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View Tree for King Of FRANCE PharamondKing Of FRANCE Pharamond (b. Abt. 370, d. 427)

King Of FRANCE Pharamond (son of Marcomir Duke Of The East FRANKS and Duchess Of The East FRANKS Mrs-Marcomir)38 was born Abt. 370 in Westphalia, Germany, and died 427. He married Queen Of FRANKS Argotta on 394, daughter of Duke Of The East FRANKS Genebald and Duke Of The East FRANKS Mrs-Genebald.

 Includes NotesNotes for King Of FRANCE Pharamond:
Under Pharamond reign the Franks were united under one crown. He succeeded his father as Duke of the East Franks in 404 A.D.; became King of the West Franks in 419 A.D. and King of Westphalia in 4 20 A.D. He married Argotta, daughter of Grimald, Duke of the West Franks, in 409 A.D. At his father-in- law's death in 419 A.D., Pharamond became Duke of the West Franks. A son is recorded from this marriage: Clod io , b. 389 A.D.

Merovingian
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Merovingians were a dynasty of Frankish kings who ruled a frequently fluctuating area in parts of present-day France and Germany from the fifth to the eighth century. They were sometimes referred to as the "long-haired kings" (Latin reges criniti) by contemporaries, for their symbolically unshorn hair (traditionally the tribal leader of the Franks wore his hair long, while the warriors trimmed it short). The term is drawn directly from Germanic, akin to their dynasty's Old English name Merewiowing.

Character
The Merovingian king was the master of the spoils of war, both movable and in lands and their folk, and he was in charge of the redistribution of conquered wealth among the first of his followers. "When he died his property was divided equally among his heirs as though it were private property: the kingdom was a form of patrimony" (Rouche 1987 p 420). The kings appointed magnates to be comites, charging them with defence, administration, and the judgement of disputes. This happened against the backdrop of a newly isolated Europe without its Roman systems of taxation and bureaucracy, the Franks having taken over administration as they gradually penetrated into the thoroughly Romanised west and south of Gaul. The counts had to provide armies, enlisting their milites and endowing them with land in return. These armies were subject to the king's call for military support. There were annual national assemblies of the nobles of the realm and their armed retainers which decides major policies of warmaking. The army also acclaimed new kings by raising them on its shields in a continuance of ancient practice which made the king the leader of the warrior-band, not a head of state. Furthermore, the king was expected to support himself with the products of his private domain (royal demesne), which was called the fisc. Some scholars have attributed this to the Merovingians lacking a sense of res publica, but other historians have criticized this view as an oversimplification. This system developed in time into feudalism, and expectations of royal self-sufficiency lasted until the Hundred Years' War.

Trade declined with the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, and agricultural estates were mostly self-sufficient. The remaining international trade was dominated by Middle Eastern merchants.

Merovingian law was not universal law based on rational equity, generally applicable to all, as Roman law; it was applied to each man according to his origin: Ripuarian Franks were subject to their own Lex Ribuaria, codified at a late date (Beyerle and Buchner 1954), while the so-called Lex Salica (Salic Law) of the Salian clans, first tentatively codified in 511 (Rouche 1987 p 423) was invoked under medieval exigencies as late as the Valois era. In this the Franks lagged behind the Burgundians and the Visigoths, that they had no universal Roman-based law. In Merovingian times, law remained in the rote memorisation of rachimburgs, who memorised all the precedents on which it was based, for Merovingian law did not admit of the concept of creating new law, only of maintaining tradition. Nor did its Germanic traditions offer any code of civil law required of urbanised society, such as Justinian caused to be assembled and promulgated in the Byzantine Empire. The few surviving Merovingian edicts are almost entirely concerned with settling divisions of estates among heirs.

History
The Merovingian kingdom, which included, from at latest 509, all the Franks and all of Gaul but Burgundy, from its first division in 511 was in an almost constant state of war, usually civil. The sons of Clovis maintained their fraternal bonds in wars with the Burgundians, but showed that dangerous vice of personal aggrandisement when their brothers died. Heirs were seized and executed and kingdoms annexed. Eventually, fresh from his latest familial homicide, Clotaire I reunited, in 558, the entire Frankish realm under one ruler. He survived only three years and in turn his realm was divided into quarters for his four living sons.

The second division of the realm was not marked by the confraternal ventures of the first, for the eldest son was debauched and short-lived and the youngest an exemplar of all that was not admirable in the dynasty. Civil wars between the Neustrian and Austrasian factions which were developing did not cease until all the realms had fallen into Clotaire II's hands. Thus reunited, the kingdom was necessarily weaker. The nobles had made great gains and procured enormous concessions from the kings who were purchasing their support. Though the dynasty would continue for over a century and though it would produce strong, effective scions in the future, its first century, which established the Frankish state as the most stable and important in Western Europe, also dilapidated it beyond recovery. Its effective rule notably diminished, the increasingly token presence of the kings was required to legitimise any action by the mayors of the palaces who had risen during the final decades of war to a prominence which would become regal in the next century. During the remainder of the seventh century, the kings ceased to wield effective political power and became more and more symbolic figures; they began to allot more and more day-to-day administration to that powerful official in their household, the mayor.

After the reign of the powerful Dagobert I (died 639), who had spent much of his career invading foreign lands, such as Spain and the pagan Slavic territories to the east, the kings are known as rois fainéants ("do-nothing kings"). Though, in truth, no kings but the last two did nothing, their own will counted for little in the decision-making process. The dynasty had sapped itself of its vital energy and the kings mounted the throne at a young age and died in the prime of life, while the mayors warred with one another for the supremacy of their realm. The Austrasians under the Arnulfing Pepin the Middle eventually triumphed in 687 at the Battle of Tertry and the chroniclers state unapologetically that, in that year, began the rule of Pepin.

Among the strong-willed kings who ruled during these desolate times, Dagobert II and Chilperic II deserve mention, but the mayors continued to exert their authority in both Neustria and Austrasia. Pepin's son Charles Martel even for a few years ruled without a king, though he himself did not assume the royal dignity. Later, his son Pepin the Younger or Pepin the Short, gathered support among Frankish nobles for a change in dynasty. When Pope Zachary appealed to him for assistance against the Lombards, Pepin insisted that the church sanction his coronation in exchange. In 751, Childeric III, the last Merovingian royal, was deposed. He was allowed to live, but his long hair was cut and he was sent to a monastery.

Historiography and sources
There exists a limited number of contemporary sources for the history of the Merovingian Franks, but those which have survived cover the entire period from Clovis' succession to Childeric's deposition. First and foremost among chroniclers of the age is the canonised bishop of Tours, Gregory of Tours. His Decem Libri Historiarum is a primary source for the reigns of the sons of Clotaire II and their descendants until Gregory's own death.

The next major source, far less organised than Gregory's work, is the Chronicle of Fredegar, begun by Fredegar but continued by unknown authors. It covers the period from 584 to 641, though its continuators, under Carolingian patronage, extended it to 768, after the close of the Merovingian era. It is the only primary narrative source for much of its period. The only other major contemporary source is the Liber Historiae Francorum, which covers the final chapter of Merovingian history: its author(s) ends with a reference to Theuderic IV's sixth year, which would be 727. It was widely read, though it was a undoubtedly a piece of Carolingian work.

Aside from these chronicles, the only surviving reservoires of historiography are letters, capitularies, and the like. Clerical men such as Gregory and Sulpitius the Pious were letter-writers, though relatively few letters survive. Edicts, grants, and judicial decisions survive, as well as the famous Lex Salica, mentioned above. From the reign of Clotaire II and Dagobert I survive many examples of the royal position as the supreme justice and final arbiter.

Finally, archaeological evidence cannot be ignored as a source for information, at the very least, on the modus vivendi of the Franks of the time. Among the greatest discoveries of lost objects was the 1653 accidental uncovering of Childeric I's tomb in the church of Saint Brice in Tournai. The grave objects included a golden bull's head and the famous golden insects (perhaps bees, cicadas, aphids, or flies) on which Napoleon modelled his coronation cloak. In 1957, the sepulchre of Clotaire I's second wife, Aregund, was discovered in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris. The funerary clothing and jewellery were reasonably well-preserved, giving us a look into the costume of the time.

Numismatics
Merovingian coins are on display at Monnaie de Paris, (the French mint) at 11, quai de Conti, Paris, France.

Merovingians in popular culture
Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln use the Merovingians in their book, The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail (1982, reprinted 2004; Delacorte Press, ISBN 0385338597, as Holy Blood, Holy Grail), which later influenced the novel The Da Vinci Code. Relying on conjecture and methodological fallacies to re-interpret historical sources, the theory says that the Merovingians were the descendants of Jesus Christ; it is seen as popular pseudohistory by academic historians.
The Merovingian is a powerful computer program, portrayed by Lambert Wilson, in the 2003 science-fiction movies The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions. His character has chosen a French accent, clothing style, and attitude. He is a broker of power and knowledge.

References
Beyerle, F and R. Buchner: Lex Ribuaria in MGH, Hannover 1954.
Eugen Ewig: Die Merowinger und das Frankenreich. Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 2001.
Patrick J. Geary: Before France and Germany: The Creation and Transformation of the Merovingian World, Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
Kaiser, Reinhold: Das römische Erbe und das Merowingerreich, (Enzyklopädie deutscher Geschichte 26) (München, 2004)
Rouche, Michael: "Private life conquers State and Society" in Paul Veyne (ed.), A History of Private Life: 1. From Pagan Rome to Byzantium, Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1987.
Werner, Karl Ferdinand: Die Ursprünge Frankreichs bis zum Jahr 1000, Stuttgart 1989.
Oman, Charles: The Dark Ages 476-918, London, 1914.

See also
Franks (main history of Frankish kingdoms)
List of Frankish kings
History of France
Carolingians
[edit]
External links
The Oxford Merovingian Page.
From Merovingians to Carolingians: Dynastic Change in Frankia.
Dr Deborah Vess: Merovingian and Carolingian bibliography, souces and web links.
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merovingian"
Categories: Early Middle Ages | Franks | German nobility | History of France | Middle Ages | Royal families | Cryptohistory

Merovingian Dynasty Kings of All the Franks
Kings of Neustria
Kings of Austrasia
Pharamond 410-426
Clodio 426-447
Merowig 447-458
Childeric I 458-481
Clovis I 481 - 511
Childebert I 511-558
Clotaire I 511-561
Chlodomer 511-524
Theuderic I 511-534
Theudebert I 534-548
Theudebald 548-555
Clotaire I 558-561
Charibert I 561-567
Chilperic I 561-584
Clotaire II 584-629
Guntram 561-592
Childebert II 592-595
Theuderic II 595-613
Sigebert II 613
Sigebert I 561-575
Childebert II 575-595
Theudebert II 595-612
Theuderic II 612-613
Sigebert II 613
Clotaire II 613-629
Dagobert I 623-629
Dagobert I 629-639
Charibert II 629-632
Chilperic 632
Clovis II 639-658
Clotaire III 658-673
Theuderic III 673
Childeric II 673-675
Theuderic III 675-691
Sigebert III 634-656
Childebert the Adopted 656-661
Clotaire III 661-662
Childeric II 662-675
Clovis III 675-676
Dagobert II 676-679
Theuderic III 679-691
Clovis IV 691-695
Childebert III 695-711
Dagobert III 711-715
Chilperic II 715-720
Clotaire IV 717-720
Theuderic IV 721-737
Childeric III 743-751

http://www.royalty.nu/history/empires/Frankish.html:

The Franks were a group of Germanic tribes -- the Chatti, the Ripuarians, and the Salians -- who shared similar laws and customs. In the 4th and 5th centuries AD, they began settling in the Roman region of Gaul (which included what is now Belgium, France, Luxembourg, and some of Germany and Italy). At first they lived in Belgium; eventually most of Gaul would belong to the Frankish empire.

Very little is known about the early rulers of the Franks. A Salian king named Merovech (or Merovee) founded the royal Merovingian dynasty, whose kings were notable for their long hair. At that time the Franks were allies of Rome, and Merovech is said to have fought with the Romans against Attila the Hun.

According to The History of the Franks by sixth century writer Gregory of Tours, Merovech's son Childeric I "was excessively wanton, and being king of the Franks he began to dishonor their daughters." For this bad behavior, Childeric's subjects drove him out of his kingdom. He went into hiding at the court of King Basinus and Queen Basina of Thuringia in Germany.

After eight years, Childeric's subjects accepted him back as their king. But it seems Childeric hadn't changed his womanizing ways during his stay in Thuringia. After he left, Queen Basina missed him so much that she followed him back to his kingdom. When Childeric asked why she had traveled so far to see him, she said, "I know your worth, and that you are very strong, and therefore I have come to live with you." Childeric married her, and she gave birth to his son and successor, King Clovis I.

King Clovis and Queen Clotilda
Clovis conquered most of Gaul, ruthlessly murdering relatives who stood in his way, and united the Franks under his rule. He made Paris the capital of his empire, setting the stage for the future French monarchy. In fact, France is named after the Franks.

In 492 or 493 Clovis married a princess named Clotilda, the niece of King Gundobad of Burgundy. Like most of the Franks, Clotilda was a Catholic. Clovis allowed her to have their children baptized, but she was unable to convert her pagan husband.

Then, in 496, during a ferocious battle with another Germanic tribe, the Alemanni, Clovis prayed to Clotilda's god, promising to convert to Catholicism if he won. He did win and, according to traditional accounts, was baptized on Christmas Day along with 3,000 of his soldiers, and became a champion of Catholicism. (However, some experts believe Clovis's baptism took place later in his life.)

After her husband's death in 511, Queen Clotilda spent her life caring for the poor. She is remembered as a Catholic saint, and her feast is traditionally celebrated on June 3.

A Feuding Family
After Clovis's death, the kingdom of the Franks was divided among his sons Theuderic I, Chlodomer, Childebert I, and Chlothar I. Clovis's heirs conquered other kingdoms (including Burgundy) and enlarged the Frankish empire, but they also fought each other for power.

A terrible example of Merovingian ruthlessness occurred after Chlodomer died. Coveting their dead brother's kingdom, Childebert and Chlothar stabbed to death his two young sons. A third child escaped with his life and grew up to become a priest, while his three uncles divided Chlodomer's kingdom between them.

Chlothar I managed to outlive all his brothers and their heirs, and ruled the Frankish Empire alone for a few years. Upon his death, the empire was divided between his sons Charibert I, Gunthram I, Sigibert I, and Chilperic I.

Things really got complicated in 567 when Sigibert married Brunhilda, the beautiful daughter of the Visigoth king Athanagild. Not to be outdone, Sigibert's brother Chilperic married Brunhilda's older sister Galswintha. But Chilperic soon had Galswintha strangled so he could marry a servant named Fredegund instead. Brunhilda was enraged by her sister's murder, and the next four decades were filled with bitter and violent family feuding.

Fredegund was a very dangerous enemy. She has been accused of killing or trying to kill just about everyone who crossed her path, including her stepchildren, local "witches," two bishops, her own son Samson (who annoyed her by getting sick), and her daughter Rigunth (who dared argue with her mother). Fredegund had Brunhilda's husband Sigibert assassinated in 575.

After Fredegund's own husband was assassinated in 584, she became regent for her young son Chlothar II, king of Neustria. Until her death in 597, Fredegund continued scheming on her son's behalf.

Meanwhile, Fredegund's enemy Brunhilda wielded great influence in the kingdom of Austrasia, where her son Childebert II reigned. After King Gunthram died in 593, Childebert inherited the kingdom of Burgundy, too.

Childebert died in 595, leaving two sons: Theudebert II, who became king of Austrasia, and Theuderic II, who became king of Burgundy. At first they worked together, defeating Fredegund's son Chlothar II in battle and seizing part of his kingdom. But in time the brothers turned on each other, and in 612 Theuderic overthrew Theudebert with his grandmother Brunhilda's support. It is unclear what happened to Theudebert after that, but he may have died soon afterward.

Unfortunately for Brunhilda, Theuderic also died that year, leaving his 12-year-old son Sigibert II as king. The noblemen of Austrasia did not want Brunhilda to rule as Sigibert's regent, so they joined forces with Chlothar II, who took Brunhilda prisoner. Brunhilda, now an old woman, endured three days of torture before being tied to a horse and dragged to death. Sigibert was also killed, and King Chlothar II became the sole ruler of the Frankish empire.

The Fall of the Merovingians
Chlothar II and his son Dagobert I maintained control of the empire, but Dagobert's successors were mostly figureheads. The real power was now held by aristocratic Frankish officials called "mayors of the palace." After 687, the empire was dominated by mayors from the Carolingian dynasty (a name the family was given later because many of its members were named Charles, including the emperor better known as Charlemagne).

Finally, in 751, a Carolingian called Pepin the Short was elected king of the Franks. The last Merovingian king, Childeric III, was deposed that year or early the next year. He was imprisoned in a monastery, where he died in 755.

For more on the history of the Frankish empire, visit this page:
Charlemagne and His Empire

Books About the Franks
Unless otherwise noted, these books are for sale at Amazon.com. Your purchase from Amazon or Alibris through these links will help to support the continued operation and improvement of the Royalty.nu site. (Note: Some links below may not be visible if you are using the ad-blocking feature of Norton Personal Firewall.)

Book topics: Gregory of Tours, Franks & Merovingians, Their World, Coronations, Religion, Women, Miscellaneous, Fiction, Carolingians, Charlemagne, Europe

Gregory of Tours
The History of the Franks by Gregory of Tours, translated by Lewis Thorpe. A dramatic narrative of French history in the sixth century, written by a bishop who became a Catholic saint. Gregory of Tours knew King Sigibert, Queen Brunhilda, and others about whom he wrote. He was tried for slandering Queen Fredegund, but was acquitted.

The World of Gregory of Tours edited by Kathleen Mitchell and Ian Wood. These essays evaluate the life, works, and world of Gregory of Tours, and offer an assessment of Merovingian culture, history, and religion.

Gregory of Tours: History and Society in the Sixth Century by Martin Heinzelmann, translated by Christopher Carroll. This new interpretation of Gregory's Histories finds connections between apparently unconnected, adjacent chapters.

The Franks & Merovingians
Long-Haired Kings and Other Studies in Frankish History by J. M. Wallace-Hadrill.

The Merovingian Kingdoms, 450-751 by Ian Wood. Discusses the lives of Clovis, Chlothar, Brunhilda, Fredegund, and other powerful people upon whom the fate of western Europe depended. Out of print, but available from Alibris.

The Franks by Edward James. A scholarly book, based on archaeological evidence. Available at Alibris.

The Kingdom of the Franks: North-West Europe Before Charlemagne by Peter Lasko. Published in 1971, this book provides a brief overview of the history of the Franks. Most of the book is devoted to Frankish art and archaeological discoveries. Includes 101 black-and-white illustrations, 21 color illustrations, and a Merovingian royal family tree. From Alibris.

Books About the Carolingians

The Merovingian World
Before France and Germany: The Creation and Transformation of the Merovingian World by Patrick J. Geary. Presents the Merovingian period as an integral part of late antiquity, tracing the Romanization of barbarians and the barbarization of the Romans which ultimately made these populations indistinguishable.

Roman to Merovingian Gaul: A Reader edited by Alexander Callendar Murray.

Merovingian Mortuary Archaeology and the Making of the Early Middle Ages edited by Bonnie Effros. Assesses what contemporary archaeology can tell us about the Frankish kingdoms.

Creating Community With Food and Drink in Merovingian Gaul by Bonnie Effros. Feasting and fasting were central to social interaction in Gaul both prior and subsequent to Christianization of Franks and Gallo Romans.

The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 2, c.700-c.900 edited by Rosamond McKitterick. Covers most of the period of Frankish and Carolingian dominance in western Europe. The authors examine the interaction between rulers and ruled, how power actually worked, and the society and culture of Europe as a whole.

Books About the Age of Charlemagne

Frankish Coronations
The Royal Patronage of Liturgy in Frankish Gaul to the Death of Charles the Bald, 877 by Yitzhak Hen. Frankish patronage of liturgy started in the Merovingian period, but it was the Carolingians who used it to ease the acceptance of new political ideals.

Ordines Coronationis Franciae: Volume One edited by Richard A. Jackson. Texts and ordines for the coronation of Frankish and French kings and queens in the Middle Ages (the texts are not translated from Latin). Volume one contains the general introduction and the 19 texts and ordines up to the beginning of the 13th century. (UK)

Ordines Coronationis Franciae: Volume Two by Richard A. Jackson. Contains the later six ordines, bibliographies, indexes, and illustrations. (UK)

Frankish Religion
The Frankish Church by J. M. Wallace-Hadrill. This survey of the development of the Frankish Church under the Merovingian and Carolingian kings (approximately AD 500-900) is the first of its kind to appear in English.

Caring for Body and Soul: Burial and the Afterlife in the Merovingian World by Bonnie Effros. Funerals and burial sites were important means for establishing or extending power over rival families and monasteries.

Culture and Religion in Merovingian Gaul A.D. 481-751 by Yitzhak Hen. Although often depicted as barbaric, Merovingian Gaul was a Christian society and a continuation of Roman civilization.

Dreams, Visions, and Spiritual Authority in Merovingian Gaul by Isabel Moreira. Describes how, over the course of the Merovingian period, the clergy came to accept the visions of ordinary folk -- peasants, women, and children -- as authentic.

Frankish Women
Women in Frankish Society by Suzanne Fonay Wemple. Marriage and the cloister, 500 to 900.

Saints' Lives and the Rhetoric of Gender: Male and Female in Merovingian Hagiography by John Kitchen. Examines texts by authors of both sexes and casts doubt on the assumption that male authors were hostile to female concerns.

Miscellaneous
Dark Age Naval Power by John Haywood. A reassessment of Frankish and Anglo-Saxon shipbuilding and seafaring, which were far more advanced than previously thought.

Books, Scribes and Learning in the Frankish Kingdoms, 6th-9th Centuries by Rosamond McKitterick. Essays about manuscripts from the Merovingian and Carolingian periods.

Franks and Alamans in the Merovingian Period: An Ethnographic Perspective edited by Ian Wood. The Alamans were swallowed up by Frankish expansion. This volume considers the origin of both peoples; the urban, social, and legal history of the Franks; and the uses of silver in the early Middle Ages.

The Nibelungenlied translated by A.T. Hatto. This great German epic poem of murder and revenge, written around 1200 by an unknown author, recounts a quarrel between two queens named Brunhild and Kriemhild. It may have been inspired in part by the rivalry of the Frankish queens Brunhilda and Fredegund.

Fiction
Women in the Wall by Julia O'Faolain. This novel takes place in the convent of Queen Radegunda (or Radegund), wife of King Chlothar I, who became a nun after the king killed her brother. She is considered a Catholic saint. Available from Alibris.


http://www.fluckers.com/family/daspit/merovingian.html:

ANCIENT GENEALOGY
OF THE
MEROVINGIAN KINGS OF FRANCE,
DUKES OF ACQUITAINE, KINGS OF NAVARRE, COUNTS OF LERIN

Through the marriage of Jeanne de Mesmes with Jewin Daspit in 1568, the Daspit de St Amand family may claim descent from the Merovingian line by connection with the Kings of Navarre, Counts of Bigorre, the de la Barthe lords of the Four Valleys, the Royal dynasties of Merovingian, Carolingian and Capetian Kings of France and the Exilarchs of Narbonne of the Royal House of David. The dynasties of France all descend from the Merovingian line traced back to the Cimmerian tribe on the Black Sea in the lands of Scythia. By legend the King (Euxim) of the Cimmerians was descended from the Royal line of Troy. It is from this line that the Merovingian dynasty has its source.

The following genealogy was developed by Pere Anselm for the Regent of France and was augmented by genealogical research done later at the command of Napoleon I to determine descendants of the Merovingian royal house.

Contributed by Ray Olivier

I. ANTENOR I, EUXIM OF THE CIMMERIANS
b. ca. 483 B.C., d. 443 B.C.
Antenor's wife is unknown. One son is recorded: Marcomir b. 460 B.C.


II. MARCOMIR, KING OF THE CIMMERIANS
b. 460 B.C. ; d. 396 B.C.
Marcomir brought his people of the Cimmerians across the lands of the Danube into Gaul. One son is recorded: Antenor I b. 442 B.C.


III. ANTENOR II, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 442 B.C. ; d. 384 B.C.
Antenor married the nobel lady Cambra ca. 419 B.C. It is from her name that the Sicambri received its name. At least one son is recorded from this marriage: Priamus, b. 417 B. C..


IV. PRIAMUS , KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 417, B.C. ; d. 358 B.C.
His lady wife's name is not known. One son is recorded: Helenus, b. 385 B.C..


V. HELENUS I, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 387 B.C.; d. 339 B.C.
One son is recorded: Diocles, b. 360 B.C.


VI. DIOCLES, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 360 B.C.; d. 300 B.C.
Diocles aided the Saxons in their war on the Goths. One son is recorded: Bassanus, b. 339 B.C.


V. BASSANUS MAGNUS, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 339 B.C.; d.287 B.C.
Bassanus married the daughter of the King of the Orcades (a tribe of ancient Norway). One child is recorded of this marriage: Clodomir, b.290 B.C.


VI. CLODOMIR I, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 290 B.C. ; d. 232 B.C.
His lady wife is unknown. One son is recorded: Nicanor, b. 275 B.C.


VII. NICANOR, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 275 B.C.; d. 198 B.C.
One son is recorded: Marcomir, b. 296 B.C.


VIII. MARCOMIR II, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 296. B.C. ; d. 178 B.C.
One son is recorded: Clodius, b. 189 B.C.


IX. CLODIUS , KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 189 B.C. ; d. 159 B.C.
Clodius was slain in battle in 359 B.C. One son is recorded: Antenor, b. 169 B.C.


X. ANTENOR III, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 169 B.C.; d. 143 B.C.
One son is recorded: Clodomir, b. 149. B.C.


XI. CLODOMIR II, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 149 B.C. ; d. 123 B.C.
One son is recorded: Merodachus , b. 128 B.C..


XII. MERODACHUS, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 128 B.C.; d. 95 B.C.
A son is recorded: Cassander, b. 106 B.C.


XIV. CASSANDER, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 106 B.C.; d. 74. B.C.
Cassander was expelled from his kingdom by the Goths. He died in exile. One son is recorded: Antharius , b. 80 B.C.


XV. ANTHARIUS, KING OF THE SICAMBRI
b. 80 B.C.; d. 37 B.C.
Antharius was slain in battle with the Gauls. One son is recorded: Francus, b. 58 B.C..


XVI. FRANCUS, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 58 B.C. ; d. 11 B.C.
Francus changed the name of his people to Franks. He also made a perpetual alliance with the Saxon and East German tribes. One son is recorded : Clodius, b. 37 B.C.


XVII. CLODIUS II, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 37 B.C.; d. 20 A.D.
A son was recorded: Marcomir, b. 16. B.C.


XVIII. MARCOMIR III, KING OF THE FRANKS
b.16 B.C.; d.50 A.D.
One son is recorded: Clodomir, b. 2 A.D.


XIX. CLODOMIR III, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 2 A.D. ; d.63 A.D.
One son is recorded: Antenor, b. 25 A.D.


XX. ANTENOR IV, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 25 A.D.; d. 69 A.D.
A son is recorded: Ratherius, b. 52 A.D.


XXI. RATHERIUS, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 52 A.D.; d. 90 A.D.
Ratherius is mentioned as the founder of Rotterdam. One son is recorded: Richemer, b. 75 A.D.


XXII. RICHEMER I, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 75 A.D.; d. 114 A.D.
One son is mentioned: Odomar, b. 96 A.D.


XXIII. ODOMAR, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 96 A.D. ; d. 149 A.D.
Odomar is mentioned in the records of the Roman Empire as making a pact with Rome and the Gaulic tribes. One son is recorded: Marcomir, b. 114 A.D.


XIX. MARCOMIR IV, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 114 A.D.; d. 166 A.D.
Marcomir married in 129 A.D. to Athildis, daughter of Coilus King of the Britains (125-170). Through this marriage the blood of the ancient Roman houses of the Julii and Claudii, as well as the ancient Royal lines of the Silures, become mixed with the ancient Merovingian line. Coilus was the son of Marius, King of the British Silures and a daughter of Boadicia, the great Queen of the Iceni. Marius was the son of Arviragus, King of the Silures and Venissa, daughter of Claudius I, Emperor of Rome. (See Ancient Roman genealogy). A son was born of this union: Pharabert (Farbert) in 131 A.D.


XX. PHARABERT, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 131 A.D.: d. 186 A.D.
Pharabert's lady wife is not known. One son is recorded: Sunno, b. 156 A.D.


XXI. SUNNO, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 156 A.D. ; d.213 A.D.
During his reign the Franks had many wars with Romans and Gaulic tribes. One son is recorded: Hilderic, b. 175 A.D.


XXII. HILDERIC, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 175 A.D.; d. 253 A.D.
One son is recorded: Bartherus, b. 205 A.D.


XXIII. BARTHERUS, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 205 A.D.; d. 272 A.D.
One son is recorded: Clodius, b. 230 A.D.


XXIV. CLODIUS III, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 230 A.D.; d. 298 A.D.
A son is recorded: Walter, b. 252 A.D..


XXV. WALTER, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 252 A.D.; d. 306 A.D.
One son is recorded: Dagobert, 275 A.D.


XXVI. DAGOBERT I, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 275 A.D.; d. 317 A.D.
A son is recorded: Genebald, b. 296 A.D.


XXVII. GENEBALD I, DUKE OF THE EAST FRANKS
b. 296 A.D.; d.358 A.D.
One son is recorded: Dagobert , b. 314 A. D.


XXVIII. DAGOBERT II, DUKE OF THE EAST FRANKS
b. 314 A.D.; d. 379 A.D.
One son is recorded: Clodius, b. 332 A.D.


XXIX. CLODIUS IV, DUKE OF THE EAST FRANKS
b. 332 A.D.; d. 389 A.D.
One son is recorded: Marcomir, b. 351 A.D.


XXX. MARCOMIR V, DUKE OF THE EAST FRANKS
b. 351 A.D.; d. 404 A.D.
One son is recorded: Pharamond, b.370 A.D.


XXXI. PHARAMOND, KING OF ALL FRANKS
b. 370 A.D.; d. 430 A.D.
Under Pharamond reign the Franks were united under one crown. He succeeded his father as Duke of the East Franks in 404 A.D.; became King of the West Franks in 419 A.D. and King of Westphalia in 420 A.D. He married Argotta, daughter of Grimald, Duke of the West Franks, in 409 A.D. At his father-in- law's death in 419 A.D., Pharamond became Duke of the West Franks. A son is recorded from this marriage: Clodio , b. 389 A.D.

Pharamond is the ancestor that has a clear documented line. Earlier rulers were documented from ancient records and annals referenced in church histories.


XXXII. CLODIO , KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 389 A.D., d. 445 A.D.
Clodio married ca. 410 A.D. to Princess Basina, daughter of Widelphrus, King of the Thuringians (a state in Germany near Bavaria). Of this marriage there were three sons recorded:

1. MEROVIUS, b. 411 A.D.;
2. Sigemerus, b. 413 A.D.; and
3. ALBERO, b.417 A.D..
Merovius succeeded his father as King of the Franks. Albero became Duke of Moselle, and the ancestor of the Carolingian kings of France, the Duke of Bavaria and the Kings of Lorraine (see Carolingian line).


XXXIII. MEROVIUS, KING OF THE SALIC FRANKS
b. 411 A.D.; d. 458 A.D.
Merovius gave the name to his descendants and his dynasty. Merovius had one recorded son: Childeric, b. 436 A.D.


XXXIV. CHILDERIC I, KING OF THE SALIC FRANKS
b. 436 A.D.; d.481
Childeric married his cousin Basina, daughter of Basin, King of Thuringia. Basin was the grandson of Widelphrus and first cousin to Merovius. In 465 A.D. a son was born of this marriage: Clovis, b. 465 A.D.


XXXV. CLOVIS, THE GREAT, KING OF THE FRANKS
b. 465 A.D.; d. 511 A.D.
Clovis became the great conqueror king uniting all of the tribes under one rulership. He married in 493 A.D. to Clothilde, daughter of Chilperic II, King of Burgundy. Clothilde died in 540 A.D. She was later canonized for her saintly life. Of this marriage there was born: Clothair , b. 497 A.D.


XXXVI. CLOTHAIR I, KING OF SOISSONS, ORLEANS, METZ AND PARIS,
b. 497 A.D. ; d. 561 A.D.
He married first to the Princess Theodosa, daughter of the Sigemond, King of Burgundy and his queen Theudegoth, daughter of the King of the Ostrogoths. He secondly married Radegonde, daughter of the King of the Thuringians. Thirdly he married Ingunda. There were four children recorded:

1.( 1) CHARIBERT, b. 521 A.D.;
2.(1) CHILPERIC, b. 523 A.D.;
(3) SIGEBERT , b. 535 A.D.; and
(2) BLITHILDIS,b. 527 A.D.
Charibert became King of Paris (561-567). He married the lady Ingeberga as his first wife. The union produced Princess Bertha who married St. Ethelbert, King of Kent. (Saxon Royal houses).
Chilperic became King of Soissons (561-584). He married Fredegunde and became the progenitor of the main branch of Merovingian Kings of France (Genealogy of Aragon, Navarre, Gascony and Aquitaine).

Sigebert became King of Metz ( 561-574). He married the Princess Brunhilda, daughter of Athanagild, King of the Visigoths. From this union came Childebert, King of Austrasia and Ingunda wife of St. Herminguild, Prince of the Visigoths, son of Leuvigild, King of the Visigoths. (Genealogy of the Cid)

Blithildis married Ausbertus, Duke of Moselle, grandson of Albero, Duke of Moselle, son of Clodio I, King of the Franks and Argotta, daughter of Theoderic, King of Verona. From this union came the royal line of the Carolingians (Genealogy of Capetians and Counts of Champagne).

Eventually the Royal line of Navarre is descended from all four children of Clothair I.


XXXVII. CHILPERIC, KING OF SOISSONS
(561-584)
Chilperic married Fredegunde. A son is recorded: Clothair b. 584 A.D.; d. 628 A.D.


XXXVIII. CLOTHAIR, KING OF NEUSTRIA, KING OF ALL FRANKS (620)
b. 584 A.D.; d.628 A.D.
Clothair married three times. By his third wife Sichilda he had: Charibert b. 603 A.D.


XXXIX. CHARIBERT II, KING OF ACQUITAINE, DUKE OF GASCONY,
KING OF TOULOUSE
b. 603 A.D.; d. 631 A.D.
His older brother Dagobert became King of Neustria and of the Franks. Charibert was given the Kingship of Toulouse and Acquitaine. His capital was Toulouse. Charibert married in 618 A.D., the lady Gisela, daughter and heiress of Amandus, Duke of Gascony. Two children were recorded of this marriage:

1. Bertrand, b.619
2. Boggis, b. 621 A.D.
After the death of Charibert II, the children were raised by their grandfather Amandus. Both sons married daughters of their cousin Childebert, son of Theodoric, son of Childebert II, King Austrasia and Burgundy. Childebert II (b.587; d. 613) was the son of Sigebert I, King of Metz and his wife Brunhilda, daughter of Athanagild, King of the Visigoths.
Bertrand married Phigberta. Boggis married Oda.


XXXX. BOGGIS, DUKE OF ACQUITAINE AND GASCONY
b. 621 A.D.; d. 688 A.D.
Boggis married Princess Oda, daughter of Childebert, King of Austrasia and Burgundy. Oda was a lady of great virtue and compassion. She was canonized as a saint in the 8th century. She died in 723 A.D. One son was recorded of this marriage: Eudes (Odo) b. 644 A.D.; d. 735 A.D.


XXXXI. EUDES THE GREAT, DUKE OF ACQUITAINE AND GASCONY
b. 644 A.D.; d. 735 A.D..
As sole heir to Boggis, Eudes became the heir to the Merovingian claim. He was contemporary with Charles Martel (the Hammer). Eudes fought to keep his territories safe from the acquisitive Merovingian cousins and the powerful Mayors of the Palace. Although history credits Charles Martel with successfully defeating Arab invasion of the Frankish territories, Eudes was known as the great warrior Duke who first fought the Arab invaders and in partnership with Charles defeated the Arabs in Acquitaine. During his life time he was given the title of "Great". In order to secure his position Eudes married a cousin of Charles, the lady Valtrude, daughter of Walchigise, Count of Verdun and his wife Valtrude.

Walchigise was the son of St. Arnould (Arnulf) (b.583, d. 641) and the lady Dode of Boulougne. St Arnould was Bishop of Metz, Mayor of the Palace and Margave of the Schelde. His sister Itta married Pepin of Landen. His elder son Angise married Begga, daughter of Pepin of Landen and Itta. They were the parents of Pepin of Heristal, father of Charles Martel.

Eudes the Great and Valtrude produced three sons:

1. Hunold. b.683
2. Hatton, b. 685
3. Aznair Remistan, b. 687
Hunold succeeded his father as Duke of Acquitaine in 735. Hatton became Duke of Gascony. Aznair Remistan became the first Count of Aragon. Through the De Mesmes connection the Daspit de St. Amand family are descended from all three sons of Eudes.


XXXXII. HUNOLD, DUKE OF ACQUITAINE
b. 683 A.D. ; d. 774 A.D.
Hunold along with his brothers fought against the growing power of Charles Martel and his sons Carloman and Pepin. During his long life he was a force of resistance and a rallying point for the Meroviginian claim to the throne of the Franks. Hunold is recorded as having one son Waifre, b. 690 A.D. In 745 Hunold handed over his dukedom to his son Waifre. He retired to a monastery on the isle of Re. After Waifre's death in 768, Hunold was again called to lead the resistance to Pepin I , son of Charles Martel. Pepin finally annexed Acquitaine. Hunold is recorded to have died in a monastery in Pavia in 774. His descendants removed themselves to the mountain areas of the Pyrenees and founded the Kingdom of Navarre.


XXXXIII. WAIFRE, DUKE OF ACQUITAINE
b. 706 A.D. ; d. 768 A.D.
Waifre was the only son of Hunold, duke of Acquitaine. He married in 726 A.D. to his cousin Adela, daughter of Loupe I Duke of Gascony. Loupe I (d. 774) was the son of Hatton, Duke of Gascony and brother of Waifre's father Hunold. Through this marriage descended the early Dukes of Gascony and Kings of Navarre. Of this marriage there is recorded one son:

1. Loupe II, b. 727 A.D..


XXXXIV. LOUPE II, DUKE OF GASCONY
b. 727 A.D., d. 778 A.D.
The name of his lady wife is not recorded. One son is recorded of this marriage:

1. Adelric (Adelrico) b. ca. 750.


XXXXV. ADELRIC (ADELRICO) I, DUKE OF GASCONY
b. 750 A.D., d.812 A.D.
His lady wife is not known. Two sons are recorded :
1. Ximeno, b. 780 A.D.
2. Cantule, b. 783.


XXXXVI. XIMENO, DUKE OF GASCONY
b. 780 A.D., d. 842 A.D.
Ximeno married the lady Munia. Two sons are recorded :

1. Sancho
2. Inigo Arista


XXXXVII. INIGO ARISTA, COUNT OF BIGORRE, KING OF NAVARRE
b. 810 A.D., d.888 A.D.
Inigo Arista married the lady Iniga Ximena, daughter of the Count of Oviedo. He married secondly Theida, daughter of the Count of Biscay. From his first marriage there is recorded one son GARCIA INIGO, b.834. From the second is recorded one son DONAT LOUPE, Count of Bigorre (see Bigorre).

The de Mesmes family is descended from Inigo Arista through children Garcia Inigo and Donat Loupe,


XXXXVIII. GARCIA INIGO, KING OF NAVARRE AND ARAGON
b. 834 A.D., d. 880.
Garcia Inigo married the lady Urraca Major, daughter of Sancho II, Duke of Gascony. Sancho II of Gascony was the son of Sancho I, Duke of Gascony (son of Ximeno, Duke of Gascony). Four children are recorded of this marriage:

1. Fortune ,b. 857 A.D. (reigned as King of Navarre 880 to 905 A.D.)
2. SANCHO I, b. 860 A.D.
3. Ximeno b. 864
4. Sanctiva , b. 870


XXXXIX. SANCHO I (EL REPARADOR)
b. 860 A.D., d. 935 A.D..
Sancho married the lady Theida (Toda), daughter of Aznar Galindez, Count of Aragon. Aznar Galindez was the son of Galindo Aznares, Count of Aragon. Galindo Aznares was the son of Aznar of Aragon. (The Counts of Aragon were the younger branch of the House of Gascony, descended from Eudes the Great). Several children were born of this marriage:

1. Urraca Ximena;
2. Theida
3. GARCIA II SANCHEZ b. 890 A.D.
4. Gonsalvo
5. Ferdinand.


XXXXX. GARCIA II SANCHEZ, KING OF NAVARRE
b. 890 A.D., d. 970
Garcia II Sanchez married the princess Theresa Iniquez of Aragon. (Theresa Iniquez was the daughter of Endregota Aznarez, son of Galindo Aznarez Count of Aragon; thus cousin to Garcia II). Five children were recorded of this marriage:

1. Urraca, b. 919
2. Ermenside, b. 921
3. Theresa Florentina, b. 924
4. SANCHO II b. 927
5. Ramirez, b. 930.


XXXXXI. SANCHO II GARCIAS (ABARCA), KING OF NAVARRE
b. 927 A.D. , d.994 A.D.
Sancho II married his cousin the princess Urraca Clara of Navarre, daughter of Fortunio Ximenez of Navarre. (Fortunio Ximenez was the son of Ximeno of Navarre, third son of Garcia Inigo of Navarre and Urraca Major of Gascony. Two children were born of this marriage:

1. GARCIA III SANCHEZ, b. 958 A.D.
2. Gonsalvo.


XXXXXII. GARCIA II( the Trembler), KING OF NAVARRE
b. 958 A.D., d. 1001 A.D.
Garcia III married the lady Chimena of Asturias, daughter of Gonsalo, Count of Asturias and the noble lady Teresa of Leon. One son is recorded of this marriage:
1. SANCHO III, b. 985 A.D.


XXXXXIII. SANCHO III (THE GREAT), EMPEROR OF SPAIN, KING OF NAVARRE
b. 985, d. Feb. 1035
Sancho III married princess Donna Munia Elvira, daughter of Sancho Garcias, King of Castile and Urraca of Navarre. Four children were recorded from this marriage:

1. GARCIAS III, b.1005
2. Fernando, King of Leon and Castile b.1008
3. Gonsalvo, Count of Sobrarve and Ribagorce b. 1011
4. Ramirez, King of Aragon b.1015.


XXXXXIV. GARCIAS III, KING OF NAVARRE, GALICIA AND PORTUGAL
b. 1005, d. 1054
Garcias III married the lady Estaphania of Barcelona, daughter of Count Raymund of Barcelona and the lady Ermensinde of Carcassone. Three children are recorded of this marriage:

1. Sancho IV, b. 1038, d. 1076
2. Raymond, b.1039, d. 1076
3. RAMIREZ b. 1040.
After the death of Garcias III the kingdom of Navarre was inherited by his eldest son, Sancho IV. In 1076 Sancho was assassinated by his brother Raymond who also was assassinated in the same year. In that year the Kingdom of Navarre was offered to Sancho Ramirez, King of Aragon, the son of Ramirez , son of Sancho III the Great of Navarre. In 1094 at the death of Sancho Ramirez his son Pedro King of Aragon succeeded to the throne. By 1104 the Kingdom again was succeeded by another of the Aragon line, Alfonso. At the death of Alfonso in 1134 the kingdom was elected to Garcias V Ramirez, grandson of Ramirez, son of Garcias III.


XXXXXV. RAMIREZ, COUNT OF CALAHORRA, LORD OF MONCON
b. 1040, d. 1084
Ramirez married the lady Teresa Gonsalez de Salvadores, daughter of Gonsalvo de Salvadores and Sancha. Of this marriage there is one son recorded:


1. Ramirez II, b.1062.


XXXXXVI. RAMIREZ II , COUNT OF CALAHORRA AND MONCON
b. 1062, d. 1116
Married the noble lady Christina Diaz de Vivar, daughter of Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar (the illustrious CID) and the noble lady Ximena of Asturias, daughter of Diego Rodriguez, Count of Asturias and the Princess Ximena of Leon. Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar was the son of Diego Lainez de Castro and the lady Teresa Nunez de Amaya de Castro, granddaughter of Alphonso V of Leon and Guitierra de Castro. (see genealogy of the CID at Brian Thompsett's Directory of Royal Genealogical Data).

One son is recorded of this marriage:

1. Garcia V of Navarre, b.1090, d. 1150.
Related Information on Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar: El Cid Campeador; "The Lay of The Cid"


XXXXXVII. GARCIA V RAMIREZ (the Restorer) KING OF NAVARRE
b. 1090, d. 1150
Garcia V married first to Marguerite de l'Aigle. After Queen Marguerite's death in 1141 he married a second time to the Princess Urraca, daughter of Alphonso II , King of Leon and Castile. Of the first marriage there was one child:

1. Blanche b. 1141.
Of the second there were three children:

1. SANCHO VI, b. 1150
2. Marguerite, b.1146
3. Sancha, b. 1147.


XXXXXVIII. SANCHO VI, (the Wise) KING OF NAVARRE
b. 1150, d. 1194
Sancho VI married in 1173 to Sancha, daughter of Alphonso VII, King of Castile and Berenguela of Barcelona. Three children were born of this marriage:

1. Sancho VII, b. 1173
2. Berengaria,b. 1174 (married to Richard I of England)
3. BLANCHE, b. 1176.
In 1194 Sancho VII succeeded his father as King of Navarre. He reigned until his death in 1134. His only son Ferdinand died before his father without issue. Berengaria had already predeceased Sancho VII in 1130 without issue. The Kingdom was then inherited by Blanche who allowed her husband THIBAUD of Champagne to be styled King of Navarre.


XXXXXIX. BLANCHE, PRINCESS OF NAVARRE
b. 1176., d 1229
Blanche married in 1195 to Thibaud III, Count of Troyes and Meaux and eventually Champagne (see Champagne genealogy) son of Henry I, Count of Champagne and Marie of France, daughter of Louis VII of France and his first wife Eleanor of Guienne and Acquitaine. Thibaud was the descendant of Charlemagne through decent of the Counts of Vermandois, and Pepin King of Italy. Thibaud died in 1201 and Blanche died in 1229. One child was born of this marriage:

1. THIBAUD I, b. 1201.


XXXXXX. THIBAUD I, KING OF NAVARRE, COUNT OF CHAMPAGNE,
COUNT OF TROYES AND MEAUX
b. 1201 (after the death of his father), d. 1253
Thibaud inherited the Kingdom of Navarre at the death of his uncle Sancho VII in 1234. Thibaud married firstly in 1220 to Gertrude of Dachsburg, daughter of Albert, Count of Metz. She died in 1222. He then married in 1225 Agnes, daughter of Guichard IV, Count of Beaujeau. One child was produced from this marriage:

1. Blanche, b. 1226 , d. 1283.
Agnes died in 1231 and Thibaud married a third time in 1232 to Marguerite daughter of Archambaud IX, Count of Bourbon and Beatrix de Montlucon. Of the third marriage there were five children recorded:
1. Thibaud II, b. 1240
2. Pierre, b. 1241
3. HENRY I, b.1243;
4. Marguerite, b. 1244
5. Beatrix, b. 1245.

Thibaud died in 1253 and was succeeded by his eldest son Thibaud II. Thibaud died in 1270 without leaving heirs.


XXXXXXI: HENRY I (the Fat) KING OF NAVARRE, COUNT OF CHAMPAGNE
b. 1243, d. 1274.
Henry married in 1269 to Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I, Count of Artois and Mahaud of Brabant (see Artois and Brabant genealogies). Two children were born of this marriage:


1. JUANNA b.1270
2. Thibaud ,b. 1272, d.1273

XXXXXXII: JUANNA, QUEEN OF NAVARRE AND OF FRANCE,
COUNTESS OF CHAMPAGNE
b. 1270, d. 1304
Juanna married in 1284 to Phillip IV , the Fair, King of France (see the Royal Capetian Genealogy). With this marriage the County of Champagne and of Meaux and Troyes became merged with the Crown of France. Phillip IV died in 1314. Of this marriage were born four children:

1. LOUIS X, b.1289
2. Phillipe V, b. 1294
3. Charles I, b.1294
4. Isabella, b. 1296.


XXXXXXIII: LOUIS X, KING OF FRANCE AND NAVARRE
b. 1289, d.1316
Louis married in 1305 to Marguerite of Burgundy, daughter of Otto of Burgundy and Mahaut of Artois. Marguerite lived from 1290 to 1315. One child was born from this marriage:

1. JEANNE , b. ca 1307
Louis X married secondly in 1315 to Clemence of Hungary (1293-1328). Louis X died in 1316, a son was postumously born to Clemence in November 1316 but lived only a few days. This child was named John.
After the death of Louis X in 1316 the thrones of France and Navarre passed to his son John who lived only months. Afterwards the brother of Louis X succeeded in turn to the thrones of France and Navarre. After the death of Charles I in 1328, the throne of France was inherited by the next senior branch of the Capetian Royal House because of the Salic law preventing women from inheriting the French throne. The throne of Navarre was not heritable under the Salic law and reverted to the remaining daughter of Louis X, Jeanne.


XXXXXXIV: JEANNE, QUEEN OF NAVARRE
b. 1311, d. 1349
Jeanne married in 1318 to Phillip, Count of Evereux , b. 1301, d. 1343. Phillip was the son of Louis of France, Count of Evereux, d' Estampes, de Beamont-le- Roger, de Meulan and de Gien and his wife Marguerite of Artois, daughter of Phillipe, Count of Artois and Blanche of Brittany. Of this marriage there were eight children:

1. Juanna, b. 1321
2. CHARLES II, b.1332
3. Phillipe, b. 1333
4. Blanche, b. 1335
5. Marie, b. 1336
6. Agnes, b. 1337
7. Jane, 1339
8. LOUIS , b. 1340
Through the throne was inherited by Charles II in 1349. Louis the last son was vested as Duke of Navarre and Count of Beaumont-le-Roger. It is through him that the Beaumonts Counts of Lerin descend.


XXXXXXV: CHARLES II , KING OF NAVARRE
b. 1332, d. 1387
Charles II married in 1352 to Jeanne, daughter of Jean II , King of France. Of this marriage there were seven children:

1. CHARLES III, b. 1361
2. Phillipe, b. 1363
3. Pierre, b. 1365;
4. Maria, b. 1366
5. Jeanne, b. 1367
6. Bonna, b. 1368 - d. 1368
7. Blanche, b. 1368 - d.1368


XXXXXXVI: CHARLES III, KING OF NAVARRE, COUNT OF EVEREUX,
DUKE OF NEMOURS
b. 1361, d. 1425
Charles married in 3175 Eleanor of Castile, daughter of Henry II of Castile. By her he had eight legitimate children. Charles III also recognized his illegitimate children. One of these was JEANNE OF NAVARRE who married as his second wife , her cousin LOUIS I, Count of Lerin.


HERE BEGINS THE GENEALOGY OF THE HOUSE OF BEAUMONT, COUNTS OF LERIN.

XXXXXXVII: LOUIS , DUKE OF NAVARRE, COUNT OF BEAUMONT-LE-ROGER,
b. 1340, d.1372
Louis married in 1366 to Joanna of Naples who died in 1392. Of this marriage there was no children. Louis had children by his mistress Marie de Lissaracu:

1. Jeanne b.1368
2. CHARLES, b. 1370


XXXXXXVIII: CHARLES DE BEAUMONT, COUNT OF LERIN,
HEREDITARY CONSTABLE OF NAVARRE
b. 1370, d. 1432.
Charles was granted recognition as a son of Navarre and given the coat of arms of Navarre for quartering. He was also granted the position of Standard bearer for the Royal Household. He married in 1390 to Anne de Curton, Dame du Guicun en Gascogne. Four children were born of this marriage:

1. Charles, b.1391
2. LOUIS I, b. 1393
3. Jeanne, b. 1394
4. Catherine, b. 1395.


XXXXXXIX: LOUIS I DE BEAUMONT, COUNT OF LERIN
HEREDITARY CONSTABLE OF NAVARRE
b. 1393, d.1462 in Madrid.
Louis married in 1413 to Jeanne, natural daughter of Charles III King of Navarre. By this marriage there were nine children:

1. Louis II, b. 1414
2. Charles, b. 1416
3. Henry, b. 1418
4. Thibaud, b. 1420
5. Phillippe, b. 1421
6. Jean, b. 1423
7. JEANNE, b. 1424;
8. Anne, b. 1426
9. Madelene , b. 1428.


XXXXXXX: JEANNE DE BEAUMONT
b.1424, d. .
Jeanne married in 1440 to Jean Sire de Luxe. Her second marriage was to Bernard de Cauna, Chevalier of the illustrious house of Guienne. Of the second marriage there is recorded one daughter:

1. MARGUERITE, b. 1452.


XXXXXXXI: MARGUERITE DE CAUNA, b. 1452.
Marguerite de Cauna married in 1480 to George de Mesmes, Seigneur de Caixchen, de Lusson and de Brocas. (See de Mesmes genealogy).




More About King Of FRANCE Pharamond:
Ancestral File Number: 9GBJ-V0.

More About King Of FRANCE Pharamond and Queen Of FRANKS Argotta:
Marriage: 394

Children of King Of FRANCE Pharamond and Queen Of FRANKS Argotta are:
  1. Duke Of MOSELLE Adelbertus, b. Abt. 405, Westphalia, Germany, d. 491.
  2. +Clodion "Le Chevelu" King Of FRANCE, b. Abt. 395, Westphalia, Germany, d. 447.
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