorough as they were as far as they went, were limited in scope in comparison with the "Great Plantation of Ulster," for which James I.'s reign will be forever remembered in Ireland. It is extremely difficult to make out the circumstances which led up to this remarkable measure, or to understand the action of the Ulster chiefs, who, to all appearance, played so thoroughly into the hands of the Government. Which side first was false to the peace, it is impossible now to say. One party declares that the chiefs began to conspire against the Government; the other, that the Government drove the chiefs to conspire in self-defence. The Ulster chiefs began to correspond with Spain once more, as if in preparation for a new outbreak; the Government intercepted the letters, and O'Neill, earl of Tyrone, and O'Donnell, earl of Tyrconnel, confessed, if not guilt, at least fear of punishment, by leaving their country, and sailing from Lough Swilly along with a number of adherents, on the 3d September, 1607. In 1608, Sir Cahir O'Dogherty perished in rebellion, and his lands were confiscated. Mulmorie O'Reilly, whose father died fighting for the English at Yellow Ford, and whose mother was a niece of the duke of Ormond, had to accept a "proportion" of his lands. Other native chieftains, against whom there was no accusation of disloyalty, were compelled to surrender a large part of their property, and a vigorous attempt was now made to plant the country with Protestants.

It is asserted by Hill, that as a result of the flight of the earls and of an act of Parliament known as the 11th of Elizabeth, no less than 3,800,000 acres in Tyrone, Derry, Donegal, Fermanagh, and Cavan were placed at the disposal of the Crown, and made available for plantations. The earls had now rebelled against the king and been proclaimed traitors, and their lands were therefore "escheated" to the Crown. Estates were constantly changing hands in this way in Scotland during the sixteenth century. The more important of the chiefs had gone into voluntary exile with Tyrone; against the rest it was not difficult for the Crown lawyers to find sufficient proof of treason. Thus all northern Ireland--Londonderry, Donegal, Tyrone, Cavan, Armagh, and Fermanagh--had passed at one fell swoop into the hands of the Crown; while, as we have seen, Down and Antrim had been already, to a great extent, taken possession of and colonized by English and Lowland Scotch. The plan adopted by King James for the colonization of the six "escheated" counties was to take possession of the finest portions of this great tract of country, amounting in all to nearly four millions of acres; to divide it into small estates, none larger than two thousand acres; and to grant these to men of known wealth and substance. Those who accepted grants were bound to live on their land themselves, to bring with them English and Scottish settlers, and to build for themselves and for their tenants fortified places for defence, houses to live in, and churches in which to worship. The native Irish were assigned to the poorer lands and less accessible districts; while the allotments to the English and Scots were kept together, so that they might form communities and not mix or intermarry with the Irish. The errors of former Irish "plantations" were to be avoided--the mistakes of placing too much land in one hand, and of allowing non-resident proprietors. The purpose was not only to transfer the ownership of the land from Irish to Scot, but to introduce a Scottish population in place of an Irish one; to bring about in Ulster exactly what has happened without design during the last half-century in New Zealand, the introduction of an English-speaking race, the natives being expected to disappear as have perished the Maori.

The English Council requested the Scottish Privy Council to draw up a list of Scotsmen willing to settle in Ulster. The king seems to have taken the duty of selecting the Scottish undertakers into his own hands, the men who got grants being of higher social standing and wider influence than those who first offered. A second and more careful survey having been made in 1609, the commission proceeded, in the summer of 1610, to divide up the land. This second survey may have been better than the first, but it was very inaccurate after all, as it mapped out for division only 500,000 acres of land suitable for "plantation," out of a total acreage of 3,800,000 contained in the six counties.1 Fifty-nine Scotsmen were chosen, and to them 81,000 acres were allotted in estates scattered over the five counties, Londonderry being reserved for the city of London. A careful examination of the list of Scottish undertakers enables us to see the plan which was finally adopted for securing proper colonists. There was, of course, as was always the case at this time, a certain number of the hangers-on about the Court who got grants, which they at once sold to raise money. But as a whole, the plan of distribution was thoroughly well conceived and well carried out.

James seems to have seen that the parts of Scotland nearest Ireland, and which had most intercourse with it, were most likely to yield proper colonists. He resolved, therefore, to enlist the assistance of the great families of the southwest, trusting that their feudal power would enable them to bring with them bodies of colonists. Thus grants were made to the duke of Lennox, who bad great power in Dumbartonshire; to the earl of Abercorn and his brothers, who represented the power of the Hamiltons in Renfrewshire. North Ayrshire had been already largely drawn on by Hamilton and Montgomery, but one of the sons of Lord Kilmarnock, Sir Thomas Boyd, received a grant; while from South Ayrshire came the Cunninghams and Crawfords, and Lord Ochiltree and his son; the latter were known in Galloway as well as in the county from which their title was derived. But it was on Galloway men that the greatest grants were bestowed. Almost all the great houses of the times are represented,--Sir Robert Maclellan, Laird Bomby as he is called, who afterwards became Lord Kirkcudbright, and whose great castle stands to this day; John Murray of Broughton, one of the secretaries of state; Vans of Barnbarroch; Sir Patrick MeKie of Laerg; Dunbar of Mochrum; one of the Stewarts of Garlies, from whom Newtown-Stewart in Tyrone takes its nalne. Some of these failed to implement their bargains, but the best of the undertakers proved to be men like the earl of Abercorn and his brothers, and the Stewarts of Ochiltree and Garlies; for while their straitened means led them to seek fortune in Ireland, their social position enabled them without difficulty to draw good colonists from their own districts, and so fulfil the terms of the "plantation" contract, which bound them to "plant" their holdings with tenants. With the recipient of two thousand acres, tbe agreement was that he was to bring "forty-eight able men of the age of eighteen or upwards, being born in England or the inward parts of Scotland." He was further bound to grant farms to his tenants, the sizes of these being specified, and it being particularly required that these should be "feus" or on lease for twenty-one years or for life. A stock of muskets and hand weapons to arm himself and his tenants was to be provided. The term used, "the inward parts of Scotland," refers to the old invasions of Ulster by the men of the Western Islands. No more of these Celts were wanted; there were plenty of that race already in North Antrim; it was the Lowland Scots, who were peace-loving and Protestants, whom the Government desired. The phrase, "the inward parts of Scotland," occurs again and again.

These lands were now granted to three classes of proprietors. The first were English and Scottish undertakers, who were to plant with tenants from England or Scotland, and conform themselves in religion according to his Majesty's laws. The second were "servitors," or military undertakers, who were permitted to take Irish tenants; and the third were native irish who obtained grants. The first paid a yearly rent of L5 6s. 8d., the second of L8, and the third of L10 13s. 4d. for every thousand acres. But if the servitors planted part of their estates with English or Scotch tenants, their rents for all the lands thus colonized would be the same as was paid by the first class.

In 1609, the forfeited lands were surveyed by commissioners, many grants were made to undertakers and servitors, aud all things prepared for planting Ulster with another race, professing another religion. The Episcopa1 Church received a large proportion; Trinity College was not forgotten; and the great part of county Derry was given to the Corporation of London, on condition of building and fortifying Londonderry and Coleraine, and thus spending twenty thousand ponnds on the property. A committee of the Corporation, called the Irish Society, was formed, whose duty was to carry out the plantation of their estates.

Next year, the first settlers began to arrive. Some came from England, but most were from Scotland. The English settled in the sonthern part of the province; while the Scots occupied the north and centre, including Londonderry--and Coleraine, as well as Tyrone, "the fayrest and goodliest countrye in Ireland universallie." Among these settlers were so many who left their country for their country's good, that it became a proverb regarding any one not doing well, to say that his latter end would be "Ireland." But the great body of colonists were earnest and industrious. Succeeding bands were even more earnest aud more industrious, while the most worthless among them were, in every mental and moral quality, far above the Irish by whom they were surrounded.

At first these settlers erected their rude, rush-thatched huts near the landlord's castle for protection, and every night they had to place their flocks within the "bawn," or walled enclosure by which that castle was surrounded, for fear of the Irish driving them off in the darkness. But, afterwards, as the settlers became more numerous, they ventured to build their houses here and there in little clusters called towns. This caused each farmer's land to be divided into lots, separated one from another, and mixed up with the lots of others.

Many of the natives, driven to the mountains or woods, were known as woodkernes, and lived by plunder. But woe betide the unfortunate wood-kerne when taken in theft! Small crimes were punished by death. Bloodhounds were kept for tracing these outlaws, who, when taken, were often shot without trial. If tried, they were generally found guilty, and, when sentenced, halters were immediately put round their necks; they were then led through the principal streets of the town to the places of execution, and hanged in the most barbarous manner. But woodkernes were not the only enemies of the settlers. Large flocks of wolves roamed about by night, and often made sad havoc among their cattle. The land was unfenced and undrained. Much of it was covered with woods, affording refuge to the outlaws.

>>>>>CONTINUED AT MARRIAGE NOTES OF ROBERT REID AND JANE FINDLAY>>>>>


More About Jane~ Findlay:
Burial: 1845, Grey Abbey, County Down, Ireland
Ethnicity: Scotch descent232
Migration: from Scotland

Marriage Notes for Robert~ Reid and Jane~ Findlay:
>>>>>CONTINUED FROM NOTES FOR JANE FINDLAY, WIFE OF ROBERT REID>>>>>

THE SCOTCH-IRISH OR THE SCOT IN NORTH BRITAIN, NORTH IRELAND, AND NORTH AMERICA
CHAPTER XXXIV THE GREAT PLANTATION OF ULSTER

But the colonists drained the swamps, cut down the woods, sowed wheat, and planted the potato--an article of food lately brought from America. Barley was also cultivated extensively, and was prepared for use by pounding in those round stone troughs still to be seen at old farmhouses, and preserved as curiosities.

Even then a trade in linen had taken root in the country. Existing before the foot of a Saxon had been placed on its free soil, it was now carried on with vigor and success. The colonists sowed flax, spun the flax into yarn, and wove the yarn into linen cloth. The cloth when sold produced much of the money they obtained. There was also woollen cloth manufactured. Both commodities were easily conveyed over bad roads to the seaports for exportation; and were highly esteemed abroad.

With their lands at a nominal rent, their clothing and their tools manufactured by themselves, with linen and woolien cloth, cattle and horses, to sell, the colonists soon began to thrive. As the woods were cut and the marshes drained, a larger proportion of the country was cultivated. The land, after its long rest, brought forth abundantly. The success of the settlers induced many of their friends from Scotland to follow. The vacant parts of the country were occupied. The woodman's axe rang in the forests, and the husbandman's plough turned up the fruitful soil in the plains. Notwithstanding a difference of race and religion, a common humanity was often sufficient to establish a feeling of friendship between the settlers and the more civilized of the Irish. The woodkernes were subdued or exterminated, and prosperity began to reign in Ulster.

The settlement made by Hugh Montgomery and James Hamilton in 1606 opened up the county of Down to Scottish emigrants. They took possession of the whole of the north of the county, but they were satisfied with the arable lands which they found there and did not intrude on the hill-country of the southern baronies, which therefore remained Irish and Roman Catholic. To the west of the county the Scots were met by the English colony which Chichester had founded at Belfast, and which spread up the river Lagan, along both its banks, towards Hillsborough, on the county Down side, and far into county Armagh on the west. Their common Puritanism formed a bond of union between these English and Scottish colonists. It made them unite and form into communities wherever they met, whether on the banks of the Lagan or northward throughout the length and breadth of county An-trim, when it was opened up to settlers by Sir Arthur Chichester along the shores of Belfast Lough, and by Macdonnell northward to the Giant's Causeway. The only district of this county not thoroughly colonized was the highlands along the northeast shore. Then came James's great scheme of colonization in 1610, which threw open the other six counties, for English and Scottish settlers. In some of these counties, and in some parts of them, the settlements were successful; in others they failed to take root. In Armagh, the British colony took firm hold, because, as soon as the county was opened up, settlers flocked into it across the borders from Down, and in even greater numbers from the English colony in Antrim. On the other hand, the "plantation" of Cavan was, comparatively speaking, a failure. In county Tyrone, the British settlers did not invade the mountainous country on the borders of Londonderry county, but contented themselves with the finer lands in the basin of the Mourne, and on the shores of LoughNeagh and along the streams which flow into it. Londonderry county was during the early years of the settlement left very much to itself by the "Irish Society of London," which kept its contract largely in the direction of drawing its rents--an operation which is still performed by the London Companies, the valuation of the Londoners' property being stated in the Government return for 1887 at L77,000 per annum. At the mouths of the two rivers which drain the county, however, the London Society founded the towns of Londonderry and Coleraine, and these as time went on became ports by which emigrants entered and spread all over the fertile lands of the county. In Donegal the British only attempted to colonize the eastern portion; while in Fermanagh the Scots seemed to be so little at home that they handed over their lands to the English, who here established a strong colony, from which have sprung some of the best-known names among the English in Ireland. Into these districts of Ulster both English and Scottish emigrants, but especially the latter, continued to stream at intervals during the whole of the seventeenth century.

The progress of the colonies in the different counties is very accurately describe in a series of reports by Government inspectors, and in the letters of Chichester himself. Of the Scottish undertakers, and of the manner in which they were doing their work, there is a special report; and, on the whole, Chichestcr is favorably impressed with them. "The Scottishmen come with greater port [show], and better accompanied and attended, but, it may be, with less money in their purses."

For two or three years after the "great settlement" of 1610, the colony went on increasing; and then its progress was checked by rumors of a great plot among the natives to sweep away the foreign settlers. Such a conspiracy did actually exist, and was certainly a thing which might be expected; but it was discovered and suppressed in 1615, before it came to a head. In 1618 the Irish Government instructed Captain Nicholas Pynnar to inspect every allotment in the six "escheated" counties, and to report on each one, whether held by "natives" or" foreign planters." The report presents a very exact picture of what had been done by the settlers in the counties inspected --Londonderry, Donegal, Tyrone, Armagh, Cavan, and Fermanagh. Pynnar points out that many of the undertakers had altogether failed to implement the terms of their agreement. On the other hand, he reports the number of castles, "bawns," and "dwelling-houses of stone and timber built after the English fashion," and mentions the number of tenants, and the size and conditions of their holdings. He states that "there are upon occasion 8000 men of British birth and descent for defence, though a fourth part of the lands is not fully inhabited." Of these, more than half must have been Scots; and if there be added the great colonies in Down and Antrim, there must have been an imigration from Scotland of between 30,000 and 40,000 in these ten years.

The only county in which the Scottish settlers failed to take firm root was Fermanagh, for there, by 1618, when Pynnar reported, a large number of the Scottish proportions had been sold, and were held by Englishmen. The result is seen in the small number of Presbyterians in comparison to Episcopalians to be found at the present day in county Fermanagh.

The north of Ireland is now very much what the first half of the seventeenth century made it. North Down and Antrim, with the great town of Belfast, are English and Scottish now as they then became, and desire to remain united with the countries from which their people sprang. South Down, on the other hand, was not "planted," and it is Roman Catholic and Nationalist. Londonderry county too is Loyalist, for emigrants poured into it through Colernine and Londonderry city. Northern Armagh was peopled with English and Scottish emigrants, who crowded into it from Antrim and Down, and it desires union with the other island. Tyrone county is all strongly Unionist, but it is the country around Strabane, which the Hamiltons of Abercorn and the Stewarts of Garlies so thoroughly colonized, and the eastern portion, on the borders of Lough Neagh, around the colonies founded by Lord Ochiltree, that give to the Unionists a majority; while in eastern Donegal, which the Cunninghams and the Stewarts "settled" from Ayrshire and Galloway, and in Fermanagh, where dwell the descendants of the Englishmen who fought so nobly in 1689, there is a great minority which struggles against separation from England. Over the rest, even of Ulster, the desire for a separate kingdom of Ireland is the dream of the people still, as it was three centuries ago. In many parts of Ireland which were at one time and another colonized with English, the colonists became absorbed in the native population; but in Ulster, where the Scottish blood is strong, this union has not taken place, and the result is the race difference which is so apparent in the electoral statistics of the present day. It is perhaps the stern Calvinism of these Scots, which still survives, that has prevented the colony from mixing with the surrounding people, and being absorbed by them, as the Jews of the northern kingdom became merged in the surrounding "heathen." The history of the Presbyterian Church is therefore an important part of the story of the Scot in Ulster; in fact, for many years the history of Ulster, as far as it has a separate history, is chiefly ecclesiastical.3 It.must be so; for this is a story of Scotsmen and of the first half of the seventeenth century, and at that time the history of Scotland is the history of the Scottish Church. Church polity, Church observance, Church discipline, fil1 all the chronicles, and must have formed the public life of the people.

NOTES TO CHAPTER XXXIV

1. See Appendix T (Conditions of the Ulster Plantation).
2. This state of desoiation was the result, in a great measure, of Mountjoy's ruthless policy, as carried out against the natives by Chichester and his officers, especially in the county of Down. The following extract froin Fynes Moryson's Itinerary is an awful record of the condition to which the hapless natives were reduced: "Now because I have often made mention formerly of our destroying the Rebels Corne, and using all meanes to famish them, let me by two or three examples show the miserable estate to which the Rebels were thereby brought. Sir Arthur Chichester, Sir Richard Moryson, and the other Commanders of the Forces, sent agaiust Bryan Mac Art aforesaid, in their return homeward, saw a most horrible spectacle of three children (whereof the eldest was not above ten yeeres old), all eating and knawing with their teeth the entrals of their dead mother, upon whose flesh they had fed twenty dayes past, and having eaten all from the feete upward to the bare bones, rosting it coutinually by a slow fire, were now come to the eating of her entralls in like sort roasted, yet not divided from the body, being as yet raw. . . . Capt. Trevor and many honest Gentlemen lying in the Newry can witness, that some old women of those parts used to make a fire in the fields, and divers little children driving out the cattel in the cold mornings, aud comming thither to warme them, were by them surprised, killed and eaten. which at last was discovered by a great girle breaking from them by strength of her body, and Captaine Trevor sending out souldiers to know the truth. they found the childrens skulles and bones, and apprehended the old women, who was executed for the fact. The Captains of Carrickfergus, and the adjacent Garrisons of the Northern parts can witnesse that upon the making of peace, aud receiviug the rebels to mercy, it was a common practise among the common sort of them (l meane such as were not Sword-men), to thrust long needles into the horses of our English troopes, and they dying thereupon to bee readie to teare out one another's throate for a share of them. And no spectacle was more frequent iu the Ditches of Townes, and especiallie in wasted Countries, then to see multitudes of these poore people dead with their mouths all coloured greene by eating nettles, docks, and all things they could rend up above ground."--Part ii., book iii., chap., i. p. 271.
3. See Appendix V (Early Presbyterian Congregations in Ireland). Also, Reid and Killen's History of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland.
[]

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards c
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Newtownards Priory Graveyard
O.S.12 Grid Ref. 583682
County: Down
Country: Ireland
The abbey is in the townland of Rosemount in the village and parish of Grey Abbey. It is approached by the road leaving the village towards Ballywalter. The abbey church is Early English in style, though the west doorway was restored in 1842 by the Montgomery family. The bell-cote over the door dates from 1626. There is a recumbent figure in the chancel said to be Affreca, wife of John de Courcy and one in a side chapel which is badly mutilated and may be John de Courcy. Also in the side chapel is an Anglo-Norman grave-slab or coffin lid which was brought from Black Abbey. The older memorials are in the nave and are mainly of the Montgomery family though there are some other families represented. The transepts contain more modern Montgomery memorials.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards c
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Newtownards Priory Graveyard
O.S.18 Grid Ref. 596627
County: Down
Country: Ireland
This church and graveyard are to the seaward (west) side of a small square in the village and townland of Kircubbin and civil parish of Inishargy. The church is barely visible from the road and the square is approached by a small entry from the main road. Kircubbin is a small seaport village 3 1/2 miles from Grey Abbey on the road to Portaferry, which was built largely after 1790. Prior to this there were only about 5 houses (Lewis). The congregation was originally part of Glastry but in 1777 the people here applied to be erected into a congregation and the first minister was ordained in the following year (see Brydone stone). A tablet above the door reads "Kirkcubbin Presbyterian Church, founded 1777. Church rebuilt 1861. Entrance reconstructed 1953 ". The baptismal register has survived from 1785 but there are no comparable marriage or burial registers. Kircubbin Church of Ireland church, which dates from about 1840 when a new parish was carved out of Inishargy, has no graveyard. The baptismal register dates from 1847 , marriage register from 1867 and burial register from 1896. The Inishargy registers go back to 1783 and there are baptisms and marriages in the vestry book from 1728 (burials from 1769).

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards c
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Newtownards Priory Graveyard
O.S.12 Grid Ref. 582681
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Louri Here lieth ye body of Ann Louri alias REID who died 01 Oct (1778) aged 52 years. Also 5 of her children, William and Samuel, James, Hugh and Ann. Also here lieth the body of Hugh REID, son to John REID of Grey Abbey, who departed this life ...

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards a
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Bangor Abbey Graveyard
O.S. 2 Grid Ref. 501811
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Perry Erected by John Perry, Ballycormic, in memory of his neice Anna Maria FINLAY, wife of Hugh REID, who died 02 Apr 1875 aged 28 years. Also in memory of the above named John Perry who died 15 Nov 1880 aged 58 years. Also his mother Anne Perry who died 22 Mar 1882 aged 94 years. Also his aunt Sophia Perry who died 14 Dec 1884 aged 75 years. Also his brother James Perry who died 16 Oct 1896 aged 81 years. Also Isabella, wife of the late James Perry, died 09 Feb 1898 aged 69 years. "I am the Resurrection and the life: he that believeth in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live". John, 11st, 25. Died on 27 Dec 1919, Alexander Perry REID Sergt. 66th Canadian Infantry, aged 44 years, son of Anna Maria and Hugh REID. "Faithful unto death".

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards b
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Movilla Graveyard, Newtownards
O. S. 6 Grid Ref. 504744
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finla/Finley/Finlay Here lieth the body of William FINLA who departed this life 19 Nov 1791 aged 74 years. Here lieth the body of Francis FINLEY son of William FINLEY of Ballywitticock who departed this life 07 Feb 1778 aged 22 years. Here lieth the body of Sarah FINLEY alias Paton who departed this life 17 Dec 1788 aged 73 years. Here lieth the body of Hill FINLAY who departed this life 12 Jul 1809 aged 64 years. Also Jane FINLAY alias McKee, wife to the above Hill FINLAY, who departed this life 17 Dec 1837 aged 83 years.

Down: Duferin - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Dufferin
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Killinchy Graveyard
O. S. 17 Grid Ref. 508608
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finla/Finlay Here lyeth ye body of Mary FINLA of Ballydorn who dyed 29 Dec 1739 aged 22 years. Here also are the remains of John FINLAY of Baloo who departed this life 15 Jan 1864 aged 51 years. Also his wife Anna who departed this life 03 Sep 1869 aged 60 years. Also their son Adam FINLAY who died 02 Oct 1925 aged 89 years. Also his wife Susan FINLAY who died 10 Jan 1920 aged 58 years.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards b
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Movilla Graveyard, Newtownards
O. S. 6 Grid Ref. 504744
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finlay Erected in memory of John FINLAY of Drumhirk who died on 08 Dec 1834 aged 26 years. Also his mother Agnas FINLAY who died 28 May 1835 aged 70 years. Also Eliza FINLAY who departed this life 01 Sep 1892 aged 75 years.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards b
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Movilla Graveyard, Newtownards
O. S. 6 Grid Ref. 504744
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finla/Finley/Finlay Here lieth the body of William FINLA who departed this life 19 Nov 1791 aged 74 years. Here lieth the body of Francis FINLEY son of William FINLEY of Ballywitticock who departed this life 07 Feb 1778 aged 22 years. Here lieth the body of Sarah FINLEY alias Paton who departed this life 17 Dec 1788 aged 73 years. Here lieth the body of Hill FINLAY who departed this life 12 Jul 1809 aged 64 years. Also Jane FINLAY alias McKee, wife to the above Hill FINLAY, who departed this life 17 Dec 1837 aged 83 years.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards b
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Movilla Graveyard, Newtownards
O. S. 6 Grid Ref. 504744
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finlay Erected by Eliza FINLAY in memory of her husband William FINLAY of Ballyhaft who died 02 Feb 1856 aged 68 years. Also their daughter Mary who died 01 Nov 1869 aged 45 years. Also the above named Eliza FINLAY who died 16 Oct 1891 aged 90 years. Also Martha, wife of Francis FINLAY, Ballyhaft, who died 26 Feb 1898 aged 60 years. Also the above named Francis FINLAY who died 27 Apr 1920 aged 81 years.

Down: Upper & Lower Castlereagh - Gravestone Inscriptions, Baronies of Upper & Lower Castlereagh a
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Knockbreda Graveyard
O. S. 9 Grid Ref. 352702
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finlay Erected by John FINLAY of Lismara, county of Antrim, in memory of his mother Elizabeth FINLAY who departed this life on 25 Mar 1848 aged 60 years. Also his father Alexander FINLAY who died on 09 Apr 1851 aged 82 years. Also his infant daughter Edith who died on 06 Jul 1859 aged 7 weeks. Also his beloved daughter Leila Ada who died on 01 Mar 1863 aged 7 years and 7 months.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards a
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Bangor Abbey Graveyard
O.S. 2 Grid Ref. 501811
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finlay Erected by James FINLAY, Balloo, in memory of his father James FINLAY, died 26 May 1898 aged 76 years. Also his mother Jane died 21 Dec 1911 aged 93 years. His aunt Isabella FINLAY died 23 Sep 1904 aged 85 years.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards a
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Bangor Abbey Graveyard
O.S. 2 Grid Ref. 501811
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finlay Erected as a tribute of gratitude by her children to the memory of their beloved mother Isabella FINLAY of Crawfordsburn, obt. 25 Jan 1837 AE 45. Also of their grandfather William FINLAY of Ballymullen, obt. 17 Oct 1833 AE 92. Also their father William FINLAY who died at St. Andrews, N.B. on 08 Sep 1845 aged 64 years. Also their sister Juliana who died 21 Mar 1846 , aged 29 years. Also their brother William who died 23 Apr 1849 aged 29 years. Also their brother-in-law Capn. Alexr. Campbell who died at Quebec on 05 Sep 1849 aged 37 years. Also their brother Capn. James FINLAY who died 04 Apr 1852 aged 40 years. Also their sister Mary who died on 04 Sep 1853 aged 35 years. Also their sister Jane, widow of the late Capn. Campbell who died 27 Nov 1889 aged 76 years.

Down: Upper & Lower Castlereagh - Gravestone Inscriptions, Baronies of Upper and Lower Castlereagh d
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Blaris Graveyard
O. S. 14. Grid Ref. 250627
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finlay Erected by Hugh FINLAY of Trooperfield in memory of his beloved wife Magret who departed this life 18 Jan 1848 aged 52 years. Also their son Hugh who died young.

Down: Lecale - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Lecale
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Old Court Chapel, Strangford
O. S. 31 Grid Ref. 587502
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finlay /74/. Erected by George FINLAY, surgeon, Strangford in memory of his son Robert FINLAY, L. R. C. S. I., who departed this life 14 Nov 1849 aged 22 years. Also his son George who departed this life 04 Jan 1852 aged 20 years. Likewise his daughter Mary who departed this life 16 Mar 1854 aged 20 years. Also the said George FINLAY who died 06 Jun 1854 aged 65 years.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards a
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Bangor Abbey Graveyard
O.S. 2 Grid Ref. 501811
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Russell Erected by Hugh Russell of Bangor, in memory of his daughter Mary Russell, who departed this life on 16 May 1835 aged 24 years. "Remember now thy Creator in the day of thy youth". Also the said Hugh Russell who departed this life 02 Mar 1840 aged 77 years. Also in memory of his wife Jane Russell alias FINLAY who departed this life 18 Apr 1845 aged 75 years. Also their grand-daughter Jane who died 26 May 1854 aged 13 years. John Russell, father to Jane, died 19 May 1856 aged 54 years.

Down: Ards - Gravestone Inscriptions, Barony of Ards b
Marriage Allegations, 1660
Movilla Graveyard, Newtownards
O. S. 6 Grid Ref. 504744
County: Down
Country: Ireland
Finlay Erected by Jane FINLAY, N. T. Ards in memory of her husband Robert FINLAY who died 03 Oct 1854 aged 52 years. Also her mother-in-law Susanna Smith who died 28 Jul 1853 aged 84 years. Also the above named Jane FINLAY who died 15 Aug 1898 aged 94 years. Inscribed by Robert Greer in memory of his sister Fanny who died 27 Jan 1882 aged 21 years. Also the above Robert Greer, died 21 Aug 1936 aged 78 years.
[]

Re: JANE FINLEY OR FINDLAY M. ROBERT REID, COUNTY DOWN
Posted by: Allan Finley (ID *****1497) Date: August 03, 2002 at 08:55:16
In Reply to: JANE FINLEY OR FINDLAY M. ROBERT REID, COUNTY DOWN by Ron Myers of 2064

I don't know if this is a possible thread that might help your search. Thomas Finley born 4/10/1775 in Ireland-died 8/30/1835 - Married Jane Lyle. 7 children. One child Mathew F. born 10/8/1818 in Ireland; died about 7/11/1897 in Marissa, IL. Married Jane Reid in Ireland 7/17/1837. She died about 2/9/1918 in Marissa, IL. They had 9 children. One child John Thomas Finley 8/3/1864 - 4/13/1941 was my grandfather. Another child was Jane Elinor Finley 1/25/1860 - 10/7/1863. Another child was William F. Finley 8/3/1814 Ireland - 9/5/1888 Sparta, IL. He married a Gault 12/6/1817 in Lincoln Co., TN. One of their 9 children, Sarah Elizabeth married David John Reid, 12/28/1865. John David Reid was born in Ireland 1/27/1842. One of the the Reid's children was named Robert Carlise Reid born 1/16/1873 in Sparta, IL - Died 1/20/1873. If any of the above is a possible thread, please let me know.
[]

ronmyers55@hotmail.com Printed: Wednesday, January 7, 2004 3:20 PM

From : <g.ruppert@att.net>
Sent : Thursday, December 25, 2003 5:52 PM
To : ronmyers55@hotmail.com
Subject : Findlay of Grey Abbey, County Down

Hi Ron:

I recently came across your post about Jane Findlay of Grey Abbey, County
Down. I cannot be certain of a connection, but I have also worked on a
Findlay from Grey Abbey.

Here is the limited info that I have:

Margaret Findlay was born 22 July 1798 at Ballymullen, County Down. Her
parents' names are unknown. The birth information was transcribed from her
tombstone. She married John Pentland of Grey Abbey circa 1818, although a
definitive marriage date and place are unknown. There are four known
children: Robert E. 1819, James 1820, Ann 1821 and Elisabeth Margareth 1834
(no doubt there were others). Margaret Findlay Pentland died in Baltimore in
1860 and is interred in Green Mount Cemetery.

The Pentlands emigrated in 1832 from County Down to Philadelphia and were in
Baltimore by 1842.

You can find more information on the Pentland family at my web site:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/ruppert/Pentland

Many other Pentlands and presumably some Findlays settled in Canada,
especially at or near Amherst Island in Ontario.

I wonder if your Jane and my Margaret Findlay were sisters?

Gary
25 December 2003
Baltimore
http://home.att.net/~g.ruppert
[]

http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/families/hmgfm/finley.html

The clan Finley of Scotland, a Highland family of the country in the vicinity of Inverness, is said to be one of the most ancient of all Highland clans. The late Rev. John Borland Finley, Ph.D., Kithaurny, Pennsylvania, who was an ardent lover of family history and devoted much time and labor in researches, says: "The Clan Finley is the most ancient and whole family of Scotland, and existed before a Campbell or a Stewart or a Cameron or a MacDonald had an existence."

By the same authority the origin of the clan is derived from "Macbeth." The Encyclopedia Britannica says in substance "Macbeth (son of Finley, a Celtic chieftain in Scotland, and mormaor of Moray, son of Ruadher) succeeded his father as mormaor of Moray, became a successful general under and afterwards revolted against and killed in battle, Duncan, King of Scotland. Upon Duncan's death he succeeded to the crown and reigned as king of Scotland from A.D. 1040 until his death in 1057." Dr. Finley ascribes the downfall of the clan to Macbeth's death, which was brought about by a mere party combination, after which the clan was declared to be illegal, and the tartan and the clan were known as that of Farquharson. It is possible that some kinship may have existed between the families of Finley and Farquharson, one of the latter name who was slain at Pinkie in 1547, bore the name of Finley Mor on account of his great height and strength.

The clan was in existence as a clan long after the days of Macbeth. This fact is certain and also the facts are certain of its existence during the sixteenth century, and that some time before the seventeenth century the fortunes of the clan had fallen. At some time after the beginning of the seventeenth century the clan began to migrate from Inverness, southward into the lowlands and southwesterly toward the western coast of Scotland. Certain members stopped on the westerly coast of Scotland, others crossed over into the north of Ireland.

The Irish branches are very numerous, perhaps the best known individual of the Irish settlers was late Sir Thomas Finley, of Sugarloaf, Betterby county, Caran. The earliest known spelling of the name is Finlig, subsequently Finligh and Finley. According to Dr. Finley, the names Finley, Finlay, Findlay, Findley, are identical in origin, the name Finley being Scotch, pure and simple, and all others modern and merely an attempt to Anglicize it. The name itself certainly suggests Celtic ancestry, and it is more than probable that when the Finleys of Inverness crossed over during the seventeenth century into the northern part of Ireland they were simply returning to the "Scotch Magir" whence their ancestors had departed many centuries before.
[]

GREY ABBEY

Map Reference: J583682

The Cistercian Abbey of Jugum Dei, or Mainistir-liath, was founded by Affreca, wife of John de Courcy, in 1193. It was colonised by monks from Holm Cultram in Cumberland. The monastery was dissolved about 1541 but the nave of the church was restored in the 17th century and used as the parish church until 1778. The original cruciform church had an aisle-less nave and a pair of E chapels in each of the transepts. There is a very fine pointed W doorway which probably dates to the middle of the 13th century. There are two tiers of three lancet windows in the E wall of the presbytery. The plan of the monastery is typical of the Cistercians, with the chapter house along the E side of the cloister and the refectory along the S side. There was a range of buildings along the W side of the cloister but there is now no trace of them. The roof of the chapter house was supported by six pillars but only the bases of these remain. The S wall of the refectory has some fine lancet windows and there are traces of a pulpit in the W wall. The warming room was at the NE corner of the refectory. The builders of nearby Rosemount House (1762) could see the gothic ruins from their home, and in keeping with this theme they built a Gothick room in the house and a small Gothick gate lodge.
[]




More About Robert~ Reid and Jane~ Findlay:
Marriage: 232
     
Children of Robert~ Reid and Jane~ Findlay are:
  i.   More Notes Robert Reid, died Unknown.
  Notes for More Notes Robert Reid:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jeanmccarthy36/census_two_f.htm#Top

CENSUS TWO F

EAST BELFAST COUNTY ANTRIM POOR LAW UNION: BELFAST WARD: DUNCAIRN PARISH: SHANKILL NEW FILM NO: 0807309 01 046341 SEARCHED ON 28/11/01

NAME
POSITION
RELIGION
AGE
OCCUPATION
READ/WRITE
STATUS
WHERE BORN
STREET

Sarah Boden

Head
Presb
48
Reeler of Linen Yarn
R&W
Widow
County Antrim
No 61 Hanna Street

Mary Reid

Boarder
Presb
50
Reeler of Linen Yarn
R&W
Widow
County Antrim
No 61 Hanna Street
[]

http://www.lisburn.com/history/down_your_way/edenderry.htm

Edenderry village past and present

Down your way
This week Amanda Cunningham looks at the history of Ballylesson.
02/02/2001

CLOSE your eyes and imagine a time when young girls and boys left their simplistic life of school and play to start work at the linen mill, get married, have children and then return to work.

Sadie Grimes, the oldest resident of Edenderry Village, can do this with her eyes wide open because that was her own life's path, and by evoking her memories we too can travel back in time.

From the late 19th century right up to the Seventies the whole of Edenderry village was owned by one family alone.

And the head of that household, John Shaw Brown, is best remembered for his linen factory and the hundreds of jobs it provided for the local people.

Sadie, (84), who attended Ballylesson Primary School until she was 14 was one of the many weavers to cross the threshold of the mill door.

Damask

"I went to work as a damask weaver along with my mother, sister and most of the village, she said."

"The Brown family were very nice people but you didn't make good money, and it was very hard work at the mill.

"They owned the factory, corner shop, the mill houses and the dining hall for all the workers."

Sadie has fond memories of herself and her friends going to the corner shop which was the only place they could buy sweets, and later on when they got married, groceries.

The shop has been closed for around 15 years now and although the outer shell remains it has been divided up into apartments.

When the village was under me ownership of John Shaw Brown it was extremely well kept.

"Mr Brown would send his managers out to keep the Minnowburn Road in good condition," said Sadie.

"They would clean the road and do any repairs.

"Now the Minnowburn Road is closed and the other is in need of repair"

Mr Brown also believed in keeping his work force content so on most Saturday nights he held a dance in the recreation hall at the side of the mill for his employees. He even brought billiard tables In for the men.

And every Sunday man, of the villagers attended a service at historic Drumbo Parish Church.

The graveyard was said to have an 18th century burial practice which was unusual even for the time. In order for a person to be buried, the deceased person had to be attended by some person of good standing to answer for the good behaviour of the deceased when alive.

If this was not possible, the body would have to be interred elsewhere.

Much history also lies behind Drumbo Presbyterian Church in the form of an ancient tower, daring back to 1082.

One of Sadie's favourite pastimes was to take a walk along the towpath, Minnowburn or up to the Giants Ring vi a the Gilchrist footbridge, named after the first chairman of the Lagan Valley, Regional Park.

Before the Lagan weir was built boats were able to motor up the river to Edenderry and those from the village could travel up to Belfast for the day.

However no wadays until a new waterway is built residents have to walk, or take the car or hop on a Ballylesson bus to reach the same destination.

The main social point for Ballylesson and Edenderry was and still is 'Bob Stewarts' bar. It is filled with history every way you turn, with the only new addition, being women.

"In those days you never saw girls go into the pub. I suppose they didn't have the money then," said Sadie.

Councillor William Bleakes, a resident of the area for over 30 years, explained how and why the factory closed and gave his view of how a little farming village came to be transformed into a much sought-after residential town.

Mr Bleakes said: "I remember when Edenderry was an old village.

"In the late Seventies, early Eighties John Shaw Brown was the owner of all the houses and the damask linen mill.

"But he was finding it difficult to cope with the import coming in so he decided to let the firm out in units.

"A community group was set up to make sure they blended in with the village.

"Then he got improvement grants for the old mill houses, without which I don't know what would have become of them."

Beautiful

Mr Bleakes said that although beautiful new houses selling for in the region of 160,000 had been built in recent times, it was the old mill houses that had 'kept the village alive.'

And there are further plans to further develop the old mill at St Ellen Industrial Estate into craft shops; offices and a restaurant.

"It's a place that has a past and has a future," said Mr. Bleakes.

"In the 70's and 80's we could have lost a great deal. Now Edenderry has a great future," he said.

Although Sadie is very happy living with her daughter in the village and would 'never leave', she said she did not share Mr Bleakes' optimistic outlook for the area..

"Edenderry is not the same village I was born into," she said.

"It was a lovely village then, everybody knew each other," she explained.

"If you were ill the neighbours would be the first to help. We had the best neighbours there ever was. People aren't like that anymore."

It is true that society has changed - some may say for the worst and some for the better. In most areas the extended family or neighbour network has all but vanished into the woodwork. "

And although many residents are pleased to see the new houses and developments, Sadie has yet to been convinced.

"I would rather have it the way it was." she said
[]

http://www.ul.ie/~rowing/exec.html

Vice President Ulster
Gordon Reid, 73 Ballylesson Road, Belfast BT8 8JT
Tel: 02890826471 (H and Fax), 028-90781889 (W)
g.reid@rowingulster.com
Lagan Scullers Club
[]

William Arnold (farmer) Aghafad, Cookstown Apr.30, 1880 (male)
+ Jane (Reid) [Parish of Pomeroy

Armstrong MORROW . Knockbreda Ballymacarrett; husband of Sarah Reid; father of Elizabeth b. 7 Nov 1867 CR
[]

REID / REED, Belfast, 1825-1875, Gary Sargent (3 May 2003)
garysargent@earthlink.net <garysargent@earthlink.net>
REID / REED- IRL Surnames List
[]

http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:r1vdhyAOI5oJ:www.lowary.org/LOW_idx2.doc+ballylesson+%2B+reid&hl=en&start=30&ie=UTF-8

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS TRANSCRIPTION IS NOT PERFECT. THERE MAY WELL HAVE BEEN SOME PERSONS MISSED, AND THERE ARE CERTAINLY SEVERAL CASES OF PERSONS ENTERED MORE THAN ONE TIME DUE TO CONFLICTING DATES, PLACES, AND PARTNERS.

THE CONDITIONS OF USE OF THIS MATERIAL ALLOW IT TO BE SHARED WITH GENEALOGICAL RESEARCHERS AND FAMILY MEMBERS, BUT PROHIBIT COMMERCIAL USE. PLEASE USE IT AND SHARE IT WITH OTHER RESEARCHERS BUT DO NOT SELL IT. KEEPING THIS FILE IS CONCIDERED ACCEPTENCE AND AGREEMENT WITH THIESE CONDITIONS.

ALSO... IF YOU HAPPEN TO LEARN WHO THE PARENTS OF LAZARUS LOWRY Sr. ARE, ORE WHERE IN IRELAND HE WAS BORN, PLEASE LET ME KNOW. I AM BOB LOWERY AND YOU MAY E-MAIL ME AT: THELOWERY@AOL.COM

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS TRANSCRIPTION IS NOT PERFECT. THERE MAY WELL HAVE BEEN SOME PERSONS MISSED, AND THERE ARE CERTAINLY SEVERAL CASES OF PERSONS ENTERED MORE THAN ONE TIME DUE TO CONFLICTING DATES, PLACES, AND PARTNERS.

THE CONDITIONS OF USE OF THIS MATERIAL ALLOW IT TO BE SHARED WITH GENEALOGICAL RESEARCHERS AND FAMILY MEMBERS, BUT PROHIBIT COMMERCIAL USE. PLEASE USE IT AND SHARE IT WITH OTHER RESEARCHERS BUT DO NOT SELL IT. KEEPING THIS FILE IS CONCIDERED ACCEPTENCE AND AGREEMENT WITH THIESE CONDITIONS.

ALSO... IF YOU HAPPEN TO LEARN WHO THE PARENTS OF LAZARUS LOWRY Sr. ARE, ORE WHERE IN IRELAND HE WAS BORN, PLEASE LET ME KNOW. I AM BOB LOWERY AND YOU MAY E-MAIL ME AT: THELOWERY@AOL.COM

Agnes LAURIE(F) Marr: 28 Feb 1633 Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scot. Spouse: John REID

Agnes LAURIE(F) Marr: 28 Feb 1633 Midlothian, Scot. Rel: Edward REID , (no parents listed)

Agnes LOWRIE(F) Chris: 13 Dec 1610 St.Cuthberts, Edinburgh, Father: Thomas LOWRIE Mother: Elspeth SCOT Midlothian, Scot.

Agnes LAURIE(F) Chris: 28 Dec 1613 Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scot. Father: Alexander LAURIE Mother: Susanna LEUEKOP

Agnes LOWRIE(F) Chris: 26 May 1622 High Church, Glasgow, Lanark, Father: Dauid LOWRIE Mother: Jonnet MCKINLAY Scot.

Agnes LAURIE(F) Marr: 28 Feb 1633 Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scot. Spouse: John REID

Agnes LOWRY(F) Chris: 25 Jun 1633 Innerwick, East Lothian, Scot. Father: Georg LOWRY

Agnes LAURIE(F) Marr: 28 Feb 1633 Midlothian, Scot. Rel: Edward REID , (no parents listed)

Agnes LAURENCE(F) Chris: 25 Feb 1684 Auchterarder, Perth, Scot. Father: Androw LAURENCE Mother: Margarit REID

Archbald LAURY(F) Chris: 11 Mar 1706 North Leith, Midlothian, Scot. Father: Archbald LAURY Mother: Margaret REID

Elizabeth LOWRIE(F) Died: Abt 1598 Coldingham, Berwick, Scot. > Rel: Margaret A REID (no parents listed)

Elizabeth LAWRIE(F) Born: Abt 1706 Paisley, Renfrew, Scot. Spouse: Robert REID

Florella Reid LOWRY(F) Chris: 27 May 1849 Presbyterian, Lissara, Down, Father: Thomas LOWRY Mother: Florella Ire.

George LOWRIE(M) Marr: 31 Jul 1631 Midlothian, Scot. Rel: Edward REID , (no parents listed)

Agnes LAURIE(F) Chris: 9 Feb 1665 St.Cuthberts, Midlothian, Father: James LAURIE Mother: Marie FINDLAYSON Scot.

Anne Adair LAWRIE(F) Born: 23 May 1847 Barony, Lanark, Scot. Father: James Adair LAWRIE Mother: Janet FINDLAY

Elisabeth LOWRIE(F) Chris: 28 Aug 1826 Banchory Devenick, Kincardine, Father: Alexander LOWRIE Mother: Helen FINDLAY Scot.

George LOWRIE(M) Chris: 20 Aug 1832 Banchory Devenick, Kincardine, Father: Alexander LOWRIE Mother: Helen FINDLAY Scot.

Archibald MC LARENS(M) Chris: 5 Apr 1778 Killin, Perth, Scot. Father: Finlay MC LARENS Mother: Anne MC LARENS

Christine LAURY(F) Chris: 4 May 1726 Penicuik, Midlothian, Scot. Father: John LAURY Mother: Margaret FINLAYSON

Collin MCLAWREN(M) Chris: Mar 1689 Killin, Perth, Scot. Father: Finlay MCLAWREN Mother: Margaret STIRLING

Donald MCLAWREN(M) Chris: 3 Feb 1689 Killin, Perth, Scot. Father: Duncan MCLAWREN Mother: Janett MCFINLAY

Archibald MC LARENS(M) Chris: 5 Apr 1778 Killin, Perth, Scot. Father: Finlay MC LARENS Mother: Anne MC LARENS
[]

Vianstown Down . 2km SSW of Downpatrick; in Ballyvange townland; Vianstown House residence of the Reid family in 1836; great thunderstorm, effects of lightning on Mr Reid's residence 9 Aug 1879; Vianstown Cottage also here old b/w map N15; MID p 65 ; DR; O'L V1 p 312

Olivet House Comber . in Ballygowan village; built 1886; an imposing & austere building; erected by Alexander Orr Reid as an orphanage .
[]

CLENDINNEN Lookup thru Co Down Please..ty:)
Posted by: cathy carley (ID *****2389) Date: November 28, 2003 at 12:42:43 of 660

Hi:) Im looking for parents of JOHN CLENDINNEN born circa 1770 in Co Down...I think his parents were JAMES GLENDINNING(CLENDINNEN) and JANE REID, but not sure..

JAMES Glendinning was born in 1727 in Killyleagh Co Down..His Parents WILLIAM GLENDINNING and ROSEANNE FISHER.

Possible too James might have been his Grandfather. Would Appreciate any help on this one.
Thankyou:)

Re: James JOHNSON- born Rathfiland, Down Co. , 1819
Posted by: Rick Van Dusen (ID *****7965) Date: May 04, 2003 at 16:28:10
In Reply to: Re: James JOHNSON- born Rathfiland, Down Co. , 1819 by Charrie (Gibson)Worden of 660

Found your thread while searching for my Johnston ancestors, and think there's some probability of a connection, though it appears neither of us yet know enough to find it. Below info on my ancestor-emigrants might help you, if I'm right about a connection:

Arthur Johnston and Rosa Reid. Married July 8, 1805, Loughaghery Associate Presbyterian Church, Hillsborough, County Down. Emigrated in 1832. Died aboard ship (the Thomas Gilson). "The couple's nine children were quarantined at Montreal for several weeks before they were allowed to leave. They then joined relatives in Columbiana County, Ohio, who had immigrated the year before" (Robert and Elizabeth, below).

Christopher Johnston (b. abt. 1787) and Jane/Jennie Ferguson (b. abt. 1790). Married April 20, 1806, Loughaghery Associate Presbyterian Church, Hillsborough, County Down. Emigrated 1826.

Robert Johnston (b. abt. 1767) and Elizabeth Carnes (b. abt 1771). Emigrated 1830. (Sons emigrated with Christopher and Jane/Jennie.)

Daughter of Robert/Elizabeth was Mary Ann, who stayed back and m. James Smyth. Names in this line include McCone, Jess, and some additional Johnstons.

My Johnston Ancestors
Posted by: Rick Van Dusen (ID *****7965) Date: May 03, 2003 at 21:26:05 of 660
JOHNSTON, REID, FERGUSON, CARNES, SMYTH, JESS, McCONE

Can anyone help me identify and gain further information about any of the following, my 3rd-great-grandparents? Thanks to my grandmother, we have good records of these folks after their arrival in Ohio and records of about 5000 of their descendants, but of their time in Ireland we know little except what I state below, and that they probably came from County Down or County Antrim. Evidence is that these Johnstons are related, but we have no idea how and would be greatly helped to know.

Arthur Johnston and Rosa Reid. Married July 8, 1805, Loughaghery Associate Presbyterian Church, Hillsborough, County Down. Emigrated in 1832. Died aboard ship (the Thomas Gilson). "The couple's nine children were quarantined at Montreal for several weeks before they were allowed to leave. They then joined relatives in Columbiana County, Ohio, who had immigrated the year before" (Robert and Elizabeth, below).

Christopher Johnston (b. abt. 1787) and Jane/Jennie Ferguson (b. abt. 1790). Married April 20, 1806, Loughaghery Associate Presbyterian Church, Hillsborough, County Down. Emigrated 1826.

Robert Johnston (b. abt. 1767) and Elizabeth Carnes (b. abt 1771). Emigrated 1830. (Sons emigrated with Christopher and Jane/Jennie.)

My grandmother did not leave us her sources, but I do have some more notes regarding churches, some non-emigrated descendants, etc., which are too much to post here but which I can share by email with you if you are able to help.

James Lowry of Linen-hill, Shannaghan, County Down-1700s.
Posted by: Marjorie Barron (ID *****3594) Date: November 19, 2002 at 06:41:43 of 660

Looking for parents of JAMES and wife MARY (___) LOWRY of Linen-hill, Shannaghan, County Down. His known children:

Jane, md Alexander PRENTICE in 1786.
dau (Bethel?) md Henry WALLACE 1791.
Susannah, md John BIRCH 1792.
Alexander, md Christina ZEDLITZ 1802 in Norway.
John, died before 1823, no other info.
Mary, died young.
perhaps others?
James, John, Mary and Susannah are buried at GARVAHY GRAVEYARD.

MARY, wife of James Lowry (by 1764) may have been a daughter of JAMES and wife (Isabella?) REID? Reid siblings in 1764 would have been:

Ann FORYSTHE , widow of Downpatrick.
John and Alice BOYD of Downpatrick

James REID (Jr?) , dec'd, (Isabella REID, Balloo, Co Down, Robert ARMSTRONG, Belfast, and George MAXWELL, Ballyymanis Co. Down-Exors of James Reid)
Thomas REID
wife of Hamiliton McCLURE of Dublin.
wife of Thomas GIBSON of Newry

Any help appreciated. Thank you, Marj

Maxwell/Reid & Wilson/Edgar
Posted by: Peter Collins Date: January 22, 2001 at 14:11:31 of 660

Looking for information on families of James Maxwell & wife Martha (nee Reid), farmer, from Boardmills, Co. Down, around 1815 - 1880

also, Thomas Wilson & wife, Jane (nee Edgar)also a farmer from Boardmills, Co. Down, around the same period.

MCMEEKIN, REID, NIBLOCK Donaghadee/Millisle area
Posted by: Siusaidh Burgess-Hoffman Date: October 14, 2001 at 12:19:09 of 660

I am looking for information on the families of McMeekin, Niblcok and Reid, around the early 1800s in either Donaghadee or Millisle area. William McMeekin was born, we believe,in Millisle and lived in Donaghadee at one time. He was a ship builder or sailor. William McMeekin and Agnes Reid were married abt 1854 and immigrated to Illinois abt. 1855-56. Agnes is the daughter of Anne Niblock and Robert Reid, this we know from her death certificate. Although William had been to America once before, to PA, Agned did not come over until after their marriage. Any information would be great!
[]

Helen LAVERY (F) Married: John REID On: 5 Nov 1854 Barony, Lanark, Scotland Ba: M119692 So: 1041482,994223 So:

John LAVERIE (M) Married: Mary REID On: 23 Nov 1864 Barr By Girvan, Ayr, Scotland Ba: M115801 So: 6035516 REGISTER

William LAVERIE (M) Married: Esther REID On: 8 Jul 1844 Stoneykirk, Wigtown, Scotland Ba: 7019106 50 So: 538519

William LAVERY (M) Married: Easther REID On: 7 Jul 1844 Old Luce, Wigtown, Scotland Ba: M118945 So: 1068039, 102353 Pr: 6901371
[]

  ii.   John Reid, born Abt. 1800 in Gray Abbey, County Down, Ireland; died Unknown; married Catherine Temple in Gray Abbey, County Down, Ireland232; died Unknown.
  More About John Reid:
Occupation: shoemaker232

  More About John Reid and Catherine Temple:
Marriage: Gray Abbey, County Down, Ireland232

  12 iii.   Robert Findlay Reid, Sr*, born 04 Aug 1804 in Grey Abbey, County Down, Ireland; died 27 Apr 1843 in Indianapolis, Marion County, IN; married Sarah Ogle 05 Nov 1829 in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA.
  iv.   Margaret Reid, born Aft. 1804 in Gray Abbey, County Down, Ireland232,233; died Unknown.
  Notes for Margaret Reid:
Margaret died of decline. Never married.


  More About Margaret Reid:
Occupation: 1830, Winding machine234

  v.   Mary Reid, born 1812 in Gray Abbey, County Down, Ireland235; died Unknown; married James McKay236; died Unknown.
  More About Mary Reid:
Occupation: 1830, Worked for father's shoemaking business.237

  More About James McKay and Mary Reid:
Marriage: 238

  vi.   Eliza Reid, born 1814 in Gray Abbey, County Down, Ireland239; died Unknown.
  Notes for Eliza Reid:
Never married. Died of decline.


  More About Eliza Reid:
Education: 1830, in school240



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