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Descendants of Fielding Lewis




Generation No. 1


1. FIELDING2 LEWIS (GEORGE1)1 was born May 15, 1768 in Virginia1, and died August 06, 1852 in Sandlick, Clairborne, TN1. He married MARY GAMBILL1 1791 in Wilkes Co, NC1, daughter of WILLIAM GAMBILL and MARY WASH. She was born 1773 in Culpeper Co., VA2,2,3, and died 1852 in Sandlick, Clairborne, TN3.

Notes for F
IELDING LEWIS:
[Paramore.FTW]

Per information provided by Norman Spiva, the notations below about the parents of Fielding Lewis based on 1995 research are not valid. Mr. Spiva and other researchers have concluded that Fielding's father is indeed "George Lewis" born in VA, but moved to Wilkes Co. NC when Fielding was a child.






____________________________________________________________________________________
Researched by Karen Paramore, November 1, 1995 in Claiborne County Library, Tazewell, Tennessee.

Excerpt from "Old Time Tazewell" by Mary A Hansford. She wrote sketches of the people she remembered who lived in Tazewell before 1850.

      Fielding Lewis, Sr. came to Tennessee in an early day. He was a native of North Carolina. He owned a large boundary of land about 7 miles west of Tazwell, known as the Sandlick. David Carr is living at the old homestead of said Lewis at present. He was a very wealthy man. He owned many hundred acres of land adjoining the Sandlick farm. He owned many servants also, and what was best of all, he was highly esteemed as an honorable man and a first-class citizen. His wife was Miss Mary Gambol. They raised a family of six sons and six daughters: William, George, Jessee, James, Peter and Charles. The daughters were Elizabeth, Polly, Sallie, Franky, Isabel and Martha.

From "Pioneer Lewis Families, rev July 5, 1992"

      This is a revision of data on Fielding Lewis previously shown in Pioneer Lewis Families with corrections and additions included.

b. in Virginia May 15, 1768 (not 1767) according to an entry in a notebook kept by his grandson, 8L521 Christopher James "Kit" Lewis in which Kit entered the birth and death dates for several of his relatives. See page 731, Vol V for a copy of the original as written by Kit. This notebook is now in the possession of William (Bill) Beaver, Granby, Missouri, a grandson of 8L1171 Mary Frances (Lewis) Capps.

Fielding Lewis died August 26, 1852 at Sandlick, near Tazwell Tennessee, according to a letter written from Elizabeth (Moore) Lewis, the wife of 8L504 Charles Lewis, son of Fielding Lewis. He was buried at the Head of the Barren Church Cemetery, but the exact location is not known, if a tombstone existed, it was probably destroyed during the Civil War by soldiers that occupied the church. The names of the parents of Fielding Lewis and where they lived in Virginia have not been proven. One family tradition is that 8L102 David Lewis had a son, Fielding, who disappeared while living near Winchester, Virginia. A part of this same tradition is that there was another son, 8L225a David Lewis, but this also was not proven. Another somewhat different family tradition is told by Rosanne Lewis McCandless. She states that Elizabeth "Betsey" Moore Lewis, wife of Charles , that Fielding Lewis was born in or near Fredricksburg, Spotsylvania County, VA. George Lewis 833L100 George Lewis could be father or uncle of Fielding Lewis who had formerly lived in Culpeper County, VA before moving to Wilkes County, NC just prior to 1777 which is about the same time that George Lewis first appeared in Wilkes County, NC. The William Gamble family also lived in Wilkes County, NC.

Letter from Isham G. Leabow to William Lewis, August 24 ,1933
"My mother at one time told me that her grandfather, Fielding Lewis told her that he came here from Virginia. That his Uncle George told him and his brothers about the fine lands he had surveyed in Kentucky; that when they got to Cumberland Gap, they heard of a settlement at Fort Butler...and that they went from the Gap down to Fort Butler to stay a few days. While there he concluded to locate there, that his brothers went on into Kentucky and he went with them as far as the Cumberland River. That his brothers went up the River and William said he would go on to Boonesboro, that he'd never seen or heard from them afterwards...

"There is a grave of a John Lewis in the graveyard hear the Methodist Church at Chad, about 2 miles blow the present town of Cumberland. My recollection is that he died near 1850 and I am of the opinion that he was the brother that came with Fielding from Virginia. There are many Lewises now in Harlan. They claim there are two sets of them that cannot trace their relationships. But many of them are descendants of the John mentioned...Mother did not say that his Uncle George he mentioned claimed to be George Washington, but Washington did survey a great many tracts of land in Kentucky and practically every river bottom in Pell and Harlan Counties above Pineville. A similar account about Fielding's first trip to Tennessee is given by Martha Moore Jordan, Route 4 Box 4605, Stigler, OK 74462, in her treatise on SAMUEL MOORE, HIS FAMILY AND DESCENDANTS.

"Fielding was raised in North Carolina and in 1790-1791 married Mary Gamble, born 1773 Virginia. Allegedly, Fielding and his two brothers left for Kentucky ca 1792-1793. They arrived at the Clinch River in Tennessee too late at night to cross over. After spending the night, Fielding looks over the land and decides to stay. The two brothers continue on and nothing more is recorded of them "

While these two accounts of the trip to Tennessee varies in some of the details, the essential facts are the same and lend credence to this being how Fielding, ca 1792 or 1793, moved his family Westward across the Blue Ridge Mountains to Sandlick, about 7 miles West of Tazewell, TN.,in then Granger, now Claiborne County, TN. where the lived the rest of their lives. It should be noted that the Clinch River is about 25 miles from the Cumberland Gap and that Tazwell is located between the Clinch River and the Gap and is very likely the area where Fielding and his brothers spent some time before John and William went on into Kentucky and Fielding never saw them again.

While 2 of Fielding's brothers have possibly been identified, based largely on family traditions, Fielding's parents and sisters are still unidentified. However there are two additional items of data that may eventually help to identify them. It is known that Fielding had at least two sisters living in North Carolina in 1850 when Fielding went from his home in Sandlick, TN to North Carolina to visit them. A letter dated November 18, 1850, written by one of Fielding's sons to another son, Charles Lewis, Linn Co., MO said:

      "Brother Charles I will now say something concerning your father and mother. They are well as much as people of their age. The old man went, this fall, to North Carolina to see his sisters and found them well, so I am informed." In this letter, there is no mention as to their names, where they lived, etc.

There is a possibility that Fielding's name was not just Fielding Lewis, but T. Fielding Lewis. On May 16, 1870, Fieding purchased for $1.00 in Claiborne County, Tennessee, a book 'HISTORY OF VIRGINIA by J. W. Campbell, published by J. W. Campbell in 1813. Some of the handwritten entries, apparently made by Fielding, seem to indicate his name was T. Fielding Lewis. This HISTORY OF VIRGINIA book passed from Fielding to his son 8L503 George Washington Lewis, to his son 8L521 Christopher James Lewis, to his son 8L1174 George Erwin Lewis and is now in the possession of Mrs. Dixie Haase, Granby, MO.

If his name was actually T. Fielding Lewis, it could explain why his son 8L317 Fielding Lewis when writing letters, even before his father's death, never signed his letters as Fielding Lewis, Jr. as was true in his May 8, 1852 letter to his cousin "Alphred" which was signed merely "Fielding Lewis."

When reviewing Clairborne County Court records for 1800-1840, there were many instances where Fielding Lewis was appointed Juror of Circuit Court sessions. Most of those notations were to appoint Fielding Lewis as a "Jury" membor to "view and lay out" various roads in the surrounding area. It is obvious that in addition to a landowner, Fielding had expertise as a surveyor as did decendants of Betty Washington Lewis and Fielding Lewis. George      Washington's main profession was that of a surveyor. Researched by Karen Paramore, November 1, 1995 in Claiborne County Library, Tazewell, Tennessee.

Excerpt from "Old Time Tazewell" by Mary A Hansford. She wrote sketches of the people she remembered who lived in Tazewell before 1850.

      Fielding Lewis, Sr. came to Tennessee in an early day. He was a native of North Carolina. He owned a large boundary of land about 7 miles west of Tazwell, known as the Sandlick. David Carr is living at the old homestead of said Lewis at present. He was a very wealthy man. He owned many hundred acres of land adjoining the Sandlick farm. He owned many servants also, and what was best of all, he was highly esteemed as an honorable man and a first-class citizen. His wife was Miss Mary Gambol. They raised a family of six sons and six daughters: William, George, Jessee, James, Peter and Charles. The daughters were Elizabeth, Polly, Sallie, Franky, Isabel and Martha.

From "Pioneer Lewis Families, rev July 5, 1992"

      This is a revision of data on Fielding Lewis previously shown in Pioneer Lewis Families with corrections and additions included.

b. in Virginia May 15, 1768 (not 1767) according to an entry in a notebook kept by his grandson, 8L521 Christopher James "Kit" Lewis in which Kit entered the birth and death dates for several of his relatives. See page 731, Vol V for a copy of the original as written by Kit. This notebook is now in the possession of William (Bill) Beaver, Granby, Missouri, a grandson of 8L1171 Mary Frances (Lewis) Capps.

Fielding Lewis died August 26, 1852 at Sandlick, near Tazwell Tennessee, according to a letter written from Elizabeth (Moore) Lewis, the wife of 8L504 Charles Lewis, son of Fielding Lewis. He was buried at the Head of the Barren Church Cemetery, but the exact location is not known, if a tombstone existed, it was probably destroyed during the Civil War by soldiers that occupied the church. The names of the parents of Fielding Lewis and where they lived in Virginia have not been proven. One family tradition is that 8L102 David Lewis had a son, Fielding, who disappeared while living near Winchester, Virginia. A part of this same tradition is that there was another son, 8L225a David Lewis, but this also was not proven. Another somewhat different family tradition is told by Rosanne Lewis McCandless. She states that Elizabeth "Betsey" Moore Lewis, wife of Charles , that Fielding Lewis was born in or near Fredricksburg, Spotsylvania County, VA. George Lewis 833L100 George Lewis could be father or uncle of Fielding Lewis who had formerly lived in Culpeper County, VA before moving to Wilkes County, NC just prior to 1777 which is about the same time that George Lewis first appeared in Wilkes County, NC. The William Gamble family also lived in Wilkes County, NC.

Letter from Isham G. Leabow to William Lewis, August 24 ,1933
"My mother at one time told me that her grandfather, Fielding Lewis told her that he came here from Virginia. That his Uncle George told him and his brothers about the fine lands he had surveyed in Kentucky; that when they got to Cumberland Gap, they heard of a settlement at Fort Butler...and that they went from the Gap down to Fort Butler to stay a few days. While there he concluded to locate there, that his brothers went on into Kentucky and he went with them as far as the Cumberland River. That his brothers went up the River and William said he would go on to Boonesboro, that he'd never seen or heard from them afterwards...

"There is a grave of a John Lewis in the graveyard hear the Methodist Church at Chad, about 2 miles blow the present town of Cumberland. My recollection is that he died near 1850 and I am of the opinion that he was the brother that came with Fielding from Virginia. There are many Lewises now in Harlan. They claim there are two sets of them that cannot trace their relationships. But many of them are descendants of the John mentioned...Mother did not say that his Uncle George he mentioned claimed to be George Washington, but Washington did survey a great many tracts of land in Kentucky and practically every river bottom in Pell and Harlan Counties above Pineville. A similar account about Fielding's first trip to Tennessee is given by Martha Moore Jordan, Route 4 Box 4605, Stigler, OK 74462, in her treatise on SAMUEL MOORE, HIS FAMILY AND DESCENDANTS.

"Fielding was raised in North Carolina and in 1790-1791 married Mary Gamble, born 1773 Virginia. Allegedly, Fielding and his two brothers left for Kentucky ca 1792-1793. They arrived at the Clinch River in Tennessee too late at night to cross over. After spending the night, Fielding looks over the land and decides to stay. The two brothers continue on and nothing more is recorded of them "

While these two accounts of the trip to Tennessee varies in some of the details, the essential facts are the same and lend credence to this being how Fielding, ca 1792 or 1793, moved his family Westward across the Blue Ridge Mountains to Sandlick, about 7 miles West of Tazewell, TN.,in then Granger, now Claiborne County, TN. where the lived the rest of their lives. It should be noted that the Clinch River is about 25 miles from the Cumberland Gap and that Tazwell is located between the Clinch River and the Gap and is very likely the area where Fielding and his brothers spent some time before John and William went on into Kentucky and Fielding never saw them again.

While 2 of Fielding's brothers have possibly been identified, based largely on family traditions, Fielding's parents and sisters are still unidentified. However there are two additional items of data that may eventually help to identify them. It is known that Fielding had at least two sisters living in North Carolina in 1850 when Fielding went from his home in Sandlick, TN to North Carolina to visit them. A letter dated November 18, 1850, written by one of Fielding's sons to another son, Charles Lewis, Linn Co., MO said:

      "Brother Charles I will now say something concerning your father and mother. They are well as much as people of their age. The old man went, this fall, to North Carolina to see his sisters and found them well, so I am informed." In this letter, there is no mention as to their names, where they lived, etc.

There is a possibility that Fielding's name was not just Fielding Lewis, but T. Fielding Lewis. On May 16, 1870, Fieding purchased for $1.00 in Claiborne County, Tennessee, a book 'HISTORY OF VIRGINIA by J. W. Campbell, published by J. W. Campbell in 1813. Some of the handwritten entries, apparently made by Fielding, seem to indicate his name was T. Fielding Lewis. This HISTORY OF VIRGINIA book passed from Fielding to his son 8L503 George Washington Lewis, to his son 8L521 Christopher James Lewis, to his son 8L1174 George Erwin Lewis and is now in the possession of Mrs. Dixie Haase, Granby, MO.

If his name was actually T. Fielding Lewis, it could explain why his son 8L317 Fielding Lewis when writing letters, even before his father's death, never signed his letters as Fielding Lewis, Jr. as was true in his May 8, 1852 letter to his cousin "Alphred" which was signed merely "Fielding Lewis."

When reviewing Clairborne County Court records for 1800-1840, there were many instances where Fielding Lewis was appointed Juror of Circuit Court sessions. Most of those notations were to appoint Fielding Lewis as a "Jury" membor to "view and lay out" various roads in the surrounding area. It is obvious that in addition to a landowner, Fielding had expertise as a surveyor as did decendants of Betty Washington Lewis and Fielding Lewis. George      Washington's main profession was that of a surveyor.
     
Children of F
IELDING LEWIS and MARY GAMBILL are:
2. i.   GEORGE WASHINGTON3 LEWIS, b. April 29, 1806, Claiborne Co Tenn; d. December 24, 1886, Claiborne Co Tenn.
3. ii.   WILLIAM LEWIS, b. August 27, 1792, NC or Gloucester Co, VA; d. August 28, 1871, Tazewell, TN.
  iii.   ELIZABETH LEWIS, b. Abt. 17934; d. Whitley KY5; m. ELIJAH HARP, 1838; d. , Whitley KY5.
  Notes for ELIZABETH LEWIS:
Researched by Karen Paramore, November 1, 1995 in Claiborne County Library, Tazewell, Tennessee.

Excerpt from "Founding Families of Claiborne County, Tennessee"

      Elizabeth, oldest daughter of Fielding Lewis, Sr. married Elijah Harp. They settled in Whitley County, Kentucky. They raised 13 daughters and one son. I learn that they are still citizens of that state, if living.


  iv.   MARY ANN LEWIS, b. June 06, 1794; m. SAMUEL MOORE; b. Abt. 1792.
  v.   CHARLES LEWIS, b. November 04, 1796; d. January 26, 1853, Maryville, CA; Adopted child; m. ELIZABETH MOORE; b. April 08, 1799; d. January 01, 1889, Linn County, MO..
  vi.   JESSE LEWIS, b. November 04, 1796; d. Newton County, MO; Adopted child.
  vii.   FRANCES LEWIS, b. August 04, 1799; m. NATHAN MOORE; b. Abt. 1795.
4. viii.   ISABEL LEWIS, b. 1804, Claiborne Co Tenn; d. 1860; Adopted child.
5. ix.   FIELDING LEWIS, JR., b. June 27, 1811, Claiborne Co Tenn; d. September 27, 1866, Josephine Co Oregon.
  x.   SARAH LEWIS, b. Abt. 1812; Adopted child; m. ENOCH SIMMONS.
  Notes for ENOCH SIMMONS:
Given 75 acres of land (Book G p. 176) February 1820 by Fielding Lewis (father of Sally).

  xi.   JAMES B LEWIS, b. February 13, 1814, Claiborne Co Tenn6; d. December 07, 1872, Missouri7; m. NANCY MONTGOMERY; b. December 04, 1819.
  xii.   MARTHA LEWIS, b. Abt. 18168; m. ELIZAH GOIN.


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