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Ancestors of Judith Lynn Jernigan


Generation No. 7


      64. Lewis Jernigan Jr., born Abt. 1778 in North Carolina; died in Tennessee. He was the son of 128. Lewis JERNIGAN. He married 65. Frances Douglas (Frankie) January 13, 1801 in Johnston Co. NC6.

      65. Frances Douglas (Frankie), born Abt. 1780; died in Tennessee. She was the daughter of 130. Douglas.

Notes for Lewis Jernigan Jr.:
Lewis Jernigan was the 4th great grandfather of Judith Jernigan

Lewis Jernigan Frances Douglas
Needhan Jernigan Mary "Polly" Jernigan (First Cousins)
Jefferson C Jernigan Sophonia Harrell
James Lee Jernigan Rosa Lyons
Eugene Jernigan Verlie Powell
Eugene Jernigan June Kimble
Judith Jernigan

Please refer to notes under Alexander C Jernigan, and much of the family history and notes regarding the emigration from North Carolina to Tennessee apply to Lewis, as well.


Lewis sold land on March 1, 1801. to John B. Devine, the step father of his cousins Alexander, and Lewis.

DEED

Johnston County, North Carolina Deed Book Z1, page 269, March 11, 1801.

Lewis Jernigan, Jr. of Johnston County, Tennessee to John B. Devine for 60 Lbs.,
118 acres in Johnston County on Mill Branch.
his
Lewis X Jernigan
mark
his
Witnessed by Alex X Jernigan
mark

Ben Phillips
Lewis and Francis were listed in Coffee County, TN in the Census of 1850 and 1860. (But would have been in the middle Tennessee area much earlier, according to Varna Jernigan) He is the first cousin of Alexander. His son Needham married Alexander's daughter Mary. Lewis and Frances received a land grant on Garrison Fork of the Duck River Aug. 14, 1846.

From "Life of Rev. William Keele" by John D. Ewell: "We would state that Lewis the father of Rev. Jesse Jernigan was a frequent attendant at the prayer meetings in his neighborhood. He was a member of Garrison Fort Church, and at an advanced age died in the triumphs of faith."

  Notes for Frances Douglas (Frankie):
Frances Douglas was the 4th great grandmother of Judith Jernigan

Lewis Jernigan Frances Douglas
Needhan Jernigan Mary "Polly" Jernigan (First Cousins)
Jefferson C Jernigan Sophonia Harrell
James Lee Jernigan Rosa Lyons
Eugene Jernigan Verlie Powell
Eugene Jernigan June Kimble
Judith Jernigan
     
Children of Lewis Jr. and Frances (Frankie) are:
  i.   Jesse JERNIGAN, born January 16, 1808; died October 22, 1812 in Bradyville, Tennessee; married Attilla (Anna).
  Notes for Jesse JERNIGAN:
Minister ordained in 1848. First lived in Coffee County, but moved to Bradyville where Jesse was pastor of the Hopewell Baptist Church for many years. Jesse paid $30
for the land on which Jernigan Cemetery is located, near Bradyville.

  ii.   Stephen JERNIGAN, born 1803 in North Carolina; married Mary Walton.
  Notes for Stephen JERNIGAN:
Stephen and Mary had no children. Stephen received a land grant of 100 acres in Warren County in 1834 on the Barren Fork of the Duck River, for which he paid one cent per acre.

  iii.   Kinchen Jernigan, born Abt. 1815; married Hettie.
  Notes for Kinchen Jernigan:
Varna Jernigan , Leaves of the Jernigan Tree, says there is no proof she knows of that Kinchen was the son of Lewis Jr., but she guesses that he was.

  iv.   Annie Mary Jernigan, born April 12, 1817 in Tennessee; died October 18, 1886 in Gossberg, Coffee County, Tennessee; married Uzzell Jernigan in Gossberg, Coffee County, Tennessee.
  Notes for Annie Mary Jernigan:
Buried in Jernigan Hill Cemetery near Gossburg, in Coffee County, with Uzzell.

When Uzzell died "the widow Annie had $25 which she refused to give up".
Varna Jernigan comments, "Who can blame Annie Mary: she may have been saving butter and egg money for a long time to get her $25.

  Notes for Uzzell Jernigan:
NOTES FROM VARNA JERNIGAN; LEAVES OF THE JERNIGAN TREE

Uzzell gave the land for Jernigan Hill Church and the Cemetery.

When Alex sold his land after Elizabeth died, Uzzell bought it for 7000.00.

Uzzell was a farmer, and amassed a great amount of land in the hills around Gossburg, as did most of the others. Uzzell's s land comprised some of the wildest and most inaccessible in the whole area. with hills rising into almost mountainous peaks in every direction. His home lay in a small clearing with these high hills surrounding it on all sides. However, it apparently was valuable land as he appeared to be a prosperous farmer and he gave a farm to each of his nine children, with the stipulation that each child was to pay the mother one forth of all crops for her support if he died first.

  32 v.   Needham Jernigan, born July 22, 1811 in Gossberg, Coffee County, Tennessee; died July 13, 1889 in Gossberg, Coffee County, Tennessee; married Mary "Polly"Jernigan.


      66. Alexander C. JERNIGAN7, born 1779 in Johnston County, North Carolina; died March 15, 1864 in Bedford Co, Tn. He was the son of 132. Cary JERNIGAN and 133. Jerusha Whitley. He married 67. Elizabeth Farmer (Betsy) November 29, 1803 in Johnston Co. NC8.

      67. Elizabeth Farmer (Betsy), born 1779 in North Carolina; died Abt. 1858 in Gossburg, Tn.. She was the daughter of 134. William Farmer and 135. Bathsheba.

Notes for Alexander C. JERNIGAN:
From Varna Thomas Jernigan's Leaves of the Jernigan Tree
All of the following information is from Varna's little out of print book, "Leaves of the Jernigan Tree"

The book was dedicated to Verland Jernigan, husband to Varna:
It was completed in 1968, and was well researched, with sources included.

Following are excerpts from the book:


NOTES ON REFLECTIONS BY VARNA JERNIGAN REGARDING ALEXANDER C. JERNIGAN, HIS HOME PLACE , AND HER RESEARCH

"Much has been written about the brave men who helped in the exploration of our country and the settlement of it beyond the mountains, and many names stand out like shining lights.

Unheard, though, are the names of the hard working men who helped carry the heaviest loads and went on their way quietly, seeking no great name for themselves but playing just as important a part, and of their wives and families who faced dangers, deprivations, and hardships which we can only imagine.

Such a man was Alexander C. Jernigan, Sr. and the family he brought with him from North Carolina into Middle Tennessee: and just as important are the many families who are still in this area because of his pioneering spirit.

Call it fulfillment, call it time-come-full-circle, these are the things that entered my mind as I sat on the wide broad porch nearing the two hundred year mark, the house that was built before Coffee County was formed. (Located on Jernigan Branch Road, a short distance from Gossburg, the house was owned by Mr and Mrs. Fames Frissell at the time that Varna wrote these words. He was the great great grandson of Alexander.)

He called this his mansion house, and to look at it today it would present no picture of a mansion, but they say that in that long ago it was the nicest house in the whole valley. Built of huge logs with hand hewn floors, doors you have to stoop a little to walk through, huge fireplaces and chimneys of field stone at either end, windows that had no glass in them, but shutters that could be closed against the cold,
a tiny window beside the fireplace as you so often find in old houses, and a dog trot through the middle, this is the way they found it when they came to this area in those long ago days. Rooms have been added on and the logs have been covered with boards, electricity and a telephone have been installed, but I see this house as Alexander and Elizabeth came to it in the early 1800s. I walk along the ancient boards of the porch, down the little slope to the clear spring where the water is sweet and cold and still pure enough to drink. How many many times Alexander must have walked down to this spring and looked at the loveliness around it, the valley, the hills, surrounding and protecting his homestead. How many times Elizabeth must have sent a tow haired boy down to this spring for a bucket of water. How many times she must have carried an apron full of beans to string or socks to darn and sat down in the cool shade of the trees, grateful for the respite from the summers heat.

Tradition has it that this house was once a stage coach inn, and that Andrew Jackson spent a night there on one of his many trips. This may be so, but more important to me is the fact that Alexander C. Jernigan, Sr. and his wife Elizabeth brought their first born son across the wilderness from North Carolina. and chose this place for their home. Walking over the land, and drinking from the crystal clear spring, I can feel something of the love and appreciation that they must have felt for this spot, and after nearly two hundred years, it is indeed, time come full circle.

Sitting on this wide broad porch in the cool of the evening, smoking his pipe and resting after a hard day's work, Alexander may have contemplated the life he had made for himself and his family, remembering the many things that had entered into his decision to make the long journey across the "twenty four hills", into this unknown land.

This wild mountainous county where a man could get close to God was so different from the low sandy soil where he and Elizabeth had lived along Mill Creek in North Carolina. The water of these clear cold streams was so refreshing compared to the black swampy water along the tributaries of the Neuse where he had fished many a long day. Many a time he must have thought back to those early years, to his father Cary, his sisters Nancy and Bethany, his brothers Lewis and Allen who had also come to this new country and brought their families.

Alex would have chuckled, and said that someone had delusions of grandeur had he been told what history lay behind his family back in twelfth century England"

"The names of Alexander"s brothers and sisters are taken from "Johnson County Inventories" Settlements of Estates and Wills, Account of Sale of Estate of Cary Jernigan, Dec'd, November 22, 1786. page 77-78. Much of the information, in Varna Jernigans book came from the North Carolina Department of Archives and History at Raleigh, North Carolina, the Tennessee State Library and Archives at Nashville, the Morman Library at Los Angeles, and the Argie Cooper Library at Shelbyville. Records also came from the County Court Clerk and Register of Deeds offices in Johnston, Wayne, Sampson, and Craven Counties in North Carolina, and Coffee, Bedford, Cannon, and Rutherford Counties in Tennessee."



NOTES REGARDING THE EMIGRATION OF ALEXANDER AND ELIZABETH JERNIGAN FROM NORTH CAROLINA TO MIDDLE TENNESSEE

"Alexander and Elizabeth sold their land on Mill Creek in Johnston County, NC for $125 in 1806, and shortly thereafter, left for TN. He received a land grant on Cripple Creek in Rutherford County in 1823 and in 1830 bought 100 acres in Rutherford County for which he paid one cent an acre. Afterwards, he purchased many tracts of land on the headwaters of Garrison Fork in Coffee County. Alex's neighbors living near his home place on Garrison Fork were the James and John Lawrence family, the William Keele family, the Rayburns, the McGills, James Burk, Elias Moore, and Dabney Ewell families." Varna Jernigan, "Leaves of the Jernigan Tree" Sampson County.. N. C. deed book 14, pp. 270-271"


"Alex Jernigan deed to John B. Devine

To all to Whom these presents shall come Greeting.
I, Alexander Jernigan,, of the County of Sampson and State of North Carolina for and in consideration of my natural love and affection which I have and bear to my beloved Step Father John B. Devine of the State aforesaid and County of Johnston and for Divers other causes and considerations me hereunto moving have given and ranted, and by these presents do give and grant unto the said John B. Devine all and singular my goods and chattels following: one pair of cartwheels one feather bed and furniture one trunk one pot and frying pan one wooden wheel one flaxwheel one saddle & bridle and one table one Pewter dish & Bason three Tubbs one pail one Sifter one side of leather one broad axe one-chain. To have and hold and enjoy all the singular goods chattels and personal estate aforesaid unto the said John B. Devine his Executors Administrators and assigns against all persons whatsoever shall and will warrant and forever defend by these presents. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this 8th Day of November 1806.



Alexander X Jernigan (Seal)
      his mark

Signed Sealed and delivered in Sampson County in the presence of William Blackman) Nov Term 1806 Barnaby Blackman

Registered Dec 2nd 1806."


(Cary's sons Lewis and Alexander were born around 1775-1780 and Allen around 1785. Lewis and Alexander both bought land while they were in their early twenties, Alexander paying 110 silver dollars" for 262 acres of land on the south side of Mil1 Creek where it runs into the Neuse River.)

"Johnston County No Co Deed Book B2, page 66, 1802-06. March 12, 1802 between John Stevens and Alexander Jernigan for the sum of $110 silver dollars, one plantation tract or parcel of land, south side of Mill Creek, beginning at a black gum in
Pierce's line, Pierce's Spring Branch,up the meanders of said branch to Pierce and Willis Cole's line across said branch., to Ephraim Atkinson's line, John Huzzela corner.

Witnesses

J. B. Devine

Lewis X Jernigan his mark

John Stevens

Evidently Alexander was preparing for his marriage which took place on November 29, 1803. The license did not include his bride's name, but her first name was Elizabeth from later records and we believe she was the daughter of William Farmer, a prosperous plantation owner and his wife Bathsheba. Alex and Elizabeth received some land and two hundred twenty-mine pounds, three three shillings, four pence in money from the settlement of the estate of William Farmer, and shortly after this settlement, they sold the land on Mill Creek and came to Tennessee bringing with them their little son Cary. Alex's brother Lewis may have come also, as well as his cousin, also named Lewis, who married Frances or Franky Douglas, Allen came at a later date, with his wife Mary Ann, daughter of Robert Toler, after a short sojourn in Robertson County where Mary Ann's parents lived.


The region that they chose to settle was around Gossburg Tennessee, where the counties of Coffee,Cannon, Rutherford and Bedford come together. They were in the census records as early as 1820 and may have been here as early as 1812. Their land was in what is now Coffee County. Alexander was in Rutherford County in 1820,and sold land there near Old Jefferson in 1831 when he came to Coffee County.

Alexander and Elizabeth, Lewis and Frances, and Allen and Mary are the ancestors of most of the Jernigan families in this area.

These early Jernigan settlers, and later their sons acquired a vast amount of land, most of it lying between Gossburg in Coffee County and Bradyville in Cannon County. Some of it they received by land grants some of it they purchased for as little as one-cent an acre. The description of much of it reads "on the headwaters of the Garrison Fork of Duck River and some records mention Brawley's Fork and Carson's Fork in Cannon County."


NOTES REGARDING THE MARRIAGE, FAMILY, AND LIVES OF ALEXANDER C. AND
ELIZABETH JERNIGAN

"Alexander and Elizabeth sold their land on Mill Creek in Johnston County for $125 in 1806 and shortly thereafter left for Tennessee. He received a land grant on Cripple Creek in Rutherford County in 1823 and in 1830 bought one hundred acres in Rutherford County for which he paid one cent an acre. Afterward he purchased many tracts of land on the headwaters of Garrison Fork in Coffee County.
Alex's neighbors living near his home place on Garrison Fork were the James and John Lawrence familys, the William Keels family, the Rayburn McGills, Jones Burks, Elias Moore and Dabney Ewell families.

The names of the children of Alex and Elizabeth were taken from a note in the family Bible and from Alex's will. Parthenia and Bethema died before the will was made and Sara Boyet moved westward, The Boyet family was connected with the Jernigan family in North Carolina and some of them evidently came to Tennessee in the early migration.

In enumerating the descendants of Alexander and Elizabeth's children I have listed all that were shown in census records and have tried to bring them up another two or three generations wherever possible. The list is by no means complete as their descendants would run into the tens of thousands. My hope is that in naming them the reader may find his own ancestor and thus be able to trace his way back to Thomas, the immigrant, of Nansemond County, Virginia."

"Alexander C. Jernigan, Sr. ....... died March 15, 1864 at the home of his Son, George W in Bedford County where he went to live after his wife died. I have not found his gravestones but in-indictions are that he and Elizabeth are buried an the hillside across from his home on Jernigan Branch Road between Gossburg in Coffee County and Bradyville in Cannon Co. TN."



NOTES REGARDING THE WILL OF ALEXANDER C. JERNIGAN, SR.

"Alex Jernigan of Coffee County, Tennessee, do make and publish this my last will and testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made.

I direct that my funeral expenses and all my other debts to be paid out of the money that may come to the hands of my executor.

2. 1 give and bequeath to my wife Betsy one-third of my land during her lifetime, to be laid off so as to include my mansion house with the out houses and as much of the farm as she may need for cultivation., also one horse beast, two cows and calves and two sows and pigs and five killing or pork hogs, two head of sheep and beds and furniture. The balance of my kitchen and household furniture too except beds or as much thereof as she may decide to keep and plows and a set of gears for plowing. One hoe and one ax one spinning wheel.

3. I direct all the balance of my personal estate be sold and out of the proceeds I give and bequeath to my daughter Polly, wife of Needham Jernigan $25 in money.

4. I will and devise all my real estate to my six sons, Cary, Jarrot, Uzzell, Alexander George W. and Wiley to be subject to the lifetime estate of my wife in one third and to be divided so as to give to Wiley $50 the advantage in the division so that his share is worth $50 more than the share of the others and the shares of each of the others to be equal.

5. All the cash residue of my estate of every description I will and direct shall be equally divided between my six sons. Lastly, I nominate and appoint my two sons, Cary and Uzzell Jernigan executors of this, my last will and testament. I the said Alexander Jernigan have hereunto affixed my hand and set seal the 16th day of July, 1847.

James M. Jernigan, Administrator. Discharged 1877."


NOTES REGARDING THE AREA IN TENNESSEE TO WHICH THE JERNIGANS EMIGRATED FROM NORTH CAROLINA, AND REASONS FRO EMIGRATION

"I WILL LIFT UP MINE EYES"

"The number of the Jernigan families who came to Coffey, Cannon, Rutherford and Bedford counties is only a small part of those who left North Carolina and migrated to other parts of Tennessee as well as to Georgia, South Carolina., Florida and Mississippi. Several families went to Robertson County; in 1820 there were six families listed in Robertson but at least one of these came here later.

In much traveling over the area from Beech Grove to Bradyville in search of graves and early home sites, my first reaction was puzzlement as to their reason for choosing the hilly country in preference to better land that they might have found a little farther on. I expressed this to one of the older descendants and she looked at me as if I were a traitor. "Why," she said "the hills have a spiritual quality that is not found anywhere else. They give an uplift of spirit that could never be equaled in plains country. You remember the Psalmist said 'I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills'.

Remembering the land around Johnston and Wayne counties in North Carolina I can agree with her to the fullest. I have walked along the black water of Mill Creek and the Neuse River on the land that Alexander and Elizabeth owned. I have seen the sandy soil and the low, flat terrain and I too, agree that the hills have a spiritual quality. You could travel a long way without finding anything as rugged and as beautiful as the view from the road above Rile? Hill, looking miles away to Bradyville, Hopewell Church, Tolbert Hollow. On what was once Needham's land completely hidden from the road, is a waterfall where his children must have spent many happy days. In a little valley surrounded by high ridges, this waterfall is as unspoiled as it was in Needham's day. The water is cold and clear. I visited it on a winter day when a light covering of snow lay on the ground and the waterfall was frozen, the ice
cascading like lace edged draperies except for a few small places where little
streams of water had broken through. It was almost dusk and as we stood silently watching the water we heard a sound in the woods as of a stick breaking, and there came toward us along the path two red foxes hunting food. They hesitated only a moment when they saw us, then one ran full speed across the frozen water and up the hill beyond. The second one was more shy, she looked a few seconds and
then turned and ran back the way she had come. Later we heard them calling to each other from one hill to the other. It is an unforgettable sound., the cry of wild foxes in the woods .

Alexander, Lewis and Allen and their cousin Lewis., Jr. would have found it hard to believe that their move across the mountains could have such far reaching results; that their descendants would number into the tens of thousands and would mate with members of almost every family in the surrounding counties. What lay behind their decision to leave their families and friends and start out into the unknown? For a lone hunter the adventure of it is understandable, but these men were not seeking adventure, they had families to provide for and they were taking them into land infested with Indians and they knew not what else.

History says that the whole length of the Eastern sea-board was becoming crowded with immigrants, the Germans, Scotch, Irish and many others coming down from the
northeastern states into Virginia and North Carolina. Conditions were becoming oppressive in North Carolina and many land grants were being given in the western
part of the state which is now Tennessee. Land companies were advertising the glories of the wilderness lands as flowing with milk and honey. The hardships of
their first few years in the new land must have been almost insurmountable, with building new homes,, clearing and planting new land, and starting life anew with the
few tools and household furnishings they were able to bring with them. Certainly,there were many joys and -triumphs, too, as they saw the first tender shoots of corn showing green against the rich black soil of the hillsides, and watched the thriving herds of cattle and sheep spread out over the fertile valleys. Their children had the freedom of those hillsides and valleys, streams and caves, and from their pioneering spirit we of the fourth, fifth and sixth generation are reaping the benefits."



NOTES REGARDING DEEDS CONVEYING A SLAVE

I include these notes from Varna's book, as well as other information regarding the ownership of slaves by the Jernigan family, with great sadness and shame for a time in history when such occurrences were culturally acceptable and even commonplace. Yet to leave out this information would be to deny part of the history of my ancestry, and be an act of unfairness to those who suffered the oppression of bondage. Many of these individuals may have taken the name of Jernigan, and if so, this genealogy might help them to locate their own ancestors and family roots.

Judith Jernigan Oldham

State of Tennessee, December, 28, 1857, Coffee County

I, Uzzell Jernigan, for and in consideration of the sum of $800.50 to me paid, do hereby sell and convey to Alexander Jernigan. Sr. a negro woman by the name of Mary, supposed to be about 41 years old, sound, I warrent said negro to be sound,
sensible, and a slave for life, and I furthur warrent and defend the right and title of said slave from the lawful claim of any person whomsoever.

Uzzell Jernigan

DEED

Alexander C, Jernigan, Sr. to his beloved daughter Mary, wife of Needham Jernigan, conveyed a negro woman named Mary, 45 years old. The 29th day of August, 1861.
Sold to him by Uzzell Jernigan for 800.50 on December 28, 1857.

  Notes for Elizabeth Farmer (Betsy):
Elizabeth died in 1858 at her home near Gossburg, Tennessee.

All notes for Alexander apply to Elizabeth equally.
     
Children of Alexander JERNIGAN and Elizabeth (Betsy) are:
  i.   Bethema JERNIGAN8, born in Gossberg, TN; died October 02, 1833; married Eli Boyet January 1833.
  ii.   Cary JERNIGAN, born October 04, 1804 in North Carolina.
  Notes for Cary JERNIGAN:
Cary JERNIGAN SEX M
1 NOTE WSJ says that Cary married Sarah Pierce. We have found other
2 C ONT information and marriage records between Sarah Pierce and James
2 Jernigan in Putnum Co. Ga. Could Cary have been James Cary or Cary
2 James Jernigan?
2
2 Carry was a farmer and a preacher in the Baptist Church, having been
2 appointed a Moderator of Hopewell Baptist Church of Christ in July,
2 1856

  iii.   Sara(7) JERNIGAN, married Eli Boyet.
  iv.   Parthenia JERNIGAN, born March 26, 1809 in Gossberg, TN.
  v.   Jarrot JERNIGAN, born Abt. 1813 in Gossberg, TN.
  vi.   Uzzell Jernigan, born August 28, 1814 in Gossberg, Coffee County, Tennessee; died May 23, 1883 in Gossberg, Coffee County, Tennessee; married Annie Mary Jernigan in Gossberg, Coffee County, Tennessee.
  Notes for Uzzell Jernigan:
NOTES FROM VARNA JERNIGAN; LEAVES OF THE JERNIGAN TREE

Uzzell gave the land for Jernigan Hill Church and the Cemetery.

When Alex sold his land after Elizabeth died, Uzzell bought it for 7000.00.

Uzzell was a farmer, and amassed a great amount of land in the hills around Gossburg, as did most of the others. Uzzell's s land comprised some of the wildest and most inaccessible in the whole area. with hills rising into almost mountainous peaks in every direction. His home lay in a small clearing with these high hills surrounding it on all sides. However, it apparently was valuable land as he appeared to be a prosperous farmer and he gave a farm to each of his nine children, with the stipulation that each child was to pay the mother one forth of all crops for her support if he died first.

  Notes for Annie Mary Jernigan:
Buried in Jernigan Hill Cemetery near Gossburg, in Coffee County, with Uzzell.

When Uzzell died "the widow Annie had $25 which she refused to give up".
Varna Jernigan comments, "Who can blame Annie Mary: she may have been saving butter and egg money for a long time to get her $25.

  vii.   Alexander C. Jr( JERNIGAN, born December 25, 1819 in Gossberg, TN.
  viii.   George W. JERNIGAN, born Abt. 1823 in Gossberg, TN.
  ix.   Wiley JERNIGAN, born February 18, 1825 in Gossberg, TN9.
  33 x.   Mary "Polly"Jernigan, born Abt. 1811 in Tennessee; married Needham Jernigan.


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