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Descendants of Quirinus Dieter

Generation No. 6


6. Johann George6 Dieter (Hans Johann Michael5, Wolfgang4, Michael3, Michael2, Quirinus1) was born June 07, 1699 in Schwaigern, Brackenheim, Wurttenburg, Germany, and died March 23, 1743 in Frederick or Orange County, Virginia. He married Maria Margaretha Lüttmann December 19, 1720 in Schwaigern, Wurttenburg, Germany, daughter of Johann Lüttmann and Anna Northa. She was born June 01, 1701 in Schwaigern, Wurttenburg, Germany, and died April 27, 1759 in Schwaigern, Kirchspiel Brackenheim, Herzogtum Württemberg.

Notes for Johann George Dieter:
[Genealogy.com, LLC WFT Vol. 44, Ed. 1, Tree #1239, Date of Import: Jun 11, 2000]
Data prepared by Mrs. Gamble who headed her information, "For the Grand-daughter of Damaris Blain".

Two brothers (some records say there were three brothers) George and Jacob Dieterick and friend or relative, a Von Hinkle, came over from Schlusing, Holstein, Germany together in 1717. They came through the port of Philadelphia. George's wife, Margaret Ludman, Luttman or Ludlow came with them. Von Hinkle was minister of the German Lutheran Church. It is said that he established that church in America. George and Jacob first changed their name to Dieter and possibly a census taker changed it to Teter.

George Teter settled in Pennsylvania. Later went to the Yodkin Valley in North Carolina (a German settlement). He had a family of 15 children. His 10th son was Captain Samuel Gibson Teter.
=================================================
George & Mary came from Wurtenburg, Germany. His name may have been Joh Jeorg Teter or Dieter.

Facts about this person:

Alias:     
Joh Jeorg Teter or Dieter, Dietrick, Hans Jerg Dieter
=================================================
One account says he died in Orange Co. VA.
The court appointed his wife as admnx on Mar. 23, 1744. Henckel Genealogical Bulletin, page 147 lists 11 children. On page 173 this number is reduced to 7. Eva Winfield has the 11 listed on page 147 of the Bulletin. Johann may have died in 1744 in Orange Co. VA. Maria Eva Winfield has questionable date of death of 17 Apr. 1759 in Schwaigern. Mary Harter has place of death as "America" in Henckel Genealogical Bulletin.

Sources:

1.Title: Moist, Kenneth. The Henckel-Teter (Dieter)
Connection. Morgantown,PA: Masthof Press,
1996. Available from the author at R.Rt. 3, Box92,
Newport, PA 17074.

Page: p.45
2.Title: Moist, Kenneth. The Henckel-Teter (Dieter)
Connection. Morgantown,PA: Masthof Press,
1996. Available from the author at R.Rt. 3, Box92,
Newport, PA 17074.

Page: p.30
3.Title: Moist, Kenneth. The Henckel-Teter (Dieter)
Connection. Morgantown,PA: Masthof Press,
1996. Available from the author at R.Rt. 3, Box92,
Newport, PA 17074.

Page: p.52
====================================================
Roger Engelken writes on the Teter Family Genealogy Forum message #454:
Hans Jerg Dieter and Johann George Dieter and George Teter, Sr., are all the same man. He was born in Schwaigern as Hans Jerg, also written as Johann Georg, in 1699. I am a descendant of a brother of his, one Johann Philip Dieter, born in 1717. There were eight children in this family of Johann Michael Dieter and Maria Catharina Freyer.

I would be interested in finding out the source that states the couple had 15 children. I am aware of two being born in Schwaigern before they came to the new world in 1727. I have not seen that many attributed to the couple. I am aware that there is a second George Teter line floating around the same region, but I have not dug into that area.

And yes, the family came on the ship Molly in September 1727, as records in Schwaigern show their application with authorities to leave there for Pennsylvania shortly before that time. It is also interesting that the Schwaigern records indicate Maria, his wife, returned to Schwaigern and died there in 1759.

I would appreciate any information you have on the Samuel and Mary Teter family. This is still a new research area for me, especially on this side of the pond. I have researched my father's lines in Germany for thirteen years, now I am turning to my mother's side, one branch of which statrted in Schwaigern, went to Russia, then came to America.
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http://pages.xtn.net/~billiam/teter.html
Hans Jorg (Johann George) Teter/Dieter
b 7 Jun 1699
Schwaigern Germany
Arrived Philadelphia on "Molly" signed oath 30 Sep 1727.
His belongings: 1 black coat, 1 new gray parker, 1 pair lethern trousers, 1 hat, 2 pairs knitted white stockings, 1 cotton necktie, 3 shirts, 2 working shirts.
As a present from his father he got "Handbook of Nurnberg"
They also brought 1 brown cow, 1 pig, 1 male sheep, 4 Zentner hay, 40 bands straw, 2 new songbooks for church.

rec†d 855 Guilders after step-mother†s death.
d 23 Mar 1743-1744
Orange Co VA
******************************************************************************
http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rengelken&id=I26788
1. From The Henckel - Teter Connection, pages 30-31:

"Johann Georg Dieter was born in Schwaigern, Wurttembourg on June 7, 1699 and married Maria Margaretha Lüttmann there on November 19, 1720. Their first two children were born at Schwaigern before they boarded the sailing ship 'Molly' enroute to Pennsylvania. They arrived in Philadelphia September 30, 1727, almost exactly ten (10) years after the arrival of the family of Rev. Anthony Jacob Henckel with whom their children intermarried. Johann George probably settled in or near New Hanover and thus affiliated with the Henckel family.
On January 10, 1735-36, Johann Georg Dieter, the elder, obtained a grant of land in Robinson River, Orange County (now Frederick County), Virginia (Virginia Patent Book 16, page 475) where he died intestate in 1744. His widow and children then moved to Rowen County, North Carolina apparently along with members of the Henckel family. In 1760, because of Indian uprisings, they moved to present day Pendleton County, West Virginia with other members of that settlement."


2. Teter and Henckel Marriages

According to The Henckel - Teter Connection, The Henckel Genealogy by Junkin (page 194) indicates that at least four of Johann's children intermarried with the Henckels, as follows:
1. Paul Teter married Rebecca Henkle, born October 5, 1736 in upper Milford township, Bucks county (now Lehigh County) Pennsylvania. Paul Teter came to Orange county, Virginia (now Frederick County, Virginia) in 1735.
2. Mary Barbara Teter married Jacob Hinkle.
3. Philip Teter married Susanna (Sunna) Henkle, born October 16, 1747.
4. George Dieter (Teter) married Anna Margaret Henkle, born about April 30, 1741.


3. Germanna History by John Blankenbaker

Germanna History Notes, Page 4, Nr. 86:

A Jacob Miller had a patent for 47 acres in 1733 adjoining Adam Yager in the Mt. Pony area. He paid for the land with his own headright. The absence of other headrights suggests he came as a bachelor. He was naturalized 24 Feb 1742/3. Later he appears with a wife Rebecca in deeds.

A Joseph Cooper (Kooper) patented 400 acres in 1726 and in 1728 he patented another 404 acres in the Mt. Pony watershed. He was associated with many known Germans and is thought to be German himself. He married a Barbara and died very early.

A Jacob Prosie was the administrator of the estate of Barbara Cooper in 1735. He might have been a German.

George Slaughter patented 300 acres in the midst of the Germans in the Robinson River area giving the names of his adjacent German neighbors. In the tithe list of 1739 the name is given as Slater. Since the tithe list was composed by English people, they tended to use English names which were approximate sound alikes to German names. This confuses us today because it hides the German origins of many men. In this case, Slaughter was probably a German family.

John Michael Stoltz patented 291 acres in Robinson River area in 1732. There was an earlier patent in Hanover Co. in 1725 which could have been his. His Robinson River community patent was forfeited, claimed by William Fowler and sold to Michael Utz. Michael Stoltz died in 1741/2 and his administratror was a person of the same name.

John Caspar Stöver became pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church (Hebron) in 1733. He did not live long in the community but he had a big impact as he headed the three person team which solicted funds in Europe. Stöver came to the colonies through Philadelphia with his son of the same name. Later the senior Stöver went to North Carolina and was living there when he joined forces with the Lutheran congregation in the Robinson River community.

George Teter had his origins in Schwaigern, the home of many other Germanna settlers. He arrived with his family 1727 at Philadelphia. He lived a while in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania where a son John George was christened in 1730. He obtained a patent in the Robinson River area 10 Jan 1736(NS). He died in Orange Co. in 1743.

John Paul Vogt (Vaught, etc.) was born in Frankfurt in 1680 and came with his family through Philadelphia in 1733. On 10 Jan 1736(NS) he too (see Teter, above) had a patent for 640 acres. He moved to the Shenandoah Valley in 1744.

Martin Walk is probably Hans Martin Valk who landed at Philadelphia in 1728. He married Catherine,the daughter of Michael Clore. Martin and Tobias Willhide had a joint patent of 400 acres on branches of Deep Run. Martin moved to North Carolina.

Thomas Wayland (Wieland in German) came in 1719 and patented land in 1728. He lost most of this land because it was in conflict with an earlier patent of John Broyles (Johannes Breyhel).

John Willer made a donation to the Lutheran church in 1734. Most likely, he was not German but his wife was.

Johann Leonhart Ziegler came through Philadelphia in 1732 and moved on to Virginia where he married Barbara Zimmerman. He appears to have lived in the Mt. Pony area outside the Robinson River community.

These additional names reinforce the idea that the community was rapidly growing. Many of the individual stories show that Pennsylvania was the gateway. In some of the cases, we understand why the person moved on to Virginia but in other instances we are left wondering.

Germanna History Notes, Page 6, Nr. 137:

In 1727, Hans Jorg Dieter and his wife Maria Margaretha Luttman of Schwaigern wanted to emigrate to Pennsylvania. They went to the police court to get permission and to pay the necessary taxes. There an inventory of their possessions was made. The list is interesting for what it contains. At the time Hans Jorg was in his late twenties and Maria Margaretha was in her middle twenties. They should have had one child, Johann Michael, at this time. The court minutes state that, "Hans Jorg Dieter, son of Schwaigern Mayor Hans Michael Dieter, has decided in furtherance of his expected success to render himself to Pennsylvania under Royal British Sovereignity."

They did arrive in Philadelphia later in the year and lived for a time in Lancaster County in PA. By 1736, he has taken a land patent for 200 acres in the Robinson River community among the Germanna people. The choice of the location is not unusual as Schwaigern was the home of several Germanna families. In the colonies, he became known as George Teter but he should be distinguished from the George Teter who lived at the same time in Opequon.

Returning to the possessions, the value is quoted in two denominations, Gulden and Kreuzer. I do not know the relative or the absolute value of either of these. But in the list below, values will be quoted in Kreuzer except those which specifically say Gulden (G). More to the point is what they did own:

George's property included a black coat (3G), a new gray parker (10G), a pair of leather trousers (2G). This is the only pair of trousers that he owned. Quoting now in Kreuzer, George also owned a hat (30), two pairs knitted white stockings (30), a cotton necktie (15), three shirts (15 each), and two working shirts (40 each). He also owned a book given to him by his father.

Mary's property made a longer list: one good brown skirt (1G), one worn out skirt (30), a red bodice (50), a medium brown hat (40), a heavy cap (50), a cotton Schurz (15), a white one of the same kind (20), a black Damst(?)(25), white worn sewed up cap (15), another of the same kind (10), three good skirts (30 each), two bad skirts (20 each), two good veils (30), a white neckcloth (11), pair white woolen stockings (15).

Note that no shoes are listed for either of them. Household property was listed by name but not value. That sub-list included: linen, tin pans and pots, copper pans and pots, iron pots to prepare cakes, wooden pans and pots, a bed, tables, kitchen furniture, one chair. Two new church songbooks were also included.

More of their assets were in livestock and feed: one brown cow was worth 18 Gulden, one pig at one G, one male sheep at 20 G, four zentner of hay at 2 G and 40 bands of straw at one G.

There should have been clothing for Johann Michael, the young son, but none is listed. Perhaps he had died which would be consistent with a lack of records for him in America.

Richard Phares was helpful in providing information about the family.

Germanna History Notes, Page 18, Nr. 426:

Theobald (David) Christler came to America as a nine-year-old in 1718. The family lived for a while in Pennsylvania. He moved to the Robinson River Valley at about the same time that the Garr family did. There may have been a connection in these two event, as Theobald married Rosina Garr. The name Christler or Crisler in America was Christele in Germany.

Frederick Baumgardner arrived at Philadelphia in 1732 and went to Virginia immediately where his uncle, Michael Willheit, lived. He also knew other residents of Schwaigern who had emigrated to Virginia. Baumgardner, or Baumgartner, or Bäumgardner, is a popular name in Germany and means tree-gardener or orchard-gardener. It some cases it can also mean forester.

The John and Martin Deer families appear in the Hebron Church records as Hirsch, the German word for "deer." In the civil records, the form is either Deer or Dear. John and Martin were brothers.

The George Teter family of Virginia was another Schwaigern family that arrived in Philadelphia in 1727. The family lived in Pennsylvania for a few years before settling in Virginia. An association with the Henckel family began there and, I believe, there were eventually four marriages between the two families. The German spelling of Teter was the sound-alike name of Dieter.

Three members of the Lutspike or Lotspeich family moved to Virginia in the later period of immigration, but even by then, spelling was still at the whim of the writer. In Germany, the name occurred in multiple forms with the most common being Lotspeich.

The Scheible family left no male heir in Virginia, so there are no English spellings of the name. The family came from the same small village as the Blankenbakers, Fleshmans, Schlucters, and the Thomases. Margaret James Squires, a major researcher of the emigrants from this village, thought the Scheibles might be related to the other families, but she found no conclusive proof. The Scheible family had five daughters, all of whom had the first name of Anna. Three of them were given the name Anna Maria but the first two died. Three daughters came to America in 1717 but the fate of only one, Anna Elisabetha, is known. She married Michael Holt.

Germanna History Notes, Page 33, Nr. 823:

Johann Georg Dieter emigrated from Schwaigern in 1727 with his wife, Maria Margaretha Luttman, and two children. They lived for a while in Pennsylvania, where another son was born. Then, in 1736, he obtained a patent for 200 acres on the south side of the Robinson River, adjacent to Roger Quarles and Michael Cooke. In Virginia, the name became Teter (another popular variation for people named Dieter was Teeter). George Teter died in 1744. His widow and children moved to Rowan Co., NC, and then to Pendleton County, in today's West Virginia. There were many marriages with the Henckel family.

John Paul Vogt came with a mature family in 1733, but the place of origin is unknown. He said that he was born in Frankfurt. The name Vogt has had many spellings, some of which really obscure the name. Also, he was in the habit of using all three names and many listeners heard the Paul Vogt as one name.

Another family which has obscure origins is Walk. This name could have been Volck, a fairly popular name in Germany. (The second wife of John Huffman, 1714 immigrant, was Maria Sabina Volck.) Martin Walk came in 1728, and his village of origin is unknown. His connections by marriage and business suggest that he could have come from the Kraichgal, where so many Second Colony people originated.

Johann Leonhart Ziegler came through Philadelphia, in 1732, and moved on to Virginia, where he married Barbara Zimmerman. From his land holdings, it would appear that he lived in the Mt. Pony area, where the Zimmermans and Kablers where his neighbors. Though not proven, it is highly probable that the Zieglers came from Sinsheim. The Pinnegars (Benninger) came from here and they were closely associated with the Zieglers in Virginia. Sinsheim was about eight miles northwest of Gemmingen, and was the fringe of the area from where the majority of the Second Colony came.

So far, Germanna immigrants through about 1750 to 1760 have been mentioned. A few may have been missed so, if any more are known in this time frame that have not been mentioned, please speak up. The influx of Germans after this time did not stop, even though some of the older residents were leaving the community. Some of these newer German citizens may have been transients, and, in fact, it is known that this was the case with some. A transient was often on the move, looking for a new home, and traveled only a limited distance in any one year. A community might have its appeal and the family might stay for a while before moving on. Some probably decided to stay indefinitely.

Germanna History Notes, Page 43, Nr. 1071:

The discussion here on the Redmans convinces me that we are talking about a German family; however, not all of the personal names that I gave for the Redmans are necessarily German. It may be the case that, through a convergence of names, there were two branches of Redmans, an English family and a German family. It may also be the case that the Redmans had been in the community for a while, and had marriages with an English family, with the result that some of the first names came from the English side of the family. I am still mystified how the family could have had as many members as it did and did not leave more records.

The mention of the Henkel family brings to mind another Germanna family, that of George Teter, of Schwaigern (the home of several Germanna families). The Germanna George Teter must be distinguished from another George Teter who lived in the Valley at the same time. It is seldom that there were as many marriages between two families as there were between the Teter and the Henkel families.

George Teter, born in Schwaigern, married Maria Margretha Luttman, in 1720. In 1727, Hans Jorg Dieter went to the police court in Schwaigern to obtain an exit visa (and to pay the taxes due on his property). The baptism paper of Rev. Paul Henkel in America identifies Georg Teter with Schwaigern. The Dieters arrived in Philadelphia in 1727, and lived in Pennsylvania for a few years. They then moved to Virginia, where George Teter (Jeter) obtained a patent, in Orange County, for 200 acres on the south side of the Robinson River in 1735/6. The patent was adjacent to Michael Cook, who was also from Schwaigern. George Teter died about ten years after this, for Margaret Teter obtained a bond in the administration of his estate in 1743/4. She signed for herself as Maria Mariagreda Dieter.

The record of the family grows hazy for a period. Disposition of the land and the remarriage of Maria Margaret are unknowns. Eight children are known, but two apparently died as infants, and information on one daughter is scarce. Among the knowns:

1. George (b. 1730), married, about 1764, Mary Ann Margaret Henkel.
2. Paul (b. ca 1732), married Rebecca Henkel.
3. Mary Barbara (b. May 1734), married, first, Rev. Jacob Henkel, and, second, David Harman.
4. Philip (b. ca 1733 - 36), married Susanna Henkel
5. Rosina, married Marin Peterson.

I am not sure just how the Paul Henkel, mentioned here recently, fits into this picture, but I have few doubts about his being a part of this picture. The Henkels apparently never lived in the Germanna community, but, with all of the marriages between the Henkel and Teter families, it would appear that Henkels should be honorary members.

The marriages between the Henkels and Teters took place in North Carolina, I believe. My comments are based on an article on George Teter by Franklin Cockran in Beyond Germanna.


4, Henckel Genealogical Bulletin:
Court appointed wife as administrator on Mar 23, 1744 (NS). Henckel Genealogical Bulletin, page 147 lists 11 children. On page 173 this number is reduced to 7. Eva Winfield has the 11 listed on page 147 of the Bulletin.


Father: Johann Michael Dieter b: 26 MAR 1671 in Schwaigern, Kirchspiel Brackenheim, Herzogtum Württemberg
Mother: Maria Catharina Freyer b: 2 APR 1672 in Schwaigern, Kirchspiel Brackenheim, Herzogtum Württemberg

Marriage 1 Margaretha Anna Lüttmann b: 1 JUN 1701 in Schwaigern, Kirchspiel Brackenheim, Herzogtum Württemberg
Married: 19 DEC 1720 in Schwaigern, Kirchspiel Brackenheim, Herzogtum Württemberg 3
Notes:

1. In 1727, Hans Jorg Dieter and his wife Maria Margaretha Luttman of Schwaigern wanted to emigrate to Pennsylvania. They went to the police court to get permission and to pay the necessary taxes. There an inventory of their possessions was made. The list is interesting for what it contains. At the time Hans Jorg was in his late twenties and Maria Margaretha was in her middle twenties. They should have had one child, Johann Michael, at this time. The court minutes state that, "Hans Jorg Dieter, son of Schwaigern Mayor Hans Michael Dieter, has decided in furtherance of his expected success to render himself to Pennsylvania under Royal British Sovereignity."

They did arrive in Philadelphia later in the year and lived for a time in Lancaster County in PA. By 1736, he has taken a land patent for 200 acres in the Robinson River community among the Germanna people. The choice of the location is not unusual as Schwaigern was the home of several Germanna families. In the colonies, he became known as George Teter but he should be distinguished from the George Teter who lived at the same time in Opequon.

Returning to the possessions, the value is quoted in two denominations, Gulden and Kreuzer. I do not know the relative or the absolute value of either of these. But in the list below, values will be quoted in Kreuzer except those which specifically say Gulden (G). More to the point is what they did own:

George's property included a black coat (3G), a new gray parker (10G), a pair of leather trousers (2G). This is the only pair of trousers that he owned. Quoting now in Kreuzer, George also owned a hat (30), two pairs knitted white stockings (30), a cotton necktie (15), three shirts (15 each), and two working shirts (40 each). He also owned a book given to him by his father.

Mary's property made a longer list: one good brown skirt (1G), one worn out skirt (30), a red bodice (50), a medium brown hat (40), a heavy cap (50), a cotton Schurz (15), a white one of the same kind (20), a black Damst(?)(25), white worn sewed up cap (15), another of the same kind (10), three good skirts (30 each), two bad skirts (20 each), two good veils (30), a white neckcloth (11), pair white woolen stockings (15).

Note that no shoes are listed for either of them. Household property was listed by name but not value. That sub-list included: linen, tin pans and pots, copper pans and pots, iron pots to prepare cakes, wooden pans and pots, a bed, tables, kitchen furniture, one chair. Two new church songbooks were also included.

More of their assets were in livestock and feed: one brown cow was worth 18 Gulden, one pig at one G, one male sheep at 20 G, four zentner of hay at 2 G and 40 bands of straw at one G.

There should have been clothing for Johann Michael, the young son, but none is listed. Perhaps he had died which would be consistent with a lack of records for him in America.


2. The George Teter family of Virginia was another Schwaigern family that arrived in Philadelphia in 1727. The family lived in Pennsylvania for a few years before settling in Virginia. An association with the Henckel family began there and, I believe, there were eventually four marriages between the two families. The German spelling of Teter was the sound-alike name of Dieter.


3. Emigration to America
Ship: Molly
Captain: John Hodgson
From: Rotterdam
By Way of: Deal
Arrival: Philadelphia, 30 Sep 1727

70 Palatines men over 16 and their families, approximately 300 people.

Name, Age Town of Residence Source Remarks (USA, Spelling Variations, Occupation, Relationships, etc.)

Johann Georg Dieter, 28
Maria Margaretha (Lüttmann)
Johann Michael, 5
Maria Christina, 1
Schwaigern, Baden
Teter; To Lancaster, PA; Orange Co, VA; Rowan Co, NC; and Pendleton Co, WV.

Source: http://www.palproject.org/pa/1727molly.htm


4. Emigrants (from Schwaigern) of the 18th & 19th Century by Wolfram Angerbauer (translated by Karl and Marlene Buchhalter and provided by Mrs. Eva Kendall of Schwaigern, Germany)

Immigration and migration was in the Zabergan and Leintal specific regions in central Swabia. Already in earlier centuries very common according to preserved tax returns and estate registers there was a strong population movement between the years 1370-1546.

During the years of the 30 Years War (1618-1648) the population declined rapidly due to plundering soldiers, sickness, epidemics, and hunger. Immigration and childbirth created a slow rise in population after the year 1650.

The Palantine War of Succession (1688-1697) brought again great burdens and upheavels to the region. In the 18th century, the Spanish War of Succession (1701-1741) and the Austrian War of Succession (1741-1748) caused once again great unrest in southwestern Germany. Those two wars did not have the devastating effect on the region as the previous ones had, and as a result, the population showed a significant increase in the first half of the century.

Several families immigrated in 1706 from the town of Niederhofen. In 1711 appeared the name of Magdalene Schauer from the town of Massenbach in the earliest German church register in North America. The year 1727 brought a new mass immigration into the British Colonies of North America. Approximately 1,500 immigrants landed in Philadelphia and most of them settled in Pennsylvania. Among the registered passengers were Johann Georg Dieter and Johannes Steger with their families from Schwaigern.

In 1729 followed from Schwaigern, Johann Georg Hoffert with family. In 1730 his daughter, Anna Christina, with her husband, Kaspar Krieger. At the height of the immigration surge between the years 1731-1732, 15 families and 3 single persons (a total of about 75 people) left Schwaigern for Pennsylvania.

Johann Martin Bauer, Hans Jacob Bockle, Paul Boger, Johannes Ebermann, Christopher Engler, Ulrich Fischer, the brothers, Michael and Friedrich Gebert, Wendel Holl, Johann Paul Lederer, Hans Jorg Lohrmann, Andreas Schuttler, Johann Gottfried Stahl, Jackob Weiss, and Friedrich Willheit, all with their families. In addition the 3 single persons: Martin Boger (brother of Paul Boger), Georg Glasbrenner, and Hans Jerg Heinrich.

Characteristics which an immigrating woman must have:

A strong, hardy, resistant body
Robust health
Resistant soul, strong nerves
No consideration for herself
Kind and helpful toward others

A Schwaigern immigrant, Peter Lohrmann, answers a letter from Germany in 1739: From your letter I assume that you people have it really bad with compulsory service, guard duty, taxes and sickness. Here in America it is much better. I serve 1 day a year and give 18 (?). I give my tithe and there is no penalty of 30f1(?). What I build and what I grow belongs to me. We are very happy here, and we live every day as well as the Wucherer [ Matthias Wucherer--He was the richest citizen in Schwaigern at the time]. I have 4 horses, 3 cows, 1 calf and 9 pigs. I also have many chickens and pidgeons. You must work hard or else you have nothing. If you work, you can make a very good living. If it is the way I have heard, I never want to live with you again. [His wife adds]: I have no desire to be in Germany again. If you come to me I will give you plenty of apples!!!


More About Johann George Dieter:
Burial: Unknown, Hebron Church Cem., Orange County, Virginia
Immigration: September 30, 1727, Arrived in PA on Palatine ship the Molly
Residence: 1727, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Notes for Maria Margaretha Lüttmann:
Eva Winfield has questionable death date of 17 Apr. 1759 in Schwaigern. Mary Harter has place of death as "America" in Henckel Genealogical Bulletin.

GIVN: Maria Margaretha (Margaret)
SURN: Luttmann (Ludman)
Sex: F1
Born: 1 JUN 1701 in Schwaigern, Wurttembourg,
Germany2
Died: AFT 1760 in Pendleton Co VA (now WV)3


Father: Johann Georg Luttmann, b. 1665 in Tyrol,
Austria (probably)
Mother: Anna Dorothea Norta, b. 11 OCT 1666 in
Schwaigern, Wurttembourg, Germany

Sources:

1.Title: Moist, Kenneth. The Henckel-Teter (Dieter)
Connection. Morgantown,PA: Masthof Press,
1996. Available from the author at R.Rt. 3, Box92,
Newport, PA 17074.

Page: p.59
2.Title: Moist, Kenneth. The Henckel-Teter (Dieter)
Connection. Morgantown,PA: Masthof Press,
1996. Available from the author at R.Rt. 3, Box92,
Newport, PA 17074.

Page: p.30
3.Title: Moist, Kenneth. The Henckel-Teter (Dieter)
Connection. Morgantown,PA: Masthof Press,
1996. Available from the author at R.Rt. 3, Box92,
Newport, PA 17074.

Page: p.31
***************************************************************************************
Date and Place of Death:
"Teter descendants of Hans Jorg and Maria Dieter" is uncertain about her death. It says she either died in America, date unknown, or 27 Apr 1759 back in Germany (having returned there). The parish register in Schwaigern notes she died there.



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Sources for Hans Jerg Dieter:
Title: Schwaigern Kirchenbuch, 1600-1913
Author: Evangelische Kirche Schwaigern (OA Brackenheim)
Publication: FHL International Films #1184789 through #1184792 (4 Films)
Note: 1184789: Taufen, Heiraten, Tote 1600-1699 Taufen 1700-1776 Heiraten 1700-1789 Taufen 1776-1789 Tote 1700-1789 Tauf-, Heirats-,Toten-Index 1730-1810 Taufen 1789-1807 Heiraten 1789-1805 Tote 1789-1807 Heiraten 1805-1807 Taufen 1808-1866;
1184790: Taufen 1867-1896 Heiraten 1808-1884 Tote 1808-1913;
1184791: Konfirmationen 1801-1881 Familienbuch ab 1700 Familien der Grafen Neipperg Familienbuch ab 1808;
1184792: Familienbuch & Index ab 1808, 1876.
Note: Superior
Repository:
Note: Mikrofilme aufgenommen von Manuskripten im Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart
Call Number:
Media: Manuscript
Page: Familienbuch ab 1700, Page 75
Title: Schwaigern Kirchenbuch, 1600-1913
Author: Evangelische Kirche Schwaigern (OA Brackenheim)
Publication: FHL International Films #1184789 through #1184792 (4 Films)
Note: 1184789: Taufen, Heiraten, Tote 1600-1699 Taufen 1700-1776 Heiraten 1700-1789 Taufen 1776-1789 Tote 1700-1789 Tauf-, Heirats-,Toten-Index 1730-1810 Taufen 1789-1807 Heiraten 1789-1805 Tote 1789-1807 Heiraten 1805-1807 Taufen 1808-1866;
1184790: Taufen 1867-1896 Heiraten 1808-1884 Tote 1808-1913;
1184791: Konfirmationen 1801-1881 Familienbuch ab 1700 Familien der Grafen Neipperg Familienbuch ab 1808;
1184792: Familienbuch & Index ab 1808, 1876.
Note: Superior
Repository:
Note: Mikrofilme aufgenommen von Manuskripten im Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart
Call Number:
Media: Manuscript
Page: 1600-1699 Taufen, Page 210
Title: Teter Descendants of Hans Jorg and Maria Dieter
Author: Eva A. Winfield
Publication: Gateway Press, Baltimore, Maryland, 1992
Note: Teter Descendants of Hans Jorg and Maria Dieter
Repository:
Note: Wisconsin State Historical Library
Call Number: CALN 929.273 T291we
Media: Book
Henckel Genealogical Bulletin, Page 456
Title: Pennsylvania German Pioneers
Author: Ralph B. Strassburger and William J. Hinke
Publication: 1934 by the Pennsylvania German Society, Norristown, Pennsylvania
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Book
Title: Henckel - Teter Connection
Author: Kennth F. Moist
Publication: Masthoff Press, 1966
Note: Henckel - Teter (Dieter) Connection: A Compilation of the Close Relationship of the Henckel and Teter Families in Early America and to Their New Land.
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Book
Title: Cochrun Family Genealogy
Author: Dean Cochrun
Publication: RootsWeb
Note: Cochrun Family
Repository:
Note: http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dscochrun
Call Number:
Media: Electronic
Text: Court appointed wife as admnx

More About Johann Dieter and Maria Lüttmann:
Marriage: December 19, 1720, Schwaigern, Wurttenburg, Germany
     
Children of Johann Dieter and Maria Lüttmann are:
  i.   JOHANN MICHAEL7 DIETER, b. September 18, 1722; d. Unknown.
  ii.   MARIA CHRISTINA DIETER, b. October 25, 1726, Schwaigern, Wurttenburg, Germany; d. November 26, 1726, Schwaigern, Wurttenburg, Germany.
7. iii.   JOHANN GEORG "OLD GEORGE" TETER, b. April 06, 1730, Rowan, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1798, Pendelton County, West Virginia.
8. iv.   PAUL DIETER, b. Abt. 1732, Rowan County (now Davidson County), North Carolina; d. 1784, Rockingham, Pendelton County, West Virginia.
9. v.   MARIA BARBARA TETER, b. May 1734, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania; d. February 08, 1814, Pendelton County, West Virginia.
10. vi.   CAPTAIN SAMUEL GIBSON TETER, b. January 1735, Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia; d. October 16, 1823, Union County, Maryville, Ohio..
11. vii.   PHILIP DIETER, b. Bet. 1735 - 1736, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania; d. 1815, Germany Valley, Pendelton County, West Virginia.
  viii.   JOHN GEORGE TETER, b. March 09, 1737; d. Unknown.
  ix.   SUSANNAH TETER, b. October 1738; d. Unknown.
12. x.   ROSINA TETER, b. Bet. 1739 - 1743, North Carolina; d. 1804, Hardy County, Virginia.


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