Kerry O’Dair’s Haplogroup E3B (M35) From 37 Marker DNA Test

Think of the Haplogroup as a beginning History Marker from the DNA Test

 

The Genographic Website (National Geographic Website)

Answers questions on possible origins of ancestry

https://www3.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/index.html?fs=www3.nationalgeographic.com

 

The Genographic website above will give detail information on migratory paths based on the DNA samples of thousands of people. Over time these paths will be refined with new additions to the database. Below is my own story based on my DNA test results.

 

My Y chromosome results identify me as a member of haplogroup E3B, a lineage defined by a genetic marker called M35. This haplogroup is the final destination of a genetic journey that began some 60,000 years ago with an ancient Y chromosome marker called M168.

 

The very widely dispersed M168 marker can be traced to a single individual-“Eurasian Adam.” This African Man, who lived some 31,000 to 79,000 years ago, is the common ancestor of every non-African person living today. His descendants migrated out of Africa and became the only Lineage to survive away from Humanity’s home continent.

 

Population growth during the Upper Paleolithic era may have spurred the M168 lineage to seek new hunting grounds for the plains animals crucial to their survival. A period of moist and favorable climate had expanded the ranges of such animals at this time, so these nomadic peoples may have simply followed their food source.

 

Improved tools and rudimentary art appeared during this same epoch, suggesting significant mental and behavioral changes. These shifts may have been spurred by a genetic mutation that gave “Eurasian Adam’s” descendants a cognitive advantage over the contemporary, but now extinct, human lineages.

 

M168 gave rise to M174, an ancient African lineage that first appeared in a direct descendant of “Eurasian Adam.” This lineage likely accompanied M130-bearing populations on their great migration some 50,000 years ago.

 

The route followed a food-rich coastal environment along the southern Arabian Peninsula, through India, Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia.

 

Today the members of haplogroup D, defined by marker m174, are found along portions of this ancient route in the Andaman Island and Southeast Asia, though, interestingly, not in India.

 

M174 is also a very common marker in Japan where it appears in about 40 percent of the population. This frequency suggests a later migration northward along the east Asian coast.

 

Haplogroup D also includes many Tibetans. Geneticists believe that recent migration, within the last several thousand years, brought M174-bearing peoples into Tibet from Mongolia.

 

M174 is on of two African lineages defined by the presence of the Yap Polymorphism-the other is M96.

 

The origins of m96 are unclear, though geneticists believe that the marker arose in northeast Africa. Further data, such that collect bye the Genographic Project, may shed light on the precise origin of this lineage.

 

Some 30, 000 to 40,000 years ago much of Earth’s water was frozen in massive ice sheets. At this time hunters carrying the M96 marker migrated out of Africa and followed expanding grasslands and plentiful herds of game to the Middle East.

 

These people may have journeyed with members of the more common M89 lineage to which some 90 to 95 percent of all non-Africans trace their roots. Alternatively, a later, smaller group of M96 bearing people may have undertaken their own migration along the same route previously traveled by M89 peoples.

 

M35 first appeared in the Middle East some 20,000 years ago among the M96 bearing peoples who had left Africa 30,000 to 40,000 years ago.

 

Members of haplogroup E3B bear witness the great Neolithic migrations out of the Middle East. M35 peoples were among the first farmers. They enjoyed an era of settled agricultural prosperity that led to substantial population growth and subsequent migrations, which dispersed their successful lifestyle and lineage.

 

The marker is common in southern Italy, southeast Europe and northern Africa among the descendants of ancient farmers who carried their agricultural lifestyle out of its Middle Eastern birthplace.

 

E   SRY4064 (SRY8299 or M40), M96, P29
•       E*   -
•      •       E1   M33, M132
•      •       •       E1*   -
•      •       •       E1a   M44
•      •       E2   M75
•      •       •       E2*   -
•      •       •       E2a   M41
•      •       •       E2b   M54, M90, M98
•      •       •      •       E2b*   -
•      •       •      •       E2b1   P45
•      •       •      •       E2b2   M85 (formerly E2b)
•      •       •      •       •       E2b2*   -
•      •       •      •       •       E2b2a   M200
•      •       E3   P2, DYS391p
•      •       •       E3*   -
•      •       •       E3a   M2 (SY81) (DYS271), M180, P1, P46
•      •       •      •       E3a*   -
•      •       •      •       E3a1   M58
•      •       •      •       E3a2   M116.2
•      •       •      •       E3a3   M149
•      •       •      •       E3a4   M154
•      •       •      •       E3a5   M155
•      •       •      •       E3a6   M10, M66, M156, M195
•      •       •      •       E3a7   M191
•      •       •       E3b   M215
•      •       •      •       E3b*   -
•      •       •      •       E3b1   M35 (formerly in E3b)
•      •       •      •       •       E3b1*   -
•      •       •      •       •       E3b1a   M78 (formerly E3b1)
•      •       •      •       •      •      E3b1a*   -
•      •       •      •       •      •      E3b1a1   V12
•      •       •      •       •      •      •      E3b1a1*   -
•      •       •      •       •      •      •      E3b1a1a    M224 (formerly E3b1b, then E3b1a2)
•      •       •      •       •      •      •      E3b1a1b    V32
•      •       •      •       •      •      E3b1a2   V13
•      •       •      •       •      •      •      E3b1a2*   -
•      •       •      •       •      •      •      E3b1a2a   V27 (added)
•      •       •      •       •      •      E3b1a3   V22
•      •       •      •       •      •      •      E3b1a3*   -
•      •       •      •       •      •      •      E3b1a3a   M148 (added) (formerly E3b1a, then E3b1a2)
•      •       •      •       •      •      •      E3b1a3b   V19 (added)
•      •       •      •       •       E3b1b   M81 (formerly E3b2)
•      •       •      •       •      •       E3b1b*   -
•      •       •      •       •      •       E3b1b1   M107 (formerly E3b2a)
•      •       •      •       •      •       E3b1b2   M183, M165 (formerly E3b2b)
•      •       •      •       •       E3b1c   M123 (formerly E3b3)
•      •       •      •       •      •       E3b1c*   -
•      •       •      •       •      •       E3b1c1   M34 (formerly E3b3a)
•      •       •      •       •      •       •       E3b1c1*   -
•      •       •      •       •      •       •       E3b1c1a   M136, M84 (formerly E3b3a1)
•      •       •      •       •      •       •       E3b1c1b   M290 (added) (formerly E3b3a2)
•      •       •      •       •       E3b1d   M281 (formerly E3c)
•      •       •      •       •       E3b1e   V6 (formerly E3e)
•      •       •       E3c   M329 (added)
•      •       E4   P75

Y-DNA haplogroup E probably arose in Northeast Africa and expanded into the Near and Middle East. Today E* is found predominantly in Ethiopia. E1 and E2 are found in Northeast Africa, but surveys show E1 may actually be more prevalent in Mali than in its presumed region of origin. E4 is a minor subclade. E3 is by far the lineage of greatest geographical distribution. It has two important sub-lineages, E3a and E3b. E3a is an African lineage that probably expanded from northern Africa to sub-Saharan and equatorial Africa with the Bantu agricultural expansion. E3a is the most common lineage among African Americans. E3b probably evolved either in Northeast Africa or the Near East and then expanded to the west both north and south of the Mediterranean Sea. E3b clusters are seen today in Western Europe, the Balkans, the Near East, Northeast Africa and Northwest Africa. The Cruciani articles (references and links below) are indispensable resources for understanding the structure of this complicated haplogroup.