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This project began in the early 1970s and for the first several years I did a lot of digging in Archives, Church Registers, Microfilm files, personal interviews and internet searches. Then I loaded my Descendant charts to FTM and to The Island Register http://www.islandregister.com, a phenomenal site on PEI.

Many people [hundreds] who saw these charts and recognized family connections, say a grandparent asked for more information. Typically I would supply the info and ask for theirs which was added to my family trees. When a spouses surname was added it led to a chance for a new branch and more individuals. Most of the individuals on my charts were added this way.

So now, June 2010 there are over 7667 individuals and 2208 marriages, 17 generations and 1294 Surnames in my FTM. Some direct forebear's birth dates, the Ahearns are as early as the late 1700ís with extrapolations to the mid 1700ís. An indirect forebear of Perley Merrithew, husband of my mother's Aunt "Kit" Kinch, Edmund Freeman was Mayflower stock born Bef. 26 Nov 1620.
Mr
Updated March 14, 2011

*

Thomas P OCONNOR
Apt 105
302 Linden Ponds Way
Hingham, MA 02043
United States
339-200-8635
tpoc_99@yahoo.com


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My Family History

 

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  • TPOC (16 KB)
    Taken about 1961
 

Family Tree Maker Reports and Trees

 

Related Files

  • Mary Isabel (O'Connor) Lawry (^# KB)
    MARY ISABEL (OíCONNOR) LAWRY From Mary Catherine about her mother My earliest memories are of my Mother always on a roll and going full force ahead. She always had a project going, whether it was a new suit for my father, new wallpaper for the living room, or a new paint job on the bedroom. One of her most favorite things to do was to browse the aisles of The Bargain Center in downtown Quincy . (I did not inherit this gene but my daughter, Abby, has. It must skip a generation). She was a brave entertainer and she often hosted parties, large and small, at our house in Westfield . Even after she and my Dad moved into a very small one bedroom house she had a dinner party one night with forty people. She loved to bake bread and we were lucky to come home often to the sweet smell of the dough in process. She loved her family more than anything and was very territorial and protective of all of us. She was so proud when her younger brother returned to school while an adult and became a teacher. She bragged for years about her other brother Tom who became head of the Massachusetts Teachersí Certification Department. She took on non family members and demonstrated the same protectiveness and concern towards them also. (Once I was rear ended by a man traveling with his family on his way to try and obtain his teacherís certification. The fact that this guy, driving fast and anxious to get to Westfield State to work on his problem, smashed into our car was not a concern. She called her brother Tom and tried to smooth the way for this manís certification process.) People in our town are still talking about her outrage when a friend, Jim Dowd, was passed over for Superintendent of Schools in Westfield . She knew he was the best candidate and lobbied all City officials to get Jim the job. When he did not, she was pretty upset. My mother was, as I have indicated, very brave. She enrolled as a freshman at Westfield State College in the late fifti
  • O'Connor and related Family Stories (503 KB)
    Mackie, Kinch, Whelan, Heron/Ahearn, Dalton, MacDonald, McCarthy, O'Connor, O'Hara and others [Minor editing 3/7/99] Since the early Seventies when I first saw the reprint of Meacham's 1880 Atlas I have been working on the story of my maternal ancestors, most of who arrived on PEI in the early 1800's; some first in Tryon, Lot 28 and many "up West," but most of them finally settled in or near Kildare, Lot 3, Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. At first I called it a "genealogy" but as I became more familiar with what that term meant it became clear that using true genea¨logi¨cal standards would limit the story to types of proof that would require leaving out inter¨est¨ing parts that seemed clearly true but were based on circumstantial evidence. Accordingly, I'll call it a "family history story" and try to make reasonable arguments to justify any parts for which I don't have original source documentation. I hope readers will not be too critical of some of my broader leaps of faith.
  • PEI ANCESTORS 11.11.2010 One of the eight (47 KB)
    Mackie, Kinch, Whelan, Heron/Ahearn, Dalton, MacDonald, McCarthy, O'Connor, O'Hara and others Since the early Seventies when I first saw the reprint of Meacham's 1880 Atlas I have been working on the story of my maternal ancestors, most of who arrived on PEI in the early 1800's; some first in Tryon, Lot 28 and many "up West," but most of them finally settled in or near Kildare, Lot 3, Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. At first I called it a "genealogy" but as I became more familiar with what that term meant it became clear that using true genea¨logi¨cal standards would limit the story to types of proof that would require leaving out inter¨est¨ing parts that seemed clearly true but were based on circumstantial evidence. Accordingly, I'll call it a "family history story" and try to make reasonable arguments to justify any parts for which I don't have original source documentation. I hope readers will not be too critical of some of my broader leaps of faith.
  • Karen's eulogy of Eleanor at her funeral. (6 KB)
    This is the remembrance of Eleanor given by her niece Karen OíConnor at her funeral Mass at St Maryís Church in Randolph, MA on Saturday May 12, 2001 ELEANOR ELISABETH O'CONNOR JANUARY 25, 1922 - MAY 9, 2001 Today we come together to honor and remember Eleanor's life. The irony is that she was humble and would feel self-conscious about being the center of attention. She would want to change the focus from her to us. But you can't do that today, El. We are here to celebrate your life! You touched us all so much. Elisabeth Kubler Ross wrote "people are like stained glass windows, they sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed in their light from within." This past year has been difficult for Eleanor physically, and the last few weeks were as she described "a battlefield." Through it all, her light from within shined through. She showed her dignity, humor, and determination. That's also the way she lived her life. Eleanor had a special quality that drew people to her- a fiend to so many. Her genuine caring and interest in people made her many friends during all stages of her life and in all areas of the world. She kept in touch. Even during her last few hours at the hospital, she formed a new friendship with the pastoral minister, Mary. They shared prayers and laughter. In the end Eleanor promised to pray for Mary's son. Eleanor instilled a sense of confidence and made us believe in ourselves. She was always there in a time of need for a family member or friend- from letting someone live with her, giving financial aid, taking care of our children or our pets, nursing someone to health, or simply giving an encouraging word. Auntie El would be there! Kerry O'Connor, one of Eleanor's grand nieces, gives us a good example of this when she said, ' Eleanor was so wonderful to Dave and me when we were kids. She used to pick us up on the weekends and make sure we got to CCD Saturday mornings. She made sure we had a strong sense of faith, family and self " Fiona O'Connor, a niece, told how Eleanor seemed always to be there for her during a crisis. When Fiona needed a place to five and later when she needed help when her mother died in California, Eleanor came to the rescue! When Eleanor was much younger, she left a high paying job in Chicago to help care for her mother who was dying of cancer. She moved to Westfield to help take care of her sister Mary when she was dying. We all have, "Auntie El to the rescue" stories! Eleanor gave freely of herself and did not expect anything for her good deeds. Eleanor was a giver of advice, and she expected you to follow it. Sometimes we didn't, but she loved us anyway. Recently she gave me some business advice that I didn't follow. Her comment was, "Do I have to go and run that business for you?" This was right before she was going into the hospital! A few days ago, I heard my cousin Cathy lament to another relative Diane, "Who are we going to call for advice now?" Wisely Diane replied that we, are just going to have to think about the advice Eleanor would have given us. She had a way of seeing things clearly and her advice was solid. Eleanor was a dignified woman who handled occasions with grace. Just a few weeks ago her niece, Mary took Eleanor to Whalerís Wharf in Provincetown to see my husbandís project. They had a wonderful lunch On that delightful Cape Cod spring day, of course, there was the usual fight with Eleanor about who would pay the check. The next day a beautiful handwritten note arrived from Eleanor, thanking Bruce for the day and for being such a special part of her life. Many of us have received such thoughtful notes throughout the years. She was a class act! Eleanor was not a saint, and she would not want to be thought of as one. But as I talked to relatives and friends these last few days, I began to think that maybe she should be! Eleanor was always ready for a good time and an adventure. One of her nieces, Pat, said recently that she used to be late for everything but never missed anything important. Quite a few years ago, I took Eleanor for a sail on a small sunfish. Even at the beach, she was a sophisticated dresser in her pumps and suit. We tipped over immediately and had to be saved by a passerby. Later Eleanor draped her nylons and ruined pumps over the deck of my porch where they remained for the duration of the summer. Always with Eleanor there was humor and laughter. Right to the end she was joking with the doctors and the nurses. During this last hospital stay, many staff members stopped by to say hello to her because they remembered her from her visit in September. [She had had two large melanoma removed from her lower leg then.] Family was very important to her. Auntie El was a " second mother " to so many of us. And each of us had a special relationship with her. She always wanted to hear about our escapades and our dreams. Eleanor enjoyed our accomplishments and helped us through our disappointments. She was the hub of our family, the matriarch, and the connection that let us stay in touch with each other's busy lives. Lately her chair and telephone were her command central. [She was recuperating from the Melanoma operation which required that her leg be wrapped tightly every day because lymph nodes had been removed. Karen and Mary had purchased a lift chair which helped her get up and down.] How did she keep track of so many people, so many telephone numbers and so many birthdates? Not only did she keep us in touch with the present family situation, Eleanor also taught us about our family tradition and heritage-just who was related to whom. She had a remarkable memory. Just recently she compiled a story about her mother that her niece, Mary, is typing for the family. At the end, Eleanor was at peace with her life and her death. She was prepared for her next journey and stated this. As Eleanor said during her final hours, " I will miss you all, but you will miss me more." As usual she was right. With Eleanor's death, a gap has been created in so many lives. We have to hold on to her memories and lessons to help fill it. It's been such a privilege to know and love her. You were loved so dearly, Eleanor. May you rest in peace.
 

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